Home 2010 August
Cover Story
A New Potential Developer, Renewed Optimism for State School Site

Cover August 30, 2010

Cover August 30, 2010

To date, efforts to redevelop the former Belchertown State School property have been met with only frustration and some embarrassing moments — the last lead development team bounced a check on the town as it proceeded with initial steps in the process. But there is renewed, if cautious optimism as another outfit, Pennsylvania-based Weston Solutions, goes through the due diligence process on the challenged but opportunity-laden property. Said a Weston executive: “Let’s look at the canvas, see what we’ve got. Then we can figure out what brushes and paint we want to use, and then we move forward.”

Bill Terry made a show of knocking on his wooden conference table when introducing the latest unfolding chapter in the redevelopment of the former Belchertown State School property.
Perhaps he did so because, after more than a decade of stalled or failed plans, the Belchertown Economic Development and Industrial Corp. (BEDIC), current owner of the site, may have finally found the right people for the right job.
And that’s on both sides of the negotiating table.
Terry is the chair of the BEDIC, and he said Weston Solutions, a Pennsylvania-based remediation and redevelopment firm signed a letter of interest this past July, giving it full rein over all past documents, research, and findings from the BEDIC.
That letter of interest begins a relationship between town officials and the employee-owned Weston, and while the process of due diligence is carefully underway, both sides expressed reserved, and not-so-reserved, enthusiasm.
One of the Weston officials on the site these days is Valarie Ferro, senior technical director for the Northeast Division. She told BusinessWest that “there are many fine assets to the property.
“Yes, there’s contamination there,” she continued. “But hospitals are not a new thing to us. We’ve looked at many, and were involved in a couple in various roles. When we walked onto the Belchertown property for the first time, we had a pretty good idea of what the project might entail, and when we got here, it was, ‘yup. That’s what we thought.’”
And that’s the attitude that has local officials betraying their reservations on the potential for redevelopment of the property. A 50-year-old firm with a long and successful history, Weston is no stranger to projects of this magnitude and degree of difficulty.
Weston now has 90 days to assess the property and the scope of the job. The BEDIC, meanwhile, also has 90 days of due diligence on Weston to see if its capabilities and track record are in line with the town’s master plan.
Terry acknowledged that, thus far, he is “reservedly excited.”
“They didn’t just come in and say, ‘we’re interested; we heard about this property from a developer,’” he said. “Their approach is, let’s crawl before we walk, and let’s walk before we run, and make sure that there is a good fit here for all parties involved.”
While others have come before and failed, Weston Solutions is not, as Terry said, “just some guy out of the wooly West who says he’s a developer. This company, they know what they’re doing.”
The halfway point for both parties’ pro forma on this job hasn’t yet been reached. But in separate conversations with BusinessWest, the hope for all involved is to no longer knock on wood when talking about the future of the Belchertown State School.

Strength in Numbers
The last time a developer took on the prospect of repurposing the Belchertown property, a grand resort and spa was envisioned for the remaining buildings and land at the state school, comprising just under 100 acres. Famously, the developer bounced the deposit check for the job, and the BEDIC found itself bounced back to square one — no development, a blighted property, and scant opportunity for a project to move forward.
But that’s history, and what is unfolding has those involved far more excited about prospects in tune with the community.
The details at this stage of Weston Solutions’ examination of the property is purely within the realm of speculation, but Terry allowed himself optimism when expounding on the current players involved on both sides of the property’s negotiations.
For starters, Belchertown has a crack team in its court, and Terry said that, going forward, it’s not now just him and his colleagues, all of whom have full-time jobs in addition to their role with the BEDIC. “We on the board have talents,” he explained, not diminishing whatsoever the solid work he and his colleagues have accomplished over the years, “but it is good to have these professionals in our camp.”
Among those professionals is MassDevelopment, with whom the BEDIC has been in collaboration since this past May. That signed memorandum of agreement, Terry said, puts all the resources of the state agency into play for the Belchertown property.
“These are dedicated professional real-estate people and engineers — big players,” he continued. “We need only write out a request for service, provide some sort of budget, and they get right to work.”
In addition, the town’s state legislators are all on board with any and all help that can be garnered from Beacon Hill, and Terry singled out Sens. Stan Rosenberg and Gale Candaras, and State Reps. Tom Petrolati and Stephen Kulik.
“It’s finally the time where we have the right team assembled to make this happen,” he said.

Finding a Solution
Of course, those players are an important step in maneuvering the Belchertown project toward a positive outcome. But an ace team alone doesn’t get a project of this size and scope closer to a finished product.
Weston’s history of engineering, procurement, property remediation, and development spans several countries and countless properties that were in far worse shape than the Belchertown site. From complex wetland locations to defunct chemical plants, Weston has a stated goal of “zero tolerance for unethical behavior” while working within communities.
Ferro quoted her company’s logo at the beginning of her conversation with BusinessWest: “The trusted integrator for sustainable solutions.”
“We do integrate, we pull it all together,” she explained, “but before that, we sort it all out. It’s an art, and it’s a science, and it’s an art and science at the same time. That’s where developers stumble with blighted or underutilized assets. There are just so many components to these projects.”
Like the team assembled by the BEDIC, Weston has mobilized its own bevy of seasoned professionals. At the Belchertown property that day, Ferro, who has a background in redevelopment planning and community planning, said that in addition to herself, there are three others with specialized interests.
A green deconstruction expert, “not just a landfill expert, but someone who knows how to safely and successfully repurpose any material,” she explained, was on hand along with Weston’s LEED-licensed site professional, to evaluate the environmental aspect. Rounding out the team was the LEED green-development expert, who also happens to be leading Weston’s Northeast efforts in a green-roof technology company it owns.
“That’s just three of maybe four or five other components that we have to sort together,” she emphasized.
When asked about the complexities of the Belchertown site, Ferro said, “by and large we are attracted to challenges. The projects we take on, and are successful at, are where others have failed before us. Or they were just not interested because of the inherent difficulties.”
In addition to all those difficulties, however, is a site that she said comes with just as many, if not more, attributes. She described the brick buildings as “stately,” but it’s the landscape that holds more promise than other projects Weston has overseen.
“The rolling topography, the views, the fact that it’s also a very valuable critical mass of land … you don’t know how much we struggle when working in urban environments, and we have to cobble together eight or 10 property owners just to sew together three acres. Here, we have a great big glob of land, and the surrounding land use is compatible.”
That was a word often repeated in her conversation, and in which lies a core value for Weston Solutions. She said that’s a major difference between her firm and a more traditional property developer, which customarily has a book of clients and end users for projects of this size.
“For us, we might want it, whatever it is,” she said of potential use at the site, “but if it’s not compatible with the town, or consistent with our core values, then we don’t pursue it. We just don’t go there.
“And that’s why, frankly, there’s not a lot of talk up front for us right now,” she continued, “because we’re just trying to understand what the context is — both the town and the property. What’s our canvas? Let’s look at the canvas, see what we’ve got. Then we can figure out what brushes and paint we want to use, and then we move forward.”
That canvas, however, has some underpainting already.
When asked if Weston has been given an understanding on issues of core importance for the BEDIC, town hall, and the voting population of Belchertown, Terry stated unequivocally, “absolutely.”
“They have our master development plan, and they have the 43D plan,” Terry said, referring to the site work made possible through MassDevelopment. “Not only that, we’ve verbally told them what is important to us. We told them we’re not building a new town center here. We’re not being disrespectful, but there are clear things that the community wants and doesn’t want.
“Our development plan says no big-box stores,” he added. “Nothing against ‘Wally World,’ we all go there, but we’re not a community that wants them. Weston knows that too, and knows that we won’t entertain that idea. That could have happened years ago, but we didn’t want it.”

