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Daily News

BOSTON — Business confidence continued to rebound during June as Massachusetts methodically reopened its economy and COVID-19 cases surged elsewhere in the country.

The Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) Business Confidence Index rose 6.9 points to 49.0, just a point shy of the level that denotes an optimistic outlook among employers.

The increase, which came three months after the index suffered the largest one-time decline in its history, reflected the relatively smooth rollout of the state’s four-step reopening plan and progress in containing the COVID-19 pandemic.

Confidence was closely linked to where a company was on the reopening schedule. Manufacturing companies, many of which have operated throughout the pandemic as essential businesses or were among the first companies to reopen, were more confident than retail companies and restaurants that had to wait until late June to welcome back customers.

“Companies certainly want to reopen as soon as possible and hire back some of the 1 million Massachusetts residents who lost their jobs during the pandemic. At the same time, the flareup of COVID-19 cases in states that opened aggressively seems to underscore the value of moderation,” said Raymond Torto, professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and chair of AIM’s Board of Economic Advisors (BEA).

The constituent indicators that make up the Business Confidence Index were uniformly higher during June. Employers’ confidence in their own companies rose 5.9 points to 51.6, moving into optimistic territory for the first time since the COVID-19 shutdown.

The Massachusetts Index assessing business conditions within the Commonwealth increased 9.4 points to 46.8, leaving it 14.4 points lower than in June 2019. The U.S. Index measuring conditions nationally gained 7.7 points to 43.7, a drop of 14.3 points during the year.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, surged 10.2 points to 46.3. The Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, rose 3.6 points to 51.8. The Employment Index increased 1.8 points in May, while the Sales Index, a leading indicator, gained 11.4 points to 51.7.

Manufacturing companies (49.4) were slightly more confident than non-manufacturers (47.8). Small companies (50.1) were more optimistic than medium-sized companies (49.2) or large companies (46.3). Companies in Eastern Mass. (49.4) were more optimistic than those in Western Mass. (48.5).

Michael Goodman, professor of Public Policy at UMass Dartmouth and a BEA member, said the Massachusetts job picture brightened slightly during the past month as employers began to resume business operations, but that the state economy continues to face significant challenges and uncertainty.

“In addition to its massive disruption to our daily social and economic life, the pandemic presents a significant threat to what are typically two of the Commonwealth’s most stable counter-cyclical employers — healthcare and higher education,” Goodman said. “This will make it more difficult to recover quickly this time, even if we manage to avoid a projected second wave of the COVID-19 virus later this year.”

AIM President and CEO John Regan, also a BEA member, said employers hope Massachusetts can continue to reopen its economy without the surge in COVID-19 cases being seen in states like Texas and Florida.

“Essential companies and early-stage reopening companies continue to operate in a safe and efficient manner,” he noted. “The manufacturing sector in particular has adapted to new safety regulations in a way that should allow business to remain open and put people back to work.”

Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — Levi Smith, owner of Captain Candy in the lower level of Thornes Marketplace, announced he is opening a second store in the Holyoke Mall at Ingleside.

“I’ve survived the COVID-19 shutdown, and I’m excited to be opening a second store in Holyoke,” Smith said.

Captain Candy offers eclectic candies that are not the norm in grocery and convenience stores — everything from gumballs to candy cigarettes, wax bottles full of juice, Turkish taffy, Pop Rocks, and Zotz.

Smith was contacted in January by the owners of Pyramid Management Group, which owns more than a dozen malls in the Northeast, including the Holyoke Mall. “They thought Captain Candy would be a good concept to expand into the mall,” he said, noting that his shop will be located next to the Apple store on the mall’s top floor.

Smith’s Holyoke store opening comes a little over a year after he purchased the Northampton shop from former owner Nolan Anaya. Smith was 18 at the time. Currently, he is a business student at Holyoke Community College.

In the early months, Smith will operate the new store to ensure a smooth start, and then he will hire as needed. Currently, he and six part-time employees operate the Thornes location, which opened in 2013.

After he purchased the Thornes location for an undisclosed amount, Anaya served as a mentor to Smith. “He’s still a resource to me,” Smith said. “He’s been very helpful, but he doesn’t have an active role anymore.”

Smith’s grandfather, Roger Fuller, owns R&R Window Contractors Inc. in Easthampton, and his family has long been involved in the business.

Daily News

WATERBURY, Conn. — Webster Bank became one of the first financial-services companies nationwide to introduce Frontline Heroes, a program for essential healthcare workers and first responders that enhances the financial well-being of those who are on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In gratitude for their selfless service, Webster’s new Frontline Heroes program offers a range of financial benefits, including checking accounts free of a monthly maintenance fee and free checking withdrawals at any ATM through December 2021. The program provides new customers with the ability to earn a cash incentive, as well as additional discounts and benefits.

“Our Frontline Heroes deserve to receive financial benefits for all of the sacrifices they have made during this extraordinary time of need,” said Nitin Mhatre, executive vice president and head of Community Banking. “This program is just one small way Webster is saying ‘thank you.’ Our communities are forever indebted to these heroes and their families.”

Frontline Heroes includes any full-time or part-time employee currently in essential healthcare, including hospitals, nursing homes, medical and dental practices, and home healthcare. The program is also available to first responders.

For every new Frontline Heroes customer, Webster will also donate $250 to United Way COVID-19 Response Funds, making a minimum donation of $100,000.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Michael Paysnick, CEO of Springfield Jewish Community Center (JCC), has announced his retirement. Initially intending to retire in September, Paysnick has agreed, in light of COVID-19, to remain until a replacement is hired or until the end of the year.

“We are confident that we will situate an effective CEO to lead us in the years to come,” said Jonathan Goldsmith, president of the Springfield JCC board of directors. “We are fiscally solid; known for our amazing programs, services, and staff; as well as situated in a wonderful geographic location. As such, we are confident we will be hearing from many qualified applicants.”

Paysnick began his career at the JCC as assistant executive director in 1988. In 2008, he succeeded Mark Dindas, now executive director emeritus.

During his tenure, Paysnick helped establish the JCC as the central meeting place of the Jewish and general community. He set the organization on a path to financial sustainability, a goal achieved by working closely with the board of directors. “My work with the board has always been a partnership in which our vision and goals have been developed together and shared,” he said. “Their passion, support, and commitment to the J have inspired my work.”

Paysnick’s formula for accomplishing his leadership goals included a solid support staff. “I believe in hiring the best people, giving them space to create, challenging their ideas, and then providing the support they need,” he said. “Involving stakeholders in the decision-making process is critical to success.”

Goldsmith noted that “Michael was instrumental in expanding existing programs, as well as overseeing the initiation of new and creative programs and services, in a fiscally responsible manner. He successfully achieved the creation of the special-needs program Kehillah. He oversaw the expansion of the after-school program and infant program in the Early Learning Center. In 2011, he achieved the successful hosting of the 2011 JCC Maccabi Games held at the Springfield JCC. During his time at the helm, Michael presided over numerous renovations and infrastructure improvements to the center’s facility.”

The Springfield JCC received several recognition awards under Paysnick’s leadership, including one from Human Resources Unlimited (now Viability), which recognized the JCC for its employment practices of hiring individuals with special needs. The JCC also received the Brianna Award for its commitment to providing quality programs and services for individuals with special needs and their families.

Goldsmith announced that a committee has been formed to assist in the search for a CEO. Chaired by Richard Goldstein and vice-chaired by Sally Schneider, the committee also includes Goldsmith, Sue Kline, Betsy Bertuzzi, Harvey Schrage, Amy Anderlonis, Liz Cohen Rappaport, Lindsey Pratola, and Adam Deutsch.

Coronavirus Special Coverage

For every business in Western Mass., there is a story about coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. Each one, as we’ve noted before, is different. But there are many common themes, especially the need to deal effectively — somehow — with those things that one can control, and cope — again, somehow — with the things one can’t control. And that latter list is, unfortunately, long and complicated. It includes everything from navigating the state’s rules (and short timelines) for reopening to losing large and important clients, like MGM Springfield, to not knowing what the future holds. Here are six more COVID stories.

 

Judy Puffer

Puffer’s Salon & Day Spa

Responding to COVID-19 has been hair-raising to say the least   Read More >>

 


 

White Lion Brewery

For this Springfield business, better times are on tap   Read More >>

 


 

Wilbraham Monson Academy

At this school, pandemic has been a real learning experience    Read More >>

 


 

Jerome’s Party Plus

Growing need for tents is helping company through a trying year   Read More >>

 


 

King Ward Bus Lines

Chicopee-based company is still trying to get out
of first gear   Read More >>

 


 

Park Cleaners

‘The place where COVID goes to die’ is still in recovery mode   Read More >>

 


 

Back on the Clock

COVID-19 era presents unique challenge for older workers   Read More >>

Women in Businesss

Critical Tools

As women continue to experience the devastating impact of unemployment due to COVID-19, representing close to 60% of all lost jobs this spring, the food-service, hospitality, retail, and travel industries have been some of the hardest hit.

Further delivering on its mission of empowering women, at a time when many are forced to reimagine their lives, Bay Path University is offering a free three-credit online undergraduate college course in August. The course, “Fundamentals of Digital Literacy,” will help women expand their digital technology skill set and be better prepared for the workforce of the future. The course is offered through The American Women’s College, Bay Path University’s fully online division designed to fit busy women’s lives.

“We hope this free course inspires women to look to a better future through education at a time when they are experiencing such uncertainty,” said Carol Leary before her recent retirement as Bay Path president. “This is our way to offer women an opportunity to discover the benefits of online learning. We have deep experience serving women in a proven college format resulting in a graduation rate that is 20% higher than other adult-serving online programs.”

“Fundamentals of Digital Literacy” is a six-week, three-credit course in which students will examine best practices for utilizing social-media and digital-communication tools in the workplace. In addition, they will learn practical skills for a digital world and gain an increasing awareness of the risks of digital communication essential in all fields. By mastering the fundamentals of computing technology and demonstrating digital literacy, women who complete the course will have developed the computer skills needed to thrive in a 21st-century workforce that is continually changing.

“We hope this free course inspires women to look to a better future through education at a time when they are experiencing such uncertainty. This is our way to offer women an opportunity to discover the benefits of online learning. We have deep experience serving women in a proven college format resulting in a graduation rate that is 20% higher than other adult-serving online programs.”

Leaders in the Women in Travel and Hospitality and Women in Retail Leadership Circle organizations are sharing this free course opportunity with impacted employees impacted. The course offering is not exclusive to these groups, however, and any woman in sectors affected by COVID-19 are welcome to enroll.

“At a time when the retail industry has been dramatically impacted, it is refreshing to see Bay Path University, an institution dedicated to advancing the lives of women, provide an opportunity for women in our industry to gain a valuable skillset and college credits,” said Melissa Campanelli and Jen DiPasquale, co-founders of the Women in Retail Leadership Circle.

Unlike other online degree programs, students enrolled in classes through the American Women’s College at Bay Path University are able to get immediate feedback on individual academic performance. They also get the support they need to excel in the program, such as coaching, counseling, virtual learning communities, and social networking. The courses are designed to help provide the flexibility women need to engage in their studies, while still balancing their daily lives, jobs, and families.

As a result of the innovative approach to learning offered through the American Women’s College, women successfully earn degrees at higher rates than national averages, the institution notes. The model has been widely recognized by industry experts, the federal government, and granting agencies since its inception in 2013. Most recently, the American Women’s College was awarded a $1.6 million grant from the Strada Education Network to use its unique model to close the digital-literacy gap for women.

Enrollment in this six-week, three-credit course is subject to availability. This offer is intended for women who are first-time attendees of Bay Path University. Active Bay Path University students and those enrolled within the past year are not eligible for this offer.

Any student enrolled in this course who wishes to officially enroll into a certificate or degree program at the American Women’s College or Bay Path University must submit the appropriate application for admission and be accepted according to standard admissions guidelines. 

To register for the course, visit bpu.tfaforms.net/41. The registration deadline is July 20, and enrollees will have course access on July 27. For more information, visit www.baypath.edu/baypathworks.

Events Features

Meet the Judges

With nominations now closed for BusinessWest’s Alumni Achievement Award, it now falls to three judges — Vince Jackson, Keith Ledoux, and Cheri Mills — to study the entries and determine the sixth annual winner.

The award, sponsored by Health New England, was launched in 2015 as the Continued Excellence Award, an offshoot of BusinessWest’s 40 Under Forty program, which recognizes young professionals for their career accomplishments and civic involvement. Rebranded this year as the Alumni Achievement Award, it is presented annually to one former 40 Under Forty honoree who, in the eyes of the judges, has most impressively continued and built upon the track record of accomplishment that earned them 40 Under Forty status. The award will be presented at this year’s 40 Under Forty Gala. The date and location of the event are still to be determined due to reopening guidelines.

For each application, the judges have been asked to consider how the candidate has built upon his or her success in business or service to a nonprofit; built upon his or her record of service within the community; become even more of a leader in Western Mass.; contributed to efforts to make this region an attractive place to live, work, and do business; and inspired others through his or her work.

The judges will first narrow a broad field of nominees to five candidates, who will be informed that they are finalists for the coveted honor — an accomplishment in itself. They will then choose a winner, the identity of whom will not be known to anyone but the judges until the night of the event.

Past winners include: 2019: Cinda Jones, president, W.D. Cowls Inc. (40 Under Forty class of 2007); 2018: Samalid Hogan, regional director, Massachusetts Small Business Development Center (class of 2013); 2017: Scott Foster, attorney, Bulkley Richardson (class of 2011), and Nicole Griffin, owner, ManeHire (class of 2014); 2016: Dr. Jonathan Bayuk, president, Allergy & Immunology Associates of New England (class of 2008); 2015: Delcie Bean, president, Paragus Strategic IT (class of 2008).

The judges are:

Vincent Jackson

Vincent Jackson

Vincent Jackson is executive director of the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, a role he took on last year. He is also the founder and CEO of the consulting company Marketing Moves, which provides companies — from Fortune 500 corporations to small businesses — with strategic and innovative marketing support. Before founding the company in 2000, Jackson worked for a decade as a senior product manager at PepsiCo, two years as an assistant product manager at Kraft Foods, and three years as a senior systems analyst at Procter & Gamble Company.

Keith Ledoux

Keith Ledoux

Keith Ledoux is vice president of Sales, Marketing and Business Development at Health New England. He has more than 25 years of experience in the insurance industry and has a background in sales, healthcare information technology, and strategy development. Prior to joining HNE in 2019, he served as senior advisor and board member for MiHealth in Medway. He began his career at Tufts Health Plan in Waltham, where he rose to become regional sales manager, and also held senior leadership positions at Fallon Health in Worcester and Minuteman Health and Constitution Health, both in Boston.

