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Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — Marcella, a mission-driven, ethically made direct-to-consumer designer fashion brand committed to advancing women and girls globally, experienced a 909% jump in revenue from 2018 to 2021 and has been listed on the annual Inc. 5000 list as the fastest-growing company in the retail sector in New England, 35th in retail nationally, and 689th overall.

The Inc. 5000 is a ranking of the fastest-growing private companies in America. In addition to impressive growth, the companies on the 2022 Inc. 5000 have also demonstrated resilience amid supply-chain woes, labor shortages, and the ongoing impact of COVID-19.

Headquartered in Northampton and founded by husband and wife duo Siyana and Andy Huszar, Marcella’s edgy, affordable women’s minimalist basics are designed in New York and handcrafted in Europe. Core to the brand’s DNA is a commitment to benefiting women and girls around the world: for every design Marcella sells, the company supports three days of school for a marginalized girl around the world, with the goal of supporting 8.5 million school days by the end of 2024. In pursuit of this mission, Marcella partners with CAMFED, the global NGO revolutionizing how girls’ education is delivered. Since April 2021, Marcella has already supported more than 600,000 school days for girls in need.

“At a time when women’s rights are under attack in much of the U.S. and around the world, we’re proud to be highlighted by Inc. as a brand that’s committed to lifting up women and girls globally,” said Siyana Huszar, co-founder and creative director of Marcella.

Marcella takes a holistic approach to sustainability that respects both people and the planet. Its original designer apparel and accessories are priced accessibly. Every individual involved in the production of any Marcella product enjoys a truly living wage, generous benefits, and free healthcare. Additionally, the brand’s innovative ‘just in time’ production cycle minimizes the global fashion industry’s typical inventory overproduction and waste, enabling Marcella to sell more than 99% of what it makes and dramatically reducing its ecological footprint.

“Marcella began as an Etsy shop and quickly transformed into a successful global e-commerce business fueled by our ‘design that matters’ philosophy of accessible prices, ethical production, sustainability, and social impact,” added Andy Huszar, co-founder and CEO of Marcella. “We moved Marcella’s headquarters from New York City to Western Massachusetts in 2017 because we saw unlimited potential in the region for supporting the growth of a global e-commerce brand. We’re honored to be recognized by Inc. and excited to continue to deliver on our mission to create sustainable fashion that reflects our brand values.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that 16 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in 2023 edition of Best Lawyers in America. These lawyers were recognized in 24 unique areas of practice. They include:

• Peter Barry (in the practice areas of construction, education, healthcare);

• Kathleen Bernardo (real estate);

• Michael Burke (medical malpractice law: defendants, personal injury litigation: defendants);

• Mark Cress (banking and finance, bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, corporate);

• Francis Dibble Jr. (bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, criminal defense: white-collar, litigation: labor and employment, litigation: securities);

• Daniel Finnegan (administrative/regulatory law, construction, litigation: construction);

• Scott Foster (business organizations, including LLCs and partnerships);

• Mary Jo Kennedy (employment);

• Kevin Maynard (commercial litigation, litigation: banking and finance, litigation: construction);

• David Parke (corporate, mergers and acquisitions);

• Jeffrey Poindexter (commercial litigation, litigation: construction);

• John Pucci (bet-the-company litigation, criminal defense: general practice, criminal defense: white-collar);

• Jeffrey Roberts (corporate, trusts and estates);

• Michael Roundy (commercial litigation);

• Elizabeth Sillin (nonprofit/charities law, trusts and estates); and

• Ronald Weiss (corporate, mergers and acquisitions, tax).

Daily News

HADLEY — UMassFive College Federal Credit Union recently introduced Emi Lee as the newest member of its expanding UMassFive Retirement Planning and Investments team available through CUSO Financial Services, LP.

Lee supports two of the credit union’s CFS financial advisors, Aimee Marden and Dana Graham. She schedules appointments, sends appointment reminders, and helps with advisor administrative duties and service work. As an advisor assistant, she is also now the primary contact for current and prospective clients looking to work with Marden and Graham.

After joining UMassFive as a part-time member service representative in November 2019, Lee quickly transitioned into a full-time position as a member service specialist at the Hadley branch in March 2020. In that role, she excelled at educating members financially and connecting them to the financial services most relevant to their needs. Her background includes a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Smith College, and she applies her knowledge from that field to help others improve their financial well-being.

Daily News

WESTFIELD — The Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce announced that its annual September Breakfast will be held on Thursday, Sept. 22 from 7 to 9 a.m. at the 104th Fighter Wing Air National Guard Base, 175 Falcon Dr., Westfield. The chief greeter will be Chris Thompson of the Westfield Starfires. Immediately following the breakfast, guests can take a tour of the 104th Air National Guard Base.

Tickets for the breakfast cost $35 for members and $40 for general admission. For more information or registration, call (413) 568-1618 or email [email protected].

The platinum event sponsor is Baystate Noble Hospital; silver sponsors are A Plus HVAC Inc. and ProAmpac; bronze sponsors are Westfield Public Schools, Armbrook Village, Fly Lugu Flight Training, BHN – the Carson Center, and Northeast Paving; and the coffee bar sponsor is the Westfield Starfires.

Chamber events are held throughout the year to foster connections with member businesses, local government leaders, and the chamber’s communities. For more information, visit www.westfieldbiz.org.

Community Spotlight Cover Story

Community Spotlight

Architect’s rendering of the new parking garage

Architect’s rendering of the new parking garage soon to take shape in the city’s downtown.

‘Good traffic.’

That’s the phrase used by Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno — who acknowledged that it is somewhat of an oxymoron — to describe traffic that is, well, positive in nature.

This would be traffic generated by vibrancy, by people coming into a city from somewhere else; traffic indicative of progress, as opposed to insufficient infrastructure, poor planning, or both.

Springfield saw quite a bit of this ‘good traffic’ prior to the pandemic, said Sarno, noting that it was generated by concerts at MGM Springfield’s venues, Thunderbirds games, conventions and college graduations at the MassMutual Center, special gatherings like the Winter Weekend staged by the Red Sox in early 2020, or any combination of the above. Sometimes, a random Friday night would be enough to generate such traffic.

And after two years of relative quiet in the wake of the pandemic, the ‘good traffic’ is starting to make a comeback, as is the city as a whole, said Sarno, Springfield’s longest-serving mayor, with 14 years in the corner office, adding that there is promise for a whole lot more in the months and years to come, as pieces to a puzzle come together — or back together, as the case may be.

“Before COVID hit, we had a tremendous amount of momentum going on in Springfield, not just in the downtown, but in all our neighborhoods,” he told BusinessWest. “I think we’re starting to get our mojo back.”

These pieces include everything from a resurgent Thunderbirds squad, which made it all the way the AHL finals after taking a full year off due to COVID, to new housing, including the long-delayed renovation of the former Court Square hotel; from a casino in comeback mode, buoyed by the promise of sports gambling, to the return of the Marriott brand downtown after more than $40 million in renovations to the property in Tower Square; from new restaurants and clubs on Worthington Street to a new parking garage soon to rise where an existing structure is being razed.

“Before COVID hit, we had a tremendous amount of momentum going on in Springfield, not just in the downtown, but in all our neighborhoods. I think we’re starting to get our mojo back.”

The “state-of-the-art and environmentally friendly parking garage,” as Sarno described it, will be part of a larger development in the area around the MassMutual Center, an initiative aimed at bringing people to that site before, during, and perhaps after events (more on that later).

The city still faces a number of stern challenges, many of them COVID-related, said Tim Sheehan, the city’s chief Development officer, citing such matters as the impact of remote work and hybrid schedules on downtown office buildings, an ongoing workforce crisis that has impacted in businesses in all sectors, and the pressing need to redevelop vacant or underutilized properties across Main Street from MGM Springfield.

An architect’s rendering of the planned new entrance at the southwest corner of the MassMutual Center.

An architect’s rendering of the planned new entrance at the southwest corner of the MassMutual Center.

But he, like the mayor, sees progress on many fronts and, overall, a pronounced recovery from a pandemic that hit the city very hard.

“We’re seeing many positive signs that Springfield is making its way back from the pandemic and the many challenges it created,” said Sheehan, who cited, among many yardsticks of momentum, a long line to get a table at Wahlburgers during a recent visit. “And we’re seeing these signs not only in the downtown, but the neighborhoods as well.”

Sarno agreed. He said that, over his lengthy tenure as mayor, the city has coped with a number of challenges and crises, from the June 2011 tornado to the November 2012 natural-gas explosion. But COVID has been different, and it has tested the city and its business community in many different ways.

“It’s been a difficult two years; the pandemic threw everyone a huge curveball,” he explained, adding that city leaders were trying to respond to an unprecedented health crisis while also making good use of state and especially federal money to help small businesses keep the lights on.

“My team has been tested, and, true, it’s been through a lot of disasters before,” he went on. “But this was like shadowboxing — it was surreal.”

COVID isn’t over, and challenges for small businesses remain, but in many respects, the city can get back to business, and it is doing just that.

For this, the latest installment of its Community Spotlight series, BusinessWest takes an in-depth look at Springfield, its ongoing bounce-back from COVID, and, yes, the return of that ‘good traffic.’

State of the City

It was affectionately known as the ‘dog and pony show.’

That’s what some called an annual gathering, orchestrated by the city in conjunction with the Springfield Regional Chamber, at which officials gave what amounted to a progress report on the city, with a large dollar amount attached to all the various economic-development and infrastructure projects — from MGM Springfield to the renovation of Union Station to the reconstruction of the I-91 viaduct — that were in progress or on the drawing board.

The city hasn’t staged one of these sessions in several years, mostly due to COVID, said Sarno, but one is being planned, probably for early next year. And there will be quite a bit to talk about, he went on, hinting at new developments at sites ranging from Union Station to the former Municipal Hospital on State Street, while offering what amounts to a preview of that gathering.

Mayor Domenic Sarno sees progress on many fronts in Springfield after a tumultuous past couple of years.

Mayor Domenic Sarno sees progress on many fronts in Springfield after a tumultuous past couple of years.

And he started with the new, 1,000-space parking garage, which he and Sheehan anticipate will be much more than that.

Indeed, plans for the site include ‘activation’ — that’s a word you hear often when it comes to properties in the downtown — of a surface parking lot next to the present (and future) garage, and, overall, creation of an atmosphere similar, said the mayor, to what is seen at Fenway Park in Boston on game nights.

“Bruce Landon Way will be activated, and many times, it will be shut down,” said Sheehan, adding that the current surface lot, and Bruce Landon Way itself, will become extensions of the MassMutual Center.

“They can have their events literally flowing out to Bruce Landon Way, creating much more activation within the downtown,” he explained. “And it will be utilized for pre- and post-event programming.”

Elaborating, he said the current surface lot will be public space that the Convention Center Authority will lease out for various kinds of functions, bringing more people downtown.

Meanwhile, a new entrance to the MassMutual Center will be added at the corner of State and Main streets, providing the facility with two points of entry and, with this new addition, what the mayor likened to a “Broadway marquee,” a much stronger bridge to MGM Springfield and other businesses south of the arena.

“One of the critical elements of our master plan involves finding ways to activate both of our anchors downtown — MGM Springfield and the convention center itself,” said Sheehan. “And one critical missing piece to that was always the southern entrance to the MassMutual Center, and now, that’s being addressed.”

That new entrance may help spur development of several vacant or underutilized properties across Main Street from the MGM casino, said Sarno, adding that requests for proposals to redevelop these properties, now under city control, will be issued soon.

Dinesh Patel, seen here in the lobby of the soon-to-open Marriott

Dinesh Patel, seen here in the lobby of the soon-to-open Marriott in downtown Springfield, says the facility was designed to reflect the history and culture of the city.

These developments, coupled with the ongoing renovation of 31 Elm St., the former Court Square Hotel, into market-rate apartments due to be ready for occupancy in roughly a year, are expected to create more interest in Springfield and its downtown within the development community, said the mayor, noting, again, that needed pieces are coming together.

These pieces include housing, which will create a larger population of people living in the downtown; restaurants and other hospitality-related businesses, a broad category that includes MGM Springfield, restaurants, and the Thunderbirds; and a vibrant business community.

“One of the critical elements of our master plan involves finding ways to activate both of our anchors downtown — MGM Springfield and the convention center itself. And one critical missing piece to that was always the southern entrance to the MassMutual Center, and now, that’s being addressed.”

Individual pieces coming into place include not only 31 Elm, but the recently opened housing in the former Willys-Overland building on Chestnut Street; some new restaurants and clubs on and around Worthington Street, including Dewey’s Lounge, the Del Raye, and Jackalope; and the planned new Big Y supermarket, which will address a recognized need in what has long been recognized as a food desert.

Staying Power

Then, there’s Tower Square and the Marriott flag that has been returned to the hotel several years after it was lost.

As he talked with BusinessWest about the two years worth of renovations to that hotel and planned reopening of the facility, Dinesh Patel showed off finishing-touch work in several areas, including the lobby, the fitness center, the pool room, and some of the meeting rooms.

He also opened the door the large ballroom, revealing a training session for dozens of the more than 180 people expected to be hired before the facility opens its doors. Like most of the renovation work itself, conducted at the height of the pandemic and its aftermath amid supply-chain issues and soaring prices for many products and materials, the hiring process has been a stern challenge as qualified help remains in short supply.

But for Patel and partner Mid Vitta, whose work to reclaim the Marriott flag — and reinvent Tower Square — earned them BusinessWest’s Top Entrepreneur award for 2022, it has been what amounts to a labor of love. The two saw an opportunity in the once-thriving but then-challenged retail and office complex in the heart of downtown, and have made the most of it, finding some imaginative reuse of many spaces. These include the recruitment of the YMCA, which has brought its childcare and fitness-center operations, as well as its administrative offices, to Tower Square. It also includes that new and decidedly different kind of Big Y store in space formerly occupied by CVS.

As for the hotel, which will open in time for the induction ceremonies for the Basketball Hall of Fame and the Big E, Patel said the timing is good for the property to come back online.

“Gas prices are coming down, and people are traveling again,” he said. “They want to get out and go places; we see a lot of pent-up demand.”

As he offered a tour of the nearly-ready facility, Patel noted the many nods to Springfield, its history, and its culture, from the basketball-themed art in the fitness center to the wall coverings depicting blueprints of noted inventions that happened in Springfield (from the monkey wrench to rail cars) to the many photographs of ‘old Springfield’ found on the walls of the stairs leading to the meeting facilities on the sixth floor.

“We wanted to tell the story of Springfield,” Patel said. “And we tell that story all through the hotel.”

Increasingly, that story is one of progress and recovery from COVID, not only in the downtown, where much of the interest is focused, but in many other neighborhoods as well, said both Sarno and Sheehan, noting that neighborhood plans have been developed for many different sections of the city that address everything from sidewalks to lighting to beautification, with gathered suggestions then forwarded to an ARPA advisory committee.

Overall, new schools and libraries are being built, infrastructure improvements are being undertaken, and businesses continue to be supported as they face the lingering effects of COVID through initiatives such as the Prime the Pump program, which provided grants of various sizes to businesses in need.

The city has received nearly $124 million in ARPA (American Rescue Plan Act) money to date, and it has distributed more than $50 million, including $4 million dispensed in the seventh round to date, earlier this month. Those funds went to small businesses, new businesses, nonprofits, neighborhoods, housing, capital projects, and direct financial assistance to households and seniors, said Sarno, adding that that the basic strategy has been put that money to use in ways where the impact can be dramatic and immediate.

The renovated outdoor space off the sixth-floor meeting area

The renovated outdoor space off the sixth-floor meeting area is one of the highlights of the soon-to-open Marriott in downtown Springfield.

“The majority of the monies that have been distributed have really helped a lot of minority-owned businesses and women-owned businesses,” he explained. “It’s a very eclectic mix, from mom-and-pop businesses to larger ventures to direct assistance.”

There have been efforts in the broad category of workforce development as well, he went on, adding that businesses of all kinds continue to be impacted by an ultra-tight labor market, just as many are starting to see business pick up again.

Overall, there have been more than 30 meetings conducted with residents and business owners in attendance, said the mayor, adding that these listening sessions were staged to gain direct feedback on how federal COVID relief money can best be spent in Springfield.

Identified needs and challenges range from workforce issues to childcare to transportation, said Sheehan, adding that what has come from these sessions is dialogue, which has often led to action, on how the city can collaborate with other groups and agencies to address these matters. And it has been a very fruitful learning experience.

“It created an opportunity to look at things differently,” he noted. “And I do think it has caused people to look at how we can work collaboratively to solve some pretty significant problems.”

Bottom Line

To motorists who are stuck in it, there is really no such thing as ‘good traffic.’

But while drivers don’t use that phrase, elected officials and economic-development leaders certainly do. As Sarno told BusinessWest, good traffic is a barometer of a city’s vibrancy, a measure of whether, and to what degree, a community has become a destination.

For a long while, Springfield didn’t have much, if any, of this ‘good traffic,’ and then, in the 18 months or so before COVID, it did. The pandemic and its many side effects took much of that traffic away, but there are many signs that it’s back and here to stay.

As the mayor said, the city is starting to get its mojo back. 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Features Special Coverage

Pivot Move

 

Mike Yates, left, and Ray Berry

Mike Yates, left, and Ray Berry agree that expansion into Amherst is a common-sense move for the company.

 

When asked how he would eventually become business partners with Marcus Camby, the former UMass and NBA star, Ray Berry, founder of White Lion Brewery, leaned back in his chair as if to indicate it was a bit of a long story.

It starts with Travis Best, another former NBA player who made his first headlines while playing for Springfield’s Central High School. It was Best who put together several annual Basketball Hall of Fame enshrinement weekend events, including a post-induction gathering. Following the opening of White Lion’s downtown Springfield operation just over a year ago, Best was looking to include the company in the festivities — and did.

Indeed, Best and Berry would collaborate with the city on a block party on Bridge Street during enshrinement weekend — the same weekend, it turned out, that UMass Amherst would be honoring Camby, Julius Erving, and John Calipari with statues in their honor on campus. Best and Berry decided to reach out to Camby to see if he wanted to co-host the event in Springfield, which he did.

“Marcus was all in — he was already in town, and he was excited to be part of what we were doing,” Berry recalled. “We shut down Bridge Street, rolled up the garage doors, and had some entertainment; it was our first grand event at our brick-and-mortar spot. At one point, I think we had 700 people between the brewery and the block-party environment. It was a beautiful evening downtown.”

Fast-forwarding a little, Camby became more than a little impressed with the White Lion operation and Berry’s status as one of the very few minority brewery owners in Massachusetts — so much so that he attached his name to an IPA produced by White Lion. And later — we’re moving very quickly now, but will go back and fill in some detail in a bit — when Berry was presented with an opportunity to expand his footprint and bring the White Lion brand to Amherst with a location in the heart of downtown, Camby agreed to come in as a partner.

The venture will be called White Lion Brewing Amherst, and will be based in a location that has been making headlines in recent months — 104 North Pleasant St., home to the recently opened Drake, a live-event venue that is already fulfilling its vast promise as a destination for music lovers from across Western Mass. and far beyond.

The White Lion taproom will be located just below the Drake in space that was formerly the High Horse restaurant and, before that, Amherst Brewing, where Mike Yates served as head brewer — before working behind the bar at High Horse.

He now has that same title at White Lion, so this new venture amounts to going home for him.

And with that perspective, he believes the White Lion brand is in the right place at the right time, and with the right business partner.

“It will feel good to be back there. It’s a great little town — I love Amherst,” Yates told BusinessWest. “I think this is going to be a big hit here. Since Amherst Brewing left downtown, there’s no brewery in the downtown area. This is essentially a tourist town — every year you have a new crop of students coming in and parents looking for a place to go for lunch or dinner, and a brewery is always a good option.

“I think this is going to be a big hit here. Since Amherst Brewing left downtown, there’s no brewery in the downtown area.”

“Combine that with our partnership with Marcus and our establishment’s reputation here in Springfield as a prominent player in the brewing business, and I think it will be a big win,” he went on. “I think they hit a big home run with the Drake — that’s what Amherst sorely needed — and we will be another big piece of the puzzle.”

For this issue, BusinessWest looks at how this new venture came together, and what it means for Amherst — and White Lion.

 

What’s Brewing?

Berry told BusinessWest that he recently took part in a panel discussion before a convention of craft brewers at the Samuel Adams facility outside Boston.

The subject being addressed by the panel was satellite facilities, and, more specifically, when and under what circumstances they should be considered.

Summing up his remarks, Berry said he told them, “from a business lens, if the situation if right, and you’re not over-leveraging yourself, it could make sense for that brewery’s respective business model.”

That is certainly the case with this new location in Amherst, he said, adding that it makes sense on a number of levels. “Amherst is a great town. It’s a natural fit for White Lion and its progression.”

So much so that the Amherst Business Improvement District and other stakeholders, diligently trying to replace the lost Amherst Brewing operation, initiated talks with Berry back in 2019, by his recollection, about bringing his brand there.

He listened, but back then, he was devoting almost all of his time and energy to opening his brewery and taproom in the former Spaghetti Freddie’s location in Tower Square, a project that would eventually be slowed — as in slowed — by COVID-19 and its profound impact on construction and the larger renovation efforts at Tower Square.

When that location was well on its way, Berry and Amherst officials essentially picked up where they left off.

“They kept in communication — the conversations would come and go,” said Berry, adding that he eventually went to Amherst to look at some spaces there, including the former High Horse/Amherst Brewing location, which was attractive, but far more space than he needed. Consumed with opening his Springfield location, he put the Amherst project, if it could be called that, on pause.

