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Survey: Limited Job Market Expected in Area

SPRINGFIELD — Springfield area employers expect to hire at a cautious pace during the third quarter of 2009, according to the recent Manpower Employment Outlook Survey. From July to September, 14% of the companies interviewed plan to hire more employees, while 22% expect to reduce their payrolls. Additionally, 60% expect to maintain their current staff levels, and 4% are not certain of their hiring plans. For the coming quarter, job prospects appear best in professional and business services and leisure/hospitality services. Employers in durable-goods manufacturing, non-durable-goods manufacturing, transportation and utilities, information, financial activities, education and health services, and government plan to reduce staffing levels, while hiring in construction and wholesale and retail trade is expected to remain unchanged. Of the more than 28,000 employers surveyed in the U.S., 15% expect to increase their staff levels during the July-to-September period, while 13% expect to reduce their payrolls, resulting in a net employment outlook of 2%. Also, 67% of employers expect no change in hiring, and 5% are undecided about third-quarter 2009 hiring plans. The next Manpower Employment Outlook Survey will be released Sept. 8 to report hiring expectations for the fourth quarter of 2009. The complete survey results can be found at www.us.manpower/com/meos.

Year-over-year Delinquency Rate Climbs

NEW YORK — Average bank-card borrower debt inched upward nationally by 0.8% to $5,776 from the previous quarter’s $5,729, and by 4.1% compared to the first quarter of 2008 ($5,548), according to a new report by TransUnion. The highest state-average bank-card debt remains in Alaska at $7,476, followed by Tennessee at $6,869 and Nevada at $6,677. The lowest average bank-card debt was found in Iowa ($4,300), followed by North Dakota ($4,414) and West Virginia ($4,640). Nationally, the bank card delinquency rate increased to 1.32% in the first quarter of 2009, up 9.1% over the previous quarter. Year-over-year, bank-card delinquencies increased 11% to 1.3%. Incidence of bank card delinquency was highest in Nevada (2.4%), followed by Florida (1.9%) and Arizona (1.7%). Information for the analysis is culled quarterly from approximately 27 million anonymous, individual credit files, providing a real-life perspective on how U.S. consumers are managing their credit health.

Study: Education Reform Has Had Limited Success

BOSTON — Bold new steps are needed for the state to meet one of the primary goals of education reform, according to a new report recently released by MassINC. Incomplete Grade: Massachusetts Education Reform at 15 assesses the impact of the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993 (MERA) and compares the relative performance of low-spending school districts with those of high-spending school districts. The study found that, despite producing gains in overall student achievement since its passage, the legislation has not closed the achievement gap that remains between high- and low-spending districts. The report also found that shifting demographics in Massachusetts have increased the percentages of low-income students in the lowest-spending districts, raising questions about the effect of concentrated poverty on student performance. The report’s findings show that the funding levels of low-spending districts have been raised to meet statewide averages, largely through a doubling of state aid to those districts. In terms of overall student performance, it appears the architects of MERA have much to celebrate. At the time of education reform, the proficiency levels of state students were above the national average. But the gains in the performance of Massachusetts students as education reform has been implemented have outpaced those of their national and international peers, as evidenced by leading scores in NAEP and the international TIMSS. Statewide SAT and MCAS scores have consistently improved as well. The report concludes that, despite the gains made, more of the same will not close the achievement gap and that precedent-setting initiatives, particularly those that are focused on cultivating high-performing, low-spending schools, are needed. The report includes recommendations such as placing the most effective teachers in high-poverty schools, rewarding teachers who are effective in raising student achievement, and raising the cap on charter schools and allowing effective charter schools to operate additional schools. The full report is available online at www.massinc.org.

Sections Supplements
Tournament Organizer BasketBull is Generating Net Results
The team at BasketBull: from left, Patrick Fisher, Molly Dullea, Colin Tabb, and Chris Sparks.

The team at BasketBull: from left, Patrick Fisher, Molly Dullea, Colin Tabb, and Chris Sparks.

Using the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a drawing card, a still-developing business venture called BasketBull is bringing thousands of young players to Springfield and other area communities for tournaments, thus filling hundreds of hotel rooms and providing business for other hospitality-related businesses, including the Hall, in the process. There are ambitious growth plans on the table, according to general manager Colin Tabb, who believes his company has a winning formula.

