Home 2010 September
Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the month of September 2010.

AGAWAM

Marcell Welton
44 Annable St.
$3,775 — 12’x18’ New England Cape storage building

CHICOPEE

Campanelli Chicopee II, LLC
21 Taxiway Dr.
$1,765,000 — Construct a 31,000-square-foot warehouse

Chicopee Housing Authority
400 Britton St.
$76,000 — Remove old generators and replace with new

GREENFIELD

Gary L. Schaefer
76 School St.
$6,300 — Install new rubber roof

YMCA
451 Main St.
$232,000 — Construction of a spa addition and other renovations

Pushkin, LLC
332 Main St.
$29,000 — Installation of a sprinkler system

United Arc of Franklin & Ham Inc.
111 Summer St.
$2,000 — Install two doors

HADLEY

CBR Realty Corporation
195 Russell St.
$5,000 — Office build out on the second floor

Town of Hadley School Department
131 Russell St.
$11,000 — Replacement of acoustical ceiling tile in cafeteria

HOLYOKE

Holyoke Health Center
230-234 Maple St.
$108,000 — Tenant fit-out of existing space

Holyoke Mall Company, LLP
50 Holyoke St.
$72,000 — Remodel existing Express store

KMART Corporation
2201-2211 Northampton St.
$328,000 — Construction of a new Taco Bell restaurant

O’C Ingleside, LLC
361 Whitney Ave.
$38,000 — Install finishes to existing space

LUDLOW

SMD Properties
90 Center St.
$8,000 — New siding

NORTHAMPTON

Coolidge Northampton, LLC
243 King St.
$9,300 — Construct interior partitions in Suite 239

F. L. Roberts & Company
188 North King St.
$7,500 — New façade

Florence Congregational Church
130 Pine St.
$7,300 — Construct partition wall to create large room

Thornes Marketplace LLC
150 Main St.
$21,000 — Renovate Rao’s Coffee Shop

SOUTH HADLEY

Loomis Community
7 Ivy Lane
$3,500 — Install insulation

SPRINGFIELD

City of Springfield
70 Tapley St.
$96,000 — Renovations on 1st floor

3640 Main St., LLC
3640 Main St.
$188,000 — Office fit up for Valley Medical Associates

3640 Main St., LLC
3640 Main St.
$561,000 — Office fit up for Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition

United House of Prayer
339 Wilbraham Road
$141,000 — Replace roofing and general maintenance

WESTFIELD

Mark Armanti
8 Turnpike Industrial Road
$385,000 – Construct new manufacturing building for cold storage

NEHTS
101 Springdale Road
$26,000 — Renovations

Samaritan Inn
7 Free St.
$18,000 — Re-roof

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Houston Enterprise
91 Riverdale St.
$209,000 — Remodel existing KFC restaurant

Oleg Abramettzer
553 Main St.
$5,000 — Renovate existing office space for hair salon

SBA Communications, Inc.
63 Bridge St.
$20,000 — Install three antennas and two communications cabinets

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
NES Rental Holdings Inc. v. Alpha & Omega Construction
Allegation: Breach of contract for rental equipment: $2,789.35
Filed: 8/23/10

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
CIT Technology Financing Services LLC v. Billups World Entertainment Inc.
Allegation: Breach of lease agreement: $54,598.34
Filed: 7/16/10

Liberty Mutual Insurance A/S/O Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. v. Kennedy, Gustafson, & Cole Inc.
Allegation: Breach of warranty and property damage caused by fire: $1,982,000
Filed: 7/21/10

People’s United Bank v. La Cucina Di Pinocchio Inc.
Allegation: Breach of several promissory notes: $673,140.77
Filed: 8/11/10

Plaza @ Buckland Hills LLC v. Emanuel Rovithis and Demetia Inc.
Allegation: Enforcement of judgment: $274,582.32
Filed: 7/23/10

Pravin Mathur v. Roy’s Towing Co. and John Burdick
Allegation: Negligence in operation of motor vehicle: $1,600,000
Filed: 8/6/10

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
Acadia Insurance Co. v. Bishop Burner Services
Allegation: Balance due for insurance premium: $37,042
Filed: 8/11/10

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Bradco Supply v. Henderson Roofing Co.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $3,174.35
Filed: 7/23/10

Comcast Spotlight Inc. v. Brockton Fair
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $11,025.72
Filed: 7/22/10

Consumer Auto Parts v. Fini’s Auto Sales
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $5,549.60
Filed: 7/22/10

High Priority Associates Inc. v. Ilmondo Pizza
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $7,298.91
Filed: 7/22/10

Western Massachusetts Electric v. Springfield Bible Institute & Theological Seminary
Allegation: Non-payment of utility services: $10,243.93
Filed: 7/15/10

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
ServiceMaster Assured Cleaning v. Big Family Adventure
Allegation: Failure to pay for cleaning services and breach of contract: $14,270.78
Filed: 7/26/10

Company Notebook Departments

WNEC, Big Y Create Wellness Center
SPRINGFIELD — Big Y Foods Inc. and Western New England College School of Pharmacy have partnered to create a faculty pharmacist-run, patient-centered Consultation and Wellness Center at 300 Cooley St. The facility is one of the largest pharmacy consultation and wellness centers in the region and the first to be located in a supermarket. Patients are able to make an appointment with a pharmacist who will work with the individual and their physician to optimize their care. A grand-opening ceremony was staged Sept. 10. Services offered include education and training programs, blood-glucose evaluations, individualized patient care plans, and medication review. The creators of the center note that the services are needed now more than ever given the aging population and the increasing strain on the state’s health care system. Kam Capoccia, clinical associate professor at the School of Pharmacy, will supervise the center. Capoccia notes that collaborative practice models in other states have already demonstrated the ability to improve the health of their patients and save the health care system millions of dollars. Capoccia added that among the goals of the center’s creators are to decrease visits to the emergency room and the number of hospital readmissions by collaborating with physicians on patient care. For more information on the center, call (413) 782-4606 or (413) 796-2000.