Marcus Camby has already attached his name to an IPA

Marcus Camby has already attached his name to an IPA, and now he will take his involvement with White Lion Brewery to a higher level as a partner in the Amherst venture.

And it stayed there until, by coincidence (again), Camby was back in Amherst for event. While there, he and his business agent were inquiring about the “space across from Antonio’s Pizza” — the Amherst Brewing space.

That conversation started a dialogue between the two about what whether that location was available and what could be done with it, conversations that got more serious over time, prompted more visits to Amherst, and eventually spurred consideration of not the Amherst Brewing site (because it wasn’t exactly available at that time) but one just down the street, owned by the same party.

But then, the space under the Drake did become available, and the parties involved made an important pivot — yes, that’s a basketball term — back to 104 North Pleasant St.

With that backstory now complete, Berry and Yates have their focus on the future, one they believe holds a great deal of promise, because of the community, Amherst, the specific location, and what White Lion can bring to the table.

“From a White Lion lens, this makes total sense, and for a number of reasons,” Berry said. “For starters, the Drake is iconic. What they’re trying to do on that second floor is a game changer for the downtown Amherst community. To be below that music venue has a number of benefits, from a business perspective.”

“To be on the Main Street corridor in downtown Amherst has a number of benefits from a business lens,” he went on, adding that, while Springfield and Amherst are vastly different in terms of size, he sees many similarities in their downtowns and the work done by the two communities’ business improvement districts and efforts to bring more vibrancy to their respective downtowns.

“We see the many benefits that come with being in the heart of downtown Springfield, and we see the benefit of the partnership and the work that our own Business Improvement District does day in and day out, which includes special programming with White Lion,” he went on. “And the leadership at the Amherst BID has a similar fabric relative to their approach with downtown Amherst; they encourage and participate and facilitate and coordinate outdoor programming, special events, and business-improvement initiatives. Based off of what we’ve witnessed and knowing what they’re doing, it made total sense to be right in the heart of downtown Amherst.”

What also made sense, he said, was to meld the White Lion brand with the brand that Camby has developed, especially in the community where he originally made his mark a quarter-century ago.

“Amherst is a great town. It’s a natural fit for White Lion and its progression.”

Berry said preliminary design work is underway, and the Amherst facility should be open for business by the end of December, in time for the winter semester of classes at UMass and other area schools.

The facility will be a taproom, restaurant, outdoor social space, and a small pilot, nano-brew house — the main production will still be in the Springfield location — one that will allow for what Yates called “one-off” experimental ales.

“It will be a smaller scale — probably a three- or five-barrel brew system, which will allow us to spread our creativity wings a little and try some things that we couldn’t afford to do on a large scale like we have here in Springfield,” he explained. “It will be fun; I’m excited. Springfield’s great, and Springfield’s coming along, but it will be great to do a little bit of both.”

 

Draught Pick

Summing up his thoughts on the two communities where White Lion will have a presence, Berry said Springfield and Amherst have “similar bones.”

By that, he meant they’re trying to achieve the same things in their downtowns — specifically the establishment of an eclectic mix of businesses that complement one another and, together, create a destination.

White Lion has become a key piece of this puzzle in Springfield, and Berry is expecting the same in Amherst, especially with his new business partner attached to the project.

Together, they’ll be making a full-court press in a town where Camby is synonymous with success.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Guide to Senior Planning Special Coverage Special Publications

Preparing for Life After 65

When people think about strategizing for their senior years, they often see it as a downbeat task, one marked by growing incapacity, financial stress, and, well, dying.

That’s not what this guide is about, although it definitely contains plenty of information about what to do before that day comes. But the goal isn’t planning to die; it’s making sure you get all your plans in order — from where you or your loved ones will live to how finances will be distributed — so you don’t have to worry about it. You can, instead, enjoy life.

 

And that planning is an increasingly important task. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of Americans age 65 and older rose from 35 million in 2000 — 12% of the population — to 56.1 million, or 17%. By 2030, the bureau estimates, more than 21% of U.S. residents, about 73.1 million, will have passed their 65th birthdays.

That’s a lot of people. And a lot of planning. And a lot of living left to enjoy.

Achieving your goals — and your desires for your loved ones — requires careful thought, and that’s where our annual Senior Planning Guide comes in. So let’s sort through some of the confusion and get those conversations — and the rest of your life — started.

 

Architecture Special Coverage

Growth by Design

Tighe & Bond President and CEO Robert Belitz

Tighe & Bond President and CEO Robert Belitz

To say Tighe & Bond is a growing company would be an understatement.

From 2006 to 2016, the Westfield-based engineering firm increased its workforce from 170 to 270, but since then, the tally has expanded to 450, due to a combination of geographic expansion across the Northeast, enhancements to specialized services, and organic growth.

“We like to say it’s still manageable growth — robust, but manageable for us,” said Robert Belitz, who was hired by Tighe & Bond as chief financial officer in 2014 and took the reins as president and CEO three years later. “Our strategic planning process, which we go through every year, says it would be nice to grow between 5% and 10%. So you can see we’re on the higher end of that range.”

Among the recent footprint-expanding additions include an office in Portland, Maine, and two strategic acquisitions. One is a landscape-architecture and urban-planning firm in Boston called Halvorson Design (now Halvorson | Tighe & Bond Studio), which is part of the firm’s continuing strategy in Eastern Mass. and its first office presence in the Hub.

“The work they do is a terrific complement to our existing sites and brings more capabilities to our clients; they also did a lot of coastal-resiliency work as well, and that will continue to be in high demand for us.”

“We like to say it’s still manageable growth — robust, but manageable for us.”

The other recent acquisition was joining forces with RT Group, which expanded the firm’s waterfront and coastal-engineering capabilities in Rhode Island.

“Given where our offices are, there is a tremendous amount of coastline where we have opportunities to support our clients,” Belitz said. “There’s an awful lot of funding that’s being directed toward seawall construction, which is part of our coastal practice. The RT Group does a lot of work around port areas.”

River Valley Co-op in Easthampton

River Valley Co-op in Easthampton is one of the first net-zero-energy grocery stores in Massachusetts.
(Photo by Tighe & Bond)

With offices in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, it’s a natural fit for Tighe & Bond to tackle more coastline work, he added. “There have been a number of natural-disaster events that have raised the awareness of the need for coastal resilience.”

Clippership Wharf in East Boston is a good example. The waterfront residential complex was developed by Lendlease with landscape design by Tighe & Bond and Halvorson, and building design by the Architectural Team. The tiered site includes a harbor walk at the lower level, public access and open spaces at mid-level, and residences and a courtyard above. A ‘living shoreline,’ the first in Boston’s urban harbor, recreates the coastal habitat through the introduction of native plantings and wave-dissipating features to accommodate future sea-level rise, creating a natural flood barrier protecting tenants and other inland properties.

“Our challenge is prioritizing how we can capitalize on all these opportunities in the market.”

Tighe & Bond has also significantly expanded its capabilities in the MEP — mechanical, electrical, and plumbing — area, Belitz said. “We’ve added a significant number of resources there. That’s to serve our existing client base, but it’s also in response to the pandemic, when we were asked to do a fair amount of air-quality work.”

Other growth areas have included traffic and roadway projects as well as asset management, he added. Meanwhile, the firm’s traditional niches in water, wastewater, and other types of projects remain strong.

“We’re still really well-diversified in terms of the services that we can provide to our clients,” he went on. “We’ve trademarked a terminology we call the whole-asset approach, which says we can support a client’s needs on whatever their assets are, from the outset of a project all the way to completion, and that’s because we provide such a broad array of services to our clients.”

At the same time, “I think the stimulus money that’s coming from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act aligns really well with the services that we provide as an organization, including our core water and wastewater services and our environmental work related to brownfield remediation. Our challenge is prioritizing how we can capitalize on all these opportunities in the market.”

 

System Expansion

Founded in 1911 to consult on broad-based civil-engineering projects, Tighe & Bond eventually came to specialize in environmental engineering, focusing on water, wastewater, solid-waste, and hazardous-waste issues, and its growing diversity of expertise has been a buffer against economic downturns in any one area.

Currently, 60% to 65% of its projects are public contracts with municipalities and state government agencies throughout New England and New York, and 35% to 40% are private work for a diverse group of industries.

Clippership Wharf in East Boston

Clippership Wharf in East Boston is an example of a project that includes elements of coastal resiliency.
(Photo by Ed Wonsek)

“It’s a great thing to be diversified during an economic slowdown,” Belitz said. “The diversity of the services we provide has always been beneficial for us.”

That’s particularly important during times of unusual economic disruption, like the current environment.

“We’re always trying to keep an eye on the economic conditions,” he told BusinessWest. “We are partnering very closely with our clients on any supply-chain issues that might cause delays in their projects or extensions of their projects. We’ve been trying to keep a very close eye on that and work closely internally to make sure our people understand how best to communicate with a client. That’s what it comes down to; it’s primarily communication around schedule and timing and making sure that all of that is coordinated.”

The firm has expanded its presence in renewable-energy projects over the past 15 years or so. For example, River Valley Co-op in Easthampton is one of the first net-zero-energy grocery stores in Massachusetts. Tighe’s engineers provided energy-modeling services to evaluate various design alternatives, including HVAC systems, building envelope, and lighting systems. In addition, it designed an array of electric-vehicle charging stations in the co-op parking lot.

Tighe & Bond, like all such firms, has faced an increasingly complex regulatory and permitting landscape, one where environmental concerns once considered minor are now paramount. But Belitz considers these issues not hurdles, but opportunities.

For example, “nitrogen and phosphorous removal for wastewater treatment plants has been a pretty big driver of some of our growth over the last few years,” he explained.

In that vein, the firm recently worked with the town of Southington, Conn. to upgrade its water-pollution control facility. Tighe & Bond developed a phased plan for addressing the town’s wastewater infrastructure needs over the next 20 years. Recent improvements included phosphorus removal, odor control, and UV disinfection.

The upgrades helped the town meet new phosphorus discharge limits that protect the Quinnipiac River, and odor-control measures have helped residents in nearby neighborhoods and those using abutting sports fields. The American Council of Engineering Companies of Connecticut honored the project team’s designs with the 2022 Grand Award for Engineering Excellence.

“We are partnering very closely with our clients on any supply-chain issues that might cause delays in their projects or extensions of their projects.”

Meanwhile, Belitz said, “one of the emerging regulatory drivers is what’s called lead service line replacements, which are requirements for communities to do inventories and replacement plans for the lead service lines. We also do a lot of brownfields cleanup, and that’s been a very significant piece of our growth over the past two to three years, and another example of our well-rounded services.”

 

Working on the Pipeline

Asked how Tighe & Bond continues to grow its workforce at a time when companies of all kinds are struggling with finding and retaining talent, Belitz said it’s a multi-layered strategy.

“I’m not sure a day goes by when we don’t talk about our hiring and attraction of talent. We’ve beefed up our talent-acquisition function here at the firm to continue to identify and attract candidates to the firm. And once we get candidates to join us, we’ve always done a really good job of investing in their development, in order to retain our latest employees.”

He said the firm’s “very robust” onboarding and training program consists of not only leadership training, but anything people need to do their jobs: project management, quality management, safety and health principles, and more. “We’ve made a very big investment in that area just because we’ve had to, given our growth. We’ve kind of branded it internally as Tighe & Bond University, where new folks come in and meet with their supervisor and figure out what sorts of training they need to be effective in their jobs, and we think that’s key to a successful onboarding.”

Tighe & Bond has purposefully cultivated a culture of mentorship and teamwork as well, particularly between the older and younger generations of engineers.

“One of the nice things that we hear all the time from people in our organization is they get to work on all different kinds of projects,” Belitz said. “The other thing we’ve always done, but have made further investments in, is the ability to work seamlessly across all of our offices. All our offices are fitted with collaboration tools and the technology that people need to work together, and to complement that, we assign new hires to current employees when they join the firm so they can get that initial mentoring and that on-the-job training that is so important to their success.”

The firm adopted a hybrid work model during the pandemic that has continued to be effective, he added. “We think that allows our people not only to have some of the work-life balance and work-life integration objectives they’ve always had, but it still affords us ample opportunities to collaborate on projects and have that on-the-job mentoring and training. That’s how we’ve approached the pandemic, with a pretty big investment in technology to make sure that happens.

“From the outset of the pandemic, we were very intentional about saying our main goals are to look after the safety and health of our people, to protect the jobs of our people, and also to maintain our employee benefits,” he went on. “There was a lot of uncertainty at the time. We had some sectors that slowed down for a short period of time, but we had others that ramped up, and now I think some of those sectors that have slowed down have come out of the pandemic ready to work with Tighe & Bond on even more projects.”

 

Building a Culture

Belitz said Tighe & Bond’s leadership is proud of the firm’s culture, which includes elements like the Make a Difference program, which affords employees time to give back to their communities through service projects with local nonprofits.

“Even during the pandemic, though we couldn’t do some of those things because of the restrictions, we had a number of our people volunteer in places like food banks and hospitals and places that had the most need during that period of time,” he explained.

Meanwhile, the company’s employee-benefit program has seen additions like a paid-time-off donation program, by which employees can donate hours of unused vacation to co-workers for certain personal needs; and a student-loan repayment benefit through which the company makes a principal payment to an employee’s student loan. “It shows our commitment to importance of education and our commitment to employees,” Belitz said.

Meanwhile, he added, the firm has made further investments in technology, both internally and with tools like drone technology, 3D laser scanning, and enhanced use of GIS. “We think those are things that enhance the client and employee experience.”

The firm has also increased its commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion through efforts like the Supporting Women at Tighe & Bond Employee Resource Group and a partnership with the National Society for Black Engineers, which includes two scholarships for students in the engineering field; both efforts aim to increase the diversity of the firm’s talent pipeline.

All these efforts create an environment where people want to work, Belitz said.

“One area that’s super important for us is our employee ownership and the fact that, even in a climate today where there’s a lot of consolidation and a lot of influence of equity investment in engineering and architecture firms, we’re remaining committed to our employee ownership model,” he added.

“That, combined with the fact that we have all our offices within the Northeast, is a very good model for us to keep growing, but to grow in a manageable way. Growth creates opportunity for our people, and I think we’ve got a nice growth model in place.”

 

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

 

 

Home Improvement Special Coverage

Putting Wood to Work

 

Tom and Pam Brogle work out of a small factory built in the 1800s.

Tom and Pam Brogle work out of a small factory built in the 1800s.

 

 

Tom Brogle has had plenty of titles during his life: father, husband, secretary, boss. But he takes particular pride in being the owner of a small cabinet-making business.

“I remember a former employer who always said, ‘if it was easy, then everybody would be doing it,’” he said. “Owning a business is never easy. But at the end of the day, I feel good — tired, but good.”

Brogle is the founder and owner of Deerfield Cabinets and Millwork. Located in Greenfield, the business tackles both commercial and residential cabinetry and millwork. But he was eager to say he is not a carpenter.

“Please don’t ask me to build your house,” he said. “Instead, ask me to build your cabinets, built-ins, moldings. I will make you what you want, not what the big blue and orange box stores sell.”

Brogle originally “got hooked on woodworking” as a kid; his grandfather was an electrician and pushed him to pursue his interests. He went to a trade school where he took a carpentry and cabinet-making class, but most of his work revolved around the latter. Now, he’s been in the industry for 40-plus years, working for “just about every shop in the area, whether it be a closet place, store-fixture manufacturer, or millwork shop.”

His biggest motivation for getting out of the shops was his dislike for the way they treated their employees, and even customers.

“For most people, when they go to any custom shop, it usually means they have exhausted the options at the stores. They don’t have issues with cost, they’re probably tired of the usual stuff, and don’t want to replace it in five years or so. We will make it to last.”

“I saw how they treated people. I didn’t like the way they treated their employees; that’s why I don’t have any. And the way they treated their customers? I wasn’t crazy about that either.”

So he started his own cabinetry business — his second business in the field, actually. His first business was located in Chicopee.

“My family has a business bug. I got bit by it on the first go-round over 20 years ago. I had about 15 employees at its height. Don’t get me wrong — every employee at that time I considered my friend. But I lost touch with my trade. I felt at times just a sort of babysitter. When you own any business and have employees, they need to be busy, or you are not doing it right.”

Deerfield Cabinets and Millwork (DCM) is different, he said, explaining that he wanted to pursue his passion, but not have to answer to, or worry about, anyone else. In short, he prioritized his happiness overall, and that lies in the work itself.

Tom Brogle says some repeat customers ask for another product before the first is delivered.

Tom Brogle says some repeat customers ask for another product before the first is delivered.

He does have one other co-worker, his ‘office manager,’ Kali — his four-legged best friend. Well, maybe not his best friend. “I owe a lot to my wife, Pam, who, against her better wishes, is always there when I need her.”

 

Home and Office

DCM specializes in cabinetry and millwork projects. Millwork can be defined as anything from making a kitchen to just crafting the molding that fits around the door. It ranges from a custom piece of furniture, like a desk, to commercial kiosks like those seen in a mall. Brogle makes pieces for businesses and residents all over the New England area.

“The repeat customers are there as long as you treat them correctly.”

“We really specialize in commercial millwork for other businesses. We love doing projects for hospitals and doctors’ offices. We have a regular customer that brings us projects for pharmacies,” he explained. “Those kinds of jobs are great. We also love working with general contractors; they are aware of many factors that go into any project.”

Products are made, finished, and delivered to the customer, but DCM doesn’t typically perform installations. Brogle told BusinessWest that the piece is usually left in the designated area, but he will do installations only if it is one cabinet that requires a few screws in the wall.

“For most people, when they go to any custom shop, it usually means they have exhausted the options at the stores. They don’t have issues with cost, they’re probably tired of the usual stuff, and don’t want to replace it in five years or so. We will make it to last.”

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Brogle was concerned for his enterprise, like other owners. He felt especially vulnerable, having been in business for only six months before the world shut down.

“I was very concerned about making it,” he told BusinessWest, and the worry is still there. There was little work, but still work to be done. He acquired a job for a Boston hospital, but it has been an on-again, off-again opportunity.

“When COVID hit, of course everything shut down. To this day, they haven’t asked for their project. I have it in the other room, and I’m still working on it. It hurt — but it didn’t hurt much because I was still in the infancy stage.”

He’s also had issues with supply limitations. Brogle explained that, if he needed a lift of plywood, the supplier wouldn’t sell the lift of 35 to 40 sheets; they, too, were losing out on money. “They would sell 10-12 pieces at a time so they can make more money. If you order a lift, they give you a big discount. They can’t take that price cut, either — suppliers would rather sell 10 here, another 10 there, and so forth. I’ve had to watch what I buy. And sometimes I just don’t get it — it’s just not there.”

Despite the setbacks of COVID-19 and the resulting economic disruption, his business is starting to see a rise in sales. He explained a new job opportunity he received with a friend; he’s building about 50 mall kiosks, and the client is requesting 30 to 40 more over the next year.

Kali the ‘office manager’ checks out a kid gym Tom Brogle made.

Kali the ‘office manager’ checks out a kid gym Tom Brogle made.

“It’s a big job for all of us — the repeat customers are there as long as you treat them correctly,” he said. “You can treat a customer pretty badly and think you’re doing a good job. But if they don’t come back or if they tell someone you did a lousy job, you’ll lose money. It might not be a lot, but you don’t get that customer back.”

Brogle added that he likes to work with his customers to make projects doable, especially for residential jobs. When quoting a job, he tries to honor the price if it is within a certain range of the original estimate.

 

Milling About

Though there’s a lot of competition in his field, Brogle is excited for the future of Deerfield Cabinets and Millwork.

There’s no predicting what the next year or five years will bring, but he is hoping to hire people that are passionate about the trade.

“I don’t have that crystal ball and all the answers, but this I do know — life is only what you make of it,” he told BusinessWest. “You can either be noticed or sit on your butt the rest of your days. And this is my trade.”

 

Kailey Houle can be reached at [email protected]

Daily News

SOUTH HADLEY — With a team of collaborators and scholars, the second installation of “Voices of Resilience: The Intersection of Women on the Move” will be presented by South Hadley’s Center Church from Sept. 18 to Oct. 15. The opening event will be held Sunday, Sept. 18 at 2 p.m.

Taking an inclusive look at local and national women’s history while exploring the pursuit of a more complete narrative of American history, the exhibition celebrates the intersecting lives of women — and women of color — in Massachusetts and beyond who changed the course of history.

The exhibit launched at the Springfield Museums during the pandemic. The new installation will open at Center Church and reflect on local history and political shifts in our culture. The Rev. Lori Souder invites everyone to take advantage of this unique opportunity. “We welcome the community to view this exhibit and be inspired to learn more about ‘hidden figures’ in our communities and beyond.”

The exhibit is free and open to the public Saturdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sundays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Wednesdays 4 to 7 p.m. Group visits at other times are available by appointment. Exhibit sponsors include E Ink Corp., Mount Holyoke College, PeoplesBank, Thomson Financial Management, Odyssey Bookshop, and Sankofa Gumbo Inc.; the South Hadley Cultural Council, a local agency supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, also provided a grant. Community collaborators for the exhibit include Bay Path University, Springfield Museums, On the Move Forum, Human Service Forum, Arise for Social Justice, the African American Female Professors Assoc., and others.

The guiding inspiration for the exhibit will be “Highest Star,” a song by singer and presidential honoree Melba Moore, which notes that “everybody needs a hero to set their spirits free.” Guest curator Janine Fondon, assistant professor and chair of Undergraduate Communication at Bay Path, added that “we raise the voices of women — past and present — by acknowledging their critical narrative along history’s timeline. This year we will learn more about the Combahee River Collective and its historic 1977 statement raising the voice of Black women with intention during an era of defining feminism.”