Colin Tabb says there are two rather unofficial “missions” for the company called BasketBull, LLC — named in part for his grandfather (more on that later) — which he serves as general manager.

The first, as it states on the back of Tabb’s business card, is to “organize competitive AAU tournaments, thus providing players of all ages and ability the chance to learn and compete at the highest level and develop to their fullest potential.”

The second mission — equally important, but in a much different way — is to help “make Springfield ‘Basketball City,’” said Tabb, a former college shooting guard who played professionally overseas for several seasons before shifting gears career-wise. He believes this fledgling company is well on its way to accomplishing that lofty goal, through a partnership with the sport’s Hall of Fame and an ambitious business plan that outlines net results on several levels.

Started as a part-time venture for Tabb and the principals who created it — his uncles, Mike and Bob Martin — BasketBull, now occupying space on the 15th floor of One Financial Plaza, arranges Amateur Athletic Union tournaments at various sites across Western Mass. and elsewhere, with the championship games often played on Center Court at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

These tournaments have names like ‘HoopHall Invitational,’ ‘New England Elite Showcase,’ ‘End of Summer Blowout,’ ‘New England Best of the Best,’ and ‘Columbus Day Challenge.’ They have brought, or will bring, between 60 and 1,800 players to the host city (usually Springfield, but others have been played in locales ranging from Amherst to Chicago), with that number usually somewhere in the middle of those extremes.

And by doing so, these events have helped bring thousands of additional visitors to the Hall of Fame, while also filling hotel rooms, seats in restaurants, and rides at Six Flags, thus making BasketBull, the official organization for all basketball-related events associated with the Hall, an economic driver as much as it is an organizer of hoop tournaments.

From a business perspective, says Tabb, a political science major still learning many of the ins and outs of running a company, BasketBull is hitting or exceeding the numbers laid out in a business plan that has seen several revisions in only a few years.

The business model is fairly simple: teams are charged entrance fees (averaging $400 or so) to participate in the various tournaments, revenues that currently exceed expenses that range from rental fees paid to area colleges and high schools to use their gyms to hiring game officials to insurance. The immediate goals are to increase the number of events — there appears to be strong growth potential with girls’ tournaments, for example — and maximize revenues from each one, said Tabb, who told BusinessWest that he and his staff members are aggressively exploring expansion strategies, including plans to become more national in scope.

There are several competitors in what would be considered a relatively new business sector, said Tabb, but none that can really offer what BasketBull can — a chance to play a game on a court where players can look up and see the plaques of Hall of Fame inductees.

“It’s really a unique opportunity to play at the Hall of Fame,” he said. “It’s something players and coaches will remember long after the games are over.”

In this issue, BusinessWest looks at how this intriguing company intends to capitalize on this home-court advantage, and thus create new opportunities — for BasketBull, Springfield, the Hall of Fame, and other hospitality-related businesses.

Court of Opinion

Tabb said the inspiration for BasketBull came in large part from a venture often referred to as the Field of Dreams — Cooperstown Dreams Park is the actual name of the facility — which stages baseball tournaments at a large complex of diamonds near, but not part of, the Baseball Hall of Fame in that New York hamlet.

“Our model is very similar to that in the sense that we want to use the Hall of Fame as a drawing card,” Tabb explained, “and try to make Springfield more of a basketball town, a basketball city in America.”

The success of the Cooperstown initiative prompted Basketball Hall of Fame officials to approach Mike and Bob Martin — the former the athletic director for Springfield schools and the latter a long-time basketball referee and supervisor of officials — in 2004 to see if there was any interest in putting on events that would, among other things, create more foot traffic for the Hall.

There was.

What emerged was a small start-up that would take the name BasketBull, LLC, a tribute of sorts to Tabb’s grandfather, William Martin, a former basketball star at Providence College and long-time Springfield police chief, who was nicknamed ‘Bull.’

“It seemed like a good fit, and it makes a lot more sense when we explain it,” joked Tabb, who joined the company with the assignment of taking it to the next level. He brings to that task a varied background, including knowledge of the local sports market — be was raised in Springfield — and a passion for the game. After playing college ball at Trinity in Hartford, where he earned Division III first-team All American honors, he played professionally in Germany and Ireland before eventually taking a job as assistant coach at Brandeis University in Wellesley. He was in that post when he got the call from his uncles to join them in their entrepreneurial venture.