Cheri Mills

Cheri Mills

Cheri Mills is a business banking officer with PeoplesBank, and has worked in banking for 32 years. She began her career in 1988 as a mail runner, working up to banking center manager in 1997, and eventually discovered a love of business banking. She takes pride in assisting business owners with achieving financials goals. She is currently the president of the Rotary Club of Chicopee, treasurer of Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts, and a board member with the Minority Business Council in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 

Celebrating 40 Years

Robert MacDonald, executive director of Work Opportunity Center Inc. (WOC) was recently honored with a Zoom anniversary celebration for his 40 years of leadership. WOC provides services to individuals with developmental challenges, including community integration, work skills, and community employment. Agawam Mayor William Sapelli, Springfield Mayor Dominic Sarno, and West Springfield Mayor William Reichelt all offered proclamations. Pictured, from left: Mary Akers, assistant executive director; Dale Lapointe, board secretary; Joanne Roberts, board member; MacDonald; Steve Robinson, board president; and Rick Hanchett, vice president.

 


 

Sharing and Caring

Cooley Dickinson Health Care employees recently donated hundreds of personal-hygiene products ranging from hair brushes and razors to deodorant, soap, and toothpaste to the Amherst and Northampton Survival Centers and the Easthampton Community Center. Pictured, from left: Jeff Harness, Cooley Dickinson’s director of Community Health and Government Relations; Robin Bialecki, executive director of the Easthampton Community Center; and Angela Belmont, chief Nursing officer at Cooley Dickinson Hospital.

 


 

Service Above Self

Last month, John Doleva, president and CEO of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame; and Frank Colaccino, Hall of Fame governor, CEO of the Colvest Group, and chair of the Westfield Bank 2019 Service Above Self luncheon committee, presented a check for $6,500 to the Rotary Club of Springfield, which is planning to award $10,000 in grants to Springfield-based nonprofit organizations that benefit the Greater Springfield community, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pictured from left: Paul Lambert, Rotarian and vice president of Enshrinement Services & Community Engagement at the Hall of Fame; Doleva; Colaccino; and Sue Mastroianni and Jack Toner, past presidents of the Rotary Club of Springfield.

 


 

Special Delivery

Amid COVID-19, the need for organizations such as Open Pantry Community Services has grown. Matt Ogrodowicz of Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. led a charge to collect food and donations at MBK over a two-week period. He shared Open Pantry’s mission as well as its high-demand items, including cereal, pasta, canned goods, peanut butter, and spaghetti sauce. Staff at MBK donated food and/or money, which Ogrodowicz used to shop for additional items on the high-demand list. With the combined efforts, MBK was able to donate 279 pounds of food to Open Pantry.

Agenda

Big E 2020

Canceled: For the safety of fairgoers, staff, vendors, entertainers, exhibitors, sponsors, suppliers, and the broader community, the leadership of the Eastern States Exposition have canceled the 2020 Big E. “We know our faithful fairgoers will be disappointed,” a statement noted. “This decision was difficult and complex, but we all know in our hearts that it’s the right thing to do for the health and safety of the 1.6 million people who support us each year. Our staff has spent the last few months working tirelessly to figure a way to bring our annual New England tradition to everyone this fall. Despite exploring all our options and planning extensively, we realized that the Big E experience that everyone has come to know and love would not be the same.” Next year’s edition of the Big E is scheduled for Sept. 17 to Oct. 3, 2021.

Café Creations

July 8, 15, 22: Café Creations, an interactive learning program designed by transition specialist Kelsey Poole in conjunction with the Mental Health Assoc. (MHA), will provide opportunities for creativity, friendship, and increasing independence for 15 adults ages 18 to 22 with autism or developmental disabilities. The program was made possible through a grant provided by the Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism Inc. Café Creations will run for three consecutive Wednesdays from 3 to 4 p.m. via the Zoom virtual meeting platform. To participate, students need access to an internet-enabled computer or tablet that can connect to Zoom. Interested individuals should sign up no later than Friday, July 3 by contacting Poole at (413) 454-7112 or [email protected] Café Creations is designed to provide adults with autism or developmental disabilities a virtual, interactive, and fun learning experience that enables them to walk away with something they created. Along the way, students have the opportunity to connect with others outside of their community, mostly in towns in Western Mass, while focusing on recreational and educational activities that incorporate meaningful connections and sustainable friendships. To finish each weekly session, students play interactive games with incentives and prizes. Materials required for each session’s creative project will be delivered to each student’s residence in time for each session. These materials include vision boards, which enable students to get to know something about themselves and then share that with others in the group; food ingredients for students to make their own pizzas; and materials to create a lava lamp. Students are encouraged to have a job coach or parent nearby to assist with some activities, notably making pizza, which involves using an oven. According to Poole, the program promotes independence and builds friendships through creation. “Folks with autism or developmental disabilities don’t always know how to meet others like themselves in their community,” she said. “I designed Café Creations to be an alternative way of learning and, at the same time, an alternative way of connecting with others. It provides that linkage and does so in a manner where there’s something creative happening. With this population, it’s important to peel back the support and get them to spread their wings.”

Asnuntuck Information Sessions

July 13, 22, 28; Aug. 6: Asnuntuck Community College has scheduled several virtual information sessions with the Admissions and Financial Aid departments during the summer. The sessions will be held on Monday, July 13 at 5 p.m.; Wednesday, July 22 at 3 p.m.; Tuesday, July 28 at 5 p.m.; and Thursday, Aug. 6 at 3 p.m. Prospective students need to attend only one of the sessions. Participants will be able to learn about the admissions and financial-aid process. The July 13 session will feature information regarding Connecticut’s community-college debt-free scholarship, Pledge to Advance Connecticut (PACT). Students must apply and be registered for a full-time schedule of courses by July 15 to be eligible for PACT. It is free to apply to the college. The sessions will also include time for questions and answers. To register for a session and learn how to register for classes, visit asnuntuck.edu/admissions/how-to-enroll. Registration for the fall semester is now open.

Healthcare Heroes Nominations

Through July 17: BusinessWest and its sister publication, the Healthcare News, will pay tribute to the heroes of COVID-19 by dedicating their annual Healthcare Heroes program in 2020 to those who are have emerged as true heroes during this crisis. The deadline for nominations is July 17. Healthcare Heroes was launched by the two publications in 2017 to recognize those working in this all-important sector of the region’s economy, many of whom are overlooked when it comes to traditional recognition programs. Over the years, the program has recognized providers, administrators, emerging leaders, innovators, and collaborators. For 2020, the program will shift its focus somewhat to the COVID-19 pandemic and all those who are working in the healthcare field or helping to assist it at this trying time. All manner of heroes have emerged this year, and we invite you to nominate one — or several — for what has become a very prestigious honor in Western Mass.: the Healthcare Heroes award. All we need is a 400- to 500-word essay and/or two-minute video entry explaining why the group or individual stands out as an inspiration, and a truly bright star in a galaxy of healthcare heroes. These nominations will be carefully considered by a panel of independent judges, who will select the class of 2020. For more information on how to nominate someone for the Healthcare Heroes class of 2020, visit businesswest.com/healthcare-heroes/nomination-form. Videos can be sent via dropbox to [email protected]. Healthcare Heroes is sponsored by Comcast Business and Elms College.

Nominations for Humane Awards

Through July 31: Dakin Humane Society is accepting nominations from the public for its Dakin Humane Awards until July 31. Nominees should be people who go out of their way to care for animals in need, people who volunteer to help animals, or people and/or animals who have provided significant public service or shown courage in a crisis. Finalists in each of the award categories will be picked from among the nominees and notified of their selection in August. The award ceremony will be livestreamed at a later date in the fall, and one winner in each of the categories will be announced. There are five awards to be bestowed: the Frances M. Wells Award, given to an individual recognized for notable contributions to the health and welfare of animals; the Youth Award, honoring a hero, age 16 or younger, whose extraordinary care and compassion makes a difference in the life of an animal, and makes the world a kinder and gentler place; the Champion Award, given to a public servant who makes life better for tens of thousands of animals and people in their community, and recognizing their dedication and compassion on behalf of animals and people in need; the Richard and Nathalie Woodbury Philanthropy Award, paying homage to an individual who displays a remarkable sense of stewardship in sharing time, talent, and financial resources to improve the lives of animals and people who love them; and the Animal Hero Award, recognizing an exceptional animal and handler (when applicable) whose valor and extraordinary devotion to people proved life-saving in disastrous or challenging heath circumstances. Nominations are being accepted online only at bit.ly/2NOcgps. Mail-in nominations will not be accepted. Nominees should be residents of Central or Western Mass. or Northern Connecticut.

MCLA Gallery 51 Virtual Artist Series

Through Aug. 8: MCLA Gallery 51 will continue its online program, the G51 Virtual Artist Series, live via Zoom at noon on alternating Saturdays. Local, regional, national, and international artists will give virtual tours of their studios and discuss their practices. Discussions with the artists will also be recorded for later viewing. The series kicked off on May 16. The gallery’s full spring programming schedule is available on its website. Upcoming artists include Sula Bermudez-Silverman (July 11), whose conceptual work intertwines multiple issues, investigating and critiquing the issues of race, gender, and economics; Kim Faler (July 25), a local, multi-disciplinary artist working in painting, drawing, installation, sculpture, and photography, whose art practice unpacks the emotional weight found within everyday objects and architecture; and Anina Major (Aug. 8), who works with topics of identity, slavery, the female body, Bahamian culture, and more. She considers her creative practice to be a response to continuous erasure and a culture that is constantly being oversimplified.

Submission Period for Virtual Art Show

Through Aug. 13: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, NAMI Western Massachusetts will present a virtual art show this year, and is now accepting artwork for the show. Submissions are limited to individuals living with a mental-health diagnosis, and the artwork will be displayed on the organization’s website and social-media pages for a limited time, then switched out for new artwork. To submit, e-mail a picture of the art to [email protected]. Note the size of the piece, the medium, and the price if it is for sale. The artist should also specify if they want their name used. The deadline for submissions is Aug. 13.

Elms College Executive Leadership Breakfast

Sept. 22: Elms College has rescheduled its third annual Executive Leadership Breakfast due to state-mandated caution regarding large crowds and coronavirus. U.S. Rep. Richard Neal is still slated to be the keynote speaker for the event, which was originally scheduled for April 9. As the coronavirus pandemic continues to unfold, the college will announce more details as necessary. This annual event features talks by the region’s leaders on topics of relevance that impact all sectors of business and the economy in Western Mass. Speakers at past events have included Dennis Duquette, head of Community Responsibility at MassMutual and president of the MassMutual Foundation, and Regina Noonan Hitchery, retired vice president of Human Resources at Alcoa.

People on the Move

Theresa Jasmin

The board of directors of Big Y Foods Inc. announced the appointment of Theresa Jasmin as CFO following the recent retirement of William Mahoney. She is responsible for the company’s strategic planning, finance, accounting, treasury, and tax functions. As a senior member of the executive team, she reports to Charles D’Amour, president and CEO, along with Big Y’s board of directors. She also represents the first woman to be appointed to the company’s C-suite. Jasmin has more than 25 years of experience in the food industry. She began her career at Friendly Ice Cream Corp., where she held senior management positions in both Treasury and Accounting. She joined Big Y in 2005 and held several positions of increasing responsibility in accounting and finance. She became controller in 2010. In 2014, she was appointed senior director of Finance, followed by vice president of Finance in 2016 until her new appointment. Jasmin holds a BBA from the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst and an MBA from Western New England University. In 2014, she was named a Top Woman in Grocery by Progressive Grocer magazine and was a founding member of Big Y’s Women LEAD (Leaders Engaged in Action and Development), the company’s first-ever employee-resource group charged with inspiring and empowering women. She currently serves on the executive committee and as treasurer for the YMCA of Greater Springfield. She also serves on the finance committees for both the Massachusetts and Connecticut Food Associations.

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Erin Chrzanowski

Erin Chrzanowski

Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Erin Chrzanowski has joined the firm as an associate and a member of the firm’s business and corporate practice group, where she works on matters related to commercial real estate and financing. In addition, she was recently elected to serve on the board of Revitalize Community Development Corp. in Springfield. Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Chrzanowski attended Syracuse University College of Law, earning her JD in 2019, and UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management, earning her BBA cum laude in 2017. She is licensed to practice in both Massachusetts and New York.

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Dawn Harrington

Dawn Harrington

Florence Bank announced that Dawn Harrington was recently selected as a recipient of its President’s Award. The President’s Award was established by the bank in 1995, affording employees the annual opportunity to nominate their peers for this prestigious honor that recognizes outstanding performance, customer service, and overall contribution to Florence Bank. Harrington was nominated by numerous colleagues. Harrington, a senior mortgage underwriter in the main office’s Mortgage Origination department, joined Florence Bank in 2016 and has 19 years of banking experience. She earned her associate degree in legal studies from Bay Path University.

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CISA (Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture) recently welcomed three new board members: Myra Marcellin, vice president and senior loan officer at Farm Credit East; Tessa White-Diemand, of Diemand Farm in Wendell; and Elizabeth Wroblicka, environmental consultant at Conservation Works. The three were voted in during CISA’s annual meeting, held virtually on May 21, and will serve three-year terms. CISA, a South Deerfield based nonprofit, strengthens farms and engages the community to build the local food economy. CISA’s board is made up of both farmers and community members who represent a range of business and community ties. These three board members have expertise in a variety of topics directly related to CISA’s work, including firsthand farming experience, land conservation, and farm financing. Marcellin serves in the local community, participating in the music ministry at her church, and she had served on the board of directors of the Boys & Girls Club Family Center until mid-2019. She has served in the agricultural community as well, representing Farm Credit East in various capacities and previously serving on the Massachusetts Agriculture in the Classroom board of directors. She currently serves as a regular trustee to the Eastern States Exposition, representing the state of Massachusetts. White-Diemand returned to her family farm in 2017 after working in the social-work field for many years. She is the third generation to work the Diemand Farm in Wendell, raising grass-fed beef cattle, broiler chickens, cage-free laying hens, and pasture-raised turkeys. The farm also has a small commercial kitchen that produces value-added products which are sold at their small farm store and across the Pioneer Valley. Wroblicka has dedicated her more than 25-year career to protecting important natural resources, including many farms and forests in the Pioneer Valley. Currently, as part of a team of environmental consultants at Conservation Works, LLC, she specializes in land-conservation transactions and helping landowners figure out the best way to protect their land. She has served as chief of Wildlife Lands for the Massachusetts Division of Wildlife, on staff at several land trusts, and as an attorney in private practice.