“Voices of Resilience” showcases a range of voices from early Black feminists such as Barbara Smith to longtime columnist Barbara Bernard. The exhibit celebrates both spiritual and lay leaders, artists, musicians, and educators such as Amy Hughes, formerly of the MacDuffie School, as well as Lucie Lewis, who traces her story to the Salem witch trials. Many voices from Springfield, South Hadley, Amherst, and beyond are featured. The upcoming book It’s Our Movement Now will also be highlighted. The book was edited by Laura Lovett from the University of Pittsburgh and Rachel Jessica Daniel and Kelly Giles from the University of Massachusetts, with a chapter by Fondon.

Exhibition scholar Demetria Shabazz noted that the exhibit presents an opportunity to learn how women overcame challenges and created enduring legacies. “It is important to reflect on how African-American women and women in general have stepped up to shape our local and national civic and political cultures over time.”

Lewis, exhibition scholar and researcher, added that “remembering the shoulders on which we stand and discovering the spirit that guided their journey emboldens each of us to embrace the work that remains yet to be done.”

To learn more about the exhibit, visit centerchurchsouthhadley.org/voices. For questions or to schedule a tour, call (413) 532-2262 or email [email protected].

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Holyoke Community College (HCC) will begin its fall 2022 Women’s Leadership Series on Wednesday, Sept. 21 with presenter Trayce Whitfield, executive director of the Coalition for an Equitable Economy, leading a discussion titled “Leaning Into the Positive.”

Whitfield will be followed in subsequent months by Michelle Lemoi, chief operating officer of Zora Builders in Newton; Christina Royal, president of HCC; and Suzanne Blake, a career coach and consultant based in Medfield. All sessions run from noon to 1 p.m. on the last Wednesday of the month over Zoom.

During each session, participants will join prominent women leaders for discussions on relevant topics and ideas to help their leadership development. They will also have the opportunity to form a supportive network to help navigate their own careers.

“This will be the sixth semester HCC has offered this lunchtime series over Zoom, allowing women the opportunity for connection, networking, and professional development at a time and place that is convenient for them,” said Michele Cabral, an adjunct professor of Business and organizer of HCC’s Women’s Leadership Series.

Whitfield, the first guest presenter, is the former director of contract sales for HCC’s division of Business & Community Services. In 2020, she was honored by the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women as a 2020 Commonwealth Heroine.

On Oct. 19: Lemoi will present “How Claiming ‘I Don’t Know’ Opens Up Opportunities to Bolster Confidence.” On Nov. 16, Royal will discuss “Growth Mindset.” And on Dec. 21, Blake will present “Ask for It and Get It.”

The cost of each session is $25. The full four-session series can be purchased for $75. Email Lanre Ajayi, HCC’s executive director of Education & Corporate Learning, at [email protected] if pricing is an issue.

Registration will open soon at hcc.edu/womens-leadership. Space is limited, so advance registration is required.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield (YPS) will hold its annual Adult Field Day on Saturday, Aug. 20 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., celebrating friendly competition, meaningful networking, and minute-to-win-it-style games for prizes and bragging rights.

The community-building day, hosted by Train for Life and 413 Athletic Center and presented by Canna Provisions, will take place at 413 Athletic Training Center, 340 McKinstry Ave., Suite 250, Chicopee. YPS members and non-members are welcome. Registration is $100 per team of four. Advance registration is required.

The event aims to provide an opportunity for local young professionals to gather in teams for a friendly competition, networking with other professionals while competing in relay races, tug-of-war, and many more games. Athletic ability is not required, but a desire to have fun is.

Daily News

BOSTON — The state Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development’s Department of Industrial Accidents (DIA) is now accepting Workplace Safety and Education Grant submissions. Applications are due Friday, Sept. 30.

Training programs that have been funded in the past often include OHSA 10 or 30, aerial lift, fall protection, crane and rigger, forklift, ergonomics, CPR/AED, injury prevention, fire/electrical, asbestos, defensive and winter driving, lead hazards, toxins and hazards communication, trenching excavation, confined space rescue, and more. Applicants are also encouraged to develop new training specific to the needs of their workforce.

“Safety Grants represent an $800,000 annual investment in the safety of the Commonwealth’s workforce,” Labor and Workforce Development Secretary Rosalin Acosta said. “I encourage companies to take advantage of this opportunity to provide their employees with the knowledge they need to help create a healthier and safer workplace.”

DIA’s Office of Safety is responsible for administering and managing the Workplace Safety Training and Education Grant program. The goal of the program is to promote safe and healthy conditions in the workplace through training, education, and other preventive programs for employees and employers, as well as organizations operating within the Commonwealth and covered by Massachusetts workers’ compensation law.

To date, DIA has funded hundreds of programs that have benefited and educated thousands of workers and employers throughout the Commonwealth. A total of $800,000 is budgeted annually for the Workplace Safety and Education Grant program.

Grants are awarded to qualified applicants through a competitive selection process. Applications can be submitted to DIA’s Office of Safety seeking up to a maximum of $25,000 per entity, per fiscal year. Interested employers can email [email protected] to receive an application package. Visit mass.gov/dia to learn more.

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 


 

Giving Back

Monson Savings Bank has been emphasizing its culture of philanthropy and giving back to local communities during its 150th-anniversary year, including these three recent donations.

bank President and CEO Dan Moriarty (right) and Dina Merwin, the bank’s senior vice president, chief risk and senior compliance officer (center), visit Leo Williams, president and CEO of Springfield Neighborhood Housing Services, to present his organization with a $5,000 donation.

Bank President and CEO Dan Moriarty (right) and Dina Merwin, the bank’s senior vice president, chief risk and senior compliance officer (center), visit Leo Williams, president and CEO of Springfield Neighborhood Housing Services, to present his organization with a $5,000 donation.

 

Moriarty presents Laurie Flynn, president and CEO of Link to Libraries, with a $1,500 donation as a part of the bank’s Community Giving Initiative

Moriarty presents Laurie Flynn, president and CEO of Link to Libraries, with a $1,500 donation as a part of the bank’s Community Giving Initiative

 

Moriarty visits Shriners Children’s Hospital in Springfield to present Stacey Perlmutter, the hospital’s director of Development, with a $2,250 donation, also part of the Community Giving Initiative

Moriarty visits Shriners Children’s Hospital in Springfield to present Stacey Perlmutter, the hospital’s director of Development, with a $2,250 donation, also part of the Community Giving Initiative

 

 


 

Service Above Self

 

Rotary Club of Amherst recently prepared its annual donation of 150 stuffed backpacks with the help of UMass Hockey volunteers at the Inn on Boltwood. This is the Rotary’s 12th year supporting the Amherst Regional Public Schools’ Project Backpack. Organizers included Ellen Carey of Davis Financial Group and Anna Holhut of Amherst Insurance Agency, with the support of Rotary Club of Amherst members and President Claudia Pazmany.

(Photos by Thaddeus Dabrowski)

 


 

Strengthening Wellness and Family

bankESB recently donated $5,000 to the Hampshire Regional YMCA to help fund continued wellness programming and family services in Hampshire County. This brings the bank’s total contributions to the organization over t he past two years to more than $20,000. Pictured, from left: Nancy Lapointe, bankESB senior vice president of Retail Banking; Natalie Didonna, bankESB assistant vice president and branch officer of the Northampton Street branch in Easthampton, as well as a Hampshire Regional YMCA board member; and Julie Bianco, CEO of Hampshire Regional YMCA.

Nancy Lapointe, bankESB senior vice president of Retail Banking; Natalie Didonna, bankESB assistant vice president and branch officer of the Northampton Street branch in Easthampton, as well as a Hampshire Regional YMCA board member; and Julie Bianco, CEO of Hampshire Regional YMCA.

Nancy Lapointe, bankESB senior vice president of Retail Banking; Natalie Didonna, bankESB assistant vice president and branch officer of the Northampton Street branch in Easthampton, as well as a Hampshire Regional YMCA board member; and Julie Bianco, CEO of Hampshire Regional YMCA.

 

 


 

Court Dockets

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

 

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT

 

Anna Sepanek v. John Doe Corp.

Allegation: Negligence; slip and fall causing personal injury: $29,095.20+

Filed: 7/26/22

 

Patti G. Glenn, trustee of the 1234-1236 Worcester St. Realty Trust v. Vermont Mutual Insurance Group

Allegation: Breach of contract: $37,827.08

Filed: 7/28/22

 

Tristian Anglin v. Brett William and Pete’s Sales & Service d/b/a Pete’s Sweeper Service Inc.

Allegation: Motor-vehicle negligence causing personal injury: $216,776+

Filed: 7/28/22

 

Tara Lopez v. People’s Dental, P.C. and David Hirsh, M.D., D.D.S.

Allegation: Medical malpractice, negligence: $608,851.38

Filed: 7/28/22

 

Margaree Robinson v. Dine In Group LLC and Sam’s Food Stores Inc.

Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury: $109,389.48

Filed: 7/28/22

 

Martin Lesser, D.O. v. Holyoke Medical Center

Allegation: Employment discrimination: $50,000

Filed: 7/29/22

 

Lacrisha Wise v. Stanley J. Paulauskas, F.P.S. Inc., F.P.S. of Northampton Inc., F.P.S. of Sixteen Acres Inc., F.P.S. of Springfield Plaza Inc., F.P.S. of Springfield Inc., and Burger King Corp.

Allegation: Premises liability, negligent supervision, slip and fall resulting in personal injury: $38,824.29

Filed: 8/1/22

 

Patricia Biela v. Sentry Uniform Inc., Michael O’Leary, Eileen Pare, and Kyle Pare

Allegation: Minority shareholder’s suit: $850,000

Filed: 8/2/22

 

Samuel Cartagena v. City of Holyoke

Allegation: Tortious action involving municipality: $12,674.68

Filed: 8/3/22

 

Flint Herold v. Demetrios Venetis, Jeffrey Struck, Hemant V. Ajbani, and Triseptagon LLC f/k/a Alpha Builders d/b/a Sterling Architectural Millwork

Allegation: Breach of contract, breach of fiduciary duty, unjust enrichment, intentional misrepresentation

Filed: 8/4/22

 

Song Ja No individually and as personal representative of the estate of Man Yong No v. Fitness First Inc. and Bragaraus LLC

Allegation: Negligence, gross negligence, conscious pain and suffering, wrongful death: $1,000,000

Filed: 8/4/22

 

Opinion

Editorial

 

It took a few years longer than it should have, but sports gambling finally seems to be a reality in the Bay State.

The Massachusetts Legislature recently approved a sports-betting bill, and Gov. Charlie Baker has signed it into law. If all goes well — something that doesn’t happen often in this state — systems should be in place for sports betting for later this year and certainly by the time the Super Bowl rolls around next February.

This news is cause for celebration in the state’s three casinos, which have been pushing hard for such a measure, and for good reason. Gaming revenues have certainly not been what they were projected to be nearly four years after MGM Springfield opened its doors to great pomp and circumstance. And the lack of sports betting has given gamblers one more reason to cross the border and go to facilities in New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New York. Sports betting seemed to always make sense as a way to help these casinos improve traffic, bring more revenue to the state, and add some jobs. But that didn’t stop the Legislature from doing what it does all too often: sit on its hands.

Indeed, state lawmakers tend to overthink these things, if that’s even the right term, and this leads to indecision. It happened with gaming for several years, and it happened with sports betting as well.

After four years of “painstaking work and research,” as state Sen. Eric Lesser called it, the Legislature was able to come to an agreement on a bill providing for both retail and mobile sports wagering, one that will allow betting on college sports, with some restrictions, and also comes with a number of consumer protections. These include a provision whereby, for online and mobile betting, bets cannot be linked to credit cards — a measure implemented to make sure consumers are wagering with funds on hand and not borrowing.

Projections of revenues vary, but the measure is expected to bring in more than $35 million annually. That’s not a huge number, but right now, it’s money that’s going elsewhere, and that the state could put to good use in areas ranging from workforce development to public health.

The state is once again late to the party. But late is better than never — or even later. v

 

Opinion

Opinion

By Mark Adams

 

Employers have an obligation to maintain a workplace free from unlawful harassment and discrimination. When it comes to the pillars and strategies for achieving this outcome, many focus upon their efforts and resources on training their management and employees. Others focus on promoting and reinforcing positive behaviors and conduct in support of their values and culture to pull their workforce together, foster greater employee engagement, and thereby collectively root out such inappropriate and unlawful conduct. Most, if not all, enforce existing policies or practices for compliance and employee-relations purposes.

Yet despite the myriad paths to take (whether individually or concurrently), one tool that is critical towards supporting all of them is the need to conduct effective and thorough investigations.

Internal investigations are a powerful tool. Done effectively, they can help mitigate and control the risk that an organization may face when a dispute or complaint surfaces. Is termination warranted? Some other form of discipline? Or no discipline at all? A thorough and objective investigation can provide the foundation and backbone to justify whatever action management chooses to take in response to a situation, especially if challenged by others or by opposing legal counsel (if litigation later ensues).

Investigations can also serve as a deterrent against inappropriate conduct occurring in the workplace in the first place. While some perpetrators will succumb to the temptation of engaging in bad conduct when they are not being supervised or when they feel management will not be able to get to the bottom of it, they may think twice or not do something at all when management has a reputation of taking complaints seriously and conducting investigations thoroughly.

Then there is the engagement benefit that comes with investigations. Employees often feel disengaged if they feel they don’t have a voice in the workplace when their concerns are ignored or are not addressed. Such disengagement can have severe consequences for a company. It can lead to lost productivity and turnover, and when it involves questions of illegal conduct, it can also lead to employees going elsewhere to air their concerns (such as by filing a complaint with a state or federal anti-discrimination agency or going to court).

By contrast, employers who conduct investigations in a timely, thorough, and objective manner can engender trust and credibility among their employees, and with that gained trust, employees are more likely than not to utilize an employer’s internal complaint- and problem-resolution procedures rather than going outside the organization.

Employers who ignore conducting them altogether do so at their peril. In an opinion handed down by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, the court described the failure to investigate a sexual harassment complaint as follows: “an employer’s investigation of a sexual-harassment complaint is not a gratuitous or optional undertaking; under federal law, an employer’s failure to investigate may allow a jury to impose liability on the employer” (Malik v. Carrier Corp.).

So, do you have a plan for how internal investigations are to be conducted? Will it be by someone from inside the organization? If so, are they trained on how to conduct workplace investigations? Will you use an outside resource to conduct them on your behalf? Or will you evaluate which path to take on a case-by-case basis? For employers, it is important to have answers to these questions and have either the internal or external resources in place to be able to respond promptly. Failing to do so can lead to delay or inaction altogether, which can create greater risk.

 

Mark Adams, director of Compliance for the Employers Assoc. of the NorthEast, leads EANE’s HR Services Team. This article first appeared on the EANE blog; eane.org

 

Agenda

MOSSO Brass Quintet

Aug. 20: Bing Productions will present the Musicians of the Springfield Symphony Orchestra (MOSSO) Brass Quintet in a free concert from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Camp STAR Angelina, 300 Trafton Road, in Springfield’s Forest Park. The rain date is Aug. 21. The MOSSO Brass Quintet features Gerald Serfass and John Charles Thomas on trumpet, Lauren Winter on horn, Scott Cranston on trombone, and Stephen Perry on tuba. According to Perry, the family-friendly program, which will be announced from the stage, will include classics by Bach, Brahms, and Copland; pops and jazz by Ellington, Strayhorn, and Lennon/McCartney, and marches by John Philip Sousa. The Amphitheater at Camp STAR Angelina is outdoors, and people should either bring blankets and cushions or lawn chairs.

 

ONEHolyoke Community Walk

Aug. 27: OneHolyoke CDC has partnered with Holyoke community organizations, including HG&E, to host the ONEHolyoke Community Walk at 10 a.m., with registration beginning at 8:30 a.m. The 5K will bring the community together safely outdoors for a walk and roll (wheelchair, bicycle, stroller) along a Holyoke route featuring family activities and to raise awareness of continued safe practices to keep the community healthy. This is the second annual community walk organized by OneHolyoke CDC. Last year’s inaugural event focused on COVID safety, the importance of getting the community vaccinated, and remembering those lost to the virus. This year’s event will be broadened to emphasize the importance of community and will provide resources, giveaways, and activities for families. The 5K route will begin at the intersection of Race Street, Main Street, and Canal Street (near Lawler’s Insurance) and will end on Race Street at Middle Street, where participants can view the HyggeHaus home donated to OneHolyoke CDC by the UMass Building Construction and Technology Program. The Holyoke Farmers’ Market will be in progress at the end of the route. The event will also feature giveaways and resources by partnering organizations at five water stations along the route, a Holyoke history and local business scavenger hunt along the route, a story walk at the end of the route with an opportunity to bring home a copy of the book, a vaccine clinic at the end of the route (near the Farmer’s Market); and a celebration at the end of the walk. Registration costs $10 for adults and $15 per couple, and children are free. Registration is open at go.rallyup.com/c/participar5k2022, and those who don’t pre-register can also sign up on-site.

 

Housatonic Heritage Walks

Weekends from Sept. 3 to Oct. 2: The Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area announced the 20th annual autumn Housatonic Heritage Walks on five weekends: Sept. 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, and 24-25; and Oct. 1-2. More than 80 free, guided walks will be offered throughout Berkshire County, Mass., and Litchfield County, Conn. The public is invited to participate in these family-friendly, informative walks, offered in partnership with our region’s historic, cultural, and outdoor recreational organizations. The Heritage Walks are an ideal opportunity to experience and learn about this region’s rich and varied local heritage. Historians, naturalists, and environmentalists will lead participants on explorations through historic estate gardens and town districts, behind-the-scenes cultural-site tours, nature walks, trail hikes, and tours of many of the industrial-site ruins that were once thriving local industries. There will be Native American and African-American history walks, a canoe paddling trip on the Housatonic River and a bike tour on scenic country roads. Detailed Heritage Walks brochures will be available at libraries, post offices, restaurants, and grocery stores in the region. The schedule is also available at housatonicheritage.org/events/heritage-walks. To request a brochure by mail, email [email protected].

 

Sip & Slide FUNd-raiser

Sept. 8: In support of the Eastern States Exposition’s (ESE) youth agriculture programs, the ESE Foundation Sip & Slide FUNd-raiser will take place from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Giant Slide. Attendees can ride down the slide and enjoy craft beer, wine, hors d’oeuvres, live music, raffles, and more. Partners Restaurant and Catering will provide a range of appetizers such as pulled-pork, veggie, and grilled-chicken sliders; potato-skin bites; assorted kabobs; and more. Live music will be provided by Ric & Amy Acoustic. Guests will receive welcome bags stuffed with three event drink tickets, Big E swag, a cream- puff voucher to be used during the Big E (Sept. 16 through Oct. 2), and other surprises. Presented by PeoplesBank, Sip & Slide tickets are available for purchase at thebige.com/sipandslide. Tickets cost $50 per person if purchased in advance and $60 at the door. You must be 21 or over to attend this event.

 

Annual HCC Golf Benefit

Sept. 12: Registration is now open for the Holyoke Community College (HCC) Foundation’s 35th annual golf tournament at Springfield Country Club in West Springfield. Money raised from this year’s tournament will support student scholarships managed by the HCC Foundation, the nonprofit fundraising arm of Holyoke Community College. The golf outing begins with an 11 a.m. buffet lunch followed by a 12:30 p.m. shotgun start. After golf, participants can enjoy cocktails on the clubhouse porch with scenic views of the Pioneer Valley, followed by dinner. Participants can arrange their own foursomes or sign up as singles. The $185 individual fee includes greens fees, golf cart, lunch, dinner, and refreshments on the course. The cost per foursome is $740. Dinner only is $40 per person. Sponsorships are also available in various increments from $100 to $10,000. To register or sponsor the golf tournament, visit www.hcc.edu/golf.

 

United Way Day of Caring

Sept. 23: United Way of Pioneer Valley announced the 2022 Day of Caring. Anyone interested in local volunteer opportunities can visit volunteer.uwpv.org to register as a volunteer. Day of Caring opportunities will be posted as the details are finalized, and other opportunities year-round are hosted on this site as well. Agencies who are interested in hosting a Day of Caring location, or corporations interested in sponsorships and/or bringing a group of volunteers, can contact Jennifer Kinsman, director of Community Impact, at [email protected] or (413) 693-0212.

 

Cruise for Critters

Sept. 24: Cruise for Critters returns to Westview Farms Creamery for the 10th annual car show to benefit pets in need at Second Chance Animal Services. The fundraiser, sponsored by Service Connection of Monson, has been helping Massachusetts pets since 2012. This year’s event will have fall fun for everyone, including a vendor fair and the popular Halloween Barktacular kids’ games. Second Chance volunteers are excited to break out the Halloween Barktacular kids’ games. After COVID forced the nonprofit to cancel both the 2020 and 2021 Halloween Barktacular, a group of volunteers brought a few of the games to last year’s Cruise for Critters. This year, volunteers are planning even more fun for kids. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and will also feature all the fall fun that Westview Farms Creamery has to offer, including pumpkin picking and a corn maze. Spare Parts will be on hand to provide entertainment, and visitors can take a chance to win some raffle prizes. Event organizers are appealing to local businesses and vendors to join the fight for pets in need. For more information on sponsorships or to become a vendor, visit secondchanceanimals.org/events/cruise. The event will be free to spectators, and there’s a $20 car-show entry fee, with every dollar supporting pets in need. In case of bad weather, the rain date is Saturday, Oct. 1.