Sense Break
Looking ahead, Terry said the BEDIC has some clear hopes for what might unfold at the state school property. As a town resident with roots that trace back to the earliest settlers, he said that it is important for him, and many others, to keep that intergenerational component in Belchertown.
To accomplish that, he sees health and wellness, specifically assisted living, as a good use for some of the property. He cited a similar project in Ludlow that had designs on full occupancy five years after construction, but successfully met capacity in two.
Belchertown, he maintains, is a middle-class community with good schools and a strong commitment to public services. In keeping with that tradition, he said, is the need to “take care of mom and dad.”
An assisted-living developer has expressed interest in parts of the property for several years, he continued, but has lacked the resources to tackle anything beyond his own slice of real estate.
To further substantiate the possibility of a successful market for that style of development, he noted that several other assisted-living builders have looked at the site and weighed in with their own vote of confidence and an interest in buildable property.
In a separate conversation, Ferro brought up a similar train of thought, giving evidence to her prior comments on collaboration. Weston has looked at the conceptuals for wellness and assisted-living development on the property, and while one of the things it is doing during this period is “going with their gut feelings and considerable contacts,” she agreed with that facet to Terry’s vision.
“I really am attracted to their idea of inter-generational living,” she said. “Right next door there’s the police station, the teen center, and maybe some of this can be expanded so that it represents Belchertown as a whole. I think there’s real potential there.”
But again, she tempered her enthusiasm with restraint. “I think we all wish there was a CliffsNotes on what to do about the Belchertown property. We’re sorting through an enormous amount of information and just literally sopping it up like sponges.”
Just like everyone working on both sides of the project, however, restraint gave way to hope. “My gut feeling is that, seeing what’s there, there is potential to pull this off,” she said.
From his office in Springfield, Terry echoed that sentiment.
“We’re conservatively excited,” he said again. “It’s going to take a lot of care, but it seems like we’re working with the right folks, and this is the best shot we have had since I’ve been on the board.”
Noticeably, he didn’t knock on wood this time. n

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

Sept. 1: ACCGS [email protected] Breakfast — Making Chamber Connections, 7:15 a.m. to 9 a.m..
hosted by The Log Cabin.

Featuring guest speaker Tim Cahill, Massachusetts state treasurer and a 2010 gubernatorial candidate. Cost for members is $20; non-members is$30. Call the chamber for more information.
Sept. 15: ACCGS After 5, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Hosted by the Springfield Marriott. Cost for members is $10, non-members, $20.
Sept. 23: Feast in the East-ERC, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Hosted by: Elmcrest Country Club Cost: $25 per person. Call the chamber for more information.

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com   
n Sept. 15: 17th Annual United Way Day of Caring. This event pairs volunteers with agency service providers to accomplish a variety of projects. YPS will again pair up with the Greater Springfield Habitat for Humanity and work on one of the homes currently under construction in Springfield. If you are interested in joining our team please e-mail Maureen Picknally at [email protected]
Sept. 16: Third Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Hosted by Springfield Country Club, 1375 Elm St., West Springfield. This event is free for YPS members, and $5 for non-members.

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

Sept. 21: 13th Annual Table Top Showcase and business networking event, from 4:30 to 7 p.m., at the The Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Presented by the Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield Chambers of Commerce. Call the chambers for more information.

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463

Sept. 24: Breakfast Series – United Way Program, 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Hosted by Franklin County Technical School, Turners Falls. Call the chamber for more information.
Sept. 25 and 26: Fiber Twist, an Annual Celebration of All Things Fiber in Franklin County,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hosted by Marketplace at Healthworks, Yankee Candle Village, Routes 5 and 10, South Deerfield. No admission charge. For details, visit www.fibertwist.com

Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

Sept. 8: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Hosted by the Apollo Grill. Tickets: $5 for members, $15 for non-members.
Oct. 1: Casino Night, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m, at One Cottage St., Easthampton. Tickets: $25 in advance, $30 at the door. For more information, visit www.easthamptonchamber.org

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

Sept. 15: Holyoke Chamber Clambake, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., at Holyoke Country Club. Tickets are $26. Call the chamber to reserve tickets.
Sept.  21: The 13th Annual Table Top Showcase, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Hosted by the Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Drive, Chicopee. Call the chamber for more information or to reserve tickets.
Sept. 22: 2010 Pacesetter Awards Recognition Breakfast, starting at 7:30 a.m. Hosted by the Delaney House. The Pacesetter Awards go to exceptional small businesses and non-profit agencies, to entrepreneurs, and to those advocates who make other businesses successful. Tickets are $18. Please call the chamber for more information or to reserve tickets. 

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

Sept. 1: Arrive @ 5, from 5-7 p.m. Hosted by the Snow Farm & The New England Craft Program,  5 Clary Road Williamsburg. Cost: $10 for members

Sept. 10: New Member Breakfast, from 8 to 9 a.m. Hosted by the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce. Call the chamber for more information.

Northampton Area Young Professional Society
www.thenayp.com
(413) 584-1900

Sept. 9: Party with a Purpose, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Hosted by the Hotel Northampton. Free for NAYP members, $5 for guests. The event, the third birthday party of the Northampton Area Young Professionals, will be held outside on the Patio, weather permitting. If the weather is inclement, we will be inside in the Coolidge Park Cafe. Call YPS for more information.
Sept. 17: NAYP Dynamics of Fleet Safety Seminar, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., at Union Station. Safety supervisors and fleet managers from all industries will benefit from this important presentation, led by Gerry Sousa, executive director of the National Safety Council’s Western New England Chapter. Participants will identify the daily challenges of running an effective fleet and learn the essential elements of a fleet safety program. Best practices for motor vehicle safety, collision prevention and asset use will be discussed.
Sept. 21: Meet & Eat, from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center. Tickets are $15 for members, $20 for guests.

Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce
www.qvcc.biz
(413) 283-2418

South Hadley/Granby Chamber of Commerce
www.shchamber.com
(413) 532-6451

Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce
www.threeriverschamber.org
(413) 283-6425

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

Sept. 8: WestNet After 5 Networking, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Hosted by: Shaker Farms Country Club. Tickets are $10 for members, $15 for non-members. Call the chamber for more information.
n Sept. 21: “Rake in The Business” TableTop Expo, from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Castle of Knights on Memorial Drive in Chicopee. Presented by the Chicopee, Holyoke and Westfield Chambers of Commerce. Call the chambers for more information.

Sept. 24: Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce 104th Air Fighter Annual Breakfast, from 7:15 a.m. to 9 a.m. Hosted by the 104th Air Fighter, Barnes Airport, 175 Falcon Dr., Westfield.  Guest Speaker:Ira Bryck, director of UMass Family Business Center. Tickets are #20 for members, $25 for non-members. Call the chamber for more information.