Company Notebook

UMass to Expand Online Educational Opportunities

BOSTON — The University of Massachusetts and Chapman University System announced their intent to form an exclusive strategic partnership between UMass Online and Brandman University to expand educational opportunities for adult learners in Massachusetts and across the nation. This partnership, expected to be finalized later this year, will be launched as millions of adults in Massachusetts and across the U.S. need flexible, high-quality, and affordable online-education alternatives now and as they recover from the economic dislocation caused by COVID-19, which has disproportionately impacted communities of color. Based in Irvine, Calif., Brandman was established in 1958 by Chapman University, a 159-year-old private institution in Orange, Calif. Originally founded to deliver high-quality education to active-service military, Brandman has evolved into a widely recognized leader in online education, with a strong record of serving veterans and a diverse range of adult learners. The partnership will augment UMass Online, which now supports more than 25,000 students, strengthening its technology platform and student-support services tailored to adult learners. UMass President Marty Meehan recently cited dramatic declines in the number of high-school graduates and employers’ need for a highly skilled workforce in announcing plans to scale up online programming at UMass. He also cited the “troubling lack of economic mobility” among African-Americans and Hispanics. The economic disruption caused by COVID-19 has accelerated these challenges, and the need for new online education programs that remove the obstacles adult learners often face is now even more urgent. A key target group for the partnership will be adult learners in underserved communities. According to a Strada Network survey of 4,000 adults, most Americans (62%) are concerned about unemployment, but African-Americans are moreso (68%), and their Latinx and Asian counterparts are even more worried (72%). The same study indicated that 53% of adult learners prefer online education opportunities.

HMC Submits Proposal to Expand Psychiatric Bed Capacity

HOLYOKE — Holyoke Medical Center (HMC) has submitted a letter of intent and project proposal to the Massachusetts Bureau of Health Care Safety and Quality to expand psychiatric bed capacity. The letter, sent on June 19, notified the Determination of Need Program that HMC will be completing an application for an additional 64 psychiatric beds. If approved, this will increase the hospital’s total capacity to 84 psychiatric beds, which will serve adult and geriatric populations. The 68,000-square-foot Holyoke Medical Center Behavioral Health Pavilion proposal includes 48 adult psychiatric beds, 36 geriatric beds, and 4,000 square feet of shell space for future expansion or uses to be determined later. Population statistics and competitive analysis suggest that there is a need within a 14-mile radius of Holyoke Medical Center for 52 adult psychiatric beds and 36 geriatric psychiatric beds. The proposal also includes a parking analysis and parking-garage study, which could provide an additional 60 to 180 parking spaces. Holyoke Medical Center is partnered with Signet Health Corp., assisting the hospital in the delivery of behavioral-health services by providing management and consulting services. The Leo Brown Group, a full-service healthcare real-estate development and solutions company, will design and build the facility. It is estimated that, once approved by state and local officials, the new facility will take 18 months to complete and become operational.

Monson Savings Bank to Open New Branch in East Longmeadow

EAST LONGMEADOW — Monson Savings Bank announced the expansion of its branch network into East Longmeadow. This new office, located at 61 North Main St., is expected to open in late summer. The full-service branch will offer an extensive array of consumer and commercial products, traditional banking products, wealth-management products, and several robust digital solutions that have grown more important in today’s environment. It has been the bank’s goal to further expand the markets it serves.

Royal, P.C. Moves to Springfield

SPRINGFIELD — The law firm of Royal, P.C. has moved to Springfield. Founded by attorney Amy Royal in 2008, Royal, P.C. is now located in the Indian Orchard section of Springfield, at 819 Worcester St., Suite 2. “Springfield is where I grew up, so it felt natural to relocate my law firm here,” Royal said. “Indian Orchard, with its unique history, has always felt like a special place within the city to me, and its geography otherwise places us in a more centralized location with respect to our Central and Eastern Massachusetts and Northern Connecticut clients.” The telephone and fax numbers of (413) 586-2288 and (413) 586-2281 remain the same. For more information about the firm, visit www.theroyallawfirm.com.

Bay Path Launches Risk Management Degree

LONGMEADOW — Bay Path University is expanding its focus in the rapidly growing area of cybersecurity — and helping to bring more women into it — with the introduction of an undergraduate major in risk management. In addition, the university will offer scholarships to women looking to obtain degrees in cybersecurity. Made possible by Strada Education Network, these scholarships will help offset the cost of fall 2020 enrollment in cybersecurity programs. The term ‘risk management’ applies to the forecasting and evaluation of risks alongside the identification of procedures to avoid or minimize their impact. This new program concentration will include coursework in data privacy, project management, crisis management, and incident recovery. With nearly 80% of the organizations surveyed for the 2019 Marsh Microsoft Global Cyber Risk Perception Survey ranking cyber risks as a top-five concern, but only 11% feeling adequately prepared to assess and address those threats, the need for risk managers in the cybersecurity sphere is more important than ever. Within those responding organizations, the majority of board members and senior executives responsible for their organization’s cyber risk management reported that they had less than a day in the last year to spend focused on cyber risk issues.

ValleyBike Share Launches 2020 Season

PIONEER VALLEY — ValleyBike Share — the electric-assist bike-share program of the Pioneer Valley that includes Amherst, Easthampton, Holyoke, Northampton, South Hadley, Springfield, and the UMass Amherst campus — has launched the 2020 season in select locations. Remaining stations will be opened over the following weeks. ValleyBike boasts more than 40,000 active members, who have ridden more than 280,000 miles on 126,940 trips. Due to the situation with Covid-19, ValleyBike is urging members to sanitize the handles, seat, and PIN pad before and after using the bikes. Every time the maintenance team touches a bike, it will be fully sanitized, but the public can do their part to keep themselves and others safe. Visit www.valleybike.org for more information and to find out how to become a member.

Art Therapy/Counseling Program Accredited at Springfield College

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield College Art Therapy/Counseling master’s-degree program has been granted initial accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), effective immediately. Awarded after a peer review by the Accreditation Council for Art Therapy Education and the CAAHEP board of directors, this accreditation determined the Springfield College Art Therapy/Counseling program was in substantial compliance with nationally established accreditation standards. Students enrolled in the program will have the option to either pursue a master of science or master of education degree. Graduates are master’s-level clinicians who can jump right into the workforce or pursue additional licensure opportunities, which will allow them to earn a license in the mental-health field after graduation and to obtain board certification as an art therapist.

Applied Mortgage Giving Makes $45,000 Regional Donation

NORTHAMPTON — Applied Mortgage Giving announced a new campaign, the Vitality Grant, which will be donated to six local community organizations: Downtown Amherst Foundation (Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce and Amherst Business Improvement District), Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce, Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, United Way of Franklin County, and United Way of Hampshire County. These organizations will each receive a portion of the gift to use at their discretion to support their work in the community. The Vitality Grant — sponsored by Applied Mortgage Giving, the charitable arm of Applied Mortgage, a d/b/a of HarborOne Mortgage, LLC — is designed to positively influence and provide opportunities for the success of small businesses and nonprofits in Hampshire and Franklin counties. Applied Mortgage Giving will be partnering with the local chambers and United Ways, hoping to enhance these organizations’ opportunities to meet the specific needs of their communities. For more information or questions regarding the Vitality Grant, e-mail LaBonte at [email protected].

Westfield State Accepting Applications for Addiction Counselor Education Program

WESTFIELD — Westfield State University’s College of Graduate and Continuing Education is accepting applications for the 2020-21 addiction counselor education (ACE) program. Classes will be held evenings and weekends starting in September 2020 and ending in May 2021. The goal of this non-credit certificate program, offered at the university since 1991, is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and techniques necessary for the successful treatment of individuals and families afflicted by alcoholism and/or other drug addictions. This program has been highly instrumental in the professional development of individuals in Western Mass. who are either working or interested in the growing healthcare field of addiction services. To help with this mission, Westfield State also offers the ACE program at a satellite location, in Pittsfield, to help train potential counselors in the Berkshires area to fill critical positions in treatment facilities that are understaffed and unable to fill open positions. Applications for both programs are available online at www.westfield.ma.edu/ace. For more information, or to receive an application by mail, contact Brandon Fredette at [email protected] or (413) 572-8033.

Pittsfield Cooperative Bank Supports Resilience Fund

PITTSFIELD — Berkshire Agricultural Ventures (BAV) announced it has been awarded a $5,000 grant from Pittsfield Cooperative Bank to support its Resilience Fund for Farmers. This new fund was established in response to the COVID-19 crisis and the resulting impact on local farmers, who are hurting right now as stores, restaurants, and other income-generating avenues like farmers’ markets and CSA are closed or operating in different, logistically challenging ways due to the virus. Despite these challenges, many farmers are reaching out to contribute healthy food to the neediest among us and sell as much as they can directly to consumers. The goal of the BAV Resilience Fund for Farmers is to support those who are experiencing business challenges as a result of COVID-19. Zero-interest, forgivable loans and grants will be provided to help farmers adapt to new realities, overcome significant income challenges, and ensure that farms remain viable and sustainable so they continue to meet demand for healthy, local foods. In addition to working with individual farmers, BAV also hopes to support strategies that avoid costly duplication of effort among farmers, such as developing coordinated delivery services. The first grant from the fund helped Roots Rising to pivot and establish the Berkshire County-wide Virtual Farmers Market, which in its first eight weeks served 1,400 households, gave $18,000 to neighbors in need, and generated $50,000 in sales to support the local food system. The grant from Pittsfield Cooperative Bank represents the first corporate support to the fund, which was established with a grant from a local family foundation. J. Jay Anderson, president and CEO of Pittsfield Cooperative Bank, added that the bank “is proud to support the work of the Berkshire Agricultural Ventures and the Resilience Fund for Farmers during this extraordinary time. At a time when local food systems and healthy food is important to our communities more than ever before, we thank them for their work.”

MCLA Receives Two Awards from Council for Advancement and Support of Education

NORTH ADAMS — Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) announced it has received two awards from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE), a global nonprofit association dedicated to educational advancement. The college received an Educational Fundraising Award for Overall Performance in the category of Public Liberal Arts Institutions and a Circle of Excellence Award for its 2018-19 President’s Report. This is the first year MCLA has been recognized by this program. The annual Educational Fundraising Awards recognize exemplary development programs based on a blind review of data submitted to the CASE Voluntary Support of Education survey. Winners are selected based on factors and variables that include, but are not limited to, patterns of growth, overall breadth of fundraising, amount raised per student, and alumni participation. The Circle of Excellence Awards recognize institutions whose staff members advanced their institutions through innovative, inspiring, and creative ideas. The awards acknowledge superior accomplishments that have lasting impact, demonstrate the highest level of professionalism, and deliver exceptional results. CASE judges commended the 2018-19 President’s Report, which was developed by MCLA’s Department of Marketing and Communications staff, on its theme and narrative flow, effective use of vintage and modern photographs and design elements, concise but not spare use of color, and the overall feeling of community it expressed, among other praise.

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

CHICOPEE

Taifa Foundation Inc., 1981 Memorial Dr., Suite 201, Chicopee, MA 01020. Joseph N. Kariuki, 245 Senator St., Springfield, MA 01129. We bring together, Kenyan diverse communities without regard to tribal, ethnic, political, or religious backgrounds and empower them to build a great future in western Massachusetts and beyond while maintaining and promoting our rich and diverse culture.

ZB Consulting Inc., 161 Hampden St., Apt 1L, Chicopee, MA 01013. Ashley M. Martinez, same. Provide holistic, client-centered representation to indigent persons in civil and criminal matters.

GRANBY

The Friends of Granby’s Parks and Recreation, 152 Harris St., Granby, MA 01033. Louis M. Barry, same. Support and improve the town of Granby parks and the recreation programs.

HADLEY

The Coop Education Integrity Board Inc., 105 Honey Pot Road, Hadley, MA 01035. Patrick John Leighton, same. To promote and fund the development and dissemination of a pre- K-12, three-dimensional model of curriculum, instruction, assessment, teaching, and learning in which learning outcomes are organized into the three categories of transferable concepts, specific content information, and kinesthetic/intellectual skills and processes.

HOLYOKE

Starzwireless Inc., 48 Holy Family Road, Apt 116, Holyoke, MA 01040. Boris Mordukhaev, same. A store that repairs electronic devices.

PITTSFIELD

Tamarack Equipment Sales Inc., 850 Tamarack Road, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Daniel P. Burke, 845 Tamarack Road, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Used car dealership.

SOUTHAMPTON

US Cannabis Corp., 111 Strong Road, Southampton, MA 01073. Michael Jaeger, same. Apply for cultivation license with CCC.

SPRINGFIELD

Pioneer Valley House of Labor Inc., 640 Page Blvd., Springfield, MA 01104. Michael Harazmus, 36 Mason Road, Holyoke, MA 01040. The purchase, construction, lease and/or maintenance of a building or portion thereof for the use, occupation and management of Western Mass. labor organizations affiliated now and hereafter with the Western Massachusetts area labor federation.

R R Enterprise Inc., 121 Albemarle St., Springfield, MA 01109. Ronald Ruell, same. Paper sales recycle.

SPP Investments Inc., 25 Chesterfield Ave., Springfield, MA 01118. Mike Lemelin, same. Own, rent, and manage real estate.

T Transportation Inc., 170 Switzer Ave., Springfield, MA 01109. Andriy Tanchev, same. Transportation.

W.W. Hispanic American Wrestling Alliance Corporation, 62 Governor St., Springfield, MA 01104. Guillermo R. Negron, same. Entertainment, sports events, and music concerts.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Sprintway Trans Inc., 51 Wistaria St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Dimitar Dimitrov, same. Trucking.

Through Ebony’s Eyes LLC, 900 Riverdale St., #116, West Springfield, MA 01089. Larshell Curley, 40 Hawthorne St., Springfield, MA 01105. Provide scholarship and financial aid support to young people pursuing post-secondary education.

WESTFIELD

Pioneer Valley Pt & Sport Rehab Inc., 20 Hunters Slope, Westfield, MA 01085. Anatoliy Pavlyuk, same. Physical therapy & sports rehabilitation services.

Road Mass Transportation Corp., 50 Medeiros Way, Westfield, MA 01085. Dale Unsderfer, 48 Sunset Dr., Westfield, MA 01085. Trucking business.

WESTHAMPTON

Quotient Education Inc., 75 Montague Road, Westhampton, MA 01027. Andrew M. Hilnbrand, same. Tutoring and test preparation service.

Building Permits

The following building permits were issued during the month of June 2020. (Filings are limited due to closures or reduced staffing hours at municipal offices due to COVID-19 restrictions).

