Justin Killeen

Owner and Trainer, Energia Fitness and 50/50 Fitness/Nutrition; Age 25

Justin Killeen

Justin Killeen


“I always knew what I wanted to do,” Justin Killeen said of his entrepreneurial success at a young age. “I just didn’t know how I’d get there.”

What he did know, while employed at a fitness facility in South Deerfield, was that he didn’t enjoy working for someone else.

“I was motivated to start something on my own, so I started doing in-home training in 2013,” he recalled. From there, he launched a personal-training program from the ground up at Energia Fitness in Hadley; a year later, he purchased the gym and went about building up its membership and expanding its roster of programs and classes. In 2015, he launched a second business just down the road, 50/50 Fitness/Nutrition, which focuses on personal training.

The rapid growth of both businesses testifies to Killeen’s training philosophy, one that treats every client differently.

“We constantly assess and determine individual need and continue to raise the bar higher, while teaching and educating every step of the way,” he said. “We look at injuries, muscular imbalances, flexibility, strength, cardiovascular health, and nutrition. More importantly, we determine where our clients stand, where they could stand to see improvements, and where we fit in.”

Killeen says he wants to bridge the gap between fitness professionals and healthcare professionals like doctors, nutritionists, physical therapists, and massage therapists.

“There is so much information and misinformation out there, which is why we meet with every new client to discuss our program in detail,” he said. “We don’t prescribe diets, we don’t promise instant results, and we don’t injure our clients. What we do offer is a renewed sense of balance, a promise for lifestyle change, and a community of support.”

Speaking of community, Killeen is active outside his workplace as well, as a board member for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampshire County and a supporter and sponsor of several nonprofits and charity events.

“Businesses have to be willing to be out there, present in the community,” he said. “We’re looking to help in a number of different ways.”

He calls the past few years a “whirlwind” and says he hasn’t had much time to take a breath and simply appreciate it, but the results of his work keep him motivated.

“When you look around and see the energy and excitement in the room when people come together and really work toward a higher level … that, to me, is the most satisfying thing.”

— Joseph Bednar


Photography by Leah Martin Photography

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