Briefcase Departments

AIM’s Business Confidence Index Stumbles in July

BOSTON — The Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index dropped 5.2 points in July to 48.5, falling below 50 — neutral on its 100-point scale — after moving into positive territory in May and June. This is the index’s most significant monthly setback since it bottomed out in February 2009, according to Raymond Torto, global chief economist at CB Richard Ellis Group Inc. and chair of AIM’s board of economic advisors. Despite 14 gains in the previous 16 months, Massachusetts employers’ doubts about the strength and staying power of the economic recovery have been evident throughout, and those concerns are now coming to the fore, he added. Torto noted there are global as well as domestic issues in play; the fate on the euro, for example, will affect Massachusetts exports. The quarterly Massachusetts Consumer Confidence Index, released by Mass Insight, showed similar backsliding. Mostly due to concerns on jobs, the July Consumer Confidence Index fell 19 points to 61, its lowest level since last year. Torto added that weakening consumer confidence, nationally and here in Massachusetts, is a grave concern for employers because there can be no real economic recovery unless consumer spending picks up. AIM’s Business Confidence Index has been issued monthly since July 1991. Its historical high was 68.5, attained in 1997 and 1998; its low was 33.3 in February 2009. The Index was up 3.7 points from July 2009 and 4.1 over two years, but down 6.5 from July 2007. All of the sub-indices based on selected questions or respondent characteristics lost ground in July along with the main index, but there was marked variation in the magnitude of the declines. The Current Index of conditions prevailing at the time of the survey was off 2.2 points to 49.1, while the Future Index of expected conditions six months ahead plunged eight points to 48.1. The Massachusetts Index of business conditions prevailing within the Commonwealth fell 6.1 points to 41.7, but remained above the U.S. Index of national conditions, which lost 6.6 to 38.2. The Company Index, which measures survey respondents’ overall confidence in the situations of their own operations, was down 3.9 points in July to 55.0. The Employment Index held up well, edging off eight-tenths to 53.7, but the Sales Index dropped seven points to 54.4. Confidence was lower in July among manufacturers (down 4.3 to 52.5) and among other employers (down 6.2 to 44.2). Manufacturers were more likely to call current conditions for the companies ‘good’ (50% to 35%), were more positive about sales and employment, and foresaw less deterioration of conditions ahead. Respondents outside Greater Boston were slightly more confident (down1.6 to 49.5) than those within the metropolitan area (down 7.9 to 47.8). Employers of all sizes were less confident in July, with an especially steep decline among small companies. The monthly Business Confidence Index is based on a survey of AIM member companies across Massachusetts, asking questions about current and prospective business conditions in the state and nation, as well as for respondents’ own operations.

Former Mastex Site Chosen for Computing Center

HOLYOKE — After months of speculation, state officials revealed announced recently that the former Mastex Industries Inc. facility on Bigelow Street would become the site for a highly anticipated high-performance computing center. Gov. Deval Patrick, flanked by state and local officials, including Holyoke Mayor Elaine Pluta, U.S. rep. John Olver, and UMass President Jack Wilson, made the announcement, calling this “one of the most excitinjg developments in Western Massachusetts.” The project, which will entail an initial investment of $168 million, has a number of partners, including the state, UMass, MIT, Harvard, Boston University, Cisco Systems, and EMC Corp. Officials expect that the center will create only about 20 full-time positions, but that the computing capacity may eventually lure other companies and perhaps government agencies to the area.

Callaway Announces More Job Cuts at Chicopee Plant

CHICOPEE — Callaway Golf Corp. announced recently that it will substantially reduce its workforce in Chicopee over the next 12 to 18 months as it continues to expand golf ball and club manufacturing operations at its location in Mexico. The cuts are expected to leave the plant, which employed roughly 600 people as recently as the fall of 2008, with 150-200 workers. In a prepared statement, the company, Callaway cited a softness in the golf industry as one of the reasons for the move to Mexico.

Bay State Continues to Add Jobs

BOSTON — Massachusetts employers continued to add jobs for the sixth consecutive month in July, continuing a pace of growth that is well ahead of the nation’s. The state gained more than 13,000 jobs in July, while data revisions showed that employment growth in June, nearly 3,000 jobs, was far stronger than initially estimated, according to the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development. The state unemployment rate held steady at 9%.

Legislation Reduces Health Care Costs for Small Businesses

BOSTON — Governor Deval Patrick recently joined legislative leaders and small business owners to sign legislation that could save small employers up to 12% on insurance premiums, increase transparency among providers and insurers, and improve the quality of health care for residents across the state. The law also makes small businesses eligible for savings on health care premiums, and will allow them to be able to pool their resources and establish cooperatives for the purpose of purchasing health insurance. As part of his efforts to control skyrocketing health care costs, Patrick has instructed the Division of Insurance to review rates from carriers using the Division’s existing authority..

Bankruptcies Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Agin, Bryon D.
Agin, Constance L.
1 Prospect St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Akey, Michael J.
Akey, Alissa M.
6 Dewolf Road
Montague, MA 01351
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Alvarado, Joseth del Carmen
a/k/a Moreno, Joseth C.
164 Colonial Village
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/10

Ansanitis, David A.
25 Maple St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/06/10

Arias, Carlos E.
Arias, Nancy C.
a/k/a Lopez, Nancy C.
101 Dorset St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Austin, Eric S.
Austin, Tracy A.
13 Phillips St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Bashaw, Joan M.
17 Highview Dr., Apt. A
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

Bechta, Leonard J.
Bechta, Sara L.
a/k/a Durocher, Sara L.
98 Carver St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/26/10

Beckett, Herbert
70 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/19/10

Bedard, Theresa A.
233 Cedar Swamp Road
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/10

Bosworth, Bruce D.
317 Southwick Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Bowden, Roger C.
86 Sesame Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/10

Broga, Deborah A.
P.O.Box 518
Lee, MA 01238
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Bruno, Alberta A.
70 Powder Mill Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Burgen, Paulette A.
594 George Hannum Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Burnett, Loida P.
41 Klondike Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Card, Lisa M.
64 Brickyard Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Carrigan, Michael T.
636 New Braintree Road
Oakham, MA 01068
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Castonguay, Vaughn P.
216 Greenaway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Chartier’s General Carpentry
Chartier, Donald N.
59 Reed St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Cintron, Nilsa
a/k/a Almonla, Nilsa
a/k/a Jones, Nilsa
85 West Alvord St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Clevenshire, John J.
Clevenshire, Katherine A.
a/k/a Marceau, Katherine
22 Kingston St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Clough, Constance P.
P.O.Box 97
West Warren, MA 01092
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Cogswell, Robert E.
PO Box 506
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Costella, Raymond A.
Costella, Michelle L.
37 Editha Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Crafts, Gilbert J.
428 Cummington Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

Curley, Martin F.
Curley, Michele C.
96 Judson St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Davila, Juanita M.
6 Springfield St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/19/10

Derosier, Lawrence L.
Derosier, Kerrie L.
25 Mount Dumplin Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Dizdarevic, Suad
60 Colony Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/19/10