CHICOPEE

Baystate Medical Center Inc.
451 Center St.
$45,000 — AT&T to remove and replace three antennas and three remote radio units on existing cell tower

James Legrand
3 Muzzy St.
$3,875 — Roofing

Republic Services
845 Burnett Road
$205,995 — Roofing

LEE

Travis Cabral, Rian Dowd
165-1 Water St.
$34,000 — Fix up barn to turn into automotive repair shop

The Cohen Group, LLC
10 Railroad St.
$1,000 — Demolish interior, remove interior wall and ceiling cover, remove bar

LENOX

490 Pittsfield Road, LLC
490 Pittsfield Road
$87,000 — Change Mascots bar layout into deli and retail space

SPRINGFIELD

Ali Syed Bakhtiar Ali, Nasir Awan
762 Boston Road
$8,000 — Alter restroom for accessible compliance and repair delivery ramp railings in vacant restaurant

City of Springfield
15 Catharine St.
$20,000 — Demolish block partition walls to combine two classrooms into one and relocate sink; turn 36 classrooms into 18 at Early Childhood Education Center

The Colvest Group
1340 Boston Road
$10,300 — Install fire-alarm system

Eastco Realty
30 Magaziner Place
$53,000 — Install six windows to front and side of building at Enfield Enterprises Inc.

Jijay Gaddam
1410 Carew St.
$13,500 — Convert two rooms into new hygiene rooms at 7 Hills Dental

Realted Management
115 Dwight St.
$3,371 — Replace fire-alarm panel

Sims Enterprises, LLC
1201 Parker St.
$230,000 — Alter tenant space for Family Dollar

Springfield Tower Square
1500 Main St.
$30,000 — AT&T to remove and replace three roof-mounted antennas and three remote radio heads

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and/or trade names were issued or renewed during the month of June 2020. (Filings are limited due to closures or reduced staffing hours at municipal offices due to COVID-19 restrictions).

BELCHERTOWN

Priveasy
21 Two Ponds Road
Noah Troy

DEERFIELD

The Deerfield Fly Shop
8A Elm St.
Brian Comfort

NHF
16 Yankee Candle Way
Bradford Turner

Stillwater Farms, LLC
5 Stillwater Road
Peter Melnik, Mark Melnik

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Brown, Olivia M.
a/k/a Conte-Brown, Olivia M.
8 Foss St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/011/2020

Chisholm, Nicole M.
74 Partridge Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/01/2020

Cruz, Licenia
21 Lawndale St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/02/2020

Fox-Bryant, Molly Ellen
4- A Maple View Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 13
Date: 06/04/2020

Houston, Brenda D.
a/k/a Houston-Leslie, Brenda D.
45 Willow St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/08/2020

LeBlanc, Robert
75 Judson St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/10/2020

Millan, Jose L.
301 Dwight Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 13
Date: 06/09/2020

Pouliot, Melissa J.
22 Marguerite St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/08/2020

Randolph, Darryl Eugene
3 Eastwood Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/02/2020

Robinson, Marie L.
485 South St., Apt. 217
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Date: 06/05/2020

Tavares, Maria G.
340 Holyoke St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Date: 06/09/2020

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

876 Beldingville Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Darius Marder
Seller: Janet L. Castleman
Date: 06/16/20

BERNARDSTON

34 South St.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $205,750
Buyer: Jess E. Schulte
Seller: Cameron A. Schmitz
Date: 06/15/20

GREENFIELD

179 Green River Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $204,900
Buyer: Alexander J. Fullerton
Seller: Mary E. McEneany
Date: 06/12/20

284 High St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: JLS Enterprises LLC
Seller: Green Man Enterprises LLC
Date: 06/08/20

57 Silver St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Amanda Mullen
Seller: Newcomb INT
Date: 06/05/20

21 Spring Ter.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Danielle M. Bonsanti
Seller: Anne M. Platzner
Date: 06/08/20

49 Vernon St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Ciaran C. Kelahan
Seller: Dennis M. Parrott
Date: 06/11/20

HAWLEY

58 Forget Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $791,500
Buyer: Meadowsweet Farm LLC
Seller: Paul M. Lacinski
Date: 06/04/20

59 Forget Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Kyra M. Cressotti
Seller: Paul M. Lacinski
Date: 06/04/20

HEATH

62 Long Hill Road
Heath, MA 01346
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Angela M. Taylor
Seller: Sheila D. Urban
Date: 06/10/20

Rowe Road
Heath, MA 01346
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Nancee Bershof
Seller: York INT
Date: 06/03/20

MONTAGUE

75 Turnpike Road
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Jordan Kozloski
Seller: Frances C. MacPhail
Date: 06/05/20

ORANGE

69 Prescott Lane
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $226,000
Buyer: Aaron Moore
Seller: Thavath Sayarath
Date: 06/04/20

48 West Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: Paul Theisen
Seller: Laelia LLC
Date: 06/09/20

111 West Myrtle St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Jason R. James
Seller: B. Peter & M. A. Holmes FT
Date: 06/05/20

1

Dell Road
Rowe, MA 01367
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Nancee Bershof
Seller: York INT
Date: 06/03/20

SHUTESBURY

295 Montague Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $364,000
Buyer: Jennifer M. Cheever
Seller: Robert L. McCormick RET
Date: 06/11/20

SUNDERLAND

192 Hadley Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $288,600
Buyer: Yan Y. Ma
Seller: Steven C. Kennedy
Date: 06/09/20

50 South Silver Lane
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $281,500
Buyer: Michael Kline
Seller: Jason W. Shea
Date: 06/15/20

WHATELY

239 State Road
Whately, MA 01373
Amount: $258,000
Buyer: Jill Skowronek
Seller: Jordan M. Bean
Date: 06/05/20

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

Blacksmith Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $308,000
Buyer: Michelle S. Butler FT
Seller: Christine A. Calabrese
Date: 06/15/20

251 Cooper St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Michael Korolev
Seller: Ahmed AlZuhairi
Date: 06/12/20

12 Cosgrove Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Zachary Matys
Seller: Eugene Beauchemin
Date: 06/05/20

15 Ellington St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $166,950
Buyer: Marco A. Scibelli
Seller: Bank New York Mellon
Date: 06/10/20

35-37 Federal St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $314,000
Buyer: Husam A. Alugaidi
Seller: Mack A. Lynch
Date: 06/15/20

119 Florida Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Michael Lapointe
Seller: Colby, Brian X., (Estate)
Date: 06/04/20

338 Meadow St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $8,000,000
Buyer: Pynchon LLC
Seller: Donna M. Dreyer
Date: 06/15/20

109 Paul Revere Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Sean P. Riley
Seller: Paul Giusto
Date: 06/05/20

304 Silver St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $168,542
Buyer: Plata O. Plomo Inc.
Seller: Mark Leblanc
Date: 06/05/20

BRIMFIELD

1154 Dunhamtown Brimfield Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Jonas Vandebroek
Seller: Cory S. Lapan
Date: 06/11/20

CHESTER

67 Middlefield Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Cora Boudreau
Seller: John R. Buikus
Date: 06/09/20

CHICOPEE

89 6th Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kristian Hennessey
Seller: Robert E. Archambault
Date: 06/12/20

36 Cambridge St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $222,500
Buyer: Jose E. Padilla
Seller: Nasser Zebian
Date: 06/05/20

945 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: Navin Patel
Seller: CLT Realty Inc.
Date: 06/08/20

29 Dorrance St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Mykola Nikulin
Seller: Paul Troy
Date: 06/12/20

163 East St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $159,999
Buyer: Anacelis Molina
Seller: Corey J. Black
Date: 06/09/20

50 Edbert St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Dorothy Jacques
Seller: Premier Home Builders Inc.
Date: 06/09/20

107 Edward St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: NAR Realty LLC
Seller: Lorraine A. Cote
Date: 06/04/20

29 Emerson St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $139,900
Buyer: Westwood Estates LLC
Seller: Exchange Management TR
Date: 06/03/20

41 Fernhill St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $131,000
Buyer: Seweryn W. Grabowski
Seller: US Bank
Date: 06/16/20

9 Hampden Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: Jorge L. Aponte
Seller: David Larkin
Date: 06/16/20

29 Jean Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Ernest W. Hayden
Seller: N. Riley Construction Inc.
Date: 06/05/20

14 Kowal Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $238,000
Buyer: Justin L. Veillette
Seller: Wilmington Trust
Date: 06/05/20

218 Lafayette St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: David A. Assarian
Seller: Paul R. Samson
Date: 06/12/20

23 Marten St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $138,722
Buyer: Works Of Art LLC
Seller: Jerod R. Laflamme
Date: 06/04/20

80 Munger Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Samuel B. Sharpe
Seller: Rehab Home Buyers LLC
Date: 06/05/20

28 Orchard St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $222,500
Buyer: Joseph D. Julio
Seller: Gregory Bernat
Date: 06/11/20

47 Richelieu St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Paul Racine
Seller: Debra Kolnicki
Date: 06/12/20

38 Shepherd St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Nathan Moreau
Seller: Marc A. Labrie
Date: 06/12/20

17 Sunnyside St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $341,300
Buyer: Ryan P. McEwan
Seller: Green Fields Inc.
Date: 06/15/20

81 Syrek St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $186,000
Buyer: Nicholas Bernier
Seller: Rudolph P. Piotrowski
Date: 06/15/20

88 Wallace Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $244,000
Buyer: Janisse Bonilla-Pedraza
Seller: Maureen E. Boutin
Date: 06/10/20

59 West St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Albert E. Paone
Seller: Anthony Alvaro
Date: 06/12/20

EAST LONGMEADOW

18 Bayne St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Sandra Wainwright
Seller: Kenric D. Gallano
Date: 06/08/20

462 Chestnut St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Arvind K. Sundaram
Seller: Robert T. Scott
Date: 06/04/20

141 Country Club Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $545,000
Buyer: Michael Donskoy
Seller: Keun S. Han
Date: 06/11/20

131 Dwight Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Luke Paull
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 06/03/20

51 East Circle Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $326,000
Buyer: Kimberly Lord
Seller: Seth M. Fiore
Date: 06/15/20

5 Judy Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $366,750
Buyer: Kim A. Ainsworth
Seller: Joseph A. Conant
Date: 06/05/20

114 Lasalle St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $238,000
Buyer: Jonathan Coyne
Seller: Jerry E. Gray
Date: 06/11/20

228 Maple St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Georgiana C. Gibson-Daw
Seller: James M. Mott
Date: 06/16/20

321 Pease Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: Colon Franco-Aristides
Seller: George R. Sullivan
Date: 06/12/20

295 Prospect St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Kenneth Cooper
Seller: Anthony G. Richards
Date: 06/10/20

12 Susan St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jonathan C. Thomas
Seller: Lisa K. Patnode
Date: 06/12/20

HAMPDEN

3-9 Allen St.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $2,175,000
Buyer: MJCEL LLC
Seller: Roha Enterprises 2 LLC
Date: 06/12/20

14-20 East Longmeadow Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $2,175,000
Buyer: MJCEL LLC
Seller: Roha Enterprises 2 LLC
Date: 06/12/20

50 Woodland Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Daniel Berg
Seller: Christopher E. Hagen
Date: 06/15/20

HOLLAND

2 Clark Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Paul E. Holloway
Seller: FNMA
Date: 06/12/20

48 Leno Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Patricia Reece
Seller: Brian McDonnell
Date: 06/08/20

HOLYOKE

33-35 Brookline Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $133,041
Buyer: Fens Co. LLC
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 06/12/20

291 Elm St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $780,000
Buyer: NCA Properties LLC
Seller: Sic Infit LLC
Date: 06/04/20

32 Florida Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Dmitriy Y. Bazukin
Seller: Bethany I. Labelle
Date: 06/09/20

21 Hillview Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: Nuriye Kartal
Seller: Louise F. Millane-George
Date: 06/12/20

50-52 Hitchcock St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Efrain Tirado
Seller: John P. Brunelle
Date: 06/04/20

283 Linden St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $206,000
Buyer: Daniel Rose
Seller: Michael Siciliano
Date: 06/15/20

68 Lynch Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Joshua Riberio
Seller: Amanda Wellman-Gomez
Date: 06/04/20

55 Nonotuck St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Corey Flanders
Seller: Kenneth C. Kiontke
Date: 06/08/20

31 North Branch Pkwy.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Kyle Rivera
Seller: Katherine R. McCabe
Date: 06/12/20

323 Sargeant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: Bartlett M. Doty
Seller: David Mathes
Date: 06/03/20

510 South Bridge St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $411,123
Buyer: Next Realty Inc.
Seller: Bridge Street Equities
Date: 06/12/20

12 Scott Hollow Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Kerry M. Mikalchus
Seller: Dawn L. Blyda
Date: 06/11/20

LONGMEADOW

81 Benedict Ter.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Paul M. Thompson
Seller: Geordie S. Kinnear
Date: 06/09/20

96 Birchwood Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $303,000
Buyer: Nathaniel O. Waugaman
Seller: Andrew Barbosa
Date: 06/03/20

15 Converse St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: James H. McClintock
Seller: Mark T. Langone
Date: 06/12/20

167 Dwight Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $4,750,000
Buyer: Workers Credit Union
Seller: Longmeadow Park LLC
Date: 06/03/20

171 Dwight Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $4,750,000
Buyer: Workers Credit Union
Seller: Longmeadow Park LLC
Date: 06/03/20

175 Dwight Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $4,750,000
Buyer: Workers Credit Union
Seller: Longmeadow Park LLC
Date: 06/03/20

10 Eastham Lane
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $691,000
Buyer: Steven Berger
Seller: Holland TR
Date: 06/05/20

12 Erskine Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Frohmund K. Burger
Seller: Ian L. Goldsmith
Date: 06/08/20

42 Laurel Lane
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $430,000
Buyer: Kyle Chambers
Seller: Paula C. Tredeau
Date: 06/11/20

249 Lynnwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Patti G. Glenn
Seller: Roy FT
Date: 06/12/20

23 Meadow Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Jesus Escobar
Seller: Juan C. Escobar
Date: 06/12/20

LUDLOW

60 Clearwater Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Corey Day
Seller: Mel K. Kwatowski
Date: 06/05/20

99 Edgewood Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Jason A. Chelo
Seller: Scott R. Johnson
Date: 06/05/20

146 Highland Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Robert McRobbie
Seller: Meghan Lynch
Date: 06/03/20

148 Highland Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Caitlin G. Pestana
Seller: Corey S. Day
Date: 06/05/20

115 Laconia St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Dominick A. Corsetti
Seller: Boyko, Stanley S., (Estate)
Date: 06/08/20

21 Main Blvd.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $213,100
Buyer: Garrett M. Richard
Seller: George A. Hapcook
Date: 06/08/20

434 Miller St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Todd M. Nareau
Seller: Henry E. Gaviglio
Date: 06/04/20

66 New Crest St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Samuel J. Acevedo-Nichols
Seller: Jason Gagnon
Date: 06/08/20

MONSON

14 Crest Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Eric T. Alexopoulos
Seller: Douglas K. Dehanas
Date: 06/05/20

