Accounting and Tax Planning

The COVID-19 Pandemic Alters an Already-evolving Picture

Changes in Benefit Plans

By Melissa English

Melissa English

Melissa English

Audits of employee-benefit plans continue to evolve, and the pace of this evolution is unpredictable.

Areas such as technology and skills continue to grow, as well as industry standards. Now, throw COVID-19 into the mix, and we have to adjust not only to new ways of having these plans audited, but to additional standards that come into play with it.

The Auditing Standards Board has recently been issuing new standards. These standards go hand-in-hand with changes in technology and skills. These standards will improve the provisions of plans, affect the audits of plans, and address risk assessment and quality control. Auditors, as well as plan sponsors and administrators, should understand what these changes are and how they will affect retirement plans.

So what are some of the changes we can expect to see in the near future?

• Accounting Standards Updates (ASU) 2018-09 and 2018-13, which improve the standards on valuation of investments that use net-asset value as a practical expedient and improvements to fair-value disclosures. These both will be effective for years beginning after Dec. 15, 2019; and

• Statement on Auditing Standards (SAS) 134-141, with the biggest impact on limited-scope audits, which will now be called ERISA Section 103(a)(3)(c) audits. These standards will also affect the form and content of engagement letters, auditors’ opinions, and representation letters. The Statement on Auditing Standards was previously effective for years beginning after Dec. 15, 2020 but, due to COVID-19, has been moved, and is effective for years beginning after Dec. 15, 2021.

“Now, throw COVID-19 into the mix, and we have to adjust not only to new ways of having these plans audited, but to additional standards that come into play with it.”

In addition to these new standards, new acts recently came into law:

• The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which was signed into law on Feb. 9, 2018. This act made changes in regulations for hardship distributions;

• The SECURE Act which became law on Dec. 20, 2019. This act will make it easier for small businesses to set up safe-harbor plans, allow part-time employees to participate in retirement plans, push back the age limit for required minimum distributions from 70 1/2 to 72, allow 401(k) plans to offer annuities, and change distribution rules for beneficiaries. This act also added new provisions for qualified automatic contribution arrangements (QACAs), birth and adoption distributions, and in-service distributions for defined benefit plans; and

• The CARES Act, which was signed into law on March 27, 2020 and acts as an aid and relief initiative from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This act allows participants who are in retirement plans the option of taking distributions and/or loan withdrawals early without penalties during certain time periods for qualified individuals.

Lastly, there are constant discussions on cybersecurity. Cybercrime is one of the greatest threats to every company. Some questions to consider: does your company have a cybersecurity policy in place? Do you have insurance for cybersecurity? What is management’s role on cyber risk management? Do you offer trainings on how to handle cybercrime for both your IT department and all employees of the company? Cyberattacks are a normal part of daily business, but they can be significantly reduced if companies understand the risk, offer adequate resources and trainings, and maintain effective monitoring.

These changes affect most defined-contribution and defined-benefit plans. Plan sponsors should be evaluating these changes and the impact they have on retirement plans.

Some of these changes are optional, some are required, and some require amendments to plan documents. Plan sponsors should be discussing these changes as soon as possible with their third-party administrators and auditors. Remember, it’s the fiduciary’s responsibility to run the plan in the sole interest of its participants and beneficiaries, and to do this in accordance with all industry rules, regulations, and updated standards.

Melissa English is an audit manager at MP P.C. in its Springfield location. She specializes in employee benefit-plan work, such as audits; researching plan issues; compliance regulations, including voluntary plan corrections and self-corrections; and DOL and IRS audit examinations; (413) 739-1800.

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