 

World Affairs Council Talk on Indo-Pacific Developments

Sept. 28: The World Affairs Council of Western Massachusetts will present its first Instant Issues brown bag lunchtime discussion of the 2022-23 program year at noon at 1350 Main St. in downtown Springfield. Dennis Yasutomo, Esther Cloudman Dunn professor emeritus of Government at Smith College, will speak on “Ukraine and the Indo-Pacific: Evolution of a Eurasian Century?” A longtime member and friend of the Council, Yasutomo’s field of research is contemporary Japanese foreign policy, and he is the author of numerous books and articles on Japanese politics and diplomacy. He will look at the impact of the crisis in Ukraine on the emerging Euro-Asian geopolitical dynamics involving China, the U.S., Japan, Australia, and Europe’s enhanced involvement in the Indo-Pacific region. Advance registration is required at www.eventbrite.com/e/instant-issues-ukraine-and-the-indo-pacific-tickets-399638689077. No walk-ins will be allowed. Admission to the event is $5 for council members without a lunch provided, $20 with a box lunch. Non-members’ admission cost is $10 without a lunch and $25 with lunch.

 

Hooplandia

June 23-25, 2023: After nearly three years of pandemic-era scheduling hurdles, Springfield and West Springfield will host Hooplandia, the largest 3×3 basketball competition and celebration on the East Coast, next spring. The event, which will be hosted by the Eastern States Exposition and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, will feature hundreds of games for thousands of players of all ages and playing abilities, with divisions for young girls, boys, women, men, high-school elite, college elite, pro-am, OGs, wheelchair, Wounded Warrior, Special Olympians, veterans, first responders, and more. The event will feature more than 70 outdoor blacktop courts placed throughout the roadway and parking-lot network of the Eastern States Exposition fairgrounds in West Springfield; slam-dunk, three-point, free-throw, dribble-course, vertical-jump, and full-court-shot skills competitions; themed state courts for all six New England states; featured ‘showcase games’ held on new court surfaces in the historic Eastern States Coliseum and on the Court of Dreams, the center court of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame; and a festival environment throughout the weekend with food, music, entertainment, and family activities. A year-long community-outreach effort will begin immediately. Registration will open on March 1, 2023.

People on the Move

MP CPAs recently announced the promotions of six team members.

Sharon Blazejowski

Sharon Blazejowski

Sharon Blazejowski was promoted to senior audit manager. She manages audits, reviews, and compilations for small to medium-sized businesses. She specializes in and is a key leader for Massachusetts charter school and non-profit organization engagements, including yellow book and single audits. Blazejowski joined the firm in 1996 and has more than 30 years of experience in public accounting. She holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting and business administration from American International College. She is a certified public accountant and a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants (MSCPA).

Phil Giguere

Phil Giguere

Phil Giguere was promoted to senior tax manager. He provides consulting and tax solutions to a diverse group of clients including individuals, partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and trusts.  He also has experience working with international affiliates on foreign tax issues. He specializes in working with high-net-worth clients and with private-equity firms and their owners. Giguere joined the firm in 2006 and has more than 16 years of experience in business and individual taxation.  He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting and an MBA from Western New England University.  He is a certified public accountant and a member of AICPA and MSCPA. He sits on the golf committee for Make-A-Wish Massachusetts and Rhode Island and the finance committee of Wellspring Cooperative, and volunteers his time with the Cory J Garwacki Foundation.

Eun Mi Kwon

Eun Mi Kwon

Eun Mi Kwon was promoted to senior tax manager. She provides tax compliance and planning services to a diverse group of clients in the U.S. and abroad, specializing in estate and trust taxation. She has more than 15 years of experience in personal and business taxation. Kwon holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Ewha Womans University in Seoul, Korea and an MBA with a concentration in accounting from the University of Massachusetts. She is a certified public accountant and certified financial planner, and a member of the AICPA. Active in the community, she serves on the finance committee for the Amherst Survival Center.

Jeff Laboe

Jeff Laboe

Jeff Laboe was promoted to tax manager. He provides consulting and tax solutions to a diverse group of clients, including individuals, trusts, partnerships, and corporations. He specializes in working with private-equity firms and their owners, as well as high-net-worth clients and their families. Laboe joined the firm in 2010 and has more than 12 years of experience in personal and business taxation and holds a bachelor’s degree in sports management from Iowa State University. He became an enrolled agent in the spring of 2021.

Tim LaFalam

Tim LaFalam

Tim LaFalam was promoted to tax manager. He provides planning and tax solutions to a diverse group of clients, including individuals, estates, trusts, corporations, and partnerships. He has built solid and trusting relationships with countless clients. LaFalam joined the firm as an intern and started full-time in 2016. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Western New England University, and he leads the firm’s efforts in continuing a mentoring and recruiting relationship with the university. He has taken the lead in many fundraising and community-service activities that the firm participates in, including coordinating the firm’s United Way annual pledge, South Park Inn program, and Children’s Study Home Secret Santa.

Joe Oliveira

Joe Oliveira

Joe Oliveira was promoted to senior tax manager. He provides quality tax services to high-net-worth clients. His experience includes successful representation before the Internal Revenue Service and other taxing authorities, planning for life events, and estate planning. Oliveira holds a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in accounting from the University of Connecticut. He is a certified public accountant in both Connecticut and Massachusetts, and is a member of the AICPA and the Connecticut Society of CPAs. He is the treasurer of the Suffield, Conn. chapter of the Girl Scouts of Connecticut and an active member of Sacred Heart Church in Suffield.

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Sam Skura, MPH, MBA, a healthcare professional with more than 25 years of clinical leadership experience, has been named president of Baystate Medical Center and senior vice president of Hospital Operations for Baystate Health. His appointment becomes effective Sept. 12. In his new role, Skura will join the senior leadership team and serve as a member of the president’s cabinet, reporting directly to Marion McGowan, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Baystate Health. Skura has an extensive background in hospital leadership and most recently served as chief operating officer reporting to the president at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. In previous roles, he served as senior vice president of Ambulatory and Clinical Services and chief administrative officer at BIDMC. Prior to BIDMC, Skura was vice president of Clinical Operations at Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, reporting to the chief operating officer. He served on the leadership team of a combined group practice of more than 500 physicians and a 335-bed inpatient hospital. He also held administrative roles at Cambridge Health Alliance, where he provided oversight to senior leadership for 16 community health centers and practice sites and a three-campus Emergency Department. He was administrative director for Steward Health Care (formerly Caritas Christi Health Care System) in Boston, where he provided management for the largest emergency-medicine group in Massachusetts, trending more than 240,000 annual visits. Skura also held managerial roles at Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Partners Healthcare in Boston and Fallon Healthcare System in Worcester. Skura earned an MBA from the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst, a master’s degree in public health from Boston University, and a bachelor of arts and economics degree from Brandeis University.

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Andrew Cade

Andrew Cade

Margaret Mantoni

Margaret Mantoni

Evan Plotkin

Evan Plotkin

The Springfield Symphony Orchestra (SSO) announced that three new members have been elected to the SSO’s board of directors: Andrew Cade, Margaret Mantoni, and Evan Plotkin. Cade is the senior vice president of the Urban League of Springfield Inc., which serves the Greater Springfield African-American community by advocating for and providing model services that enhance the academic and social development of young people and families, promoting economic self-sufficiency, and fostering racial inclusion and social justice. Apart from his job at Urban League, Cade also serves as president of the Springfield Cultural Council. Mantoni is president and CEO of the Loomis Communities. She served for 30 years as the organization’s CFO prior to taking her current position. She is a certified public accountant and worked in a local accounting firm for eight years before joining the Loomis Communities. She serves on the Audit Committee of the United Way of Pioneer Valley, is a member of the LeadingAge Massachusetts board, and serves on the Capital Projects Planning Committee for the city of West Springfield. Mantoni has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Massachusetts and an MBA from Western New England College. Plotkin is president of NAI Plotkin, a full-service brokerage and property-management company. He has extensive experience in all aspects of property management and commercial brokerage, including commercial office buildings, medical office buildings, industrial buildings, shopping centers, and condominium/residential management. Plotkin is one of the lead organizers of the Springfield Jazz & Roots Festival and the City Mosaic project, as well as the force behind Art & Soles. He was recently named the 2022 Richard J. Moriarty Citizen of the Year by the Springfield Regional Chamber. He has served on the boards of the Springfield Museums and Holyoke Community College.

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Carolyn Martinez

Carolyn Martinez

Carolyn Martinez has been promoted to assistant executive director of Christina’s House, a nonprofit that provides transitional housing and social services for homeless or near-homeless mothers and children. Martinez has served as program manager and brings firsthand experience to Christina’s House as a program graduate. Before joining the team, she worked in community healthcare settings for several years and has completed certificate programs in child behavioral health and community health. She will work alongside founder Linda Mumblo to expand the mission and assist the Christina’s House family to reach their fullest potential. Christina’s House also announced it is seeking candidates for the new community development and administrative assistant roles, and that Executive Director Shannon Mumblo intends to transition from her role. In its 10th year, Christina’s House operates two homes in Springfield. It continues its mission to educate, embrace, and encourage families in the program to develop the life skills needed to become self-sufficient as they transition from homelessness to stable environments. Through the program, women and their children participate in programs that include financial counseling, job-skills development, parenting, conflict resolution, and building healthy eating and exercise habits.

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Holyoke Community College (HCC) Anthropology Professor Vanessa Martínez is the recipient of the 2022 Antonia Pantoja Award from the Latino Scholarship Fund of Western Massachusetts. The award, named after the noted Puerto Rican organizer and education activist, was presented on June 23 at the Latino Scholarship Fund’s 32nd annual meeting at the Log Cabin. The organization presents the award annually to an individual who has made a profound and significant contribution to education, demonstrating a dedication to the academic achievement of Latinx students. Martínez is co-director of HCC’s Honors Program and co-founder of the Women of Color Health Equity Collective, a Springfield-based nonprofit. In addition, her HCC classes frequently engage with community groups and Holyoke schools through service-learning projects. She has been teaching at HCC since 2006. In January, she also received the 2022 Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award from Campus Compact, a national coalition of colleges and universities committed to the public purposes of higher education. Martínez was born in San Sebastian, Puerto Rico, and holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbus State University, a master’s degree from Georgia State University, and a PhD from the University of Massachusetts. In 2011, she received the Latino Teaching Excellence Award from then-Gov. Deval Patrick, and was selected in 2015 as a Leadership Fellow by the American Anthropological Assoc.

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Melissa Breor

Melissa Breor

The Greater Chicopee Chamber of Commerce announced Melissa Breor as its new executive director. Breor spent four years at the Northampton Chamber of Commerce. Inspired by her work there leading the launch of Hampshire County tourism platforms, she co-founded Western Mass Beer Week in 2016 to celebrate the economic impact of the region’s burgeoning local craft-beer industry. After her time at the chamber, she worked as the assistant director of Marketing and later interim director at the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center, finding new ways to connect, grow, and measure audience development. Most recently, she worked for Gateway City Arts in Holyoke as Press & Outreach coordinator, as well as in customer service at various businesses in the region.

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Andrew Sullivan

Andrew Sullivan

Freedom Credit Union recently announced the promotion of Andrew Sullivan from commercial loan officer to assistant vice president, member business lending. Sullivan has been with Freedom since 2019 and is based in the main office in Springfield. He will continue his role providing financing for new and existing business members along with managing the existing commercial-loan portfolio. Sullivan earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting/business management and an MBA from Elms College. He is also the founder of Andrew Sullivan’s Swing for a Cure to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

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Fierst Bloomberg Ohm LLP recently made several personnel announcements.

Michael Simolo joined the firm as a partner. A graduate of Hobert College and Cornell Law School, he has 20 years of experience in corporate matters, tax, estate planning and administration, probate litigation, and related areas. He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts, the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts, and New York.

Daniel Fierst has become a partner of the firm. A graduate of the University of Colorado and UMass Dartmouth School of Law, he began his career as in-house counsel for Wargaming.net in Austin, Texas. Since joining the firm in 2016, he has focused on assisting film, television, and video-game clients with their transactional, licensing, and intellectual-property matters. He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and Florida.

Frederick Fierst and David Bloomberg were recently named 2022 Massachusetts and New England Super Lawyers. Fierst was honored in the entertainment and sports category for the 15th consecutive year, and Bloomberg in the category of real estate. Super Lawyers is a rating service of lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. Selections are limited to the top 5% of lawyers in each state.

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Tricia Serio

Tricia Serio

Tricia Serio has been named provost and senior vice chancellor for Academic Affairs at UMass Amherst. She started her new position on July 18. Serio previously served as dean of the College of Natural Sciences (CNS) and associate chancellor for Strategic Academic Planning. Serio joined UMass as dean of CNS in 2017 after serving as professor and head of the department of Molecular And Cellular Biology at the University of Arizona. Her professional honors include the 2016 Mid-career Award for Excellence in Research from the American Society for Cell Biology, the Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences for 2003-07, and the National Cancer Institute’s Howard Temin Award for 2001-06. In 2022, she was selected to be a fellow in the American Assoc. for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the pre-eminent scientific institution in the U.S. Serio earned a bachelor’s degree in molecular biology from Lehigh University and a master of philosophy degree and Ph.D. in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. She was a postdoctoral fellow in molecular genetics and cell biology at the University of Chicago.

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The Assoc. for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) awarded the 2022 Ellen Stewart Career Achievement Award in Professional Theatre to Tina Packer, founding artistic director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox. The award is named for American theater director and producer Ellen Stewart (1919-2011) and is awarded annually to an individual primarily based in professional theater, honoring a career of distinguished service to the field. “Tina Packer’s Shakespeare & Company develops and performs classical and contemporary works, houses one of the largest theater-in-education programs in the Northeast, and offers year-round actor-training opportunities,” ATHE Executive Director Aimee Zygmonski said. “She has developed transformative training methodologies and, for four decades, been an advocate of collective storytelling, both nationally and in her local community.”

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Matthew Valliere

Matthew Valliere

James Hagan, president and CEO of Westfield Bank, announced that Matthew Valliere has been appointed branch manager and retail banking officer at the bank’s 26 Arnold St. branch in Westfield. Valliere will be responsible for overseeing customer service; retail and business product sales, including mortgage originations; as well as business development and community outreach. Other responsibilities include managing general operations and employee development within the branch. Valliere graduated from Springfield Technical Community College in 2007 with an associate degree. In 2014, he completed the Connecticut School of Finance and Management. He spent time as a retirement services representative and assistant branch manager with other financial institutions before joining Westfield Bank in 2020 as an assistant branch manager at the 47 Palomba Dr. location in Enfield.

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St. Louis Blues President of Hockey Operations and General Manager Doug Armstrong announced that the team has hired Kevin Maxwell as general manager of the club’s American Hockey League affiliate, the Springfield Thunderbirds, as well as a pro scout. Maxwell joins the Blues organization following 14 seasons in the scouting department with the New York Rangers. Since 2011, Maxwell had served as the Rangers’ director of Professional Scouting. New York reached the Stanley Cup playoffs in 10 of Maxwell’s 14 seasons in the organization, including a trip to the Eastern Conference Finals last season. Maxwell was a third-round selection by the Minnesota North Stars in the 1979 NHL draft following an All-American season at the University of North Dakota. After an eight-year professional playing career, he jumped into the scouting ranks, spending three seasons with the Philadelphia Flyers scouting department from 1988 to 1991. Following a brief stint as the head coach for the Western Hockey League’s Brandon Wheat Kings in 1991-92, Maxwell spent the last 30 years in NHL scouting roles with the Hartford Whalers (1992-96), New York Islanders (1996-2006), Dallas Stars (2006-08), and Rangers (2008-2022). He has served as the director of Professional Scouting for the Whalers, Islanders, and Rangers over his tenure as an executive.

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Chris Nadeau

Chris Nadeau

Chris Nadeau recently joined O’Connor & Drew, P.C. as a tax manager. He brings with him more than 15 years of experience in public and private accounting and is regularly retained to provide business valuation, advisory, and taxation services to closely held businesses, professional service firms, and medical practices. He also has extensive experience in succession planning, corporate and partnership taxation, and individual taxation. Nadeau previously spent seven years at a regional accounting firm as a manager-director and holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in accounting from Westfield State University. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants, the National Assoc. of Certified Valuation Analysts, and the Institute of Management Accountants.

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bankESB recently promoted Karen DeMaio to assistant vice president, IRA and Operations Risk Management. DeMaio joined bankESB in 2006 as an IRA specialist and was promoted to IRA and Deposit Services officer in 2014. She is responsible for IRA services, vendor management, business-continuity planning, and insurance for the Hometown Financial Group family of banks, which includes bankESB, bankHometown, and Abington Bank. Prior to bankESB, DeMaio served as senior Marketing analyst at Friendly Ice Cream Corp. and as senior auditor at KPMG Peat Marwick. She earned her bachelor’s degree in accounting from Western New England College, completed the certified public accounting exam, and earned her Certified IRA Services Professional designation. She currently serves as vice chairperson for the town of Southwick Finance Committee and is a board member of Westfield Credit for Life.

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Ashley Rollins

Ashley Rollins

American Eagle Financial Credit Union (AEFCU) announced the appointment of Ashley Rollins as vice president of Consumer Lending. In her new role, Rollins will focus on all aspects of lending, including consumer and real-estate originations, collections, process improvement, automation, and loan reporting. Rollins assumes her new role at AEFCU with more than 11 years of experience in financial-services operations, quality control, and consumer loan products. She most recently served as Loan Administration officer for Justice Federal Credit Union in Washington, D.C. She earned certificates from the National Assoc. of Federally Insured Credit Unions Management and Leadership Institute and the Harvard Business School Leadership Academy, as well as a Yellow Belt certification from Lean Six Sigma. During her time in the D.C. region, she volunteered at the Central Virginia Food Bank and taught financial-literacy classes at Richmond, Va. elementary schools.

 

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Community Access to the Arts (CATA) announced the appointment of Kelly Galvin as program director. She joins current CATA staff members Jeff Gagnon and Kara Smith, who have been promoted to the program director position, to create a new, three-person arts leadership team at the nonprofit, reporting to Executive Director Margaret Keller. CATA strategically restructured staff roles to develop a shared program leadership model, following the retirement of long-time staff member Dawn Lane, coupled with vigorous growth in CATA’s arts programs serving people with disabilities. The three-person arts leadership team will work closely with Keller to seize opportunities and provide inclusive arts programs for people with disabilities across the Berkshires and Columbia County. Galvin joins CATA as an accomplished director, producer, and teaching artist. She has been a company member with Shakespeare & Company since 2008 and served as the artistic associate at WAM Theatre. As a director and producer, she has led acclaimed productions at Shakespeare & Company, Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, the Theater at Woodshill, and Gloucester Stage, and assisted at regional theatres including the Guthrie and Asolo Repertory Theatre. She is the founder of the rig, an organization in Western Massachusetts working to create connections through the arts and to redistribute cultural resources to a larger portion of the community.

Company Notebook

Trader Joe’s Employees in Hadley Approve Chain’s First Labor Union

HADLEY — Employees at Trader Joe’s in Hadley have become the chain’s first store to approve a labor union. The union vote passed 45-31. “This victory is historic, but not a surprise. Since the moment we announced our campaign, a majority of the crew have enthusiastically supported our union, and despite the company’s best efforts to bust us, our majority has never wavered,” Trader Joe’s United said in a statement. “We are incredibly proud of the work we have done together to win this union election, but winning is just the beginning. We now begin the difficult work of sitting down at the negotiating table as equals with our employer and securing a contract that will benefit and protect us, the crew, instead of the company’s bottom line.”

 

Tech Foundry Awarded $72,547 Tech Talent Diversity Grant

BOSTON — Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy recently announced three new grants from the Commonwealth’s Tech Talent Diversity Initiative, an effort aimed at boosting diversity hiring and training opportunities for diverse candidates. The three grants, totaling $494,947, were awarded to Tech Foundry in Springfield, Hack.Diversity in Boston, and Benjamin Franklin Cummings Institute of Technology in Boston. Tech Foundry was founded in 2014 by Pioneer Valley tech employers and other workforce, business, education, and economic-development stakeholders to address the regional skills gap in information technology and drive regional economic growth. The organization offers training programs aimed at filling entry-level IT roles and provides training that is tailored to the needs of partner employers, including a work-experience component where students are placed in a position at a local employer. Tech Foundry’s $72,547 grant award will be used to assist employer partners’ ability to host students, primarily in the Pioneer Valley, for hands-on training, by creating a new platform called Tech Foundry Ventures to host two new programs, including the development of a virtual IT technician-training environment, working with employer partners to create a tool where students will face similar scenarios to those seen on the job, allowing them to practice the skills they have learned in the classroom without the stakes of serving real-world clients; and the launch of a service-learning initiative where students will work with community organizations that cannot afford to utilize commercial services, providing similar IT services to those provided by employer partners. The expanded tools will allow Tech Foundry to train as many as 150 additional students per year, three times its existing number.

 

Chase Bank to Open First Springfield Branch

SPRINGFIELD — Chase Bank plans to open its first Springfield branch next year at 1391 Main St. in downtown Springfield. There are plans to add at least three more locations in the Greater Springfield area over the next few years. The expansion is part of the bank’s recently announced plans to more than double its presence in Massachusetts by 2025. The firm opened its first Massachusetts branch in Boston in 2018 and now has 36 statewide. Beyond Springfield, Chase will open its first branch in Worcester next month. “Springfield is a great city with a rich economic, cultural, and educational environment, which makes it an ideal place for Chase to grow,” said Ali Zaidi, Chase’s market director for Springfield and Worcester. “Our goal is to help the community and support our customers during their most important moments.” This first branch will be about 3,000 square feet in size and feature modern, bright designs with comfortable meeting areas and state-of-the-art banking technology. A dedicated Chase Private Client team will provide premium banking services, personalized attention, and access to the expertise and investment capabilities of J.P. Morgan to help families reach their goals. Customers may also meet with financial and home-lending advisors and business-banking relationship managers. “Branches are critically important to our customers, but our mission goes beyond service and convenience,” said Jennifer Piepszak, co-CEO of Chase Consumer & Community Banking for JPMorgan Chase. “We’re hiring locally, investing in the community, and bringing all the benefits our firm has to offer to drive economic growth.”