71 Maxwell Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $364,000
Buyer: Kalli Arbour
Seller: Pamela J. Arbour
Date: 06/09/20

8 Palmer Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Christopher Glista
Seller: David A. Proulx
Date: 06/11/20

MONTGOMERY

30 Mountain Acres
Montgomery, MA 01085
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Alfred G. Ames
Seller: Nina D. Fountain
Date: 06/11/20

PALMER

8 1st St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Double R. Enterprises LLC
Seller: Atlas Die LLC
Date: 06/03/20

49 Charles St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $228,750
Buyer: Andrew McCabe
Seller: Charles E. McCabe
Date: 06/12/20

4037 Hill St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $296,000
Buyer: Peter J. Kuzontkoski
Seller: Dianne L. Lefebvre
Date: 06/08/20

26 Homestead St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Alexander C. Aghjayan
Seller: Paul K. Clinton
Date: 06/10/20

Mechanic St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $228,500
Buyer: Lisa D. Gagnon
Seller: Edward T. Moynihan
Date: 06/11/20

125 State St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $125,500
Buyer: Kevin J. Czaplicki
Seller: Cascade Funding 2017-1 Al
Date: 06/05/20

RUSSELL

96 West Main St.
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $188,500
Buyer: Tracy Shaw
Seller: Kevin P. Kennedy
Date: 06/03/20

SPRINGFIELD

20 Alderman St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $230,500
Buyer: Noel Soto-Cruz
Seller: Diep T. Lam
Date: 06/15/20

125-127 Alderman St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: Luis E. Izquierdo
Seller: TM Properties Inc.
Date: 06/15/20

1174 Allen St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Shawn M. Hyland
Seller: Donna M. Houser
Date: 06/10/20

41 Arthur St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $176,900
Buyer: Mark R. Theriaque
Seller: Norman Mercier
Date: 06/12/20

155 Ashbrook St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $201,500
Buyer: Hem B. Bhattarai
Seller: Richard C. Ericksberg
Date: 06/09/20

9 Beauregard St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Luis Comas-Mejia
Seller: KEC Properties LLC
Date: 06/08/20

88 Benton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $251,900
Buyer: Pedro A. Joubert-Collazo
Seller: Adeleke Thomas
Date: 06/16/20

71 Bernard St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: Yamaira Gonzalez
Seller: H&N LLC
Date: 06/03/20

47 Biltmore St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Thang Nugyen
Seller: Raith P. Son
Date: 06/16/20

77 Biltmore St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $117,000
Buyer: Khari Crittendon
Seller: John T. Thompson
Date: 06/12/20

220 Birchland Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $212,800
Buyer: Ann Hughes
Seller: Lorraine M. Strain
Date: 06/15/20

41 Blaine St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Carlos Deleon
Seller: A&D Property Group LLC
Date: 06/12/20

81 Brickett St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $116,000
Buyer: Grosz RT
Seller: Bettie R. Young
Date: 06/05/20

88 Butternut St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $232,500
Buyer: Kathleen A. Flynn
Seller: Deborah A. O’Brien
Date: 06/08/20

15 Cass St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Edgardo E. Terrero
Seller: Amat Victoria Curam LLC
Date: 06/09/20

111 Clydesdale Lane
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $207,000
Buyer: Irmgartd Camacho
Seller: Mariam Saleh
Date: 06/08/20

266 Corcoran Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: Matthew S. Casey
Seller: Richard G. Martin
Date: 06/12/20

Davenport St. (NS)
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $116,000
Buyer: Grosz RT
Seller: Bettie R. Young
Date: 06/05/20

131 Dwight Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Luke Paull
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 06/03/20

1446-1450 Dwight St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $179,500
Buyer: Garey Allen
Seller: Amat Victoria Curam LLC
Date: 06/08/20

32 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Erich S. Driscoll
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 06/04/20

1 Florentine Gardens
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Natalie C. Cotton-Nessler
Seller: Joanne Goubourn
Date: 06/04/20

32 Forest St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $268,000
Buyer: Alejandro F. Marrero
Seller: London Realty LLC
Date: 06/05/20

186 Garland St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Jeremy Skiba
Seller: Alexis N. Warth
Date: 06/08/20

61 Garland St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Alexandra M. Otero
Seller: Jennifer Holloway
Date: 06/05/20

127 Garnet St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: Nikeya L. Lowery
Seller: Jeffrey W. Provost
Date: 06/10/20

180 Garvey Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Andrea Punch
Seller: Borgy LLC
Date: 06/16/20

43 Gertrude St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $165,500
Buyer: Krystal M. Vega
Seller: James F. Vandyke
Date: 06/12/20

41 Hayden Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $297,500
Buyer: Nolava LLC
Seller: Valley Castle Holdings
Date: 06/16/20

69 Hood St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jose E. Vargas-Baez
Seller: Enrique Ortiz
Date: 06/12/20

132 Hudson St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $171,500
Buyer: Robert P. Hanrahan
Seller: Sean D. Mangan
Date: 06/15/20

15 Irene St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Christopher Reeve
Seller: Elizabeth A. Scanlon
Date: 06/05/20

103 Kirby St.
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $177,379
Buyer: Bryan W. Punderson
Seller: Theodore J. Czepiel
Date: 06/10/20

19 Lamont St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Luiz A. Perez
Seller: Yanibel Vasquez
Date: 06/12/20

72 Larkspur St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Andrew J. Bennett
Seller: Luis Gonzalez
Date: 06/11/20

41 Lloyd Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $199,000
Buyer: Jeannette Smith
Seller: Notre Dame Properties LLC
Date: 06/05/20

101 Lowell St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $35,920,000
Buyer: Edgewater Tower LLC
Seller: Pynchon 2 Apartments LP
Date: 06/09/20

1163 Main St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Amount: $625,000
Buyer: Cedar Green LLC
Seller: Ahap LLC
Date: 06/09/20

72 Mapledell St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: B9 Industries Inc.
Seller: Hedge Hog Industries Corp.
Date: 06/05/20

89 Maynard St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $164,000
Buyer: Edmanuel Collazo
Seller: Vincent B. Shorte
Date: 06/15/20

46 Midway St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Jose M. Ramos-Rosado
Seller: Jaimie L. Standing
Date: 06/05/20

43 Montmorenci St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $139,000
Buyer: Sue Kuang
Seller: Ventura Carrasco
Date: 06/09/20

80 Northampton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $126,000
Buyer: Alycar Investments LLC
Seller: US Bank
Date: 06/11/20

13 Notre Dame St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: MNB Builders LLC
Seller: Robert C. McElligott
Date: 06/15/20

1302 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $149,400
Buyer: Fernando Matos
Seller: Michael Lapointe
Date: 06/05/20

83 Parkside St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Roel J. Burnett
Seller: A. Geovannni Bernal
Date: 06/08/20

202 Plainfield St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $40,080,000
Buyer: Pynchon Townhomes LLC
Seller: Pynchon 1 Apartments LP
Date: 06/09/20

69 Prentice St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Roshanda Yates
Seller: Ivette Diaz
Date: 06/15/20

206 Prentice St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $196,000
Buyer: James J. Ryan
Seller: Sarah K. Delisle
Date: 06/15/20

112 Quaker Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $124,054
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Wilmington Savings
Date: 06/11/20

79 Quincy St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $297,500
Buyer: Nolava LLC
Seller: Valley Castle Holdings
Date: 06/16/20

31 Ravenwood St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $181,000
Buyer: Carlos Aguasvivas
Seller: Greg A. Pease
Date: 06/05/20

2001 Roosevelt Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $7,000,000
Buyer: Friends Of Baystate Academy
Seller: Polman Realty LLC
Date: 06/11/20

260 Roy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Tyler M. Feinstein
Seller: Elke H. Davidson
Date: 06/15/20

251 Senator St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $123,000
Buyer: Stoney RT
Seller: Olga Jagiello
Date: 06/08/20

24 Sidney Place
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $158,000
Buyer: Marcia Levonne-Tate
Seller: Anthony Bourget
Date: 06/03/20

1427 South Branch Pkwy.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Alfred J. Long
Seller: Jennifer M. Darcy-Guertin
Date: 06/15/20

1072 State St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Elghani Sons Inc.
Seller: RIJO Enterprises LLC
Date: 06/05/20

103 Superior Ave.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Christine D. Johnson
Seller: Thomas G. Newell
Date: 06/16/20

23 Washington Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $319,000
Buyer: Debra Distefano
Seller: Jon A. Sandman
Date: 06/16/20

190 West Allen Ridge Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: Jeffrey Robinson-Beattie
Seller: Caitlyn D. Kelleher
Date: 06/09/20

2416 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Jose Perales
Seller: Kyle G. Roy
Date: 06/08/20

238 Winterset Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: John D. Slavick
Seller: Lindsay Tanguay
Date: 06/05/20

19 Yale St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $297,500
Buyer: Nolava LLC
Seller: Valley Castle Holdings
Date: 06/16/20

SOUTHWICK

509 College Hwy.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Whalley Properties Inc.
Seller: Norman H. Storey
Date: 06/05/20

24 Woodside Circle
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $308,000
Buyer: Garrett W. O’Keefe
Seller: Charles G. Berthiaume
Date: 06/08/20

TOLLAND

331 Hartland Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $156,000
Buyer: Brian K. Falcetti
Seller: Wayne Simeone
Date: 06/15/20

WALES

32 Reed Hill Road
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $338,000
Buyer: Donna M. Szolusha
Seller: Sandra A. Wilk
Date: 06/12/20

WESTFIELD

10 Canterbury Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Kara M. Krupa
Seller: Oak Ridge Custom Home Builders
Date: 06/15/20

27 East Bartlett St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Louis J. Siano
Seller: Theodore J. Kopyscinski
Date: 06/03/20

47 East Silver St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $291,250
Buyer: FHB Realty LLP
Seller: Ernest C. Gardner
Date: 06/12/20

26 Frederick St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Shawn M. Mahue
Seller: Ashley A. Hebda
Date: 06/08/20

63 Gary Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: Petro Levchyk
Seller: Joan W. Konefal
Date: 06/15/20

129 Glenwood Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $329,900
Buyer: Litza M. Luna-Bermudez
Seller: Maria A. Scott-Smith
Date: 06/12/20

188 Munger Hill Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Matthew Christy
Seller: Jonathan Queenin
Date: 06/15/20

345 Russellville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Kristopher R. Kelley
Seller: Wayne S. Cunningham
Date: 06/12/20

8 Whitaker Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Michael S. Knurek
Seller: John F. Hoyt
Date: 06/15/20

WILBRAHAM

16 Bellows Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $459,900
Buyer: Heydi F. Podadera
Seller: Stephanie Eagles-Fox
Date: 06/12/20

3 Bonair Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $396,000
Buyer: Rebecca Smith
Seller: Shane M. Bruscoe
Date: 06/04/20

27 Brentwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Stephanie Eagles-Fox
Seller: Maurice G. Murphy
Date: 06/12/20

5 Bulkley Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $349,900
Buyer: David P. Allum
Seller: David C. Weeks
Date: 06/10/20

288 Burleigh Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Steven M. Crochiere
Seller: Richard Schroll
Date: 06/15/20

115 Chilson Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $535,000
Buyer: Felix Y. Malinkevich
Seller: Roberts, William R., (Estate)
Date: 06/15/20

10 Hemingway Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $338,000
Buyer: Dayna Mahan
Seller: Amy J. Porter
Date: 06/04/20

188 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Michael C. Gouin
Seller: Joseph B. Doran
Date: 06/04/20

64 Old Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $184,900
Buyer: Keegan A. Voigt
Seller: Nelson Garcia
Date: 06/12/20

33 Pleasant View Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Robert J. Schroeter
Seller: Sandra K. Belcastro
Date: 06/15/20

400 Springfield St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Alexandr Kaletin
Seller: Jeffrey A. Levasseur
Date: 06/15/20

Stonegate Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Derek J. Pelkey
Seller: William J. Giokas
Date: 06/16/20

42 Stonegate Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $439,000
Buyer: Jeffrey W. Hamer
Seller: Michele T. Agahigian
Date: 06/15/20

3 Westernview Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Ethan J. Eady
Seller: Holda, Edward A., (Estate)
Date: 06/08/20

WEST SPRINGFIELD

167 Althea St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $176,500
Buyer: Meghan Provost
Seller: Sherry, Catherine M., (Estate)
Date: 06/16/20

232 Ashley Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $242,500
Buyer: Theodore E. Fydenkevez
Seller: Revitalized Properties
Date: 06/15/20

191 Baldwin St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $1,250,000
Buyer: Palpum Raw LLC
Seller: Dasare Properties LLC
Date: 06/16/20

97 Cass Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Robert A. Murphy
Seller: Mary A. Fitzgerald
Date: 06/04/20

25 Clyde Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $183,982
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Susan M. Muzzy
Date: 06/11/20

47 Hewitt St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: Alexandra D. Dupuis
Seller: Sean P. Riley
Date: 06/05/20

67 Hewitt St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Branden Patitucci
Seller: John J. Theriault
Date: 06/05/20

189 Hillcrest Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $199,500
Buyer: Andrew D. McMahon
Seller: 189 Hillcrest Avenue RT
Date: 06/05/20

95 Janet St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Olivia M. Schrader
Seller: Mark M. Salamon
Date: 06/12/20

5 Lennys Way
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: Jonathan Dominik
Seller: Javed A. Naqvi
Date: 06/05/20

176 Lower Beverly Hills
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Sarah B. Long
Seller: MAA Property LLC
Date: 06/10/20

81 Monastery Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Grisel Vargas
Seller: Gia Z. Catanzarite
Date: 06/08/20

772 Morgan Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $256,000
Buyer: Lalit Ghalley
Seller: Jonathan Dominik
Date: 06/05/20

36 Southworth St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Dylan Brochu
Seller: Michael A. Krupa
Date: 06/11/20

156 Upper Beverly Hills
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Marina Otero
Seller: Manchester Enterprises
Date: 06/12/20

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

20 Clifton Ave.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $377,000
Buyer: Elena S. Davis
Seller: Susan E. Cormier
Date: 06/10/20

135 Mill Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Richard A. Weinberg
Seller: Daniel E. Boudreau
Date: 06/05/20

320 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $272,500
Buyer: 302 Realty LLC
Seller: Margaret T. Costa
Date: 06/10/20

15 Sunrise Ave.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Dickinson Street LLC
Seller: Richard J. McKeown
Date: 06/05/20

BELCHERTOWN

221 Boardman St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $452,000
Buyer: Carla Sterling
Seller: Eilean L. Attwood
Date: 06/15/20

218 Franklin St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $313,000
Buyer: Pedro Torres
Seller: Elizabeth McNamara
Date: 06/11/20

45 Lake Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: John Bowler
Seller: Glen Hupfer
Date: 06/03/20

227 North Liberty St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $245,500
Buyer: 809 College Highway LLC
Seller: Josephine M. Fontaine
Date: 06/15/20