Drew, Alan P.
83 Pennsylvania Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Dust Bunnies Etc.
Seney, John A.
Seney, Tara M.
a/k/a Ploof, Tara M.
140 Oaklawn Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Dyer, Nicholas C.
Dyer, Kristy L.
6 Porter Ave.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Errichetto, Stephen
Errichetto, Linda A.
61 Glenwood Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Feliciano, Mayda
14 Nashawannuck St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Finklea, Eddie
57 Bretton Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Fortier, Kathleen J.
Brown, Kathleen J.
24 Treehouse Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Gadson, Wesaline
P.O.Box 1815
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/12/10

Goulet, Beth M.
P.O. Box 123
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

Graf, Debra M.
108 Trilby Ave., #2
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Graham, Timothy Adams
13 Sterling Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Hall, Courtney J.
252 West St. #2
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/19/10

Harms, Jean L.
22 Guyotte Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Harris, Frederick C.
Harris, Judith A.
43 Bates St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Hentnick, Todd R.
7 Crestwood Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/10

Hilbig, Mark C.
Hilbig, Tammy A.
47 Call St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Jaskulski, Joanne M.
51 Dogwood Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/06/10

Jones, Beverly M.
340 Hampden St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Joseph, Ketty
35 Longhill Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Kania, Sheri Lynn
24 Shore Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Kendra, Kenneth A.
384 Front St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Kindberg, Carl G
79 St. John’s St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/09/10

Kizis, Andrew B.
Kizis, Ann M.
672 Sheldon Road
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Knapp, Paula R.
106 Devon Terr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/10

Komlev, Vera
a/k/a Katko, Vera
15 Sarah Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Konopko, Krystyna
Konopko, Miroslaw I.
13 Lewis St., Apt. 2
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Kouniotis, John A.
60 Florence Road
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Koziol, Mario M.
46 Hadley St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Kraft, Kenneth A.
Kraft, Lisa J.
41 Lakemont St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

 

Kristek, Joseph J.
Kristek, Susan Y.
44 Strong St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Link, Jeffrey J.
294 Barker Road
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Loranger, Tommy P.
Loranger, Tarynn M.
37 Jerilis Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Lynch, Barry S.
62 Yorktown Court #62
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Madison, Glenn P.
P.O. Box 172
Chicopee, MA 01021
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Marchefka, Phyllis A.
37 Barton Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Millis, Rose M.
111 Meadow St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Mosher, Barbara L.
420 Main St., Unit 86
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/09/10

Motyl, Theodore S.
PO Box 491
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Nardi, Raffaela
31 Ardmore St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Nichols, Patricia
129 Brewster St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/09/10

Nooney, Stephen D.
Nooney, Marianne
a/k/a Murray, Marianne
130 Montgomery Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/22/10

O’Connor, John P.
237 Savoy Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104-2402
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

O’Meara, Robert J
1329 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Page, Virginia M.
Page, John C.
4385 South Athol Road
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Pais, Darla M.
a/k/a Allen, Darla M.
P.O. Box 253
Blandford, MA 01008
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Pelletier, Louis J.
23 Corcoran Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Peramba, Edward J.
Peramba, Pamela J.
313 Deerfield St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Pereira, Antonio D.
Pereira, Darlene M.
868 Southampton Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/10

Perkins, Timothy P.
53 Oak Ridge Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Perry, Andrea L.
50 Sackett Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Peters, Gus
Peters, Deborah A.
P.O. Box 173
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Platanitis, Marc G.
81 Erin Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Reyes, Pilar
79 Perkins St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Reynolds, Robert M.
Reynolds, Tonya L.
111 Brown St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Roberts, Steven Dennis
Roberts, Shannon Marie
441 East Main St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/10

Rock, Kristal S.
PO Box 574
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Rock, Peter D.
2 Maplelawn Dr.
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Ruggeri, William D.
Ruggeri, Janine M.
P.O. Box 840
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Ruggeri, William D.
Ruggeri, Janine M.
P.O. Box 840
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Ryan, Floyd J.
Ryan, Marilyn G.
163 Munsell St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/06/10

Sanderson, Mary E.
104 Burt Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

Savage, Albert E.
50 Redfern Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/10

Shaw, Frederick Michael
Shaw, Carol Ann
P.O.Box 894
Sheffield, MA 01257
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Shear Designs
Carey, Norman C.
Carey, Theresa K.
3602 South Athol Road
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Shelley, Christopher P.
104 Caseland St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Silakowski, E. Michael
P.O. Box 456
West Stockbridge, MA 01266
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

Simoes, Rebecca Lynn
a/k/a Towne, Rebecca Lynn
130 Water St. #8
Lee, MA 01238
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Simon, Todd P.
Simon, Monique A.
85 Falmouth Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/09/10

Smith, Robert J.
Smith, Victoria M.
108 Blaine St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/20/10

Sumwalt, Bobbi G.
a/k/a Kijak, Bobbi G.
516 Broadway St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/10

Tapia, Israel
355 Walnut St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/10

Tavarez, Aurelio
121 Eastern Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/26/10

Thomas, William L.
248 Hanson Dr.
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Tiwari, Arlene F.
80 Murphy Lane
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/22/10

Toledo, Juan M.
202 Lanconia St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/10

Trailing Edge Technologies
Harding, Christine R.
157 Chesterfield Road
Leeds, MA 01053
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Tremblay Electric, Inc.
Tremblay, Christopher J.
57 Harris St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Trott, Brian Alan
400 East St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Tsoklan, Inha V.
1329 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/21/10

Volino, Anthony A.
689 Skyline Trail
Chester, MA 01011
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/10

Washington, Kelly R.
837 State St., #411
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/10

Wheelock, Clifford John
506 Florence Road
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Williams, Katie Eileen
199 Millers Falls Road
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/10

Wilson, Audrey J.
a/k/a McGraw, Audrey
151 Pendleton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/10

Wing, Michael John
P.O. Box 846
Russell, MA 01071
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/16/10

Zebrowski, Francis D.
Zebrowski, Cynthia A.
186 Old Warren Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/23/10

Zimmerman, Katherine M.
64 Montague Road
Amherst, MA 01004
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/10

Features
The Springfield Public Forum at 75

Springfield Public Forum 2010

Springfield Public Forum 2010

Launched in 1935 as a pilot program designed to further the education of adults unable to attend college at the height of the Great Depression, the Springfield Public Forum is today one of the oldest lecture series in the country and perhaps the only one that remain free to the public. The list of speakers who have come to Springfield includes hundreds of luminaries, ranging from future presidential contenders Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey to Doonesbury creator Gary Trudeau. Through the years, the forum has remained true to its mission while also changing and evolving to remain relevant, reach audiences of all ages, and be a force in the cultural life of the region