 

Baystate Medical Center, Roca Create Violence-intervention Program

SPRINGFIELD — Baystate Medical Center and Roca Springfield are launching a first-in-the-region hospital-based violence-intervention program called Better Tomorrow to serve as a vital public-health response to violence in local communities. Funded with a $1 million U.S. Department of Justice grant through the Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program, the joint effort will combine medical staff and community-based service providers to intervene with victims of violence in hospital settings, connect them with community services, and reduce further victimization and violent behaviors. Hospital-based violence-intervention programs are multi-disciplinary teams designed to identify patients who are at risk of repeat violent injury and connect them with hospital- and community-based resources to help address underlying risk factors for violence. Research shows that these programs reduce repeat victimization and criminal-justice involvement while also decreasing healthcare and other costs associated with violence. They improve quality of life for patients by addressing disparities in access to healthcare, transportation, case management, and a range of other social determinants of health.

 

Elm Electrical Creates Program to Educate Teens on Electrical Careers

WESTFIELD — Elm Electrical has created a new program for high-school students interested in the electrical field. The students, in grades 10-12, were recommended by their teachers or Elm employees to attend this free, four-day training seminar. These prospective co-op students, or Elm Futures, were then invited to join Elm educators learn new skills as well as showcase their own talents at the First Steps Training Seminar. Monday through Wednesday, students receive instruction and training in the state-of-the-art Elm University multi-media classrooms and hands-on lab. Thursday, the final day, is Challenge Day, when students apply what they’ve learned and complete a project board challenge. Elm project managers are invited to evaluate their work, offer feedback, and get to know the students. Three sessions have been held this summer. The Elm University classrooms and lab are used year-round as Elm’s in-house training facility. Employees who want to become licensed electricians can opt into the company’s four-year apprentice program. They can work their jobs Monday through Thursday and then, every other Friday, attend school at Elm University for free.

 

Rocky’s Ace Hardware Named Presale Ticket Partner for Eastern States Exposition

WEST SPRINGFIELD — Eastern States Exposition (ESE), home of the Big E, announced a new partnership, naming Rocky’s Ace Hardware an official presale partner of the Big E. Through this partnership, Rocky’s and ESE have joined together to utilize a locally owned platform in selling tickets to the 2022 Big E. ESE and Rocky’s have developed a ticketing initiative that will allow fairgoers to purchase 2022 advance discount tickets, advance pay-one-price Midway Magic passes, value passes, and Big E Arena concert tickets through the Rocky’s mobile circular digital app and at www.rockys.com.

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AGAWAM

Gammi Inc., 10B Mansion Woods Dr., Agawam, MA, 01001. 
George Ammirato, same. Insurance logistics company.

RSB Home Improvement Inc., 65 Rosie Lane, Agawam, MA, 01001. 
Timothy Wyckoff, same. Home remodeling services. 
 
CHICOPEE
 
Chibcha Enterprises Inc., 73 Jefferson Avenue, Chicopee, MA, 01020. Carlos Rave, same. Construction business.

Chicopee Galaxy Youth Athletic Association Inc., 18 Searles St., Chicopee, MA, 01020.  Erick Cortes, 58 Fresno Street Springfield, MA 01104. Non-profit association formed to install in the youth of the community life-long principles of good citizenship, sportsmanship, teamwork, dedication, discipline, loyalty, a superior work effort, and the knowledge in the competitive fundamentals of the sport.
 
EAST LONGMEADOW
 
Kontoured By Krystal Inc., 83 Harkness Ave., East Longmeadow, MA, 01028. Krystal Prendergast, same. Body contouring services. 
 
EASTHAMPTON 

Acorn Packaging Inc., 123 Union St., Suite 200, Easthampton, MA, 01027. 
Kevin Perrier, 4 Birchwood Dr. Huntington, MA 01050. Packaging business.
 
GRANBY
 
Five Corner Cuts Salon Inc., 127 Amherst St., Granby, MA, 01033. Karen Dumais, same. Hair salon. 
 
GREENFIELD

Franklin County Community Land Trust Inc., 335 Green River Road, Greenfield, MA, 01301. Judith G. Atkins, same. A non-profit in Western Massachusetts that assists farmers and other landowners who want to protect their land from unwanted development.

MONSON
 
Friends of Monson Corp., 209 Wales Road, Monson, MA, 01057.  Kristine Ann Duval, 143 Wilbraham Road Monson, MA 01057. Charitable organization to benefit the town of Monson through hosting fundraisers, drives and accepting donations to help support various events throughout the year. 
 
NORTH  BROOKFIELD
 
M and E Rentals Inc., 74  East  Brookfield  Road, North  Brookfield, MA, 01535. Brenda L. Lacaire, same. Vehicle rentals. 
 
NORTHAMPTON
 
Constant Growth Inc., 35 Pilgrim Dr., Northampton, MA, 01060. Dee Dice, same. Business consulting and marketing services. 

Latde Diagnostics Corp., 30 Woodbine Ave., Northampton, MA, 01060. Emily Melzer, 56 Laura St. San Francisco, CA 94112. Business conducts and develops diagnostics for bacterial infections.
 
PITTSFIELD
 
Apex Home Loans Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA, 01201. David Robnett, same. Residential mortgage lending.

Elite Tile & Stone Corp., 70 Imperial Ave., Pittsfield, MA, 01201. Bryan Thomas Better, same. Construction services specializing in tile, flooring and interior finishes. 

Leadart Biotechnologies Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA, 01201. Feng Ni, 9569 Broadway Unit 1 Ca, CA 91780. Biotechnology research.
 
The Good Street Project Inc., 82 Wendell Ave. Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA, 01201. Lousie Burrell, 2 Henchman St., Worcester, MA 01605. Organization designed to empower black and underserved communities through economic, social, cultural and educational initiatives.

SOUTH HADLEY

Beauty Artistry Corp., 412 Granby Road, South Hadley, MA, 01075. Elis Hernandez, same. Esthetic treatments including: hair removal, spray tanning services, brow tinting, eyelash extensions, facials, chemical peels, semi-permanent makeup and waxing.
 
SPRINGFIELD

360 Renovations Inc., 52 Stratford Ter., Springfield, MA, 01108.  Nathaniel C. Bushey, same. Interior and exterior renovations.
 
Hope Community Development Corporation, 205 Eastern Ave., Springfield, MA, 01109.  Bishop Bruce Shaw, 364 Central Street Springfield, MA 01109. Corporation formed to pursue economic development initiatives that will lift the burden of the poor and downtrodden of the Greater Springfield Massachusetts region and contribute to the overall attractiveness of the region in general; to increase access to education for those who have been traditionally shut out or limited in their access to quality education; to create job opportunities for those who have traditionally been unemployable or underemployed and left behind by society; to establish ventures that will generate wealth that will be used for the pursuit of the foregoing objectives; to generally support such worthy efforts of others, especially as pursued by faith based and community organizations; and to engage in any other charitable or educational activities. 

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and/or trade names were issued or renewed during the month of July 2022. (Filings are limited due to closures or reduced staffing hours at municipal offices due to COVID-19 restrictions).

AMHERST

Dixie Brown
52 Valley View Circle
Sarah Brown

Market Hill Woodworks
460 Market Hill Road
Christopher Killion

CHICOPEE

CCHS Cheer Booster
71 Austin St.
Jesika Sikes

Darfin Handyman Services & Cleaning Services
33 Beverly St.
Dariusz Drap

Fortitude Physical Therapy & Performance LLC
1501 Memorial Dr.
Brandon Lawlor

Gawron Meats
576 Fuller Road
William Gawron Jr.

Gerry Ruel Remodeling
29 Arcade St.
Gerald Ruel

Internet University
6 Lombard St.
Angelique Tia-Lexandré Taylor

The Old Guy Services Transportation
325 Front St., Apt. 2
Jacob Martinez

Quality Construction
27 Chicopee St.
Jerzy Cebula

Relaxation Bodywork
1888 Memorial Dr.
Stacy Aust

SD Hall Trucking LLC
244 Fairview Ave.
Clifton Hall

Stop & Go
643 Prospect St.
Mohammed Naushad

Supreme Auto Detail
43 Olivine St.
Moises Montalvo Mendez

GRANBY

Parker’s Portables LLC
14 Darrel Ave.
Candace Parker

GREENFIELD

Carquest of Greenfield
369 Federal St.
John Lamoureux

Fogbuster Coffee Works
47 Silvio O. Conte Dr.
Sean Pierce

Lizzi Trish Designs
250 High St.
Elizabeth Feeley

Meraki Beauty Salon
64 Newton St.
Madeline Maxam

Montague Psychological Associates
55 Federal St., Suite 110
Roger Jones, Saralyn Steingiser

Valle Studio
8 Ester Ave.
Kristen Valle

HADLEY

Big Y Express
73 Russell St.
Big Y Foods Inc.

Excel Builders Co. LLC
60 Chmura Road
Andrew Klepacki

Fee-Only Financial Planning
277 Bay Road
David Martula

Friendly’s
455 Russell St.
Friendly’s Restaurant Co. LLC

Hedgehog Farms
8 Grand Oak Farm
Amanda Seymour

Horton Tank Graphics
47 East St.
Author Larson

James J. Pipczynski Farms
151 River Dr.
James Pipczynski

Maple Valley Creamery
102 Mill Valley Road
Bruce Jenks

The Massage School
231 Russell St.
Alexei Levine, Valerie Hood

Michaels
325 Russell St.
Michaels Stores Inc.

Norm’s Auto Body
11 Railroad St.
Cody Belden

One and Done Service
42 East St.
Ronald Adams

Peter’s Farm
112 East St.
Clinton Peters

Relaks
108 Russell St.
Samantha Winning

Save a Buck Auto Sales LLC
8 Pine Hill Road
Kevin Michelson

Soldega Carpentry
6 Phillips Place
James Soldega

Spinnaker Swiss
102 Mill Valley Road
Bruce Jenks

Sunrise Prosthetics & Orthotics
220 Russell St., #200A
Sunrise P & O Inc.

NORTHAMPTON

Borawski Farm
170 Audubon Road
Robert Borawski, Ann Borawski

Clarke Schools for Hearing & Speech
45 Round Hill Road
Bruce Skyer, Lynne Raymer

Kevin’s Haircuts
55 Danon Road
Kevin Ovitt

Lucy’s Nails
284 Ryan Road
Sovannary Chea

Rev. Julie G. Olmstead, Vital Spirit Life Coaching
31 Maynard Road
Julie Olmstead

Turning Leaf Cannabis
261 King St.
Sajid Khan

SOUTH HADLEY

Halloran Woodworking
144 North Main St.
David Halloran

The Paper Kitchen
138 College St., Unit 4
Adrian Anderson

Rovelli Construction
43B North Main St.
Richard Rovelli

Tailgate Picnic
7 College St.
Dawn Morey

SPRINGFIELD

7-Eleven 20448H
425 Springfield St.
7-Eleven Inc.

Acent Home
60 Gold St.
Jan Mejia

Alsa Market
522 Sumner Ave.
Harriette Kashindi

Aqui Es Que Es
79 Alexander St.
Shaquille Figueroa

Ara Investments
44 Bissell Ave.
Shanice Reid

Beautiful! Bold! Brave!
87 Sunapee St.
Simone Phillips

City of Hope 413
43 Ferris St.
Renee Stewart

Delivered by Xperience
29 Donbray Road
Kenny Washington

DFG Management Co.
287 Belmont Ave.
Cindy Gaynor

EL Fogon Latino
1135 State St.
Mariela Paredes Matos

Ethics LLC
1655 Boston Road
Leroy Crenshaw

HR Springfield Corp.
13-67 Boston Road
HR-Twenty Corp

J.R. Star Barber Inc.
471 State St.
Jasiel Reyes

Kade Studio Kreations
19 Baldwin St.
Yashira M.

L-A Auto Sales and Repair
118 Armory St.
Wassim Elkadri

Latin Gourmet
161 Albemarle St.
Juan Roldan

Little Bear’s Daycare
71 Dearborn St.
Basilla Nunez Espinal

Little Italy’s
130 Union St.
Dean Baiardi

Maria Landscaping
25 Chapel St.
Maria Rivera-Correa

Mel’s Affordable Painting
210 Marmon St.
Melvin Torres

Moda Mia
46 Melha Ave.
Johanna Maldonado

NCB Siding
23 Crosley St.
Nathan Barraso

One New Vibe
11 Lorraine St.
Yadiel Rivera Diaz

Osteria
301 Bridge St.
Christopher McKiernan

Pro Builders Home Improvement
40 Wait St.
Rosimiro Mendez

Quality Service Home
175 Gresham St.
Andre King

R.R. Enterprise
104 Spikenard Circle
Ricardo Robles

Restoration & Flips
782 Newbury St.
Edward Treadwell

Robert Rivest
64 Brunswick St.
Robert Rivest

Saigon Market
525 Belmont Ave.
Tony Tai

Universal Real Estate
33 Mulbery St.
Anthony Ardolino

WESTFIELD

A & D Homes, Carpentry
126 Old Stage Road
David Okhrimenko

Atlantic Aviation
110 Airport Road
Ross Rectrix Holdings LLC

Basement Finish Pros
135 Hillside Road
Alexandru Pascal

Better Built Bathrooms
135 Hillside Road
Alexandru Pascal

Inspirations, Nature & Champagne
45 Court St.
Josh Champagne

Jennifer Nails
50 Southampton Road, #11B
Jennifer King

MBCEC
410 Montgomery Road
Mary-Margaret Burke

Protection First LLC
110 Main St.
Althea Carter

Shoe Repair & Alterations
4 School St.
Sergey Klimeno

Tammy’s VIP Nails & Spa
47 Southwick Road
Fanny Naranjo

Trevor Hawkins Painting
40 Vadnais St.
Trevor Hawkins

Westfield Avalon Funeral Home & Cremation
4 Princeton St.
Avalon Life Celebration Center & Cremation Services LLC

Westfield Cafeteria Lunch Assoc.
144 Sunset Dr.
Paulette Marshall

Westfield Lunch Assoc.
29 Brentwood Dr.
Jennifer Hamann

Whale Rock Farms LLC
24 Northwest Road
David Albert

WEST SPRINGFIELD

A Taste of Lebanon LLC
553 Main St. 
Maher Awkal
 
Bob’s Discount Furniture LLC
135 Memorial Ave.
Jeremy Aguilar
 

Body Sculpting by Nelly
777 Riverdale St.
Nelly Martinez
 
Creation by I LLC
85 Ashley St.
Ileana Maldonado
 
Dean Moke Auto Rental
874 Memorial Ave.
Randy Rindels
 
The Indian Restaurant
1305 Memorial Ave.
Rajesh Rayonia
 
Lincare Inc.
53 Capital Dr.
Susan Yanush
 
Lincare Inc.
51 Park Ave.
Susan Yanush
 
M.H. Ball Pythons
61 Irving St.
Matthew Hanlon

The Muse Custom Framing
1680 Riverdale St.
Debra Luzny

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Ashe, Steven T.
21 North Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/11/2022

Baxter, Aaron L.
50 Coffey Hill Road
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 13
Date: 07/06/2022

Bombardier, Ron L.
24 Stratford Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Date: 07/15/2022

Breault, Kelsey B.
77 Briggs Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/15/2022

Caputo, David A.
903 Dwight St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 13
Date: 07/07/2022

Carabine, Lisa L.
a/k/a Rivera, Lisa L.
166 Old Farm Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/30/2022

Collins, Michael A.
283 Wildermere St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/13/2022

Colon-Torres, Angel Luis
1279 Dwight St., Apt. 22
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/14/2022

Gentile, Edward T.
209 Pondview Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/06/2022

Gingras, Robin L.
99 Arthur St.
22Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/30/2022

Hawk, Gina LaRae
a/k/a Roach, Gina LaRae
139 Balboa Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Date: 07/07/2022

Johnson, Desirae
303 Scantic Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 13
Date: 07/07/2022

Lakota, Cathleen A.
66 Honeysuckle Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01022
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/15/2022

Nouel, Rafael B.
Nouel, Clara G.
17 Beacon, 2nd Fl.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/07/2022

Perez, Migdalia Mejias
35 Highview Dr., Apt. C
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/15/2022

Plouffe, George H.
58 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 13
Date: 07/01/2022

Schlessman, Wayne E.
40 Clayton Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/30/2022

Sepulveda, Maribel
57 Foss Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/13/2022

Spaulding, Kaitlin E.
19 Mountain Road, Apt. 9
South Deerfield, MA 01373
Chapter: 7
Date: 07/11/2022

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

BERNARDSTON

11 South St.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: John A. Crosby
Seller: Pamela Pieropan-Adorno
Date: 07/14/22

BUCKLAND

6 Orcutt Hill Road
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Kristen Cafasso-Parker
Seller: Blackberry Fields LLC
Date: 07/20/22

COLRAIN

2 Herzig Lane
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: David E. Karbon
Seller: Gary J. Herzig
Date: 07/20/22

CONWAY

364 South Deerfield Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $247,979
Buyer: Justin S. Allis
Seller: Elliot C. Allis
Date: 07/14/22

DEERFIELD

Greenfield Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Sunnydayz Inc.
Seller: State Road Development LLC
Date: 07/12/22

81 Mill Village Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: Bailey C. Stokes
Seller: Karmin C. Boudreau
Date: 07/19/22

Route 10 Lot 15B
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Sunnydayz Inc.
Seller: State Road Development LLC
Date: 07/12/22

Route 5 Lot 15A
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Sunnydayz Inc.
Seller: State Road Development LLC
Date: 07/12/22

ERVING

5 West High St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Daniel R. Willor
Seller: Anna Jarvis
Date: 07/15/22

GREENFIELD

112 Beech St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $236,900
Buyer: Kyle Conlin-Stolberg
Seller: James A. Harris
Date: 07/22/22

269 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $285,500
Buyer: Abbigal Cushing
Seller: Vanessa Vanstee
Date: 07/11/22

353 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Kris Warner
Seller: Jolanta J. Sweeney
Date: 07/18/22

159 Davis St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $211,200
Buyer: Caiguan Chi
Seller: Tsai B. Cheng
Date: 07/13/22

342 Davis St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $251,300
Buyer: Sarah S. Burrell
Seller: Dorhamer, Barbara L., (Estate)
Date: 07/15/22

44 East Cleveland St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Anatolie V. Mihailicenco
Seller: Andrei P. Tsurkanu
Date: 07/14/22

10 Euclid Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: William G. Kleinsteiber
Seller: Fawn M. Kuzontkoski
Date: 07/14/22

68 Fairview St. E
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $259,550
Buyer: Mark Rabasco
Seller: Paul E. Tacy
Date: 07/11/22

179 Green River Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $301,000
Buyer: Elise F. Reed
Seller: Alexander J. Fullerton
Date: 07/14/22

50 Grove St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: David Paquette
Seller: Mark E. Obringer
Date: 07/22/22

47 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Nathaniel Law
Seller: Jacob Farrington
Date: 07/20/22

322 High St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Crocker & Berry LLC
Seller: Bobisfat LLC
Date: 07/20/22

9 Laurel St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $233,500
Buyer: Andrew D. Randazzo
Seller: Poudrier, Philip H., (Estate)
Date: 07/21/22

610 Leyden Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Irene M. Rule
Seller: Bryan G. Hobbs
Date: 07/21/22

344 Log Plain Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Dauntless Path LLC
Seller: Hal Griswold-Dwyer
Date: 07/21/22

67 Meadow Lane
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Jacob A. Krain
Seller: Mark R. Zemelman
Date: 07/15/22

85 Newell Pond Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $193,750
Buyer: Vesna B. Chhav
Seller: James D. Vanvalkenburgh
Date: 07/14/22

75 Phillips St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $226,500
Buyer: Brendan M. Cialek
Seller: Call, Edward A., (Estate)
Date: 07/12/22

12 Plantation Circle
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $281,000
Buyer: Barbara L. Sullivan
Seller: Daniel Moonjoo-Lee
Date: 07/11/22

85 Verde Dr.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $775,000
Buyer: David R. O’Reilly
Seller: Greenfield KMW LLC
Date: 07/15/22

MONTAGUE

1 Hatchery Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Marc Anderson
Seller: Michael A. Martino
Date: 07/15/22

43 Oakman St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Janice McMahon
Seller: Daniel M. Majewski
Date: 07/13/22

6 Whitney Way
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Paul C. Roud
Seller: Linda B. Whitney
Date: 07/22/22

NEW SALEM

13 Daniel Shays Hwy.
New Salem, MA 01355
Amount: $343,000
Buyer: Yan Y. Deng
Seller: Karmen Jianwen-Wu
Date: 07/18/22

NORTHFIELD

13 Bolton Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Margaret I. Hughes
Seller: Thomas Aquinas College
Date: 07/20/22

580 Mount Hermon Station Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Eric Seaholm
Seller: Bryon R. Gibson
Date: 07/22/22

ORANGE

137 Cheney St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $270,090
Buyer: Kevin P. Beland
Seller: Tina Spano
Date: 07/12/22

35 Johnson Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Lindsey C. Landry
Seller: Christopher W. Rutola
Date: 07/15/22