EASTHAMPTON

7 1st Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $327,000
Buyer: Jeanette Paluh
Seller: Aimie J. Sullivan
Date: 06/05/20

89 Autumn Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Nina Rogowsky
Seller: Edward J. Gallivan
Date: 06/12/20

15 Beyer Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Christopher D. Madsen
Seller: Samuel R. Maule
Date: 06/03/20

40 Carillon Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $405,850
Buyer: Anna M. Leue
Seller: Andrew C. Keller
Date: 06/04/20

20 East Green St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $259,900
Buyer: Noah Cooper
Seller: Timothy J. Garceau
Date: 06/05/20

3 Monska Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Walter J. Graff
Seller: Lynn A. Helems
Date: 06/05/20

21 River Valley Way
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $398,750
Buyer: Angelo D. Intile
Seller: Robert Solosko
Date: 06/03/20

74 Williston Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $223,969
Buyer: First NLC TR
Seller: Alice Knox-Eaton
Date: 06/08/20

GOSHEN

30 Lake Dr.
Goshen, MA 01096
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: David A. Damsky
Seller: Susan C. Bourque
Date: 06/15/20

GRANBY

12 Deerbrook Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Chevy J. Kelker
Seller: Cecilia M. Laporte
Date: 06/09/20

277 East State St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $281,400
Buyer: Andre D. Pelletier
Seller: Saunders N. Whittlesey
Date: 06/03/20

62 West St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Hannah Larrabee
Seller: Jacob G. Callery
Date: 06/08/20

HADLEY

68 Huntington Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $268,750
Buyer: Ashleigh K. Malinowski
Seller: Joseph B. Malinowski
Date: 06/12/20

2 Indian Pipe Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $698,000
Buyer: Bruce D. Tyler
Seller: Whyte FT
Date: 06/15/20

HATFIELD

166 Main St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Jason W. Shea
Seller: Strong, Teresa M., (Estate)
Date: 06/15/20

MIDDLEFIELD

163 Arthur Pease Road
Middlefield, MA 01243
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Raymond J. Bressette
Seller: Jonathan Horning
Date: 06/05/20

NORTHAMPTON

72 Austin Circle
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Lisa M. Lamere
Seller: Christopher B. Nearey
Date: 06/05/20

137 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Rosemund LLC
Seller: Mary E. Just
Date: 06/09/20

155 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: MRC Enterprises LLC
Seller: Emerson Way LLC
Date: 06/10/20

595 Haydenville Road
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Seth H. Gregory
Seller: Helen E. Symons
Date: 06/12/20

40 Spring St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Sarah L. Gilleman
Seller: Grosz RT
Date: 06/08/20

52 Winterberry Lane
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $520,000
Buyer: Jonathan Roberts
Seller: Shelly L. Rifken
Date: 06/12/20

PLAINFIELD

27 Broom St.
Plainfield, MA 01070
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Almond Property Mgmt. LLC
Seller: Farmhouse Properties LLC
Date: 06/10/20

23 Mountain St.
Plainfield, MA 01070
Amount: $298,000
Buyer: Alix Daguzan
Seller: June M. Lynds
Date: 06/15/20

SOUTH HADLEY

57 Dartmouth St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $186,000
Buyer: Joshua J. Rondeau
Seller: Derek M. Brin
Date: 06/10/20

8 Marcel St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Tucker Bixby
Seller: Rosinski Realty Inc.
Date: 06/12/20

49 North Main St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $337,500
Buyer: Todd Grover
Seller: Maurice R. Laflamme
Date: 06/12/20

14 San Souci Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $490,000
Buyer: William P. Barry
Seller: Michael Brown
Date: 06/15/20

26 Tampa St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $221,000
Buyer: Susan K. Narey
Seller: Gagnon, Doris R., (Estate)
Date: 06/09/20

136 Woodbridge St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $373,000
Buyer: Flannery L. Merideth
Seller: George R. Dempsey
Date: 06/08/20

SOUTHAMPTON

133 Pomeroy Meadow Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Joseph G. Lafreniere
Seller: Alfred J. Albano
Date: 06/08/20

119 White Loaf Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Luis O. Maisonet
Seller: Alan D. Kitch
Date: 06/08/20

WARE

3 Meadow Heights Dr.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $179,900
Buyer: Matthew P. Thibodeau
Seller: Brenda L. Scibelli
Date: 06/08/20

WILLIAMSBURG

28-R Fairfield Ave.
Williamsburg, MA 01039
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Rory Zononi
Seller: Laurie B. Farkas
Date: 06/05/20

WORTHINGTON

159 Cummington Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Andrew J. Royer
Seller: Richard G. Higgins TR
Date: 06/12/20

570 Dingle Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Tina J. Crotty-Vandoloski
Seller: Michael P. Frazier
Date: 06/04/20

Daily News

PIONEER VALLEY — The DiStefano Group and Seven Roads Media announced the Phoenix Project, a movement to collaborate and create opportunities within the Pioneer Valley business community based on the principles of kindness and understanding.

The goal is to provide a broad range of assistance to businesses that are struggling as a result of the unprecedented happenings of 2020. The two companies, in direct response to the inequities and hardships that so many in the community are facing, will seek to gain a genuine understanding of what local business owners need and address those needs immediately and for free.

The process will begin with a video interview to gather raw, first-hand knowledge. “We are looking to capture authenticity and vulnerability as only video can,” said Don Cavanaugh, co-founder and lead creative of Seven Roads Media and Phoenix Project co-founder. “That way, we can meet business owners where they are and truly help.” 

Seven Roads Media and the DiStefano Group will provide business and media coaching on the spot, but support for the business won’t end there. The Phoenix Project also includes the expertise of an established group of ‘masterminds’ — local professionals at the top of their fields — to provide coaching in banking, marketing, financial management, real estate, photography, hospitality, events, human resources, psychology, IT, and more.

Gina DiStefano, president and CEO of the DiStefano Group and Phoenix Project co-founder, explained that “the video is just the beginning. From there, we will connect the business with our group of masterminds, who will continue to provide pro bono advice. We intend to have a real impact on businesses that have been hit hard. We are willing and able to help.” 

The project’s model will build supportive relationships not just for the chosen business, but among all of the those represented by the masterminds, said the third co-founder, Jess Roncarati-Howe, a nonprofit consultant and coach with the DiStefano Group who formerly served as president of the Greater Chicopee Chamber of Commerce.

“An entrepreneurial spirit who truly cares about what’s going on around them can foster tremendous impact,” she added. “It is the driving force behind the Phoenix Project. We will help our community to heal — one interaction, one relationship at a time.”

Daily News

BOSTON — From June 21 to June 27, Massachusetts had 29,072 individuals file an initial claim for regular unemployment insurance (UI), a small decrease of 469 over the previous week, the third consecutive week of decline.

However, as the school systems officially closed for the summer, over-the-week increases in filings were seen in public administration and education. Manufacturing also posted an increase in initial claims filed. From March 15 to June 27, a total of 1,057,496 individuals have filed for regular UI. For the week, continued UI claims were down 9,828, or 1.8% over the previous week.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) initial claims filed for the week ending June 27, at 14,154, were slightly more than the previous week. Since April 20, 638,245 claimants have filed an initial claim for PUA.

The Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), which provided up to 13 weeks of extended benefits, was implemented on May 21. For the week ending June 20, 4,503 PEUC initial claims were filed, bringing the total of PEUC filings to 59,144 since implementation.

Daily News

NORTH ADAMS —The Division of Graduate and Continuing Education at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (MCLA) will hold a webinar offering information about the college’s certificate programs on Wednesday, July 8 at 11 a.m. This webinar is free and open to the public. To register, click here.

MCLA offers three certificate programs with classes at the college’s Pittsfield location: network security, principles of accounting, and the graduate certificate in business administration.

For both network security and principles of accounting, applicants need only a high-school diploma or the HiSET credential. Both programs may be completed in just over one year for students attending part-time. All courses in the certificate programs are eligible for transfer to continued study in MCLA’s undergraduate programs. The five-course graduate certificate in business administration provides either standalone advanced certification in business administration or fulfills the first 15 credits toward an MBA at MCLA.

“This certificate is appropriate for working professionals who may or may not be interested in pursuing the MBA, but for whom graduate certification in business would enhance their career potential,” said Nancy Ovitsky, director of MCLA’s MBA program.

Funding for MCLA’s certificate programs may be available for those who qualify through the MassHire Career Center. Federal financial aid is available for the two undergraduate certificates for those who qualify.

For more information, e-mail [email protected], call (413) 662-5575, or visit mcla.edu/certificates or mcla.edu/mba.

Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — The SmithVent team of engineering alumni, staff, and faculty are the winners of the CoVent-19 challenge to design an easily manufacturable ventilator for use during the coronavirus pandemic, according to Grécourt Gate, Smith College’s online news portal. The team’s breathing device was chosen from more than 200 submissions to the competition launched on April 1.

“In two months, we went from knowing nothing to having a functional prototype,” said team co-leader Susannah Howe, director of Smith’s Engineering Design Clinic. “To see that trajectory in such a short period of time, with people who are volunteering their time on top of their other jobs, is amazing and heartwarming and so rewarding.”

Smith College President Kathleen McCartney added that “I could not be more proud of the SmithVent team for winning the CoVent-19 Challenge. This win speaks volumes about the power of a liberal-arts education, grounded in experiential learning, to find innovative, collaborative solutions to complex, urgent problems. SmithVent is Smith at its best: a lasting example of our community coming together for the betterment of the world.”

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, Business Talk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times

Episode 7: July 6, 2020

George Interviews Mark Keroack, President & CEO of Baystate Health

George interviews Mark Keroack, President & CEO of Baystate Health and they discuss how COVID-19 has impaired the local healthcare economy, a potential “second wave” of the virus, and how the western Mass. community is boding well through the pandemic in comparison to other areas of the country. 

Sponsored by:

Also Available On

COVID-19 Daily News

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration announced that phase 3 of the Commonwealth’s reopening plan will begin on Monday, July 6, and updates on gatherings will be in effect. For the city of Boston, phase 3 and the gatherings order will take effect on Monday, July 13.

The following businesses will be eligible to reopen in the first stage of phase 3, subject to industry-specific rules concerning capacity and operations: movie theaters and outdoor performance venues; museums and cultural and historical sites; fitness centers and health clubs; certain indoor recreational activities with low potential for contact; and professional sports teams, which, under the authority of league-wide rules, may hold games without spectators.

The full guidance and list of businesses eligible to reopen can be found at www.mass.gov/reopening. Businesses and sectors set to begin opening in phase 3 are subject to compliance with all mandatory safety standards.

Under the updated gatherings order, indoor gatherings are limited to eight people per 1,000 square feet, but should not exceed 25 people in a single enclosed, indoor space.

Outdoor gatherings in enclosed spaces are limited to 25% of the facility’s maximum permitted occupancy, with a maximum of 100 people in a single enclosed outdoor space. This includes community events, civic events, sporting events, concerts, conventions, and more. This order does not apply to outdoor, unenclosed gatherings if proper social-distancing measures are possible.

In phase 3, healthcare providers may continue to provide in-person procedures and services as allowed in phase 2, with the addition of certain group treatment programs and day programs. These programs include adult day health, day habilitation programs, and substance-abuse services, including day treatment and outpatient services. Certain human-services programs can reopen, including community-based day services for adults with intellectual and cognitive disabilities and psychosocial rehabilitation clubhouses.

Healthcare providers are subject to compliance with all mandatory safety standards, and must continue to utilize prioritization policies established in phase 2 for care delivery and scheduling, as well as monitor patient volume for non-essential, elective procedures and services.

In phase 3, visitation guidelines have been updated for 24/7 congregate care facilities and programs overseen by the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, including the departments of Developmental Services, Youth Services, Children and Families, Public Health, Mental Health, and the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. Offsite visits, including overnight visits, will be allowed under specific guidelines. Other updated guidelines, including visitation for long-term-care facilities, will be released shortly. Complete visitation guidance is available at www.mass.gov/hhs/reopening

MassHealth will also extend its current telehealth flexibility through at least the end of the year to ensure member access to critical healthcare services and encourage continued adherence to preventive public-health precautions.

On May 18, the Baker-Polito administration released a four-phase plan to reopen the economy based on public-health data, spending at least three weeks in each phase. Key public-health data, such as new cases and hospitalizations, have been closely monitored and shown a decline, allowing for phase 3 to begin.

Since mid-April, the seven-day average for the positive COVID-19 test rate is down 94%, the three-day average of hospitalized patients is down 79%, and the number of hospitals in surge is down 86%. More than 1,000,000 total COVID-19 tests have been administered, and testing continues throughout the state.

Daily News

SOUTHWICK — John Whalley, CEO of Whalley Computer Associates (WCA), announced the appointment of Michael Sheil as the company’s new president. Whalley has led the company as president and CEO for the past 41 years and will remain in his role as CEO moving forward, working closely with Sheil and the senior leadership team.

“This is an exciting time for Whalley Computer Associates as we continue to pursue opportunities for future expansion and continued success,” Whalley said. “I am confident in Michael’s ability to lead Whalley Computer Associates throughout the next phase of growth. His sales proficiency across our major verticals, combined with his leadership skills and strong relationships with our employees, partners, and customers, makes him ideally suited to fortify WCA’s continued growth and sales presence.”

Sheil brings to the position a wealth of knowledge and a wide range of experience in the information-technology industry, with expertise in sales for higher education, healthcare, finance, enterprise, and state and local governments. He has more than 32 years of experience in sales and 27 years of IT sales with WCA, most recently as a senior account manager, where he was an integral part of WCA’s success. In his new role, he will be responsible for presiding over the entire workforce, managing budgets and making sure resources are allocated properly to meet the overall goals and initiatives of the company.

“It is an honor to serve as president of Whalley Computer Associates as we continue to flourish in all markets of IT, with specific emphasis on our engineering, managed services, and cloud offerings,” Sheil said. “I’m also committed to growing our market share throughout North America, with an acute focus on New England and Upstate New York, to establish WCA as a major IT contender. I am excited to continue working in conjunction with our 140 employees and customers to propel WCA to the next level of growth and innovation.”

Tom Hanson, vice president of Operations; Doug Moglin, vice president of the OEM Division; and Paul Whalley, vice president, will remain in their current roles.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD ​— National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Mary Anne Carter has approved more than $84 million in grants as part of the NEA’s second major funding announcement for fiscal year 2020. Included in this announcement is an Our Town award of $100,000 to​ the Springfield Library & Museums Assoc. in partnership with the Springfield Cultural Partnership for Spark!: Igniting Our Community, a project in the newly renovated Pynchon Park to envision and create public art that serves to connect the city, residents, and visitors. This is one of 51 grants nationwide that the agency has approved in this category.