Patricia Canavan says those round-number anniversaries, such as the 75th now being marked by the Springfield Public Forum, are much more than occasions for blowing out candles on a cake and marking the passage of time.
Indeed, these are occasions — historically better than other anniversary numbers, such as 74, 76, 49, or 51 — for efforts to draw attention to an organization and remind the public of its value to the community. “And, even more importantly, it’s a time for introspection, for looking at what’s being done and for ways to do it better,” said Canavan, executive director of the forum, noting that those involved with this Western Mass. institution are taking full advantage of this anniversary to do all that and more.
In other words, she said, the 75th will be an occasion to underscore one of the forum’s more effective marketing slogans: ‘Old, but New Every Year.’
Dave Martel, a partner with the Springfield-based law firm Doherty, Wallace, Pillsbury, and Murphy, and a board member for nearly half the forum’s existence, agreed. He told BusinessWest that this year’s forum series, to begin Sept. 21 with a talk from Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, is both a celebration of the institution’s contributions to the community and testimony to how the forum continues to carry out its mission to educate and engage area residents.
He said the 75th anniversary season, while in many ways no different than other years, does, because it is a milestone, present a good opportunity for everything from enlisting additional support from the business community, which underwrites the lectures, to building up an endowment that will someday lessen the forum’s reliance on fund-raising.
“We want to use that endowment to fund one lecture each year, which will put less emphasis on having to find sponsors for each talk,” said Martel, adding that the attention garnered by the 75th anniversary celebration will provide a real boost for those efforts.
Canavan, now in her fourth year at the helm of the forum, said the organization, one of the oldest lecture series in the country and perhaps the only one that remains free to the public, continues to evolve. She used that term first in reference to the fact that the staff, which has grown to four part-time employees, is now paid. But she also utilized it to describe efforts with everything from choosing speakers that will appeal to today’s tech-savvy young people to taking learning opportunities well beyond the one hour of a speaker’s address.
These and other measures are part of a broad strategic planning initiative launched in 2007 and, in many ways, inspired by the diamond anniversary, said Canavan, noting that, overall, the plan’s goal is simply to extend the forum’s reach and enable it to touch more lives.
“We needed to define where we were going and look into the future and decide what we wanted to be,” she said of the strategic initiative. “We are committed to the fact that we are education organization, and while the lectures play a huge part in this, we decided that because we’re bringing such a wealth of resources, people, to a community, to just let them speak for one night and have that be it, is in many ways a waste.”
For this issue, BusinessWest, on the occasion of the forum’s 75th anniversary, takes a broad look at how the lecture series continues to evolve and find new and different ways to remain true to its original mission.

Learning Experience
As she talked about the 75th anniversary and anticipation of it, Canavan said that one more thing the milestone inspired was research into the forum’s creation, history, and legacy. Much of the work was carried out by an intern, and it was quite eye opening, she noted.
Among other things, it revealed that the forum began in 1935 as a three-year project sponsored by the American Association for Adult Education in New York City, which ran similar programs across the country. The first series featured 40 programs over eight weeks, and functioned as a short college course with guest lecturers on related topics, said Canavan, noting that, at the time (the height of the Great Depression), many adults simply did not have the wherewithal to pursue college degrees, and the forum served as a means for continuing their education.
The lectures, which drew nearly 50,000 people that first season, were intentionally historical in nature for the first few years, she continued, but changed at the request of the audience to address topical issues. By openly addressing contemporary problems, the forum series became a driving force in the cultural life in Springfield.
Over the years, luminaries from politics, literature, science, sports, the media and other fields have appeared at Symphony Hall. The list of speakers includes Henry Kissinger, Robert Moses, Maya Angelou, Issac Asimov, Zbigniew Brzeziniski, Alex Haley, Art Linkletter, Gary Trudeau, and Red Auerbach. In 1952, Senators Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey, who would square off against each other in the 1968 presidential election, both spoke at the forum.
Then, as now, the commitment has been to “great speakers, great discourse,” said Martel, and this is a tradition being continued with the 75th anniversary lineup, which presents testimony to the many ways in which the forum remains true to its mission, but also continues that evolutionary process and strives to reach larger and more diverse audiences.
The roster of speakers reflects how those who are assembling the lineup are striving for diversity in terms of subject matter, as well as a focus on current events and efforts to grow attendance by bringing more families and young people to Symphony Hall, he continued.
Breyer, just the second Supreme Court justice to take part in the forum (William O. Douglas was the other), appears as both a jurist — speaking on current issues, including the recent appointment of the court’s latest member, Elena Kagan — and as author of several books, including Active Liberty and Through the Eyes of a Judge.
Breyer’s visit will be followed by what Canavan calls one of the forum’s “family friendly” lectures, featuring Mars Rover lead scientist Steven Squyres, on Oct. 24. This will be a multi-media presentation that will include up-to-the-minute news and footage from the Mars Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, as well as information about NASA’s future plans. The lecture, which is the culminating event in a month-long series of programming involving science and technology (more on that later) will be preceded by a small student discussion group with Squyres and demonstrations by student robotics groups.
Squyres’ appearance typifies efforts in recent years on the part of forum administrators and board members to reach out to younger people, said Canavan, noting that recent lineups, crafted with the same goal in mind, have included marine archeologist Robert Ballard, whose team located the Titanic, Jean Michel Cousteau, son of the late explorer, oceanographer, and filmmaker Jacques Cousteau and president of the Ocean Futures Society, and others involved in the sciences.
Inclusion of speakers with messages that will appeal to younger audiences is a key part of that broad initiative, but it is only one component.
“One of our big goals for this season is to really resonate with people of my generation or younger,” said Canavan, 41, noting that one of the strategies for doing this is making full use of the rapidly advancing information technology and social media outlets embraced by younger generations. “We have updated and upgraded our Web site, we have a very active FaceBook page and an electronic newsletter.
“But that’s just one part of the equation,” she continued. “Another piece is resonating with movers and shakers within the younger crowd. “I’ve reached out to people who can say to their group or sphere of influence, ‘hey, look at this … this is something great, a real asset to our community.”

Talking the Talk
The rest of the lineup for this fall reflects efforts on the forum’s part to be topical while also engaging audiences, said Canavan.
On Oct. 28, Kavita Ramdas, senior advisor to and former president and CEO of the Global Fund for Women, will give a talk focusing on the challenges and opportunities presented by globalization, with a look at the role of social entrepreneurship on improving health, education, and economic security in developing countries.
Meanwhile, urban revitalization will the focus of a talk by Newark, N.J. Mayor Cory Booker, whose innovative strategies are producing solid results for that community. Booker will share his multi-faceted approach to economic development, community building, education and housing reform, and promotion of arts and culture. The season will conclude with a town-hall-style moderated conversation with new analysts and commentators Mark Shields and David Brooks, as they appear on PBS’s Newshour. They will provide insight into current events, including the mid-term elections, the economy, national, and international affairs.
In many ways, the 2010 season and its lineup of speakers reflects initiatives included in that strategic planning process, completed two years ago, that spurred several new initiatives.
Among them is something called the City Thinks Program, undertaken in conjunction with the Springfield Public Library and funded by a number of groups, especially the American International College Honors Program. City Thinks takes one of the forum lecture topics and develops three weeks of programming around it, offered in a number of venues.
This season, the Squyres lecture was chosen, said Canavan, adding that programming will include book-discussion groups, movie and documentary screenings, a student video contest (with a special prize donated by PeoplesBank), “Family Fun Day” at the Springfield Museums, and more.
“The goal is to give as many as possible the opportunity to learn more about this topic,” she explained, noting that this year’s topic is called “The Final Frontier: Space, Science, and Technology. “We want to provide as many avenues as possible for people to engage and learn more.”
Other component of the strategic initiative involves efforts to expand outreach to area schools, community centers, and other facilities to provide resources for additional learning, she continued. These endeavors include small-group discussions with forum speakers prior to their talks at Symphony Hall. One such talk two years ago, involving presidential historian Michael Beschloss involved 25 students in Springfield Public Schools.
“It was a terrific program … these students were prepped, they came with great questions,” said Canavan. “This was a great way for them to build upon what they were learning in the classroom.
“We’re finding that with these educational outreach activities and the partnerships we’re building with different educational and cultural organizations that we’re able to reach more people,” she continued. “And that’s something we’re really excited about.”