25 Marjorie St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Zackary P. Adams
Seller: Arthur E. Billings
Date: 07/22/22

53 Mattawa Circle
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Ryan D. Tikka
Seller: Raymond, Keith S. Sr., (Estate)
Date: 07/15/22

56 Spring St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Jon Lueck
Seller: Eric P. McAvene
Date: 07/11/22

ROWE

33 Old Cyrus Stage Road
Rowe, MA 01367
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Amanda Yelle
Seller: Gallo, Raymond, (Estate)
Date: 07/15/22

SHELBURNE

Patten Road
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Todd W. Neal
Seller: E. S. Sinnigen TR
Date: 07/15/22

SHUTESBURY

29 January Hills Road
Shutesbury, MA 01002
Amount: $835,000
Buyer: Kayvon C. Ross
Seller: Constance L. Cappelli
Date: 07/15/22

197-199 Wendell Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Sarah A. Czerwonka
Seller: NE Market Trade Realty 11
Date: 07/11/22

SUNDERLAND

19 Pine Court
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $486,500
Buyer: Tera Huang
Seller: Sungwook Wi
Date: 07/12/22

WHATELY

162 Chestnut Plain Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $552,500
Buyer: Shawn Daugherty
Seller: Dana A. McGuffey
Date: 07/20/22

129 Conway Road
Whately, MA 01039
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Jeffrey Cooley
Seller: Perrine Meunier-Jones
Date: 07/21/22

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

285 Barry St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $495,000
Buyer: Lisa L. Bassette
Seller: Christine J. Chouinard
Date: 07/22/22

45 Belvidere Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Richard H. Easton
Seller: Matthew D. Blackak
Date: 07/11/22

320 Bowles Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $12,500,000
Buyer: Therma Howe LLC
Seller: Agawam 320 TGCI LLC
Date: 07/15/22

24 Christopher Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Brian J. Foley
Seller: John R. Lapierre
Date: 07/15/22

144 Line St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Nadia Grushetskiy
Seller: George H. Lolos
Date: 07/20/22

82 Mountainview St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Matthew Frappier
Seller: Frappier, Mark E., (Estate)
Date: 07/15/22

183 Parkedge Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Jonathan L. Watson
Seller: Seneca Leborgne
Date: 07/15/22

42 Red Fox Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Andrey Fedotov
Seller: Nikolay N. Shalnev
Date: 07/11/22

128 Reed St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $321,000
Buyer: Timothy Lafalam
Seller: Joseph A. Ieraci
Date: 07/11/22

901 Springfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: GSD Holdings LLC
Seller: Oday Agawam LLC
Date: 07/22/22

49 Stewart Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $246,000
Buyer: Joslyn Luginbuhl
Seller: Eleanor M. Jean
Date: 07/19/22

107 Thalia Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Maria Petrenko
Seller: Patricia A. Burns
Date: 07/21/22

325-327 Walnut St. Ext.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Walnut Vo LLC
Seller: OSC Property LLC
Date: 07/11/22

BLANDFORD

18 North St.
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $675,000
Buyer: G&Beth Lanzoni TR
Seller: Richard Igel
Date: 07/15/22

BRIMFIELD

50 6th St.
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $735,000
Buyer: Lisa Distler
Seller: Paul J. Croteau
Date: 07/22/22

65 East Brimfield Holland
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $525,000
Buyer: Keith C. Wood
Seller: Arthur E. Proulx
Date: 07/22/22

Holland Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: John Luszcz
Seller: Peter M. Robbins
Date: 07/22/22

52 Knollwood Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $352,000
Buyer: Michael Moor
Seller: Keith C. Wood
Date: 07/22/22

22 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Darren A. Wiemer
Seller: Ann F. Howell
Date: 07/11/22

284 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Kevin Baker
Seller: John G. Ludemann
Date: 07/21/22

CHICOPEE

39 Acrebrook Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jacquelyn M. Fanning
Seller: Richard E. Jette
Date: 07/15/22

61 Buckley Blvd.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $254,900
Buyer: Gabe Lachance
Seller: Tammy S. Marquez
Date: 07/19/22

159 Casey Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Olga Lopez-Rivera
Seller: Scott L. Molnar
Date: 07/22/22

924 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $2,105,000
Buyer: Blue River Properties LLC
Seller: Nolava LLC
Date: 07/13/22

105 Clarendon Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Yao Agbemordzi
Seller: Zdzislaw Rakowski
Date: 07/21/22

166 College St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $283,000
Buyer: Elias D. McDonnell
Seller: Robert F. Danczak
Date: 07/15/22

94 Cora Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Sabri Bajrami
Seller: Elsie M. Colon
Date: 07/12/22

55 Crestwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Mary M. Greco
Seller: Verronica S. Barrows
Date: 07/21/22

57 Edbert St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Emtay Inc.
Seller: Plata O. Plomo Inc.
Date: 07/19/22

22 Fisher St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Amaurys D. Amadis
Seller: Cebula Jr., Thedore J., (Estate)
Date: 07/15/22

50 George St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Phillip L. Beaulieu
Seller: Elly J. Rozell
Date: 07/15/22

358 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: David Roman
Seller: Robins, Rita, (Estate)
Date: 07/14/22

15 Kurtz St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $349,900
Buyer: Shrone Y. Tootle
Seller: David J. Viets
Date: 07/18/22

29 Lucretia Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Steven A. Maxam
Seller: Steven A. Maxam
Date: 07/22/22

90 Maryland Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Amanda N. Noel
Seller: Theodore S. Nellis
Date: 07/22/22

1052 Montgomery St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Marina Gavrilov
Seller: Lynn Fontaine
Date: 07/20/22

108 Northwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Yahaira I. Ramos
Seller: Timothy Beauchamp
Date: 07/11/22

79 Olko Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $273,000
Buyer: Jeffrey M. Carter
Seller: Brian S. Maslak
Date: 07/12/22

40 Orchard St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Haskell Holdings LLC
Seller: Eduardo Yanyuk
Date: 07/15/22

95 Quartus St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Samuel R. Castellano
Seller: Linda S. Chartier
Date: 07/11/22

36 Sesame Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $362,500
Buyer: Bethany B. Smith
Seller: Gorman, Glennis K., (Estate)
Date: 07/22/22

65 Simonich Circle
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Samantha Wotus
Seller: Thomas M. Bajgier
Date: 07/21/22

134 Stearns Ter.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Leroy A. Thomas
Seller: Johnson, William D., (Estate)
Date: 07/14/22

1 Tanglewood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kyle A. Greene
Seller: Jeremy Lambert
Date: 07/13/22

10 Tolpa Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $387,500
Buyer: James E. Mastorakis
Seller: Frank F. Vezina
Date: 07/19/22

82 Wallace Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Salomon Moreno-Rosa
Seller: Jorge Pedraza
Date: 07/15/22

2 West St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Miguel Maria
Seller: Juan A. Rosario
Date: 07/21/22

48 West St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $850,000
Buyer: Strong Building Co. LLC
Seller: Luke Realty Management LLC
Date: 07/11/22

81 Woodcrest Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $266,000
Buyer: Kyle Lafontaine
Seller: Keith A. Arvanitis
Date: 07/22/22

201 Woodcrest Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Madeline Farias
Seller: Yomaira Fernandez
Date: 07/22/22

EAST LONGMEADOW

53 Baymor Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Robert J. Collins
Seller: G. O. Markman Holdings LLC
Date: 07/22/22

9 Calkins Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Natalie Heredia
Seller: Tinkham, Debra K., (Estate)
Date: 07/13/22

170 Canterbury Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $677,500
Buyer: Steven E. Fitzek
Seller: Robert T. Whiteley
Date: 07/14/22

115 Fernwood Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Thomas J. Mazza
Seller: Allison Ebner
Date: 07/14/22

5 Garland Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: Fresly Eustache
Seller: Luz A. Manson
Date: 07/12/22

82 Millbrook Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: David T. Skorupski
Seller: Quercus Properties LLC
Date: 07/12/22

125 Parker St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Conor J. Dion
Seller: Carolina L. Joos
Date: 07/15/22

13 Pondview Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $842,000
Buyer: Robert E. Tirrell
Seller: Mikaela Pollenz
Date: 07/22/22

33 Powder Hill Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $378,400
Buyer: Freddy Torres
Seller: Donald A. Casella
Date: 07/22/22

569 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Jesse D. Garrison
Seller: Steven Scagliarini
Date: 07/15/22

41 Taylor St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Barbara Bosquet
Seller: Demetrios Sotiropoulos
Date: 07/22/22

31 Voyer Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Senaide Lopez
Seller: Fredy A. Palacio
Date: 07/21/22

9 Wisteria Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $620,000
Buyer: William Bach
Seller: Li Quan
Date: 07/15/22

GRANVILLE

129 Hartland Hollow Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Bernadette Levick
Seller: Gary J. Gingras
Date: 07/18/22

HAMPDEN

59 Meadow Brook Lane
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Susan Sirois
Seller: George A. Romano
Date: 07/14/22

HOLLAND

11 Ardmore Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Paul S. Tremblay
Seller: Marie R. Quattrocelli
Date: 07/19/22

19 Kimball Hill Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $301,000
Buyer: Kevin A. Holstrom
Seller: Scott J. Gendreau
Date: 07/20/22

7 Lakeridge Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $343,000
Buyer: Kristina Hynes
Seller: Richard F. Wilmarth
Date: 07/13/22

32 Old Acres Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $529,000
Buyer: Kristen Brierley
Seller: Ethan Loiselle
Date: 07/21/22

15 Old County Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Luke Bardsley
Seller: Kenneth L. Pronto
Date: 07/22/22

HOLYOKE

103 Brown Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $251,000
Buyer: Diane Droescher
Seller: Mindy L. Cotherman
Date: 07/22/22

27 Hitchcock St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Carlos Vazquez
Seller: Joseph M. Whitfill
Date: 07/14/22

23 Homestead Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $271,000
Buyer: Steven J. Goldman
Seller: Elizabeth J. Scheurer
Date: 07/15/22

321-323 Main St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $454,500
Buyer: Vivek Deshmukh
Seller: 321-323 Main St. Properties LLC
Date: 07/22/22

456 Maple St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: 456 Maple Holyoke MA LLC
Seller: Posiadlosc LLC
Date: 07/19/22

321 Oak St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Bryan J. Boudreau
Seller: Joseph P. Fitzgerald
Date: 07/18/22

66-68 Pearl St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $308,000
Buyer: D&S Eagle Eyes LLC
Seller: Heather Labonte
Date: 07/21/22

174 Pearl St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: KMAK LLC
Seller: Bernard F. Deorocki
Date: 07/20/22

1 Stratford Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Mary B. Agostino-Evans
Seller: Mary S. Hayden
Date: 07/22/22

47 Taylor St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $327,000
Buyer: Nicolette Leroux-Estrella
Seller: Real Estate Investments Northeast
Date: 07/20/22

323 Walnut St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $273,000
Buyer: Leonel Mendoza
Seller: Joy Meredith
Date: 07/22/22

76-78 Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: KMAK LLC
Seller: Scott Family Properties LLC
Date: 07/20/22

76-78 Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: KMAK LLC
Seller: Scott Family Properties LLC
Date: 07/21/22

138 Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: KMAK LLC
Seller: Scott Family Properties LLC
Date: 07/20/22

715 Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Josue C. Rivera-Marin
Seller: Shawn P. Antunes
Date: 07/14/22

LONGMEADOW

135 Bliss Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Raysa Alvarez
Seller: Luis A. Santiago
Date: 07/14/22

39 Circle Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Kency Gilet
Seller: Erica Basile
Date: 07/15/22

109 Concord Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $690,000
Buyer: John P. Pappas
Seller: Ida Zucker
Date: 07/15/22

184 Ellington Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: Manisha Shastry
Seller: Laura Flynn
Date: 07/20/22

38 Fernleaf Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $577,500
Buyer: Erin P. Gibson
Seller: Zachary L. Schepart
Date: 07/15/22

112 Kenmore Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Kay T. Oo
Seller: Geoffrey Putnam
Date: 07/18/22

62 Knollwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Velu Kaliappan
Seller: Cara L. Deane
Date: 07/13/22

78 Leetewood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: SRV Properties LLC
Seller: Nadine F. Buckley
Date: 07/18/22

84 Massachusetts Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Benjamin Sloan
Seller: Tessa L. Smit
Date: 07/19/22

358 Merriweather Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $690,000
Buyer: Mandana Naderi-Mehr
Seller: Shukan, Elinor B., (Estate)
Date: 07/11/22

470 Prospect St.
Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Matthew Gour
Seller: Paul S. Quatrano
Date: 07/13/22

129 Westmoreland Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Ronald T. Blechner
Seller: Zachary L. Morin
Date: 07/11/22

96 Williams St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $564,000
Buyer: Carolina L. Joos
Seller: Laura Bustamante
Date: 07/15/22

217 Williams St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Michael Elfman
Seller: Cleland D. Cochrane
Date: 07/20/22

61 Windsor Place
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Hala Saeed
Seller: Geoffrey P. Adams
Date: 07/22/22

374 Wolf Swamp Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Andrew M. Yellen
Seller: Stephany L. Seguro
Date: 07/15/22

LUDLOW

Balsam Hill Road Lot 58
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $149,900
Buyer: Raymond R. Courtney
Seller: Whitetail Wreks LLC
Date: 07/13/22

590 Center St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: JLL Real Estate LLC
Seller: CJM Properties Inc.
Date: 07/13/22

596 Center St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: JLL Real Estate LLC
Seller: CJM Properties Inc.
Date: 07/13/22

26 Coolidge Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Brian Foster
Seller: Jean M. Hafner
Date: 07/22/22

48 Franklin St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Annie Murphy
Seller: Katelyn Crogan
Date: 07/13/22

522 Holyoke St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $307,675
Buyer: Verronica S. Willis
Seller: Palmer, Sheila A., (Estate)
Date: 07/21/22

15 McLean Pkwy.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Jeffrey B. Leger
Seller: Daniel Arcobello
Date: 07/22/22

205 Miller St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $307,000
Buyer: Peter A. Arancibia
Seller: Paul D. Spooner
Date: 07/15/22

Turning Leaf Road Lot 101
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $159,900
Buyer: Mark Mainini
Seller: Whitetail Wreks LLC
Date: 07/13/22

95 Wedgewood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $501,500
Buyer: Christopher J. Spano
Seller: Giovanni Cirillo
Date: 07/14/22

109 Windwood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Marissa K. Ribeiro
Seller: Idalina S. Andre
Date: 07/14/22

78 Yale St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $233,000
Buyer: Andrea Dynak
Seller: Celeste M. Dasilva
Date: 07/15/22

MONSON

4 Bethany Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $282,000
Buyer: Rose Kowalik
Seller: Fisk H. Bacon
Date: 07/11/22

492 Boston Road West
Monson, MA 01069
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Xandria Korn
Seller: Domingos G. Alves
Date: 07/14/22

11 Cushman St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Harrison R. Morin
Seller: Christopher M. Fusco
Date: 07/21/22

12 Hampden Ave.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Cooper Scott
Seller: Real Estate Investments Northeast
Date: 07/21/22

111 May Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Darius M. Taylor
Seller: Jessy D. Shea
Date: 07/15/22

10 Palmer Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Donna Sweeney
Seller: Lauren J. Smith
Date: 07/14/22

516 Old Wales Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Jennifer R. Pitts
Seller: Eric Gianni
Date: 07/20/22

MONTGOMERY

62 New State Road
Montgomery, MA 01085
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Joseph Gonyer
Seller: Paul Zukowski
Date: 07/19/22

52 Pineridge Road
Montgomery, MA 01085
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Jason S. Fiddler
Seller: Sabino Piccirilli
Date: 07/22/22

PALMER

4002 Church St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $207,000
Buyer: Matthew Kearney
Seller: Michael D. Ciaccio
Date: 07/21/22

2009 East St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Briana A. Willard
Seller: Timothy R. Coleman
Date: 07/13/22

5 Fieldstone Dr.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Melissa Getty
Seller: Matthew J. Smith
Date: 07/20/22

16 Memory Lane
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Brittany M. Howe-Deutsch
Seller: Jeffrey Marciniec
Date: 07/22/22

23 Old Farm Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $585,000
Buyer: Roberto Rivera-Negron
Seller: Millicent J. Burke
Date: 07/11/22

2268 Palmer Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Kelly L. Gromosky
Seller: Daniel Karalash
Date: 07/22/22

3034 Pine St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Sandra L. Page
Seller: Matthew D. Boyer
Date: 07/18/22

4031-4037 Pleasant St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Lord Warren LLC
Seller: Gary Depace
Date: 07/15/22

71-R State St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $447,000
Buyer: Hazel Ulate-Chavarria
Seller: Mark R. Ricard
Date: 07/22/22

19 Winthrop St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $254,000
Buyer: Nicole Dalton
Seller: Dawn M. Watson
Date: 07/21/22

RUSSELL

1074 General Knox Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Simah A. Middleton
Seller: Donald J. Lajeunesse
Date: 07/13/22

62 Pine Hill Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $192,500
Buyer: Susan Timm-Sirignano
Seller: Lone Creek Properties LLC
Date: 07/14/22

SPRINGFIELD

33 Acushnet Ave.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Hayder Al-Badri
Seller: Robert W. Hanke
Date: 07/15/22

86 Alden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $268,000
Buyer: Dominga Dominguez-Diaz
Seller: Roberto Lopez
Date: 07/15/22

746-748 Alden St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Brendan M. Coughlin
Seller: Eric C. Cassidy
Date: 07/18/22

54 Amore Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $174,500
Buyer: Joseph Wanyama
Seller: Tangie D. Jones
Date: 07/22/22

53-55 Andrew St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Pah Properties LLC
Seller: Chapman Investments LLC
Date: 07/11/22

143 Beacon Hill Road
Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Fawaz Sattam-Almawlaa
Seller: William R. Wagner
Date: 07/18/22

100 Benton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $379,000
Buyer: Luis Correa
Seller: East Coast Contracting
Date: 07/15/22

31-33 Biltmore St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: James J. Josokos
Seller: Jerier Merzoian
Date: 07/20/22

55-57 Bloomfield St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Maria F. Alban
Seller: Peggy Sotiropoulos
Date: 07/21/22

205 Boston Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Jonathan Ashwell
Seller: John Doulakis
Date: 07/11/22

1630 Boston Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $562,500
Buyer: DDM Property Group LLC
Seller: Banas, Josephine F., (Estate)
Date: 07/22/22

35 Bowles Park
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Peter Pham
Seller: Jonathan M. Seymour
Date: 07/11/22

736 Bradley Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Ginette Macharie
Seller: Aimee L. Freedman
Date: 07/21/22

124 Buckingham St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Margarita Correa-Santiago
Seller: JJJ 17 LLC
Date: 07/11/22

27-33 Caldwell Place
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Emily Vila
Seller: Emerson Vila
Date: 07/12/22

76 Catalina Dr.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $299,900
Buyer: Erin K. Squires
Seller: Mike Nguyen
Date: 07/19/22

6 Chalmers St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $490,000
Buyer: Om B. Khadka
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 07/21/22

25 Chapel St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Maria Rivera-Guerra
Seller: H&P Investments LLC
Date: 07/14/22

126 Clement St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Jesus Marrero-Ortiz
Seller: Pah Properties LLC
Date: 07/22/22

97 Cuff Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Gloria J. Perez
Seller: Madison Property Investments LLC
Date: 07/15/22

36 Devens St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Castle Headquarters Inc.
Seller: Delores A. Jordan
Date: 07/22/22

117-119 Draper St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Nathan E. Scharf
Seller: Garken Realty LLC
Date: 07/13/22

47 Dresden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Carlos Galdamez
Seller: A2ZLH Portfolio Holding LLC
Date: 07/22/22

14 Dubois St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Sadik Tuyishime
Seller: Beverly A. Musiak
Date: 07/20/22

39 Duggan Circle
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Richard Wonderlie
Seller: Jones, Melanie F., (Estate)
Date: 07/15/22

104 Duryea St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Miguel A. Hernandez
Seller: Cheryl A. Muscolo
Date: 07/19/22

233-235 East St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Bakish Edwards
Seller: Diane Flemmings
Date: 07/19/22

53 Elwood Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $317,000
Buyer: Elizabeth A. Steedle
Seller: Bradley S. Cole
Date: 07/19/22

212 Emerson St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Deaven Theriault
Seller: MacGregor, William A., (Estate)
Date: 07/14/22

66-68 Everett St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: M. Tran Properties LLC
Seller: BRVS LLC
Date: 07/21/22

28 Fairmount St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Grisell Figueroa
Seller: Mai T. Bui
Date: 07/22/22

91 Fargo St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Nathan G. Quinones
Seller: Jamison Sanders
Date: 07/14/22

83-85 Fort Pleasant Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Jorge R. Rosa
Seller: Stephen J. Holbrook
Date: 07/15/22

23 Foster St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Belvid Realty Group LLC
Seller: Equity Trust Co.
Date: 07/22/22

63 Fresno St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Sean Collins
Seller: Linda L. Vacon
Date: 07/19/22

56 Fullerton St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Dora Agyei
Seller: Lynette M. Santa
Date: 07/15/22

120 Garvey Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $286,000
Buyer: Daniel V. Comstock
Seller: Blake L. Chatman
Date: 07/22/22

61 Gatewood Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Hosea Holder
Seller: Sybil A. Maynard-Holder
Date: 07/21/22

40 Gertrude St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Ciarra Jimenez
Seller: Jamil Y. Asad-Ubinas
Date: 07/22/22

144 Gillette Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Robert J. McCarthy
Seller: Gail P. Bordua
Date: 07/15/22

91 Glenmore St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Jamison Sanders
Seller: Syed A. Jabbar
Date: 07/14/22

125 Granger St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Brenda I. Betancourt
Seller: Cedar Investment Group LLC
Date: 07/19/22

