Meghan Godorov

Career Consultant; Age 31

Meghan Godorov

Meghan Godorov


Decades ago, 20-somethings graduated from college, joined a company, and stayed there for life. Today, young people navigate a very different career landscape, one fraught with uncertainty, where they might switch jobs or even careers multiple times before finding their calling.

That’s where Meghan Godorov comes in.

Drawing on a raft of experience in the field, Godorov launched her career-consulting business two years ago. “My focus is on helping people build careers that last, making sure they can get the skills and tools they need to find professional success.”

It’s a role she first honed at Mount Holyoke College, where she still serves as associate director of Alumnae and Community Engagement, running job-skills programs on campus and connecting students with alums for mentoring opportunities, among other roles.

“In my business, I’ve been able to extend that work, to work with this population of Millennials as they think about moving into the workplace, how to navigate that piece of who they are, personally and professionally.”

Godorov’s enterprise encompasses everything from one-on-one strategy sessions to workshops and conferences, to online connections including a blog, a YouTube channel, and a series of ‘Tea Talks’ at her Google Hangout site. Her advice has been published by the Huffington Post, NerdWallet, HigherEd Jobs, Good.Co, and a host of other outlets. Clients range from individuals just entering the workforce to people who want to change careers and have no idea how.

For the young professionals who comprise the bulk of her clientele, the current economic climate can seem daunting. Meanwhile, Millennials bring to the table a different set of priorities than their elders.

“They want to jump right in and make change happen. And that can be really frustrating,” said Godorov, noting that older generations of leadership in business don’t always share that passion for change. “They want to do some good, some social good, and that can be received with negativity at times, but it’s a positive attribute.”

An avid photographer and volleyball player, her passion for developing young leadership has guided her involvement in organizations like Northampton Area Young Professionals and Leadership Pioneer Valley. But she finds the most satisfaction simply from helping clients find where they belong professionally.

“There are people who feel stuck, who know they want to change and are frustrated about where they are. So let’s talk about what’s going on and come up with a strategy to move forward,” she said — not unlike one of her heroes, the actor Robert Downey Jr., who overcame personal turmoil to forge a wildly successful career rebound. “I love that ‘a-ha’ moment, when it all clicks, and they understand what they need to do.”

— Joseph Bednar


Photography by Leah Martin Photography

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