As he explained the basic business model behind BasketBull, Tabb said there are thousands of AAU teams, or clubs, around the country comprised of boys and girls of all ages. Locally, there are clubs affiliated with the Dunbar Community Center and South End Community Center, for example, he said.

These clubs practice during the week and, if they are so inclined, play in tournaments on the weekend, Tabb continued, adding that many are willing to travel (within driving distances, usually, but some will actually get on planes) to compete in events; for the Hall of Fame Junior Nationals (June 26-28 in Springfield), teams from North Carolina and Texas have signed on.

Event organizers do well when they have some kind of hook, he explained, adding that, for BasketBull, it is the sport’s shrine, which can comfortably sit 150 to 200 people for a title game on its not-quite-regulation-size court.

“It’s a great draw,” said Tabb, who noted that BasketBull uses E-mail blasts, phone calls to AAU coaches, and other vehicles to bring attention to its events — and people to Springfield.

Points of Interest

While BasketBull is still clearly in its developmental stage, it is already compiling some fairly impressive statistics.

For example, an event staged in Springfield in mid-May called the Spring Classic brought 170 teams (137 of them from outside the state) and 2,136 competitors to the City of Homes, said Patrick Fisher, marketing director for the company, who keeps spreadsheets detailing the company’s impact on the region. Total visitors numbered nearly 5,000, he continued, and nearly 200 admission tickets were purchased for the Hall of Fame.

Patrick has grand totals projected for the 2009 season, which will include 22 events, 14 of them in Springfield. Together, they will involve 860 teams (218 from Massachusetts and 632 from out of state) and 11,485 participants. The games will bring a projected 16,144 spectators and 30,689 total visitors to the area. They will purchase 1,070 room nights and nearly 2,000 tickets to the Hall of Fame.

“Sometimes, it’s the players and a coach coming in a van,” said Tabb, noting that teams usually put several players in a hotel room. “But many times, mom, dad, and the grandparents will come to the tournament as well; it varies from team to team. We’re impacting a number of area businesses, and we expect those numbers to continue increasing in the years to come.”

The impact on restaurants and other tourist attractions is somewhat difficult to quantify, Tabb continued, but there is no doubt that the tournaments are helping a number of chain family eateries as well as attractions like Six Flags.

Looking down the road, Tabb said the obvious goals are to broaden the schedule and expand geographically, thus building the BasketBull brand and providing long-term viability. “There’s only so much you can do in this region, the New England area,” he explained. “There’s only so many times teams are going to come to Springfield to play in a tournament and visit the Basketball Hall of Fame.”

The plan is to establish regional sites across the country, he continued, and have, in many instances, the regional winners and runners up come to Springfield and play in what would be called a national final.

There are currently 14 events on BasketBull’s local slate for 2009 — 10 for boys and four for girls — and the goal is to have 30 to 35 on the schedule within five years, said Tabb, adding that there will be a heightened focus on the girls’ side of the ledger, which has strong growth potential.

To reach it, the company has brought on Molly Dullea, who takes the title ‘girls director,’ and is focusing specifically on adding events to the calendar. Her counterpart on the boys side, Chris Sparks, has a similar assignment.

There will be some logistical challenges to accomplishing all this, said Tabb, noting that the company currently uses a number of venues, including AIC, Springfield College, Holyoke Community College, and several high schools, but could use more.

One potential re-use of the former York Street Jail site is as a home for events such as those staged by BasketBull — an option mentioned often by city economic-development officials. Tabb said such a venue would solve many of his problems, but BasketBull would not be the entity to build such a complex.

In the meantime, the company’s staff is splitting its attention and energies between work to ensure that this year’s scheduled events go off as well as possible and efforts to expand the slate for 2010.

“We’ve got one eye on this year’s tournaments and the other on 2010 and beyond,” he said. “Next year is going to be pivotal for us in terms of building our brand.”

At the Buzzer

As he took a few shots while taking part in a photo shoot at the Hall of Fame, Tabb swept his arms across Center Court and said, “what a great venue for a championship game.”