“These awards demonstrate the resilience of the arts in America, showcasing not only the creativity of their arts projects but the organizations’ agility in the face of a national health crisis,” Carter said. “We celebrate organizations like the Springfield Museums and the Springfield Cultural Partnership for providing opportunities for learning and engagement through the arts in these times.”

Spark: Igniting Our Community is a two-year public art project that will transform recently reopened Pynchon Park into a vibrant public space through innovative multi-media art installations created by local and national artists. City residents, community stakeholders, and cultural institutions will be involved in a collective process to imagine, select, and commission public art that celebrates Springfield’s citizens, culture, and heritage.

The park, closed for 40 years, will use the arts to connect neighborhoods and people, creating equitable partnerships that demonstrate the power of civic engagement for more vibrant and livable communities. The park’s reopening offers an opportunity to continue momentum by celebrating public art in this passageway and creating a programming and civic-engagement space. This project will create a walkable pathway between the museum district and the commercial downtown, spurring retail and public-space projects along these avenues and encouraging greater tourism throughout the city.

​“The Spark! art project is a remarkable opportunity to create a museum without walls informed by the hopes and vision of community members in the heart of downtown Springfield,” said Kay Simpson, president and CEO of Springfield Museums. “Pynchon Park will become more than just an easy way to walk from downtown to the Springfield Museums, the Central Library, and the Armory. It will become a community space for solace and conversation surrounded by intriguing art. We feel privileged to play a role in creating an art park that showcases the talents of artists from Springfield and beyond.”

Karen Finn, executive director for the Springfield Cultural Partnership (SPC), added that “empowering the arts and cultural community is paramount to the strength and resilience of our community. In addition to the wide range of public art installations, Pynchon Park will be a new venue for Springfield artists and organizations to utilize for programming and other activations. Receiving the NEA Our Town grant amplifies the SCP’s goal of connecting artists, institutions, and audiences to celebrate Springfield’s creativity.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Since the phrase COVID-19 came into our lexicon, those working in the broad healthcare field have emerged as the true heroes during a pandemic that has changed every facet of life as we know it.

And over the past several months, the world has paid tribute to these heroes, and in all kinds of ways — from applauding in unison from apartment-complex windows to bringing hot meals to hospital and nursing-home workers; from donating much-needed personal protective equipment (PPE) to people putting hearts on their front lawns and mailboxes to thank first responders, healthcare workers, postal workers, and others.

BusinessWest and its sister publication, the Healthcare News, will pay tribute in their own way, by dedicating their annual Healthcare Heroes program in 2020 to those who are have emerged as true heroes during this crisis. The deadline for nominations is July 17.

Healthcare Heroes was launched by the two publications in 2017 to recognize those working in this all-important sector of the region’s economy, many of whom are overlooked when it comes to traditional recognition programs. Over the years, the program has recognized providers, administrators, emerging leaders, innovators, and collaborators.

For 2020, the program will shift its focus somewhat to the COVID-19 pandemic and all those who are working in the healthcare field or helping to assist it at this trying time. All manner of heroes have emerged this year, and we invite you to nominate one — or several — for what has become a very prestigious honor in Western Mass.: the Healthcare Heroes award.

Here are some examples of those who have become real heroes:

• Doctors and nurses;

• Emergency-room personnel, including doctors, nurses, orderlies, techs, triage, receptionists, and others;

• EMTs;

• Police and firefighters;

• Nursing-home personnel, everyone from frontline providers to administrators;

• End-of-life care providers;

• Administrators leading the efforts to battle the pandemic;

• Behavioral-health practitioners helping people and families navigate this crisis;

• Individuals and groups from our community who have stepped up to help healthcare workers with everything from hot meals to PPE;

• Companies that have pivoted and commenced production of materials such as PPE to help those in healthcare confront the pandemic;

• Scientists working behind the scenes to develop a vaccine or new types of PPE; and

• Truck drivers delivering supplies to hospitals and other providers.

These are just a few examples, and there are myriad others. In truth, everyone who goes to work in a hospital, nursing home, assisted-living facility, or other healthcare facility, thereby risking their own health, and perhaps their life, is a hero.

In many respects, all these heroes will be honored at the Healthcare Heroes event, now scheduled for this fall at the Springfield Sheraton. And to honor all of them, we want to bring to the podium a number of individuals and groups that represent everyone who has become a hero in these trying times.

To assist those thinking of nominating someone for this honor, we are simplifying the process. All we desire is a 400- to 500-word essay and/or two-minute video entry explaining why the group or individual stands out as an inspiration, and a truly bright star in a galaxy of healthcare heroes. These nominations will be carefully considered by a panel of independent judges, who will select the class of 2020.

For more information on how to nominate someone for the Healthcare Heroes class of 2020, click here. Videos can be sent via dropbox to [email protected].

Healthcare Heroes is sponsored by Comcast Business and Elms College.

Daily News

Wendy Fitzgerald

EAST LONGMEADOW — HUB International New England, LLC announced that Wendy Fitzgerald, strategic account executive, received the Chartered Private Risk and Insurance Advisor (CPRIA) certificate, completing an intensive, 18-month program designed to enhance the knowledge of professionals who serve high-net-worth clients.

Nearly 600 professionals from leading insurance organizations in the U.S. have graduated from the program since its inception in 2015. The CPRIA program is offered by the Private Risk Management Association (PRMA) and is endorsed by the Tobin Center for Executive Education of St. John’s University in conjunction with St. John’s School of Risk Management, Insurance and Actuarial Science.

“Earning a CPRIA certificate is a great accomplishment, and we’re thrilled that Wendy is dedicated to continuously learning about this evolving industry in order to provide the best possible advice and customer service to our clients,” said Timm Marini, president of Western New England, HUB International New England.

The CPRIA program is unique in that it provides real-world scenarios, addresses current and complex industry trends, and predicts needs of the future.

“This year’s graduates have been wonderful collaborators who have studied with their peers and competitors and have worked to perfect the advice and solutions they provide their clients,” said Lisa Lindsay, executive director of PRMA. “We’re honored that they chose to continue their professional development through PRMA.”

The program also aims to further the knowledge of participants by providing them with access to high-net-worth industry veterans and leading insurance executives.

Daily News

LONGMEADOW — As women continue to experience the devastating impact of unemployment due to COVID-19, representing close to 60% of all lost jobs this spring, the food-service, hospitality, retail, and travel industries have been some of the hardest hit.

Further delivering on its mission of empowering women, at a time when many are forced to reimagine their lives, Bay Path University is offering a free three-credit online undergraduate college course in August. The course, “Fundamentals of Digital Literacy,” will help women expand their digital technology skill set and be better prepared for the workforce of the future. The course is offered through The American Women’s College, Bay Path University’s fully online division designed to fit busy women’s lives.

“We hope this free course inspires women to look to a better future through education at a time when they are experiencing such uncertainty,” said Carol Leary before her recent retirement as Bay Path president. “This is our way to offer women an opportunity to discover the benefits of online learning. We have deep experience serving women in a proven college format resulting in a graduation rate that is 20% higher than other adult-serving online programs.”

“Fundamentals of Digital Literacy” is a six-week, three-credit course in which students will examine best practices for utilizing social-media and digital-communication tools in the workplace. In addition, they will learn practical skills for a digital world and gain an increasing awareness of the risks of digital communication essential in all fields. By mastering the fundamentals of computing technology and demonstrating digital literacy, women who complete the course will have developed the computer skills needed to thrive in a 21st-century workforce that is continually changing.

Leaders in the Women in Travel and Hospitality and Women in Retail Leadership Circle organizations are sharing this free course opportunity with impacted employees impacted. The course offering is not exclusive to these groups, however, and any woman in sectors affected by COVID-19 are welcome to enroll.

“At a time when the retail industry has been dramatically impacted, it is refreshing to see Bay Path University, an institution dedicated to advancing the lives of women, provide an opportunity for women in our industry to gain a valuable skillset and college credits,” said Melissa Campanelli and Jen DiPasquale, co-founders of the Women in Retail Leadership Circle.

Unlike other online degree programs, students enrolled in classes through the American Women’s College at Bay Path University are able to get immediate feedback on individual academic performance. They also get the support they need to excel in the program, such as coaching, counseling, virtual learning communities, and social networking. The courses are designed to help provide the flexibility women need to engage in their studies, while still balancing their daily lives, jobs, and families.

As a result of the innovative approach to learning offered through the American Women’s College, women successfully earn degrees at higher rates than national averages, the institution notes. The model has been widely recognized by industry experts, the federal government, and granting agencies since its inception in 2013. Most recently, the American Women’s College was awarded a $1.6 million grant from the Strada Education Network to use its unique model to close the digital-literacy gap for women.

Enrollment in this six-week, three-credit course is subject to availability. This offer is intended for women who are first-time attendees of Bay Path University. Active Bay Path University students and those enrolled within the past year are not eligible for this offer.

Any student enrolled in this course who wishes to officially enroll into a certificate or degree program at the American Women’s College or Bay Path University must submit the appropriate application for admission and be accepted according to standard admissions guidelines.

To register for the course, visit bpu.tfaforms.net/41. The registration deadline is July 20, and enrollees will have course access on July 27. For more information, visit www.baypath.edu/baypathworks.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Pioneer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC) received a $195,000 grant from Tufts Health Plan Foundation to convene a Pioneer Valley Age Friendly Collaborative that will engage member communities in planning for an aging population. This is one of 13 new community investments totaling $1.7 million that reflect the foundation’s support of collaborative community efforts and systems change to advance healthy aging.

“We have an opportunity to think differently about how our systems are addressing community needs,” said Nora Moreno Cargie, president of Tufts Health Plan Foundation and vice president for corporate citizenship at Tufts Health Plan. “We are living in unprecedented times. We need to learn from this experience and think about how we can change the conditions that hold problems in place.”

This project, led by PVPC, formalizes an existing effort around age-friendly planning in the region. PVPC will partner with municipal planning departments, councils on aging, healthcare and service providers, community organizations, universities, and residents to create municipal age-friendly action plans that reflect the priorities of the region’s current and future older adults.

“We are excited to expand planning for healthy aging to municipalities throughout the PVPC region,” said Becky Basch, senior planner with the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission. “And by bringing together all of the cities and towns that are planning for an aging population, we will create a valuable space for sharing ideas and best practices at the local and regional levels.”

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Amid COVID-19, the need for organizations such as Open Pantry Community Services has grown. Matt Ogrodowicz of Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. led a charge to collect food and donations at MBK over a two-week period. He shared Open Pantry’s mission as well as its high-demand items, including cereal, pasta, canned goods, peanut butter, and spaghetti sauce.

Staff at MBK donated food and/or money, which Ogrodowicz used to shop for additional items on the high-demand list. With the combined efforts, MBK was able to donate 279 pounds of food to Open Pantry.

 

 

Daily News

PITTSFIELD — Berkshire Agricultural Ventures (BAV) announced it has been awarded a $5,000 grant from Pittsfield Cooperative Bank to support its Resilience Fund for Farmers.

This new fund was established in response to the COVID-19 crisis and the resulting impact on local farmers, who are hurting right now as stores, restaurants, and other income-generating avenues like farmers’ markets and CSA are closed or operating in different, logistically challenging ways due to the virus. Despite these challenges, many farmers are reaching out to contribute healthy food to the neediest among us and sell as much as they can directly to consumers.

The goal of the BAV Resilience Fund for Farmers is to support those who are experiencing business challenges as a result of COVID-19. Zero-interest, forgivable loans and grants will be provided to help farmers adapt to new realities, overcome significant income challenges, and ensure that farms remain viable and sustainable so they continue to meet demand for healthy, local foods.

In addition to working with individual farmers, BAV also hopes to support strategies that avoid costly duplication of effort among farmers, such as developing coordinated delivery services. The first grant from the fund helped Roots Rising to pivot and establish the Berkshire County-wide Virtual Farmers Market, which in its first eight weeks served 1,400 households, gave $18,000 to neighbors in need, and generated $50,000 in sales to support the local food system.

The grant from Pittsfield Cooperative Bank represents the first corporate support to the fund, which was established with a grant from a local family foundation.

“We are very grateful for this generous gift from Pittsfield Cooperative Bank to our Resilience Fund for Farmers. The grant will allow us to provide deeper support to our key constituents, the farmers who are providing our neighbors with fresh, healthy, and local food,” said Cynthia Pansing, BAV executive director.

J. Jay Anderson, president and CEO of Pittsfield Cooperative Bank, added that the bank “is proud to support the work of the Berkshire Agricultural Ventures and the Resilience Fund for Farmers during this extraordinary time. At a time when local food systems and healthy food is important to our communities more than ever before, we thank them for their work.”

COVID-19 Daily News

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration announced new COVID-19 public health guidelines on travel and transportation.

Effective today, July 1, all travelers arriving to Massachusetts, including residents returning home, are instructed to self-quarantine for 14 days. This guidance does not apply to travelers from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New York, or New Jersey. Additionally, workers designated by the federal government as essential critical infrastructure workers are also exempt from this directive.

Travelers who are displaying symptoms of COVID-19 are instructed to not travel to Massachusetts.

All visitors and residents of Massachusetts are also reminded that the use of masks or face coverings in public places where individuals cannot socially distance from others remains required.

These new guidelines replace previously announced Massachusetts travel guidance. For national travel information, visit www.travel.state.gov.

Daily News

AMHERST — The Downtown Amherst Foundation announced that the second round of grants from the Relief and Resiliency grant program have been made available to 28 Amherst businesses from the retail, restaurant, and service sectors. The funding arrives as more businesses open up and prepare for in-store services, shopping, and dining.

Restaurants and eateries to receive awards are Arigato, Kaiju, Momo Tibetan, Oriental Flavor, Osteria Vespa, Sunset Grill & Pizza, Wheelhouse (a catering company located in the former Lumberyard restaurant space), and the Subways on Main Street and College Street (owned and operated by locals).

Retailers awarded are Dion Tack, J. Austin Antiques, Knowles Flower Shop, and Mystery Train Records. Salons, spas, and health clubs awarded are Global Cuts, Absolutely Hair, Amherst Extensions & Beauty Supply, Artressa Salon, Casimir Kocot Salon, Eliana’s Barbershop, Electrolysis by Athena & Lorraine, Elements Hot Tub & Spa, Hair by Harlow, Hair East, and Sandy’s Barber Shop. Service-sector awards go to Amherst Copy & DesignWorks, Hampshire Athletic Club, Fitness Together, and Paul’s Shoe Repair.

The funds help business owners and staff struggling with lower customer volume while navigating staffing, services, and fiscal obligations like paying suppliers, while staying healthy and safe. Kevin Grimard at Paul’s Shoe Repair, who has been in business for 32 years, taking over from his father, who opened in 1960, said, “I’ve done really well all these years in Amherst and never thought in my life something like this would happen.”