In Conclusion
Canavan told BusinessWest that some special marketing initiatives have been undertaken for this 75th season of lectures, including a new logo and related materials. There are some other things planned that would be considered extraordinary, and there may well be a cake included in the mix somewhere.
But forum administrators and board members want to do much more this year than simply celebrate a milestone, a diamond anniversary. They want to take full advantage of this opportunity to not only mark some history, but generate some awareness and momentum so that much more history can be written, and a tradition can not only continue, but expand and thrive.
If they can succeed with all that, then there will be really something to celebrate.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Departments Picture This

One Book at a Time


Program participants

Program participants engaged in a number of learning activities with youngsters there

As part of a program called “Putting the Accent on Literacy, One Book at a Time,” BusinessWest and its Difference Makers from 2009 and 2010 coordinated a book drive in conjunction with the Hasbro Summer Learning Initiative, which links young people with books during the summer months, when they are away from. On August 13, more than 500 books were delivered to the Dunbar Community Center in Springfield, where program participants engaged in a number of learning activities with youngsters there, including book readings, games, and even a play (at left) involving Rosa Parks and her famous decision not to ride in the back of the bus.



Sally Fuller, project director for the Cherish Every Child

Sally Fuller, project director for the Cherish Every Child

Sally Fuller, project director for the Cherish Every Child initiative for the Davis Foundation, one of the Difference Makers for 2010, listens intently as one of the young students reads Where the Fern Grows.


Gwen Burke, left, and Nikia Davis

BusinessWest advertising consultant Gwen Burke, left, and Nikia Davis, the magazine’s senior designer

BusinessWest advertising consultant Gwen Burke, left, and Nikia Davis, the magazine’s senior designer, engage several students in a game of Scrabble Junior.


Maura Geary, project coordinator for the Regional Employment Board and one of the architects of the literacy program, gets to know several of the students involved with the summer reading initiative.


‘Nathanial’ proudly displays the book

‘Nathanial’ proudly displays the book

‘Nathanial’ proudly displays the book he chose to read to BusinessWest staff writer Joe Bednar. Each child was given a book to take home.

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the month of September 2010.

AGAWAM

Bondi’s Island
190 Main St.
$77,000 — Construct a truck-loading building

Heritage Hall Nursing Home
61 Cooper St.
$7,000 — Storage shed

Insurance Center of New England
1070 Suffield St.
$1,100,000 — Renovate 13,000 square feet of office space

Robert Germano
13 Maple St.
$15,000 — Renovations

AMHERST

18 Piece Chicopee, LLC
15-17 Fearing St
$6,000 — Interior renovations

Amherst College Trustees
Garman Dorm
$8,000 — Exterior renovation and porch repair

Amherst School Department
1001 South East St.
$51,000 — New roof

Grand Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa
510 North Pleasant St.
$3,300 — Ceiling repair in party room

Miller Pollin Buildings, LLC
865 Belchertown Road
$27,000 — Installation of solar panels

CHICOPEE

200 Tillary, LLC
165 Front St.
$120,000 — Replace 522 windows

200 Tillary, LLC
165 Front St.
$35,000 — Sheetrock ceilings from first to the fourth floor

Chicopee Housing Authority
165 East Main St.
$257,000 — Strip and re-shingle roof

Chicopee Savings Bank
596 East St.
$158,000 — Interior renovation

Riverbend Medical Group
444 Montgomery St.
$265,000 — Renovate Pediatric office

EASTHAMPTON

Calvery Baptist Church
413 Main St.
$2,500 — Replace 5 windows

Interland Real Estate LLC
180 Pleasant St.
$102,000 — Create 15,000 square feet of space for a machine shop

Peter Peloquin
95 Union St.
$8,400 — Remove existing roof and replace

Robert Chunyk
51 Main St.
$3,700 — Construct new rear entry stair

Valley Programs Inc.
79 East St.
$5,000 — Enlarge window to comply with fire egress

GREENFIELD

Garden Building, LLC
361 Main St.
$67,500 — New roof

Greenfield Farmers Cooperative Exchange
275 High St.
$6,000 — Replace loading dock area roof

Mark A. Zaccheo
30 Olive St.
$1,270,000 — Renovation of commercial building

Ninos Emmanuel
226 Federal St.
$14,000 — Installation of kitchen exhaust hood and fire suppression system

Park Place Realty Trust
80 Sanderson St.
$18,000 — Replace cedar shingles with vinyl siding

Spike Segundo, LLC
25-27 Bank Row
$3,000 — Add three walls for treatment rooms and doors for tenant fit-up

HADLEY

ALDI Inc.
337-357 Russell St.
$880,000 — Construction of a new retail store

Fastenal Company
220 Russell St.
$9,000 — Minor interior renovations

Parmar & Sons Inc.
37-41 Russell St.
$8,000 — Renovating entrance and framing out offices

HOLYOKE

Christian Celebration of Baptist Temple Church Inc.
375 South Elm St.
$5,400 — Change hatchway door, add ramp, and install smoke detectors

Holyoke Mall Company, L.P.
50 Holyoke St.
$122,000 — Remodel of Bare Essentials store

Holyoke Mall Company, L.P.
50 Holyoke St.
$388,500 — Remodel of Express store

Holyoke Mall Company, L.P.
50 Holyoke St.
$99, 500 — Remodel of Megan’s Treasures store

Kmart Corporation
2201-2211 Northampton St.
$328,000 — Construction of a new Taco Bell

United Water
1 Berkshire St.
$30,000 — Construct a new locker room

 

NORTHAMPTON

Academy of Music
274 Main St.
$101,000 — Interior renovations

CFP Properties LLC
320 Riverside Dr.
$9,000 — Emergency repairs

Edward’s Church of Northampton
297 Main St.
$5,800 — Stair repairs

Nonotuck Mills, LLC
296 Nonotuck St.
$40,000 — Construct interior partitions and two restrooms

Smith College
1 College Lane
$25,000 — Renovate interior at Sage Hall

Trident Realty Corporation
42 Pleasant St.
$41,000 — Interior renovations at Newbury Comics

Valley Community Development Corporation
41 Locust St.
$39,000 — Create new storefront

SOUTH HADLEY

Mount Holyoke College
50 College St.
$5,000 — New ramp at Porter Hall

Mount Holyoke – Shattuck
50 College St.
$200,000 — Renovations

Mount Holyoke President’s House
50 College St.
$315,000 — Renovations

US Industrial – E-Ink
7 Gaylord St.
$320,000 — Renovations

SPRINGFIELD

AT&T Services Inc.
194 Dwight St.
$432,000 — Remove and replace roof

Baystate Medical Center
759 Chestnut St.
$10,000 — Renovate existing office space