Indeed, the Hall is proving to be the drawing card that those at BasketBull and the shrine thought it would be.

There is considerable growth potential for this venture, said Tabb, but still considerable work to be done before Springfield can truly be called ‘Basketball City.’ However, he thinks his team is up for the challenge, and can grab the bull by the horns. n

George O’Brien can be reached at[email protected]

Sections Supplements
Holyoke Rebrands Efforts to Bring Tourism Back to the City and Its Museums

While visiting Washington, D.C., Kate Navarra Thibodeau recalls how confusing it was walking around and simply trying to find a restaurant.

“You’ve got all this incredible history around you,” she said, “but really what you want to find is a place to eat.” She told of finding street-level signposts with a wealth of information, not only outlining the vibrant historical background of the spot marking where you stand, but also restaurants and other businesses within a four-block radius.

From that trip came the idea behind a collaboration between Holyoke’s museums, business community, and civic leaders. A self-guided tour of the Paper City is in the works, to be incorporated with an update of the city’s history museums.

Called “Creating Holyoke,” the project was given a boost in the form of a National Endowment for the Humanities grant for $400,000, and a state Department of Conservation and Recreation grant for $132,000, bringing the total budget close to $700,000.

Thibodeau is the city’s historian and one of the architects of the project. In a partnership with Wistariahurst Museum, Holyoke Heritage State Park, the Children’s Museum, the Holyoke History Room, and Enchanted Circle Theater, the plan is wide-ranging in details, but with very specific goals: to infuse Holyoke with civic pride, update the exhibited history of the city, and include the business community with a plan to return visitors to the streets downtown.

City museums have had to grapple with small budgets in recent years, and the existing exhibits reflect that shortcoming. Thibodeau said that exhibits on Holyoke’s immigration are “about 30 years old,” adding “they talk about the workers, and the city’s waterpower, the basic history. But they don’t take into consideration the Puerto Rican immigration.”

New exhibits for the project involve updating that chapter of the city’s history, but also showing living spaces of past populations from three different time periods, and a display in the newly-renovated carriage house at Wistariahurst documenting the past as seen through Holyoke’s recreational attractions.

Thibodeau said the signs to be installed downtown are still in the planning stages, but the business community likes the idea. “Local businesses, in my experience, want to be involved. But the problem has been that no one is asking them for their help, or no one is providing an opportunity for them to help,” she said.

Focusing on the city’s downtown, she continued, “yes, we need to get more restaurants; yes, we need to encourage business to come back. But in the meantime, let’s highlight what we do have here already.”

Coupled with a brochure highlighting all the spots on this heritage trail, both will function as a self-guided driving or walking tour. “The city has so much to offer,” Thibodeau said. “We envision this to be a tourist destination much like the city of Lowell.”

Local businesses will sponsor the signs, designed in such a way that Thibodeau calls “accidentally learning about history when you’re trying to get from point A to B.”

From the historic canal systems to the buildings and green spaces designed by world-renowned architects, to the existing 19th-century architecture of the industrial revolution, Creating Holyoke wants to ensure that not only is the past not dead, but it’s not the past at all — it’s still the present.

That, and they want to make sure that you know where to get lunch while you’re out walking around.

Departments

CT Business Expo

The 2009 CT Business Expo, staged June 4 at the Connecticut Convention Center, featured several hundred exhibitors, including many from Western Mass., and thousands of visitors. Above, representing the event’s main sponsor, Comcast Business Services, and its Western New England region were, from left, John Howlett, sales manager; Thomas Rausch, business account executive; Jeffrey Freyer, vice president of Business Services; and James Robinson, business account executive.


ERC5 Annual Meeting

The East of the River Chamber (ERC5) recently staged its annual meeting at Hampden Country Club. Attendees heard a keynote address from John Regan, above, executive vice president for Government Affairs for the Associated Industries of Mass. At left, Joseph Lawler, right, treasuer of ERC5 and a benefits manager for the Wilbraham-based Gaudreau Group Insurance and Financial Services Agency, presents a plaque to David Leslie, controller with the Longmeadow-based retirement community Glenmeadow, recognizing his work as the first chairman of the ERC5.