152 Grayson Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Karl M. Burston
Seller: Thomas Cloarec
Date: 07/20/22

123 Harkness Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Kadisha Velasquez
Seller: Gallo, Peter B., (Estate)
Date: 07/11/22

26 Irvington St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Shamid Shortte
Seller: Kelsey Strouse
Date: 07/22/22

15 Kimberly Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Rehab Home Buyers LLC
Seller: Priscilla A. Poole
Date: 07/22/22

25 Loretta St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Chad M. Bassett
Seller: Paul Matrow
Date: 07/15/22

32 Manhattan St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Lee R. Mock
Seller: Dorothy J. Mock
Date: 07/11/22

181 Marsden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Jean-Marcell Pollock
Seller: Siam Williams Investment Group LLC
Date: 07/14/22

174-176 Massasoit St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $294,900
Buyer: Craig Smith
Seller: 3 Queens LLC
Date: 07/18/22

119-121 Merida St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Michael Hayden
Seller: Christopher S. Hamilton
Date: 07/15/22

109 Middle St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Jenisse Sanchez
Seller: Michael W. Dise
Date: 07/20/22

206 Middlesex St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Value Properties LLC
Seller: Dunham, Richard A., (Estate)
Date: 07/13/22

56 Montclair St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Yanirelis Q. Hernandez
Seller: DSmith Real Estate Holdings
Date: 07/13/22

200 Moss Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Joejoe Properties LLC
Seller: Muckle, Juanita, (Estate)
Date: 07/22/22

65 Northway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Ely J. Contreras-Gutierrez
Seller: Marcella M. Fitzgerald
Date: 07/13/22

149-151 Oak Grove Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: RRM Homes LLC
Seller: Home Equity Assets Realty
Date: 07/15/22

33 Oak Hollow Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Brendan Gondarowski
Seller: Carol A. Ouellette
Date: 07/13/22

175 Oak Hollow Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $289,000
Buyer: Judi Scavotto
Seller: Rita J. Demos
Date: 07/20/22

47 Olive St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Jacquelyn Day
Seller: Gladysh Capital LLC
Date: 07/20/22

752 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $1,387,000
Buyer: Brown Marital TR
Seller: Kasa Springfield Realty LLC
Date: 07/22/22

20 Palmer Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Devin Thomas
Seller: Ann M. Vivenzio
Date: 07/14/22

529-531 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $306,000
Buyer: German L. Colon
Seller: Khandakar I. Enam
Date: 07/22/22

120 Parkerview St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Brian P. Yacovone
Seller: Xianhong Zheng
Date: 07/15/22

117 Pilgrim Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Shamika Barrett
Seller: Adam D. Friedrich
Date: 07/19/22

546 Plainfield St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Kiari M. Ortiz-Rodriguez
Seller: Juan Alejandro
Date: 07/14/22

558 Plainfield St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Emily Baiyee-Toegel
Seller: Global Homes Properties LLC
Date: 07/21/22

95 Princeton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Elizabeth A. Wolter
Seller: Lisa M. Gaudreau
Date: 07/21/22

94 Saint James Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $192,500
Buyer: Nancy D. Pereira
Seller: Victor D. Pereira
Date: 07/18/22

262 Saint James Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Wheels & Deals Auto Sales
Seller: Marwan Awkal
Date: 07/15/22

706 Saint James Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Carlos D. Martinez-Mendoza
Seller: Carlos Rivera
Date: 07/18/22

173 Seymour Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Lynette Santa
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 07/15/22

248 Shawmut St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Bethany A. Psenicnik
Seller: Cherry Tree Realty LLC
Date: 07/20/22

54-56 Suffolk St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Gabriella Phelan
Seller: Jeannette Velez
Date: 07/15/22

232 Talmadge Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Jeffrey Delrio
Seller: Ramona R. Lees
Date: 07/20/22

471 Trafton Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $393,500
Buyer: Jason M. Lebeau
Seller: John W. Zizik
Date: 07/15/22

74 Treetop Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $192,852
Buyer: MHFA
Seller: Lausiere C. Rodriguez
Date: 07/12/22

172-174 Tyler St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Edwin M. Sanchez
Seller: Jose A. Nunez
Date: 07/22/22

514 Union St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Hector Lopez
Seller: Deveron E. Plummer
Date: 07/13/22

13-15 Utica St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Ming L. Tsang
Seller: Jeffrey Ocampo
Date: 07/13/22

19 Warner St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $735,000
Buyer: Paula Ventura
Seller: 15 Warner Street LLC
Date: 07/14/22

73 Warrenton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Jadline Alexandre
Seller: Wilmington Trust
Date: 07/22/22

616-618 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $334,000
Buyer: Cynthia N. Sanchez
Seller: Anthony M. Santaniello
Date: 07/18/22

76 Willowbrook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $256,000
Buyer: Enrique R. Velez
Seller: Michael Chu
Date: 07/22/22

26 Windemere St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Shaniha Burnett
Seller: Maria R. Hernandez
Date: 07/11/22

173 Wrentham Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Dinorah A. Marquez
Seller: Alycar Investments LLC
Date: 07/21/22

SOUTHWICK

Anderson Ridge Lot 24
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $611,000
Buyer: Scott W. Hodges
Seller: Linda A. Bengston
Date: 07/18/22

167 Berkshire Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $298,000
Buyer: Brad Lukens
Seller: Guy A. Ronzoni
Date: 07/15/22

3 George Loomis Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Benjamin Lisheness
Seller: Joan Tortoriello
Date: 07/22/22

11 George Loomis Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Benjamin Lisheness
Seller: Joan Tortoriello
Date: 07/22/22

235 Hillside Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Brian S. Rice
Seller: Eric J. Rogers
Date: 07/15/22

25 Lexington Circle
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $650,000
Buyer: Heidi Scammons
Seller: Gary F. Uliasz
Date: 07/18/22

34 Mort Vining Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $599,900
Buyer: Jonathan Seymour
Seller: Oak Ridge Custom Home Builders
Date: 07/11/22

20 Noble Steed Xing
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $717,468
Buyer: Michael Schultz
Seller: J&F Investments LLC
Date: 07/18/22

140 Point Grove Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Taylor Jacobs
Seller: Gerald A. Deblois
Date: 07/15/22

281 South Longyard Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Bryan M. Tirrell
Seller: Jason S. Fiddler
Date: 07/22/22

2 Silvergrass Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $530,000
Buyer: Katelynn Halloran
Seller: Hamelin Framing Inc.
Date: 07/21/22

TOLLAND

17 Path Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Ashley Sabin
Seller: John P. Wisner
Date: 07/15/22

WALES

17 Shore Dr.
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Scott M. Skorupski
Seller: Joel R. Mueller
Date: 07/11/22

WEST SPRINGFIELD

71 Austin Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $673,000
Buyer: James Fratantonio
Seller: Prasanth Prabhakaran
Date: 07/22/22

71 Bridle Path Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $396,000
Buyer: Bryan Jones
Seller: Jill Miles
Date: 07/14/22

181 Circle Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $357,000
Buyer: Trung Vantran
Seller: Mark R. Cote
Date: 07/19/22

46 Harrison Place
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $344,000
Buyer: Matthew R. Czepiel
Seller: Eric M. Guiel
Date: 07/20/22

53 Highland Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $535,000
Buyer: Joy Meredith
Seller: Brian P. Bessette
Date: 07/22/22

32 Old Barn Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Jeannie Stavros
Seller: Austin, Richard A., (Estate)
Date: 07/18/22

95 Orchardview St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Syed F. Ali
Seller: Yelena A. Rogozhina
Date: 07/22/22

931-983 Riverdale St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $47,000,000
Buyer: Suso 5 Riverdale LP
Seller: DDRM Riverdale Shops LLC
Date: 07/19/22

39 Rochelle St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Zuleika M. Rodriguez
Seller: Katherine G. Sherbo
Date: 07/15/22

125 South Blvd.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $288,500
Buyer: Stephanie Battise
Seller: Max J. Weisenbach
Date: 07/15/22

116 Southworth St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $282,000
Buyer: John E. Bertodo
Seller: John P. Trombley
Date: 07/19/22

155 Virginia Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: George T. Bruso
Seller: Deborah H. Benoit
Date: 07/11/22

57 Wayside Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $4,150,000
Buyer: 57 Wayside Ave LLC
Seller: JLL Real Estate LLC
Date: 07/13/22

44 Wolcott Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Jeyssica Ramirez
Seller: Meenakshi Hastings
Date: 07/22/22

 

WESTFIELD

31 A St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Ravil Agayev
Seller: Vitaliy Dubovoy
Date: 07/18/22

26 Crown St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Brian W. Selby
Seller: George A. Mercier
Date: 07/13/22

2 Cycle St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Caitlin Martin
Seller: Brandon Tessier
Date: 07/18/22

21 East Bartlett St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $610,000
Buyer: NE Properties LLC
Seller: Margaret S. Glassman
Date: 07/18/22

346 East Mountain Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Kale W. Carter
Seller: Arlene Rivie
Date: 07/15/22

24 Fowler St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: KJA Properties LLC
Seller: Wicked Deals LLC
Date: 07/12/22

1047 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Carmelo V. Chiello
Seller: Starr W. Scully
Date: 07/14/22

359 Holyoke Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $226,500
Buyer: Daniel Shokov
Seller: BCMB1 Owner LLC
Date: 07/20/22

327 Little River Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Seth T. Bertrand
Seller: Vantage Home Buyers LLC
Date: 07/14/22

498 Loomis St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Daniy Gavrilyuk
Seller: Benjamin A. Lisheness
Date: 07/22/22

281 Lower Sandyhill Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Eben Wood
Seller: Eladio Lopez
Date: 07/20/22

137 Main St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $353,000
Buyer: Fathima Sameen
Seller: James J. Jeneral
Date: 07/15/22

16 Montgomery St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Roberto Lopez
Seller: Gloria N. Wilder
Date: 07/15/22

13 Paper St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Fitzgerald Home Solutions LLC
Seller: Dorothy J. Foley
Date: 07/15/22

238 Prospect St. Ext.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Ashley Reidy
Seller: Amy E. Rocco
Date: 07/15/22

59 Putnam Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jennifer L. Calkins
Seller: Lisa Bassette
Date: 07/22/22

35 South Maple St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $352,000
Buyer: Robert C. Jones
Seller: Viktor Shevchenko
Date: 07/11/22

367 Steiger Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $403,000
Buyer: Emily D. Chute
Seller: Daniel J. Araujo
Date: 07/21/22

29 Sunrise Ter.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $428,000
Buyer: Jerry Peake
Seller: Mary E. Page
Date: 07/15/22

117 Union St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $251,720
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Richard M. Clark
Date: 07/11/22

1098-R Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Claire Carter
Seller: Viktorian Estate LLC
Date: 07/12/22

9 Wieser Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $491,000
Buyer: Amir Arbabi
Seller: Henry C. Charles
Date: 07/13/22

51 Yeoman Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Kailee M. Valliere
Seller: Randy Arkoette
Date: 07/21/22

WILBRAHAM

23 Decorie Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $237,500
Buyer: Nicole E. Bedard
Seller: Josie A. Brown
Date: 07/12/22

6 Evangeline Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Bryan E. Pelchat
Seller: Brendan Ohalloran
Date: 07/22/22

2 Hillcrest Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Trixie D. Hotchkiss
Seller: Eric K. Teed
Date: 07/21/22

655 Ridge Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $1,950,000
Buyer: Andrew T. Marecki
Seller: Joseph M. Boyle
Date: 07/15/22

459 Stony Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Andrea Rusilowicz
Seller: Shaukat Matin
Date: 07/22/22

4 Vista Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Brittany Meece
Seller: Adam D. Couture
Date: 07/20/22

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

140 Aubinwood Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Alexander Erskine-Wise
Seller: Cheonseok Park
Date: 07/19/22

68 Country Corners Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $680,000
Buyer: Gustavo Oliveira
Seller: Gabija Revis
Date: 07/21/22

238 East Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $549,900
Buyer: Thomas A. Carswell
Seller: Judith F. Moran
Date: 07/15/22

992 East Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Xian Dole
Seller: Paul L. Rilla
Date: 07/21/22

28 Farmington Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $287,500
Buyer: Ngawang T. Sherpa
Seller: Dorje Romito
Date: 07/14/22

29 Pelham Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $885,000
Buyer: Matthew W. Thomson
Seller: Rebecca D. Guay-Mitchell
Date: 07/20/22

BELCHERTOWN

474 Amherst Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $625,000
Buyer: Jaime L. Winfield
Seller: Carolyn P. Camden
Date: 07/18/22

12 Barrett St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Justin K. Kleeberg
Seller: Kathryn E. Wood
Date: 07/20/22

29 Depot St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Elena Khramtsova
Seller: Antonio Carvalho
Date: 07/12/22

33 Fuller St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $500,500
Buyer: Jennifer L. Hartshorn
Seller: Jeanne M. Boudreau
Date: 07/18/22

7 Knights St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $625,000
Buyer: David Hornstein
Seller: Peter Lobdell 2018 TR
Date: 07/15/22

170 Metacomet St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $153,000
Buyer: Gary Stones Remodeling
Seller: Gail S. Platz
Date: 07/15/22

515 Michael Sears Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $363,000
Buyer: Matthew M. Aaronian
Seller: Erica M. Bernard
Date: 07/12/22

7 Old Farm Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $366,500
Buyer: Ben K. Kalama
Seller: Barbara L. Hawley
Date: 07/12/22

47 Pine St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $705,000
Buyer: Fritz A. Kuhnlenz
Seller: C. P. Mugnier 2019 TR
Date: 07/20/22

201 Springfield Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Belchertown RE LLC
Seller: Northeast Treaters Inc.
Date: 07/12/22

20 Sycamore Circle
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $519,900
Buyer: So Y. Choi
Seller: J. N. Duquette & Son Construction
Date: 07/12/22

29 Tucker Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $142,000
Buyer: Martha J. Henneman
Seller: Linda Snow
Date: 07/11/22

CHESTERFIELD

510 Main Road
Chesterfield, MA 01012
Amount: $120,056
Buyer: Megliola Realty LLC
Seller: Mcquaid, Kevin Donald, (Estate)
Date: 07/20/22

EASTHAMPTON

31 Bayberry Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $590,000
Buyer: Tyler F. Comings
Seller: Linfei Liu
Date: 07/22/22

36-40 Chapman Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Joseph C. Martinez
Seller: Chris M. Patnode
Date: 07/15/22

36 Clark St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Peter Neely
Seller: Mary B. Cross
Date: 07/13/22

52 Glendale St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Thomas J. Kelly
Seller: Gary L. Dacunha
Date: 07/15/22

11 Grove St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $392,250
Buyer: Tim Donner
Seller: Enrique A. Suarez
Date: 07/14/22

108 Holyoke St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $397,000
Buyer: Bridget M. Woebbe
Seller: Richard F. Sedlak
Date: 07/21/22

9 Keddy St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Christina L. Gusek
Seller: Richard A. Boadway
Date: 07/18/22

27 Northampton St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Kelly A. Broderick
Seller: Wen P. Zheng
Date: 07/11/22

14 Picard Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Carley Davis
Seller: Ronald R. Davis
Date: 07/13/22

GOSHEN

106 Shaw Road
Goshen, MA 01330
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Erin Pease
Seller: Angel Zhang
Date: 07/21/22

172 West St.
Goshen, MA 01096
Amount: $415,700
Buyer: Vera Johnson
Seller: Gary J. Karowski
Date: 07/22/22

GRANBY

601 Amherst Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Megliola Realty LLC
Seller: Harrison, Frank E., (Estate)
Date: 07/20/22

156 Burnett St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Stephen F. Marion
Seller: Symasko, Edmund P., (Estate)
Date: 07/22/22

221 Chicopee St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $665,000
Buyer: Yongjian Li
Seller: Daniel Bernashe
Date: 07/15/22

Cold Hill Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Stephen R. Katigbak
Seller: Kathleen H. Maiolatesi
Date: 07/14/22

19 High St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Teddy J. Kazimierczak
Seller: Kazimierczak, Henry J., (Estate)
Date: 07/22/22

145 Pleasant St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $182,426
Buyer: Jonathan Boulanger
Seller: Roxanne C. Costigan
Date: 07/20/22

142 School St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $570,000
Buyer: Oliver Homberg
Seller: Linda M. Bessette
Date: 07/21/22

15 Smith Ave.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Dionna Armitage
Seller: Ann M. Andras
Date: 07/22/22

43 West State St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $1,200,000
Buyer: Kinetic Estates LLC
Seller: Darcy, Daniel J., (Estate)
Date: 07/13/22

HADLEY

89 Cemetery Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Brett D. Molhan
Seller: Kathleen A. Squires
Date: 07/12/22

15 Cold Spring Lane
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Choquette Capital Investments LLC
Seller: Gary S. Toth
Date: 07/19/22

148 Rocky Hill Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $389,000
Buyer: Justine M. Jannone
Seller: Gregory Omasta
Date: 07/22/22

14 Southbranch Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Brett D. Molhan
Seller: Kathleen A. Squires
Date: 07/12/22

NORTHAMPTON

57 Autumn Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $333,000
Buyer: Geoffrey Lind-Karlson
Seller: Kara M. Graves
Date: 07/12/22

72 Bliss St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $349,500
Buyer: Ilene M. Berezin
Seller: David A. Murphy
Date: 07/22/22

23 Cardinal Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: Valerie J. Johanson
Seller: Christine M. Jones
Date: 07/19/22

31 Chapel St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $685,000
Buyer: Sunwood Development Corp.
Seller: D. W. Corp.
Date: 07/19/22

33 Chapel St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $685,000
Buyer: Sunwood Development Corp.
Seller: D. W. Corp.
Date: 07/19/22

387 Florence Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Daniel Lipson
Seller: Tonet, Lee S., (Estate)
Date: 07/13/22

20 Franklin St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $905,000
Buyer: Devin M. Caughey
Seller: Ellie Shelburne
Date: 07/12/22

218 Jackson St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $179,595
Buyer: Ryan Thompson
Seller: Ryan Thompson
Date: 07/13/22

113 King St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $680,000
Buyer: Sherry L. Taylor
Seller: Strong Ave LLC
Date: 07/20/22

421 Loudville Road
Northampton, MA 01027
Amount: $349,000
Buyer: Sathya P. Levy
Seller: Jesse J. Rasid
Date: 07/11/22

773 Park Hill Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: John Silletto
Seller: Alice Heller
Date: 07/11/22

45 Reservoir Road
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Mary O. Evborokhai
Seller: Conrad Noel RET
Date: 07/20/22

79 Reservoir Road
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $362,000
Buyer: Andrew Skoirchet
Seller: Karen A. Lynds
Date: 07/13/22

63 Union St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $801,000
Buyer: Meaghan Sullivan
Seller: Samantha L. Wood
Date: 07/12/22

32 Rockland Heights Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: William Raleigh
Seller: David Kachinski
Date: 07/21/22

Stonewall Dr.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: William Raleigh
Seller: David Kachinski
Date: 07/21/22

24 Walnut St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $715,000
Buyer: Daniel Papasian
Seller: Merrill-Morrison TR
Date: 07/14/22

65 Warner St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $639,900
Buyer: Kathleen Alves
Seller: Nu-Way Homes Inc.
Date: 07/14/22

PELHAM

12 Amherst Road
Pelham, MA 01007
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Hassan Chalhe
Seller: Pioneer Valley Habitat
Date: 07/21/22

SOUTH HADLEY

85 Camden St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $250,900
Buyer: Elizabeth Martinez
Seller: Daniel J. Giroux
Date: 07/15/22

20 East St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: James Watts
Seller: Victoria A. Wildman
Date: 07/14/22

6 Hollywood St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Elisha Rosemond
Seller: Irene M. Rule
Date: 07/20/22

20 Lyman Ter.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Daniel Maynard
Seller: Mallory E. Culver
Date: 07/18/22

46 Westbrook Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Raymond G. Simon
Seller: Thomas, Beatrice A., (Estate)
Date: 07/20/22

35 Wildwood Lane
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Thomas Patria
Seller: Judith A. Lebel
Date: 07/22/22

SOUTHAMPTON

2 Anita Dr.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: George H. Blais
Seller: Joanne M. Kennedy
Date: 07/14/22

19 East St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Peter C. Frary
Seller: Richard M. Frary
Date: 07/21/22

128 East St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Calli M. Paulin
Seller: Ryan Southworth
Date: 07/15/22

75 Fomer Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $494,500
Buyer: Cheryl A. Blow
Seller: Daviau & Robert Properties LLC
Date: 07/22/22

WARE

235 Belchertown Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Edna E. Frullo
Seller: D. E. Chrabasz 2008 TR
Date: 07/15/22

59 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Paul Starkin
Seller: Mary E. Butler
Date: 07/15/22

66 Eagle St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $289,500
Buyer: Timothy D. Moenk
Seller: Walter M. Slozak
Date: 07/22/22

10 Homecrest Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Chelsea Cassidy
Seller: Michael A. Turner
Date: 07/22/22

6 Kingsberry Lane
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $264,900
Buyer: Natalie Lombardo
Seller: Kevin E. King
Date: 07/19/22

WESTHAMPTON

253 Kings Hwy.
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $359,000
Buyer: Jace M. Bryan
Seller: Cindy M. Turner
Date: 07/14/22

76 Montague Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $585,000
Buyer: Devon Greenwood
Seller: Christopher T. Wilcox
Date: 07/18/22

Building Permits

The following building permits were issued during the month of July 2022. (Filings are limited due to closures or reduced staffing hours at municipal offices due to COVID-19 restrictions).