Baystate Medical Center
759 Chestnut St.
$80,000 — Open old office space to create surgical holding area

Baystate Medical Center
1550 Main St.
$645,000 — Interior renovations of fifth floor

Baystate Medical Center
50 Maple St.
$55,000 — Interior renovations

Mason Square Health Care Center
11 Wilbraham Road
$331,000 — Renovate existing space to create exam rooms

Mass. Development
1550 Main St.
$277,000 — 3,000-square-foot office retrofit

Mass. Mutual Life Insurance Company
1295 State St.
$293,000 — Installation of support panels for thermal solar panels

Reeds Landing
807 Wilbraham Road
$15,000 — Interior renovation in arts and crafts room

Three Rivers School
26 Ridgewood Ter.
$9,000 — Re-roof

Vincenzo Amore
497 Belmont Ave.
$3,000 — Remodel of existing restaurant

Western New England College
1215 Wilbraham Road
$103,000 — Re-roof of Old Blake Law Center

WMECO
30 Cadwell Dr.
$299,000 — Office renovation and new bathroom

WESTFIELD

Splitfinger, LLC
6 Coleman Ave.
$30,000 — Exterior renovations

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Century Center, LLC
Union St.
$40,000 — Tenant fit out

Dasare Properties, LLC
191 Baldwin St.
$176,000 — Repair fire and smoke damage

Decorative Specialties International, Inc.
101 Front St.
$75,000 — Construct new entryway

Developers Diversified
935 Riverdale St.
$2,000 — Tenant fit out

Lyn Davies for Carter’s
935 Riverdale St.
$146,000 — Renovate existing retail space

Pintus
217 Elm St.
$3,000 — Renovate restaurant after fire

Town of West Springfield
135 Piper Road
$40,000 — Install replacement windows at the Water Department

Agenda Departments

District Attorney Candidates Forum

Sept. 7: Western New England College School of Law will host a forum featuring the candidates for the office of Hampden County District Attorney at 6 p.m. in the Blake Law Center’s J. Gerard Pellegrini Moot Court Room. The event is free and open to the public. The candidates will face questions from a panel including a journalist, a local criminal attorney, and a professor from the School of Law. The forum is scheduled for approximately 90 minutes. WNEC is located at 1215 Wilbraham Road in Springfield.

CORI Board Training

Sept. 14: The Berkshire Area Health Education Center is collaborating with the Mass. Criminal Systems History Board to sponsor training on criminal offender record information (CORI) from 1 to 3 p.m. at Berkshire Hills Country Club in Pittsfield. The training is for staff of agencies who are certified to request CORI information for non-criminal-justice purposes. A $13 fee covers the cost of the venue and refreshments. To register or for more information, visit www.berkshireahec.org   or call (413) 447-2417.

EANE Healthcare Conference

Sept. 16: The Employers Assoc. of the NorthEast will conduct its annual Health Care Conference from 7:30 a.m. to noon at the Publick House in Sturbridge. A panel of experts, representing insurance carriers, brokers, health care providers, and legal professionals, will discuss the challenges of the changing health-care-reform landscape. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions of the panel. For more information on the conference, contact Karen Cronenberger at (877) 662-6444 or [email protected] .

Mountain Park Memories

Sept. 17: The Holyoke Merry-Go-Round is inviting area residents to take a trip down memory lane with an event called Mountain Park Memories, slated for 6:30 p.m. at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. The event, a fund-raiser for the Merry-Go-Round, will capture the history and nostalgia of the amusement park located near the base of Mount Tom, which closed in the 1987 after operating for nearly a century. The program will include memorabilia, games, auctions, food stations, and music by Joe Canata & the Memories. Tickets are $45 per person. To order tickets, or for more information, call (413) 538-9838, or visit www.holyokemerrygoround.org .

Financial Pathways at Bay Path

Sept. 19: Intuition, creativity, and empathy are characteristics women can leverage to take control of and build their personal wealth. Bay Path College will continue its Financial Pathways series from 2 to 4 p.m. by examining these traits with A Purse of Your Own author Deborah Owens. Owens will highlight simple approaches to understanding investments and share the seven wealthy habits of successful women. The seminar is planned for the Blake Student Commons on the Longmeadow campus, 588 Longmeadow St. A question-and-answer session and book signing with Owens will follow the presentation. To build on the series’ philanthropic participation, attendees are asked to bring a gently used purse to the workshop as a donation to the college’s Professional Clothing Closet, which provides each undergraduate with one professional outfit as they begin their careers. Registration is required, and light refreshments will be served from 1:30 to 2 p.m. during event registration. Tickets are $10 each or $15 for two when signing up with a friend. To register or for more information, contact Mary Pajak at (413) 565-1115.

Sunday Brunch with Dr. Joy Browne

Sept. 19: Radio psychologist Dr. Joy Browne will be the guest speaker at a program, slated for noon to 3 p.m., sponsored by the UMass Amherst Family Business Center at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. Browne’s nationally syndicated daily radio show can be heard on the WOR Radio Network weekdays from noon to 3 p.m. A licensed clinical psychologist, Browne will answer questions about family, business, and family business. For more information on the program, contact Ira Bryck at (413) 545-1537, or visit www.umass.edu/fambiz .

Rick’s Place Open House

Sept. 21: Rick’s Place recently moved into a new facility at Kids Village, 35 Post Office Park, Suite 3514, Wilbraham, and an open house is planned from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. to introduce its services to the public. Established in memory of Rick Thorpe, who died in Tower Two of the World Trade Center on 9/11, Rick’s Place provides a supportive and secure environment for grieving families. Scheduled two weeks before grand opening day, the open house will raise awareness of the work being done by staff and volunteers. For more information, visit www.ricksplacema.org .

Springfield Developers Conference

Oct. 27: The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield will be the setting for the 2010 Springfield Developers Conference, sponsored by the City of Springfield. The conference theme is “Innovate, Grow, Create … Make It Happen,” and will highlight opportunities to incorporate new technologies and innovative practices in the building, energy, and information-technology industries to improve one’s business. Exhibitor and sponsorship opportunities are still available. For more information, contact Samalid Hogan at (413) 787-6020.

Get on Board

Oct. 28: OnBoard, a Springfield-based nonprofit, hopes to connect local organizations with individuals looking to increase their involvement in the community, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. The event will take place at Center Court, where attendees will meet with as many as eight or more organizations. The meetings will be orchestrated using the ‘speed-dating’ format, with individuals spending a few minutes with an organization of their choice and, on the sound of the basketball buzzer, moving to the next. Representatives from each organization will discuss their history, mission, and goals, and what it is they are looking for in board members. Interested individuals will have the chance to explain what skills and interests they have to make a potential match. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Elizabeth Taras at (413) 687-3144 or Brittany Castonguay at (413) 737-1131, or visit www.diversityonboard.org .