Cabinet Meeting

BnC Kitchens in Enfield recently staged grand-opening ceremonies at its showcase on Moody Road. The event was catered by Max’s Tavern, which used one of the custom kitchens to prepare appetizers. From left are Mike St.Germain, president of Atlantic Woodcraft; William Sullivan, vice president of commercial lending for PeoplesBank; and Bob Villeneuve, vice president of sales for BnC Kitchens.

Departments

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

CHICOPEE

Nucleo Sportinguista De Chicopee Inc., 147-149 Exchange St., Chicopee, MA 01013. Antonio J. Forte, 173 Summit Ave., Chicopee, MA 01020. To establish and maintain a place for holding meetings; to encourage and perform civic, cultural, and social activities relating to the sport of soccer.

EASTHAMPTON

New Beginnings Chiropractic, P.C., 41 South St. Unit 1, Easthampton, MA 01027. Matthew J. Charles, Same. Chiropractic services.

EAST LONGMEADOW

Richard Kane & Associates LTD, 87 Shaker Road, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Richard Kane, 1 Kelly Dr., Westfield, MA 01085. Perform real estate appraisals.

LUDLOW

Rebingham Inc., 11 Nash Hill Road Suite 1, Ludlow, MA 01056. Reginald E. Bingham, Same. To engage in real estate activities.

NORTHAMPTON

Amna Trading Inc., 776 North King St., Northampton, MA 01060. Babar Hussain, 73 Bartlett St., Apt. 3089, Northampton, MA 01060. Gasoline and retail trading products.

SOUTH HADLEY

Re-energizer Inc., 20 Jewett Lane, South Hadley, MA 01075. Peter McAvoy, same. To collect manufacture, and re-sell fuel energy in solid and liquid form, as well as insulation material, derived from plant-based waste products and freshly grown plants.

SPRINGFIELD

Axiom Insurance Agency Inc., One Monarch Place, Suite 2510, Springfield, MA 01103. Peter K. Kenyon, Same. Insurance agency.

Cabos Fashions Inc., 795 Liberty St., Springfield, MA 01104. Edwin Acevedo, 1264 Page Blvd., Springfield, MA 01104. Retail clothing.

Cristo Sana Y Salva Corporation, 43 Pendleton Ave., Apt. 10A, Springfield, MA 01109. Juan Ocasio, Same. Community outreach to spread the gospel.

 

WESTFIELD

Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Una Luz En Tu Camino, 124 Westfield Road, Holyoke, MA 01040. Elier Rodriguez, Same. To do outreach work to promote the gospel for a better living.

Tekoa Country Club Inc., 459 Russell Road, Westfield, MA 01085. Daniel S. Burack, 157 Somers Road, PO Box 414, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Restaurant, bar, and banquet facilities.

WESTHAMPTON

Meehan Properties Inc., 19 Perry Hill Road, Westhampton, MA 01027. James Meehan, Same. Commercial property development and rental.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Cafeno’s Inc., 380 Union St., Suite 55, West Springfield, MA 01089. Steven Sheldon, 131 Reservoir Ave., Westfield, MA 01085. Own, operate, and manage Internet cafes.

Freeline Transportation Services, Inc., 25 George St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Aliaksandr Tabolich, 126 Union St., Westfield, MA 01085. Operating specialty and dedicated services of transporting passengers via minivans, limousine, and other passenger vehicles on a for-hire basis.

WILBRAHAM

Independence Home Improvement Inc., 60 Manchonis Road, Wilbraham, MA 01095. David J Magazu, Same. Sales and home improvement contracting services for residential homes and properties.

New England Sewer & Drain Inc., 20 Cottage Ave., Wilbraham, MA 01095. Jeannine C. O’Brien, 1 Carol Ann Dr., South Hadley, MA 01075. Construction, installation, and repair of sewer pipes and linings.

Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Acus, Donald Edward
Mayfield, Heidi Ann
7 Ranch Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Adams, Christine A.
69 Hazel St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

Agostini, Michael J.
Agostini, Candice Teresa
321 Wilbraham St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Allain, Richard L.
Allain, Dorothy D.
80 Lamont St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/20/09

Antigua-Vargas, Felix
Antigua, Maria
P.O. Box 30352
Springfield, MA 01103
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Avigliano, Robyn Jude
110 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Bassett, Chad M.
Bassett, Vanessa L.
215 Narragansett Blvd.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

Batchelor, Clifford F.
532 Cottage St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/17/09

Bazelak, Annette A.
93 Better Way
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Beattie, Jennifer L.
37 Helen St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Beattie, Peter R.
45 Narragansett Blvd.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Beaulieu, Scott Andrew
Beaulieu, Brook T.
a/k/a Nelson, Brook Tiffany
18 Pepper Ridge Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Begin, Joseph L.
Begin, Patricia E.
77 May Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Bergman, Daniel Jason
381 North Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Berman, Barbara Ann
179 West St.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Billingsley, David R.
Billingsley, Mary D.
15 Brittany Road
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Blackmer, Richard N.
55 Adams St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/22/09

Blase, Roxann J.
61 Hillcrest St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Bodzioch, Joseph S.
70 Buckingham St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Bourdages, Reginald
Bourdages, Tammy M.
519 East River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/25/09

Bressette, Lauren Elizabeth
121 North Main St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Brodeur, Michelle Hazel
10 Kellogg St. 2nd FL
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Cadieux, Pauline May
168 Gilbert Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Caputo, Gregory M.
102 Spadina Parkway
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Cardaropoli, Claudio
4 Clement St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Carrano, Francesco Antonio
71 Hadley St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Christenson, Jessica L.
320 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Connell, Thomas William
Connell, Patricia LeDoux
110 Circle Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Crogan, Jean A.
85 Turkey Hill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Cunningham, Lindsay Aaron
491 Bridge St., Apt. 4
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Davis, Penelope R.
5 Meadowood Dr.
South Deerfield, MA 01373
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/25/09

Demos, Julie Suzanne
641 Springfield St.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Emerson, Rachelle Ann
a/k/a Cribley, Rachelle Ann
21 River St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Field, Erin M.
33 Appleton St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Figueroa, Eliodoro
Figueroa, Joanny
a/k/a Vargas, Joanny
103 Florida St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Floyd, Melissa M.
81 Dartmouth St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Fuentes, Celia
114 1/2 Hampden St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Giza, Linda Y.
PO Box 201
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Gonzalez, Eddie
51 Maryland St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Haggett, Steven C.
Haggett, Kathryn T.
a/k/a Reed, Kathryn T.
850 Royalston Road
Phillipston, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/17/09

Hines, Adrienne D.
84 Westminster St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Humphrey, Robert
141 West St.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Illhardt, Cindy L.
a/k/a Lavigne, Cindy L.
1850 Old Keene Road
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/17/09

Integrative & Complementation
Guiel, Robert J.
142 Lincoln St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Jimenez, Lydia
310 Stafford St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Karowski, Robert E.
1018 High St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Kedzierski, Daniel J.
37 Harvard St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Klavenski, Suzann L.
78 George St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/22/09

Klituscope Pictures
Denise Flaim Consulting
Klitus, Thomas Anthony
Flaim, Denise Marie
7 Clark Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Kolod, Emily J.
100 Elm St. Apt. 3R
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Kroll, Robert J.
Kroll, Shelly D.
682 Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

LaFleur, James Leo
34 Cambridge St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Lagace, Lee M.
284 Main St., Apt. 14
Great Barrington, MA 01230
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

LeClair, Kathleen H.
a/k/a Lolos, Kathleen Helen
66 Westernview Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Lee, Tammie J.
166 West Housatonic St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/18/09

 

 

LIA REALTY, LLC,
P O Box 2439
Lenox, MA 01240
Chapter: 11
Filing Date: 05/22/09

Lightcap, Tammy L.
a/k/a Norton, Tammy L.
7 Cross St., Apt.#1
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/20/09

Lindsey LTD. Auto Detailing
Lindsey, Michael E.
Lindsey, Kristy M.
43 Queen Avenue
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Linnell, Theodore R
Linnell, Tammy L
122 1/2 High St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

MacDonald, Kenneth Paul
210 River Road
Whately, MA 01093
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/20/09

Maciorowski, Stanley W.
Maciorowski, Gail H.
137 Linseed Road
West Hatfield, MA 01088
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Malossini, Melissa
a/k/a Davis, Melissa
15 Euclid Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/22/09

McCourt, Matthew James
McCourt, Phyllis Marie
125 School St.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/20/09