The fundraising effort has garnered more than $300,000, with generous recent donations from Applied Mortgage and the Amherst Rotary Club, along with numerous donations from residents.

The Downtown Amherst Foundation has secured personal protective equipment (PPE), and will distribute gallons of hand sanitizer, face masks, and gloves to Amherst businesses. Jay Paulo, owner of the Subway on Main Street, as well as a part-time EMT in Springfield, said the PPE is most welcome as supplies remain very limited.

The town of Amherst was also able to secure a $10,000 grant from the Solomon Foundation, which it has awarded to the Downtown Amherst Foundation. The DAF will match this grant and will use it to purchase umbrellas and large planters for shade trees to enhance the outdoor dining experience. The Amherst Downtown Business Improvement District will be working with the Department of Public Works to string café lighting along the streetscapes to create a welcoming and vibrant nighttime setting.

To donate to the Downtown Amherst Foundation, visit downtownamherstfoundation.org or send a check to 35 South Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Springfield College Associate Professor of English Justine Dymond has been selected by the Mass Cultural Council (MCC) Artist Fellowships Program as a finalist in the category of fiction/creative nonfiction on the strength of her lyrical essay titled “Brave of Worms.”

“I am so very excited with the news and the peer recognition that comes with the selection as a finalist for the MCC artist fellowship,” said Dymond, who joined the Springfield College humanities faculty in the fall of 2008. “I am thrilled to be in the company of the other finalists and fellows. Since it’s a statewide honor, you can imagine how competitive it is in Massachusetts, where so many amazing writers live and work. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve applied, and I’m still pinching myself I received this honor.”

Dymond teaches courses in writing and multi-cultural literature at Springfield College. Her short prose and poetry have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Massachusetts Review, Pleiades, Briar Cliff Review, and Cimarron Review. Her short story “Cherubs” was selected in 2007 for an O. Henry Award, a highly prestigious recognition in the art of the short story.

In 2018, she received the the Eludia Award presented by Hidden River Arts, an inter-disciplinary, independent arts organization located in Philadelphia, for her collection of stories titled The Emigrant and Other Stories. Forthcoming from Sowilo Press, the collection ranges widely in setting and era, including France during World War II, Maine in the early 18th century, and Tennessee in the 21st century.

Business Talk Podcast

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, Business Talk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times

Episode 6: July 1, 2020

Thom interviews Raymond Berry, Jr., President and General Manager of White Lion Brewing

Thom Fox interviews Raymond Berry, Jr., President and General Manager of White Lion Brewing. Thom and Raymond discuss COVID-19’s impact on the hospitality and beverage industry, how he and his peers are managing the pandemic, and when the new White Lion Tap Room will roar into Downtown Springfield.

Sponsored by:

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Coronavirus Special Coverage

Opinion

Going back to the early days of the pandemic, one of the overriding questions on the minds of many in this region, and especially its business community, was: will there be a Big E?

On Monday, we finally learned the answer: no.

In many ways, that verdict was not unexpected. Looking at the situation objectively, one had to wonder how organizers could possibly stage a fair that draws more than 100,000 people on a good day and keep not only these visitors safe, but also the workers, vendors, and area residents. It just didn’t seem doable, even to those who really, as in really, wanted the Big E to happen.

And that’s a large constituency, especially within the business community, where many different kinds of ventures benefit greatly from the 17-day fair and the 1.5 million people drawn to it annually. That list includes hotels, restaurants, tent-rental companies, transportation outfits, food vendors, breweries, and many, many more. These businesses have already lost so much to the pandemic, and now they’ve suffered perhaps the biggest loss of all.

Indeed, the year-long (at least) challenge of surviving the pandemic just became a little sterner for all kinds of businesses within the 413.

And the community loses out as well. The Big E isn’t just an annual event, it’s a century-old tradition that has become part of the fabric of this region.

Canceling the Big E was certainly the right move from a public-health perspective, and it makes sense on so many levels. But that doesn’t soften the blow for constituencies ranging from large corporations to homeowners near the fairgrounds who turn their driveways and lawns into parking lots.

The silence on Memorial Avenue this September will be deafening. And the blow to the region will be significant.

Daily News

WEST SPRINGFIELD — For the safety of fairgoers, staff, vendors, entertainers, exhibitors, sponsors, suppliers, and the broader community, the leadership of the Eastern States Exposition have canceled the 2020 Big E.

“Please know that this decision was not made lightly,” a statement noted. “The Big E fair is so much more than just a fair; it is tradition, it is celebration, it is the showcase of everything we are so proud of in New England. This is why our hearts are heavy as we bring you this news.”

The fair has been put on hold before, during both World War I and World War II.

“We know our faithful fairgoers will be disappointed,” the statement noted. “This decision was difficult and complex, but we all know in our hearts that it’s the right thing to do for the health and safety of the 1.6 million people who support us each year.

“Our staff has spent the last few months working tirelessly to figure a way to bring our annual New England tradition to everyone this fall. Despite exploring all our options and planning extensively, we realized that the Big E experience that everyone has come to know and love would not be the same.

“We care for each and every one of our fairgoers, and our job is to help you make the best memories possible. Because of that, we must now switch our focus to the future. Please join us in doing that.”

Next year’s edition of the Big E is scheduled for Sept. 17 to Oct. 3, 2021.

Daily News

LONGMEADOW — At its recent annual meeting, held virtually, the board of trustees of Bay Path University, on behalf of the entire Bay Path community, surprised retiring President Carol Leary with a celebration in her honor.

“Carol Leary led a remarkable transformation of Bay Path during her 25-year tenure. The board was honored to pay tribute to her and express gratitude for the countless ways she and her husband Noel have impacted Bay Path and the Western Massachusetts community,” said Jonathan Besse, board chair.

The longest-serving president in Bay Path’s history, the board granted Leary the title of president emerita, which will begin July 1, her first day of retirement. Emeritus status is a special honor given to an individual who has provided distinguished service to an institution or organization. During her tenure, Leary guided the university through a remarkable transformation, resulting in an unprecedented number of institutional improvements and initiatives such as strengthening academic offerings, enhancing the student experience, investing in capital projects, and establishing ties with the greater community and cultivating new partnerships.

In addition to electing Leary president emerita, the trustees voted to rename the main administration building, Deepwood Hall, to Leary Hall.

Carol and Noel Leary were also acknowledged for their commitment to diversity and inclusion, and the tremendous impact they have had on all students. As first-generation college students themselves, they have inspired hundreds of women to attain a degree.

Also, in recognition of Noel Leary’s deep commitment to students, as well as his civic activism and volunteerism, the board awarded him an honorary degree. As Besse noted, “for this selfless community servant who, without fanfare, has dedicated his life to the betterment of others, we are proud to bestow Bay Path’s highest honor, the doctor of humane letters, honoris causa, upon Noel Leary.”

Sandra Doran, the sixth president of Bay Path, will assume office on July 1.

Daily News

EASTHAMPTON — The Greater Easthampton Sustaining Small Business Grant (SSBG) program is part of a larger collaboration between the Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce and the city of Easthampton, within the Blueprint Easthampton initiative. The initial intent of the SSBG is to provide local small and micro businesses, as well as the nonprofit community, with short-term, immediate financial aid to those who have sustained economic loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic, so that businesses may continue their operations.

“We are especially thankful to our partners and are just thrilled to be a part of this important collaboration during this urgent time of need,” said Moe Belliveau, the chamber’s executive director.

A $30,000 grant has been awarded to the city of Easthampton by the office of Attorney General Maura Healy toward this effort. As program administrator, the chamber will create and run the SSBG program, while the city acts as the financial coordinator, collecting donations and writing checks once the grants are awarded by the chamber to businesses located in Easthampton.

The grant has also been seeded in conjunction with a $7,500 gift from Todd Barron and Lindsay Barron LaBonte, co-managers of Applied Mortgage, a d/b/a of HarborOne Mortgage. The Vitality Grant sponsored by Applied Mortgage Giving is based on its desire to invest in its communities by supporting Greater Easthampton small businesses and nonprofits. The Greater Easthampton area includes Easthampton, Southampton, and Westhampton.

The application process will open on July 1 at 9 a.m. and end on July 14 at 5 p.m. Applicants are encouraged to read the program requirements on the chamber’s website prior to July 1.

Daily News

AMHERST — UMass Amherst announced its fall 2020 reopening plan, noting that, while almost all courses will be taught remotely this fall, students will be given the option to live on campus under exacting public-health restrictions. No students will be required to return to campus, and students will determine which option, taking courses while living at home or in campus residence halls, is best according to their personal health, educational path, and home environment.

“Students who choose to attend UMass Amherst do so not only for the quality of the faculty and the academic programs, but also for the immersive experience, which offers opportunities for enrichment that can be undertaken with a diverse group of peers,” Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy said. “As best we can — and there are severe limitations in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic — we will strive to sustain the community connections that represent UMass at its best.”

The plan makes clear there are inherent risks to joining a residential campus environment this fall, and it provides students the opportunity to consult with their families and decide what is best for them. Subbaswamy emphasized that “it is important to understand that life on campus will not be anything resembling normal college life.”

In announcing the plan, UMass Amherst joins a small number of schools giving students the option to determine whether to spend the semester on campus or at home. The decision to invite first-year, transfer, and returning undergraduate students to live on campus was informed in part by the overwhelming feedback from students that they want to pursue their studies on campus — and, indeed, intended to seek out rental units in the area even if residence halls were not reopened.

For students who choose to reside in on-campus housing or expect to spend any time on campus, standards will be exacting. Students must agree not only to the standard Code of Student Conduct, but also to a set of protocols outlined in the UMass Agreement, a commitment they will be required to sign.

Protocols for students include strict physical distancing, wearing face coverings outside personal living spaces, limiting social contacts to a minimal number of people per day, the prohibition of guests in residence halls, subjecting themselves to virus testing on demand, daily self-monitoring and reporting, assisting with contact tracing, and limiting travel away from the immediate campus area for work and/or emergencies only.

Health and Safety

The university will establish a Public Health Promotion Center to be the central coordinating and operational center for COVID-19 on campus. It will focus on the following: asymptomatic testing (symptomatic testing will be conducted at University Health Services), contact tracing, coordinating isolation and quarantine, flu vaccinations, and communication outreach focused on health promotion with public-health ambassadors.

The university is developing a comprehensive surveillance, testing, isolation, and contact-tracing program that students must comply with both on- and off-campus. All students, faculty, and staff will be asked to self-monitor on a daily basis for COVID-19 symptoms before coming to campus. All students returning to campus will be tested prior to arrival. During the fall semester, any student experiencing even the slightest symptoms will be tested by University Health Services.

Students living on campus who test positive for COVID-19 will have the option to return to their home to isolate for the appropriate amount of time, or they will be placed in isolation housing on campus and be provided with support services and a daily wellness call. Off-campus students are also encouraged to develop an isolation and quarantine plan with their family and roommates. The university will provide support services in a student’s off-campus location or home, but it will not provide on-campus isolation or quarantine space.

Teaching and Learning

The university previously announced an altered academic calendar for fall 2020, with a start date of Aug. 24 for classes. Classes will end Nov. 20, at Thanksgiving break, when students will move out of residence halls. Final exams will be conducted remotely after Thanksgiving break. Classes also will be held on Labor Day, Columbus Day, and Veterans Day.

A majority of the fall 2020 curriculum will be fully remote, with only essential labs, studios, performances, and hands-on courses offered in-person and focused on the upper-level curriculum to provide seniors with timely progress toward degree completion. Some students who live on campus may have a fully remote curriculum, a factor they should consider in their decision whether to come to campus.

Classroom capacities will be limited to adhere to social-distancing guidelines. Additional sections of courses may be added to reduce class sizes. Course schedules will be adjusted to increase time between classes to reduce interactive foot traffic on campus and provide time for increased cleaning of lab and classroom spaces when needed. Students will be encouraged to be patient and flexible regarding classroom assignments and course schedules.

Libraries are currently working on a phased reopening plan for restoration of in-person services and on-site access to their collections. Until then, the libraries will continue to provide access to materials through the Library Express service.

Residential Life

While all courses that do not require physical presence on campus will be offered remotely this fall, all undergraduate students who have reserved on-campus housing for the upcoming semester, and for whom there is space available, are invited to live on campus under strict public-health behavioral restrictions.

After July 1, Residential Life will communicate with students who have a current housing assignment about their eligibility to live on campus. Students who plan on canceling their housing assignment should contact Residential Life immediately to inform them of their change of plans.

Life in the residence halls will be altered to include pedestrian-flow restrictions, restrictions on group gatherings, and limited face-to-face contact. No guests will be allowed in residence halls until further notice.

Move-in for fall semester will take place over multiple days to reduce the amount of people on campus at any time, and students may bring only two family members or helpers to assist them. Students are advised to bring fewer items to campus this fall and plan for 12 weeks of residential time as opposed to an entire school year due to the uncertainty of the pandemic. Also, if COVID-19 cases spike in Massachusetts, the university may close down residence halls and send students home.

Students who either do not have access to the main campus or who are seeking a residential option beyond the main campus may apply for housing on the Mount Ida campus in Newton. All health and safety protocols on the main campus will be in effect in Newton, but the total residential population at the Newton campus will be limited by available housing to fewer than 500 students. All courses taught in Newton beyond essential face-to-face courses for on-site programs (such as veterinary technology) will be offered remotely.

Campus Life

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the university is offering its immersive residential experience, which is conducive to students’ learning and academic progress, in a manner that is intended to provide safeguards for the health and well-being of the entire campus community. Given this situation, campus life will be a different experience in the fall, with all members of the campus community playing an important role in mitigating the infection and spread of the virus.

Most student services will be offered remotely, including the services of the Center for Counseling and Psychological Health. The Recreation Center will be open, but there will be limits and restrictions on activities. The center will also livestream fitness classes through the intramural leagues.

UMass Dining will adapt its services to current federal and state guidelines for food service. It will offer new grab-and-go stations, online ordering for many of its retail locations, and tents for outdoor dining on campus.

Student activities will center on small-group, in-person events, and larger virtual events.

The complete reopening plan, including a detailed set of frequently asked questions, can be found at www.umass.edu/reopening.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Erin Chrzanowski has joined the firm as an associate and a member of the firm’s business and corporate practice group, where she works on matters related to commercial real estate and financing.

In addition, she was recently elected to serve on the board of Revitalize Community Development Corp. in Springfield.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Chrzanowski attended Syracuse University College of Law, earning her JD in 2019, and UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management, earning her BBA cum laude in 2017. She is licensed to practice in both Massachusetts and New York.