CHICOPEE

Briarwood Sixteen LLC
359 Dale St.
$46,000 — Flooring, drywall, electrical, plumbing, trim, cabinets, paint, and decorate due to water damage

Prospect Meadow Associates LLC
635 Prospect St.
$41,600 — Remove two non-bearing walls; terminate electrical fixtures; install pharmacy cabinets, shelving, and new sink; relocate exit sign and emergency lighting; install new lighting

HADLEY

Allard’s Farms Inc.
315 Westgate Center Dr.
N/A — Add battery storage system

Commonwealth of Massachusetts
200 Commonwealth Ave.
N/A — Remove and replace light fixtures and unit heaters

LEE

Berkshire Corporate Realty LLC
480 Pleasant St.
$250,000 — Construct steel platform on first floor to house five private offices, to be constructed with metal wall framing, doors, windows, and suspended ceilings

Community Health Programs Inc.
11 Quarry Hill Road
$445,000 — Interior renovation of existing spaces with new paint, flooring, and ceilings

LENOX

Gateways Inn Properties LLC
51 Walker St.
$1,527 — Patch kitchen delivery ramp

Lenox Housing Authority
6 Main St.
$26,486 — Add new ADA-compliant bathroom to first floor of Curtis Hotel

North Sandy Brook LLC
9 Franklin St.
$4,000 — Install fire-detection and notification appliances

NORTHAMPTON

71-73 Market Street LLC
73 Market St.
$7,600 — Insulation and weatherization

Bowles Enterprises LLC
15 Fruit St.
$6,000 — Window replacements

Hytech Park Properties LLC
106 Industrial Dr.
$17,000 — Ductwork for clean room

MZZ Lucky LLC
18 Orchard St.
$15,000 — Interior demolition of fire-damaged areas

Perfect Properties LLC
1 Corticelli St.
$71,790 — Install roof-mounted solar system

PITTSFIELD

A. Leo Nash Realty LLC
99 Hawthorne Ave.
$139,036 — Roofing

Eagle Street Associates Nominee Trust
33 Eagle St.
$5,500 — Modify existing sprinkler system

Fourteen Fifty East Street LLC
1450 East St.
$5,000 — Siding

Hotel Lenox LLC
1032 South St.
$7,300 — Renovate convenience shop beside front desk of Hilton Garden Inn

HWC Realty LLC
1510 West Housatonic St.
$545,000 — Build new warehouse addition

RKE Realty LLC
100 West St.
$183,804 — Renovate second-floor restrooms, including new finishes, plumbing fixtures, and lighting

Three Seventy Six Tyler Street LLC
558 East St.
$10,000 — Roofing

United States Self Storage LLC
117 Fourth St.
$10,000 — Remove addition at rear of warehouse

SPRINGFIELD

Behavioral Health Network Inc.
35 Heywood St.
$208,000 — Alter interior office space for employee resource center, two accessible restrooms, offices, and conference room

DFS International Ltd.
49 Cadwell Dr.
$69,231 — Roofing on warehouse

Freedom Season LLC
68 Lyons St.
$7,000 — Roofing on detached garage

Sinai Temple Inc.
1100 Dickinson St.
$50,000 — Remove and replace 12 antennas on telecommunications tower

Third Baptist Church of Springfield
149 Walnut St.
$45,000 — Remove existing interior stairs, frame new elevator shaft, build new vestibule to serve right side of property

Louis Wiener
1391 Main St.
$1,319,719 — Alter interior tenant space on first floor and exterior modifications with new entry location for JPMorgan Chase Bank

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Museums announced the 2022 Ubora Award and Ahadi Youth Award winners.

Now in its 31st year of celebrating leadership by people of African heritage, the Ubora Award honors Dr. Gerald Cutting and Carol Moore Cutting as exemplary leaders and role models. Meanwhile, the 13th Ahadi Youth Award honors the activist energy and artistic power of Kayla Staley.

The Ubora Award and the Ahadi Youth Award — conferred annually by the African Hall Subcommittee of the Springfield Museums — are awarded to black leaders from Greater Springfield who have gone above and beyond in demonstrating commitment to fields of community service, education, science, humanities, and/or the arts. The award ceremony will be held on Saturday, Sept. 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Wood Museum of Springfield History.

Dr. Gerald Cutting is the first and only African-American individual to own and operate a veterinary hospital and clinic in Western Mass. At age 11, he decided he wanted to be a veterinarian so he could help save animals. After graduating as a doctor of veterinary medicine from Tuskegee University in Alabama, he worked hard to achieve this dream of owning his own practice, mentoring and encouraging students to explore STEM careers. For almost 50 years until his retirement, he lived his dream of serving multiple generations of ‘pet parents’ at his clinic in Chicopee.

With the goal of connecting community through communication, Carol Moore Cutting applied in 1984 to the Federal Communications Commission for a radio frequency permitting her to build a FM station. After an exhaustive 15-year legal battle with an existing broadcaster, she prevailed all the way to the Washington D.C. Court of Appeals, and finally began test broadcasting in 1999. She became the first woman in Massachusetts and the first African-American in New England to be granted a construction permit to build, own, and continuously operate an FM radio station, WEIB-106.3 Smooth FM.

Kayla Staley is a rising senior at the Conservatory of the Arts in Springfield, maintaining a 4.0 GPA and earning more than $20,000 in vocal scholarships since January 2021, as she was selected to receive private coaching and lessons from Broadway stars, college professors, summer overnight music intensive enrichment camps, and master classes with Broadway coaches. She is a frequent guest artist with Grammy winner Ben Gundersheimer (Mister G), and she often performs in the community. Staley is among two students from the Conservatory of the Arts accepted into the Massachusetts Music Educator’s Assoc. Western Regional Honors Festival Choir, the first time in 20 years any student has represented the city of Springfield in this event.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — United Way of Pioneer Valley (UWPV) will host a ‘new home’ celebration for the Chicopee Cupboard Food Pantry today, Aug. 16 from 11 a.m. to noon at 226 Exchange St. in Chicopee. Anyone interested in learning more about the fight against food insecurity is welcome to tour the expanded facility.

The Chicopee Cupboard, powered by the United Way of Pioneer Valley, provides shelf-stable food, fresh produce and dairy items, and frozen food to anyone in need. These items are available thanks to the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts, grants, and donations.

“We are honored to be able to battle any and all food insecurity in the great city of Chicopee,” said Paul Mina, president and CEO of the United Way of Pioneer Valley. “Our team is eager to provide our clients the best services possible.”

To make an appointment, call Lee Drewitz at (413) 693-0213.

Daily News

FEEDING HILLS — With the recent American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding legislation signed into law by Gov. Charlie Baker, state Sen. John Velis presented earmark funding of $50,000 to American Legion Post 185, to fund much-needed maintenance and improvements to Post 185’s existing building in Feeding Hills.

Velis was joined at American Legion Post 185 by Post Commander Wayne Keating, City Counselor Anthony Russo, members of American Legion Post 185, and members of the greater Agawam community. With the funding secured, Post 185 will move forward with plans for a new roof and insulation, among other improvements to the facility.

“On a physical level, this earmark will ensure that Post 185 can make the much-needed repairs to their existing infrastructure,” Velis said. “More broadly, the renovations are critical in supporting veterans of the past, present, and future. To have a welcoming space for veterans to congregate, organize, and engage is absolutely necessary in encouraging participation.”

With the roof leaking and causing damage to the building’s insulation, the repairs are “greatly needed,” Keating said.

American Legion Post 185 hopes to quickly move forward with the repairs in anticipation of the fall and winter months.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Beginning Wednesday, Sept. 7, the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley will host a 40-hour, 14-class sales licensing course to help individuals prepare for the Massachusetts real-estate salesperson license exam. The course will be completed on Thursday, Oct. 6.

Tuition is $400 and includes the book and materials. For an application, call the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley at (413) 785-1328 or visit www.rapv.com.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Go HERE to view all episodes

Episode 125: August 15, 2022

George Interviews Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno. The two discuss everything from the city’s new parking garage, to COVID-relief efforts, to a number of new developments — in the city’s downtown and its many neighborhoods. It’s all must listening, so join us for BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest  and sponsored by PeoplesBank.

Sponsored by:

Also Available On

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts’ trustees of the Order of William Pynchon announced their selection of two local residents, Carol Cutting and Sherry Elander, as recipients of this year’s Pynchon Medal.

“These are the times that we most need heroes, and we surely have them in this year’s recipients,” said Brenda McGiverin, chairperson of the Pynchon trustees.

Cutting has been the owner and operator of WEIB 106.3 FM since 1999. She persisted through a protracted legal battle to become the first black woman to operate a radio station in Massachusetts. In so doing, she fulfilled a 15-year vision of bringing representation of the region’s African-American community to the airwaves. She has also served in a host of change-making organizations, including Alpha Kappa Alpha and the National Assoc. of Black-Owned Broadcasters.

For nearly 24 years, Elander has served as a special-education teacher in Westfield Public Schools, with a special focus in helping students transition to life after their formal education. Throughout her career, she has built a program designed to bring college, career, and other life goals within reach for countless students with intellectual, developmental, and/or physical disabilities. The program she developed, and the network of advocacy she built, has become a model for districts throughout the state and for educators across the country. She has developed partnerships with colleges and universities, local businesses, and policymakers in Western Mass. and beyond, all with a view to maximizing opportunity for her students.

This year’s recipients were chosen from a pool of nominations received earlier this spring by the Advertising Club. All nominees are researched by the trustees, who then deliberate before selecting final recipients. All Pynchon medalists are chosen by unanimous decision of the Pynchon trustees, who are the current and five past presidents of the Advertising Club. Pynchon Trustees for 2022 are Teresa Utt, David Cecchi, Mary Shea, Scott Whitney, Brenda McGiverin, and current Advertising Club President Kelly McGiverin.

The presentation of the Pynchon Medal and celebration will take place on Thursday, Oct. 13 at the Delaney House in Holyoke. Event details and ticket information can be found at adclubwm.org or by calling (413) 342-0533.

More than 200 citizens have been inducted into the Order of William Pynchon since its founding in 1915.

Daily News

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration announced $1.68 million in Re-Entry Workforce Development Demonstration Program grants awarded to 14 organizations, including one in Western Mass., Community Action Pioneer Valley in Greenfield. Funds will place formerly incarcerated citizens re-entering the workforce into new occupations, where they will receive on-the-job training.

“The efforts of these community organizations, which includes their ability to locally connect individuals and employers, helps improve workforce readiness for those re-entering society,” Gov. Charlie Baker said. “These re-entry grants are focused on evidence-based outcomes that best prepare those who have served their time to find employment that helps support themselves and their families.”

Community Action Pioneer Valley will receive $160,000 to work with both the Franklin and Hampshire county sheriff’s offices to implement a training program focused on the manufacturing industry. Successful program graduates will be placed into production-occupation roles at Deerfield Packaging, Hillside Plastics, Western Massachusetts Food Processing Center, or Quabbin Wire & Cable Company Inc.

The Re-Entry Workforce Development Demonstration Program is an outcome of the Baker-Polito administration’s Task Force on Economic Opportunity for Populations Facing Chronically High Rates of Unemployment, chaired by Secretary of Labor and Workforce Development Rosalin Acosta.

The Task Force found that individuals within prison populations experienced complex needs that require intensive interventions for them to be successful in securing and maintaining employment. Access to adequate re-entry services was identified as a barrier to employment that disproportionally impacts the target populations and leads to greater recidivism.

“Providing the formerly incarcerated with opportunities for on-the-job-training is an important way to address inequities in the Commonwealth’s workforce,” Acosta said. “Partnering with community organizations through these grants helps those with chronic high rates of unemployment find meaningful career pathways in Massachusetts.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD ­— United Way of Pioneer Valley (UWPV) announced two new appointments within the company.

Longtime employee Megan Moynihan has been promoted to serve as UWPV’s chief operating officer. In this role, she will oversee all daily operations and fundraising. She previously held the positions of senior director of Finance and manager of Finance & Operations, and she has been in UWPV’s Finance department since 2012. Moynihan holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and administration from Salve Regina University and is a graduate of the Springfield Leadership Institute program.

Sydney Brady joined UWPV in June as the call-center supervisor for the Call2Talk Center in Springfield. Call2Talk is United Way’s emotional-support and suicide-prevention hotline. Brady holds a bachelor’s degree from Lasell University and previously served as a Call2Talk intern. She is currently earning her master’s degree in Social Work at Springfield College.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley (RAPV) announced that its community service committee will host a free shred event on Saturday, Sept. 10 at the association’s parking lot, located at 221 Industry Ave., Springfield, from 9 a.m. to noon.

The event is free and open to the public. The limit of shredding is five boxes per household, and shredding services will be provided on-site by Proshred.

Daily News

AMHERST — The Emily Dickinson Museum has completed its most significant restoration project to date of the interior architectural features, finishes, and furnishings of the revered poet’s homestead. The project has also addressed long-term stabilization with the introduction of new environmental regulating systems in Dickinson’s historic birthplace and home. This work is the first step in an ambitious, long-range vision that aims to establish the museum as the premier center for the study and celebration of the Dickinson’s life and work.

The museum will reopen to the public on Tuesday, Aug. 16 after more than two years of closure. In the interim, there has been renewed and growing interest in Dickinson and the revolutionary poetic voice she honed from her home in Amherst. Hailed as the ‘original queen of social distancing,’ Dickinson and her work have been particularly resonant in the past two years. New interpretations and citations, including Apple TV+’s hit series Dickinson, have created a heightened interest in the poet among new audiences. The Emily Dickinson Museum has found itself at the center of this buzz, attracting thousands of individuals from nearly 70 countries to its virtual programs.

With this surge in global interest, the museum is expecting significant visitation numbers in the coming months. Visitors must make an advance reservation for a guided tour, as daily space is limited. To guarantee a tour spot ahead of visiting, use the museum’s new online ticketing system at emilydickinsonmuseum.org/visit.

“We are thrilled to throw open the doors of the Dickinson homestead to visitors once more,” Executive Director Jane Wald said. “While closed, the museum remained active with dynamic online programming for a growing worldwide following, and I am grateful to the museum’s staff for their creativity, determination, and expertise in continuing to fulfill the museum’s mission under trying circumstances. The museum also completed a breathtaking restoration of a large part of the homestead interior that, amazingly, incorporates recovered original architectural features and decorative details that have been hidden for more than a hundred years. Now, every guest at Emily Dickinson’s home will have a more authentic experience of the place where her poetic genius flourished.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — City Mosaic, a nonprofit organization supporting and promoting the arts community in Springfield, will unveil the Worthington Street restoration and mural project in downtown Springfield — and acknowledge the artists and sponsors involved in creating and supporting it — tonight, Aug. 12, at the Springfield Jazz & Roots Festival.

The festival will kick off at 5 p.m., and at 8 p.m., Evan Plotkin, president and co-founder of City Mosaic and co-founder of the Springfield Jazz & Roots festival, along with Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, will unveil the mural at 211 Worthington St. and publicly acknowledge the supporters of this community-based initiative. This initiative is aimed at boosting the entertainment and dining district downtown and bringing both economic growth and people together to celebrate art and music.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame will host enshrinement ceremonies for the class of 2022 on Saturday, Sept. 10. The class was revealed in April and includes a total of 16 honorees.

This year’s class includes two-time NBA All-Star and four-time NBA champion Manu Ginobili; five-time NBA All-Star Tim Hardaway; two-time NCAA National Coach of the Year Bob Huggins; George Karl, the NBA’s sixth-winningest coach of all time; longtime NBA referee Hugh Evans; five-time WNBA All-Star, three-time WNBA champion, and two-time Olympic gold medalist Lindsay Whalen; four-time WNBA All-Star and two-time Olympic gold medalist Swin Cash; and NCAA national champion and WNBA Coach of the Year Marianne Stanley.

Distinguished committees focused on preserving all areas from the game also selected eight directly elected enshrinees. They include Lou Hudson from the Veterans Committee, Larry Costello and Del Harris from the Contributor Committee, Theresa Shank-Grentz from the Women’s Veterans Committee, Radivoj Korac from the International Committee, and Wyatt “Sonny” Boswell, Inman Jackson, and Albert “Runt” Pullins from the Early African American Pioneers Committee.

Enshrinement weekend will begin at Mohegan Sun in Montville, Conn. on Friday, Sept. 9 with the headlining Tip-Off Celebration and Awards Gala. The class of 2022 and more than 50 returning Hall of Famers will then journey to Springfield for the annual celebratory events taking place at the newly renovated Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and Symphony Hall.

Daily News

PALMER — Baystate Wing Hospital and Quaboag Valley Community Development Corp. (QVCDC) announced the funding of a new Quaboag Connector van dedicated to providing transportation to convenient-care and primary-care services for residents living in the towns currently served by the Quaboag Connector. The curb-to-curb service will provide non-emergency medical transportation, allowing patients to request rides to and from medical appointments at Baystate Wing Hospital facilities.

“We are proud to continue to partner with the QVCDC and transportation experts in our region to create solutions that address transportation barriers to healthcare for our community members served by Baystate Wing Hospital,” said Molly Gray, president and chief administrative officer of Baystate Wing Hospital. “Transportation issues are not unique to our region, but our collaborative work to find solutions to help meet these needs has led to creative and successful local solutions.”

Transportation challenges affect both rural and urban communities. According to the American Hospital Assoc., each year, 3.6 million people in the U.S. do not obtain medical care due to transportation issues.

Since 2017, Baystate Wing Hospital and medical staff have invested $210,000 in the Quaboag Connector in response to regional needs for safe and reliable transportation services in the Quaboag Hills region. This service provides community members transportation to employment, education, healthcare, workforce training, shopping, and benefit services within and outside the region. This newest addition to the connector fleet reflects Baystate Wing Hospital’s investment of $65,000 for the purchase of the Convenient Care van, and an additional $155,000 annually to cover operational costs of the new van service, all with a focus on access to healthcare in the region.

Convenient Care, an extension of Baystate Primary Care in Palmer, is dedicated to meeting the same-day urgent-care needs of community members through a collaboration with primary-care, specialty-care, and ancillary providers.

The Quaboag Connector Convenient Care van will serve the communities of Ware and Warren; additionally, services will be made available to patients living in the communities of the Quaboag region, which include Belchertown, Hardwick, Palmer, Monson, West Brookfield, Brookfield, and East Brookfield. The Quaboag Connector Convenient Care van will operate Monday through Saturday. All ride requests must to be made by calling (413) 544-3401. For more information, visit www.rideconnector.org.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — After nearly three years of pandemic-era scheduling hurdles, Springfield and West Springfield will host Hooplandia, the largest 3×3 basketball competition and celebration on the East Coast, on June 23-25, 2023.

The event, which will be hosted by the Eastern States Exposition and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, will feature hundreds of games for thousands of players of all ages and playing abilities, with divisions for young girls, boys, women, men, high-school elite, college elite, pro-am, OGs, wheelchair, Wounded Warrior, Special Olympians, veterans, first responders, and more.

The event will feature more than 70 outdoor blacktop courts placed throughout the roadway and parking-lot network of the Eastern States Exposition fairgrounds in West Springfield; slam-dunk, three-point, free-throw, dribble-course, vertical-jump, and full-court-shot skills competitions; themed state courts for all six New England states; featured ‘showcase games’ held on new court surfaces in the historic Eastern States Coliseum and on the Court of Dreams, the center court of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame; and a festival environment throughout the weekend with food, music, entertainment, and family activities.

The announcement was made today at Eastern States Exposition (ESE) with Eugene J. Cassidy, President and CEO of ESE; John Doleva, President and CEO of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame; West Springfield Mayor Will Reichelt and a host of other regional civic leaders.

“It is a thrill to finally be able to say, ‘game on for Hooplandia!’” said Eugene Cassidy, president and CEO of the Eastern States Exposition. “We are re-energized by the resilience, vision, and collaboration of our partners in this exciting initiative to celebrate basketball. It has been three years of overtime to bring reality to a project and purpose that has never lost its power or potential. Once again, we are excited to transform our grounds into the magical kingdom of Hooplandia for thousands of visitors next summer.”

John Doleva, president and CEO of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, added that “Springfield is the heart and soul of the basketball world, from its humble beginnings to our home as its Hall of Fame. Hooplandia is a natural extension of this legacy, with a grassroots competition and celebration for all ages. We are proud to help build this event, which we hope will grow to become a summer staple of Greater Springfield for years to come.”

A year-long community-outreach effort will begin immediately. Registration will open on March 1, 2023.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. (MBK) recently welcomed Christine Shea, CPA, MSA as a manager; David Lawson, MSA as a tax supervisor; Nicholas Mishol and Taylor Sawicki as associates; and Olivia Freeman as an administrative assistant..

Shea joined MBK in 2022 with more than 25 years of experience in general accounting, cost accounting, auditing, and tax in both public accounting and corporate firms. She holds a master’s degree in accounting from Northern Illinois University and is a certified public accountant in the state of Massachusetts. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants (MSCPA).

Lawson joined MBK in 2022. He has practiced public accounting since 2018 and worked for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Department of Treasury for 16 years. His experience in several different divisions and job functions at the IRS provides a strong basis for understanding a variety of tax issues and insight into the IRS’s approach to compliance issues.

Mishol is a member of the Audit and Accounting department at MBK. He received his bachelor of business administration degree in accounting from the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst and holds an associate degree in business administration from Holyoke Community College. He has practiced public accounting since June 2022.

Sawicki is a member of the Audit and Accounting department at MBK. She has worked in public accounting since January 2021, working mainly with individual tax returns, and looks forward to expanding her experience as an audit associate. She holds a bachelor of business administration degree, concentrating in accounting.

Freeman joined Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. as an administrative assistant. She brings an attitude of efficiency, hard work, ambition, and care to the team at MBK, seeking to make clients feel comfortable and cared for by the firm.

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