McGovern, John G.
186 Prospect St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

McMahon, Kevin Michael
McMahon, Shannon Rose
a/k/a Veroneau-McMahon, S. R.
12 Brentwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Millennium Hair Salon
Dominick, Dinita A.
a/k/a Nikonczyk, Dinita A.
a/k/a Bushey, Dinita A.
359 Bookside Circle
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Monska, Justin G.
46 Highland Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/25/09

Moseley, Holly Louise
80 Bowles St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/17/09

Nartowicz, Philip J.
Nartowicz, Christine M.
a/k/a Fields Nartowicz, Christine M.
312 Main St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Neidzwiecki, Rebecca D.
17 Apache Dr.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

O’Donnell, Maureen Elizabeth
266 Grove St., #21
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Packard, Corey
Packard, Lauren
a/k/a Nelson, Lauren
203 Bechan Rd # 25
Oakham, MA 01068
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

Page Product Design Inc.
Page, Matthew Edwin
111 Nonotuck St.
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Pagnoni, Claire F.
379 Maple Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Parker, Steven C.
Parker, Deborah A.
2205 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Perkins, Christopher S.
Perkins, Magaly C.
a/k/a Crespo, Magaly
50 Baldwin Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Perry, Robert W.
Perry, Dianna L.
a/k/a McCormick, Dianna L.
33 Virginia Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Perry, Tina M.
9 Victorian Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Petty, Kelly M.
373 Allen Park Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Powell, Larry T.
63 Estabrook St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/25/09

Price, Tracy L.
22 Mountain Brook Road
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

Proudy, Patricia
75 Swamp Road
West Stockbridge, MA 01266
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

Ralph John Auto Sales
Catanese, Ralph J.
Catanese, Virginia S.
814 Daniel Shays Highway
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/22/09

Raymond, Matthew A.
100 Lockhouse Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Red Oak Paving
Red Oak General Contractors
Bellinghausen, Philip G.
610 College Highway
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Rosario, Jose O.
Rosario, Gloria M.
123 Massasoit St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Sabot, Theodore Jay
Sabot, Carol Schiff
23 Walden Lane
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Shaw, Brian P.
Shaw, Christina M.
a/k/a Bell, Christina Marie
10 Dewey Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Sheehan, Lloyd E.
P.O. Box 3
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/30/09

Smashing China
Cunha, M. Edite
PO Box 149
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/20/09

Smith, Robert L.
Smith, Holly A.
131 Canterbury Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/22/09

Stetson, Andrew Joseph
23 Phillips St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Sweeney, Paul J
19 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Tebo, Ronald J.
Tebo, Sandra L.
864 Cronin Road
Warren, MA 01083
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Teele, Gary G.
Teele, Tiana N.
187 Kennebunk St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/22/09

Troiano, Claire Angela
153 Rocky Hill Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Turner, Willam E.
400 West Housatonic St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/29/09

Underwood, Amy M.
Underwood, Scott J.
7 Laurier Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/26/09

Urban, Thomas E.
Urban, Pamela J.
11 Rural Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/21/09

Van Ness, Dawn W.
P.O. Box 1303
East Otis, MA 01029
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Wachta, Bruce Michael
121 North Main St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/28/09

Ware, Maria S.
17 High St., #7
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Wilcox, Gordon D.
519 East River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/25/09

Williams, Blaine A.
Williams, Linda L.
39 Pioneer Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/18/09

Williford, Everett E.
Williford, Patricia L.
66 Chapin Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/20/09

Woods, Jarel Anthony
48 Bardwell St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/19/09

Zwinski, Irene A.
101-A Wilson St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/27/09

Opinion
The Race for Clean-energy Innovation

On a recent congressional delegation to Hong Kong, I toured a factory that is developing a thin solar cell that can be put on windows to generate electricity from the sun with zero carbon emissions. I thought of 1366 Technologies, a company in Lexington that is also racing to get advanced solar technologies to market.

It may seem like your typical competition between two companies, but this race is about much more than the solar market. It is about the race for trillions of dollars in clean-energy investments. As President Obama says, “the nation that leads in 21st-century clean energy is the nation that will lead the 21st-century global economy.”

And if we win the race, it could bring 150,000 new jobs and billions of dollars to Massachusetts.