Advanced Manufacturing Competition & Conference

Nov. 16: The first highly concentrated, cluster-centric, regional manufacturing conference of its kind will be held at the MassMutual Center in Springfield. The event, called the Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation Competition & Conference (AMICCON), is being staged in response to growing recognition among area manufacturers and supply chain members that there is an urgent need to find and meet one another. “AMICCON was formed to identify who’s here in manufacturing, expose them to OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) and procurement, and to make these introductions,” said co-founder Ellen Bemben. “The ultimate goal is to be the advanced manufacturing region in the U.S., where exotic manufacturing, such as micro, nano, and precision, meet higher specifications and tighter tolerances, and short runs are the norm.” Industry sectors to be represented at the event will include plastics and advanced materials, precision machining, paper and packaging, electronics, ‘green’/clean technology, and medical devices. Business opportunities in defense and aerospace will also be highlighted at the event. OEMs and their supply chains are being invited personally to participate. “AMICCON is a new consortium on innovation that also delivers manufacturers to innovators and new markets in order to cause new business,” said Gary Gasperack, vice president and general manager (retired) of the Spalding Division of Russell Corp. “We are very excited about introducing it to our region.” The Mass. Export Center has already produced two programs for AMICCON: an Export Experts Panel, and a seminar, “International Traffic in Arms Regulations for Defense and Aerospace Export.” For more information, visit www.amiccon.com .

Departments Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

BELCHERTOWN

Auction Shipper Inc., 442 State St., Belchertown, MA 01007. Aytac Camdeviren, same.
Shipping and receiving services.

FEEDING HILLS

AW Real Estate Corp., 74 Bessbrook St., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Alfredo Improta, same. Real estate.

FLORENCE

Bidwell ID, 30 North Maple St., Florence MA, 01062. John Bidwell, same. Full-service advertising and marketing agency.

Click Workspace Inc., 109 High St., Florence, MA 01062. Ali Usman, 109 High St., Florence, MA 01062. Non-profit economic development organization through collaboration of entrepreneurs.

GREAT BARRINGTON

Ecaerus Inc., 80 Brush Hill Road, Great Barrington, MA 01230. Brian Sutton, same.
Consulting services.

GREENFIELD

Cold River Inc., 55 Main St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Peter White, 55 Main St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Retail store, sales of beer, wine, and liquor.

LENOX

Guenhwyvar Inc., 55 Pittsfield Lenow Road, Lenox, MA 01240. Michelle Vanallen, 24 Rotermel Lane, Kinderhook, N.Y. 12106. Restaurant and bar.

LONGMEADOW

Change in Action Inc., 184 Edgewood Ave., Longmeadow, MA 01106. Susan Choquette, same. Organization established to promote the ideals of respect, compassion, and mutual responsibility through the cooperative efforts of parents children and schools.

PITTSFIELD

1 Berkshire Strategic Alliance Inc., 75 North St., Suite 350, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Michael P. Daly, 14 Lynne Court, Lanesborough, MA 01237. Economic development agency serving the business community of Berkshire County.

Bella Terra Festival Inc., 1270 North Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Jeffrey Schneider, same. Entertaining event planning.

Chestnut Tree Trauma and Attachment Center Inc., 150 North St., Suite 220, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Wendy Aunitch, 121 Edward Ave., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Center providing therapeutic services to children, young adults, and non-offending family members who have experienced trauma or neglect.

SOUTHBRIDGE

Advanced Concepts in Tiles Inc., 43 Quail Run, Southbridge, MA 01550. Michael Paul Durocher, same.

 

Complete Technology Resources Inc., 317 Pleasant St., Southbridge, MA 01550. Jamie Stafslien, same. Computer services.

SPRINGFIELD

16 Acres Computers Inc., 115 Corey Road, Springfield, MA 01128. Mary Radogiewicz., same. Computer sales and service.

Bhutanese Society of Western Massachusetts, 67 Johnson St., Apt #1 Left, Springfield, MA 01108. Hari Khanal, same. Provides support for any Bhutanese family when someone dies, and for the treatment of any medical conditions as a result of an accident or major disease.

Charles Kearse Co., Andrew M. Scibelli Enterprise Center, One Federal St., Bldg. 101, Springfield, MA 01105. Charles Kearse, 30 Bowdoin St., Springfield, MA 01109. Non-profit and business development consulting.

WASHINGTON

Harmony Building Consultants Inc., 204 Johnson Hill Road, Washington, MA 01223. Georgette Keator, same. Building and construction consultation.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

AAA Pioneer Valley Driver Training School Inc., 150 Capital Dr., West Springfield, MA 01089. Chris Mensing, 12 Echo Hill Road, Wilbraham, MA 01095. Automobile driver instruction services.

Bart Truck Equipment Company Inc., 358 River St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Martin Tourtelotte, 47 Wild Grove Lane, Longmeadow, MA 01106. Sales and service of truck equipment.

DSVT Inc., 81 Humphrey Lane, West Springfield, MA 01089. Valerity Kolodzinskiy, same. Transportation services for food, commercial goods and vehicles via flatbed, container and heavy-duty hauling vehicles.

Hannahneena Inc., 217 Elm St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Sarabjit Chawla, 3050 Mountain Road, West Suffield, CT 06093. Restaurant and bar.

WESTFIELD

358 Southwick Inc., 358 Southwick Road, Westfield, MA 01805. Rachid Messoudi, 14 Willard St., Apt. 1, Quincy, MA 01085. Convenience store.

Direct Auto Realty Inc., 300 East Main St., Westfield, MA 01085. David Dicienzo, 90 Southwood Dr., Ludlow, MA 01056. Purchase, develop, manage, and maintain real estate properties.

WORTHINGTON

Arts Alive in the Hilltowns Inc., 4 Sam Hill Road, Worthington, MA 01098. Mary Pulley, 128 Old Post Road, Worthington, MA 01098. Association of artists to network, promote, showcase and support artistic and cultural endeavors.

10 Points Departments

In this economy, companies are trying harder to protect what they own, at minimal costs. Manufacturers do not want their confidential business information, their trade secrets, taken by desperate competitors or sold by disgruntled employees. Here are 10 physical steps businesses can take within their plants to protect trade secrets:

1. Identify potential trade-secret ‘leak points.’ Minimize exposure of trade secrets to them

2. Password-protect confidential computer files and establish secure storage files for hard copies of confidential documents.
3. Establish general and restricted zones within the plant. Confine all trade-secrecy development and utilization, where possible, to the restricted zones.
4. Utilize warning signs on all entrances to the physical plant to advise non-employees to utilize only a secure, monitored ‘main entrance.’

5. Utilize color-coded identification badges for external use by all employees during work hours. Have specific colors of badges correlate with permission to be within restricted and general zones of the plant.

6. Post ‘Authorized Employees Only’ signs at the entry to all restricted zones.
7. Use locked doors for all restricted zones. Make them open only by scanning correctly colored ID badges or ID cards. Some companies scan fingerprints or eyeballs.
8. Utilize painted, directional floor lines for visitors and tours to ensure they do not stray into restricted zones.
9. Screen all visitors by having them sign a log book. Some companies make visitors produce a passport or birth certificate.

10. Prohibit any photograph taking or recording by visitors.

Donald S. Holland, Esq. is the senior partner at Holland & Bonzagni, P.C., an intellectual property law firm based in Longmeadow; www.hblaw.org.