American companies would get an edge with passage of the Waxman-Markey bill, the most sweeping energy legislation Congress has considered in a generation. The plan would end America’s dangerous dependence on foreign oil; increase the amount of clean energy we produce; make our buildings, homes, cars, and trucks more efficient; and cut the harmful carbon pollution causing global warming.

The bill requires that 20% of our electricity in 2020 come from clean-energy sources like solar or wind, or from energy efficiency. It establishes ‘clean-energy innovation hubs’ around the country to help researchers and inventors move their ideas from the lab to the market.

It also aims to reduce carbon emissions from major U.S. sources 83% by 2050 compared with 2005 levels, and saves consumers money at the pump by investing $20 billion to retool America’s auto manufacturers to produce electric cars that don’t use any gasoline.

The Waxman-Markey bill would invest more than $190 billion in clean-energy technologies that will go to the companies, research institutions, and entrepreneurs smart enough, agile enough, and innovative enough to devise the next great clean-energy technology.

Many of these cutting-edge companies will be in Massachusetts.

The state has always led the way in innovation, but, like the rest of America, our technological dominance is threatened. Germany has emerged as the global photovoltaic market, even though Massachusetts has 30% better solar resources. Korea and Japan are leapfrogging America in battery and electric-vehicle technology, even though we pioneered invention of these technologies.

Today, only one-fourth of the world’s top renewable-energy companies are American-owned, because we have failed to put in place a set of policies to promote alternative energy sources. China is spending $12.6 million per hour on clean-energy development and is preparing to invest $440 billion to $660 billion this year in clean-energy development.

As I traveled around China, I saw countless examples of how Chinese investments in clean energy are bearing fruit, from the solar company in Hong Kong to electric-car factories in Tianjin. And I came back thinking that these jobs belong in Massachusetts.

There are signs of a clean-energy economic recovery sprouting over our region. There is American Superconductor in Devens, a company pioneering wind-turbine designs and working on new power-cable systems to connect sources of renewable energy to the rest of the country. Marlborough’s Evergreen Solar is on track to be manufacturing 160 megawatts of solar panels annually, and recently opened a larger factory. These are only two local examples of the next generation of American entrepreneurs who stand poised to capitalize on the clean-energy revolution.

The American economy and the American dream have succeeded because we refuse to be shackled to old technologies and business as usual, but instead always look for the newest idea or opportunity.

In Massachusetts, we have the brain power. We have the potential. What we need are the right policies to unleash this revolution. And with the Waxman-Markey bill, the next great revolution will come to New England, as we shape a new-energy destiny for the nation.

U.S. Rep. Edward J. Markey (D-Malden) is chairman of twin climate and energy panels in the House.

Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT

Total Air Supply Inc. v. Statewide Mechanical Contracting Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $21,105.24
Filed: 5/28/09

FRANKLIN SUPERIOR COURT

Jeremiah Racine, executor of the estate of Gertrude Racine v. Adam Blacksin, M.D. and the Stop & Shop Supermarket Co., LLC
Allegation: Wrongful death: $8,000
Filed: 5/18/09

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT

Ronald Germaine v. J&G Foods Inc.
Allegation: Plaintiff sustained injuries when struck on the head by a defective door: $60,000
Filed: 4/15/09

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT

Colvest/Belchertown, LLC v. Rehabilitation Institute of Western MA Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract by failing to make payments under a written agreement: $47,522.93
Filed: 6/01/09

James Corey v. Sturdy Home Improvement Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract for home improvement and unfair and deceptive practices: $87,180
Filed: 5/18/09

HOLYOKE DISTRICT COURT

Berkshire Westwood Graphics Group Inc. v. Newprint Offset Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $18,558.13
Filed: 5/12/09

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT

J&E Precision Tool Inc. v. YRC Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract and breach of duty of good faith and fair dealing: $25,000
Filed: 5/26/09

Weslee Sicard v. Staples Inc.
Allegation: Emotional distress: $5,000
Filed: 5/19/09

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT

Bradco Supply Corp. v. TNT General Contracting
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $4,998.45
Filed: 5/06/09

Comcast Spotlight Inc. v. Planet Granite Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of advertising services rendered: $3,488.28
Filed: 5/06/09