Comcast Donates Supplies to Springfield Students
SPRINGFIELD — Comcast recently donated more than 500 backpacks stuffed with classroom essentials to city students from the Martin Luther King Jr. Family Services Afterschool Program, in partnership with Cradles to Crayons, a nonprofit organization dedicated to giving children in need the basic essentials they need to be ready to learn. Comcast and Cradles to Crayons also presented the site with a playground bag filled with essentials including bats, balls, and Frisbees.

NewAlliance, First Niagara Create Top-25 U.S. Bank
BUFFALO, N.Y. — The boards of directors of First Niagara Financial Group Inc. and New Haven, Conn.-based NewAlliance Bancshares Inc. recently announced that the companies entered into a merger agreement, valued on a fixed exchange ratio of 1.10 shares of First Niagara stock for each NewAlliance share. The merger of NewAlliance into First Niagara will be a cash-and-stock transaction creating a top-25 U.S. bank, by assets. The combined bank will have more than $29 billion in assets, including more than $14 billion in loans, as well as $18 billion in deposits. NewAlliance’s 88 branches serve eight counties from Greenwich, Conn., to Springfield. Currently, First Niagara serves communities across Upstate New York, Western Penn. including Pittsburgh, and Eastern Penn. from the Philadelphia suburbs to Allentown. NewAlliance’s Church Street headquarters in New Haven, Conn., is slated to become First Niagara’s New England Regional Market Center.

Law Firm Receives Award
SPRINGFIELD — Skoler, Abbott & Presser, P.C., has been selected for the 2010 Best of Worcester Award in the local business category by the U.S. Commerce Assoc. (USCA). The firm has offices in Springfield, Worcester, and Meriden, Conn. The USCA Best of Local Business award program recognizes local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USCA identifies companies it believes have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. Winners are determined based on both the information gathered internally by the USCA and data provided by third parties.

MMWEC Upgrades Energy Conservation Web Site
LUDLOW — The Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Co. (MMWEC) recently introduced a redesigned Web site for its Home Energy Loss Prevention Services (HELPS) program. HELPS provides energy education, home-energy audits, assistance with home-energy improvements, and ENERGY STAR appliance rebates to municipal utility customers. In addition, HELPS provides customers with a gauge of their home’s solar energy potential as a standard part of every audit, with turnkey services for solar-system installation available through the program. HELPS is the residential component of MMWEC’s energy-conservation and efficiency services, which also include programs for commercial, industrial, and institutional customer classes. The redesigned Web site is located at www.munihelps.org.

MassMutual: Plan Participants Stable
SPRINGFIELD — MassMutual’s Retirement Services Division has released data for the quarter ended June 30 indicating that participants in retirement plans administered by MassMutual showed no signs of panic despite the decline in the S&P 500 index, with 96% of participants either maintaining or increasing their savings rates. This behavior helps explain why, despite the stock market’s sharp decline for the second quarter with the S&P 500 index losing 11.4%, MassMutual’s average participant account balance declined by only 3.26%, beating the S&P 500 index by 8.14%, according to E. Heather Smiley, chief marketing officer for MassMutual’s Retirement Services Division. Smiley noted that the “substantially better” performance for participant accounts is primarily attributable to the benefits of continued ongoing deposits by participants and an increased percentage of assets allocated to stable value and bond investments. Male participants fared slightly better than females for the quarter (–2.7% compared to –5.5%) primarily as a result of the impact of higher average deferral rates. The percentage of participant assets in equity investments declined from 41.1% to 38.4% during the quarter, with stable value increasing from 26.3% to 28.4%, and investment in bonds increasing from 7.6% to 8.6%. The percentage in asset-allocation investments (target date and target risk) was relatively unchanged. MassMutual’s data covers approximately 1 million participants across more than 6,000 plans.

TD Charitable Foundation Boosts Museum Programs
SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Museums recently received a $10,000 grant from TD Bank through the TD Charitable Foundation for its Weekend Family Fun series of educational programs. Family programs highlight holidays, special exhibitions, cultures from around the world, and topics including dinosaurs and Dr. Seuss. Each program includes a performance, hands-on demonstrations, science activities, and craft workshops. TD Bank, through its foundation, provides financial assistance for a variety of cultural and community events. Holly Smith-Bové, president of the Springfield Museums, noted that, without support from TD Bank, these popular programs would not be possible.

Bolduc’s Apparel Under New Ownership
AGAWAM — Bolduc’s Apparel, a sports and custom-apparel company, was purchased in August by the firm’s former vice president and general manager, Todd M. Adelson of Longmeadow. The firm specializes in custom business, corporate, and leisure apparel, as well as school-spirit wear and promotional products. Bolduc’s employs more than 20 full-time employees, many of whom have been with the company for 15 or more years. Adelson noted that he is looking forward to continuing the firm’s steady growth through daily attention to customer satisfaction and the quality of the locally produced custom products.

Firm Acquires ADNET Technologies Inc.
SPRINGFIELD — Kostin, Ruffkess and Co., LLC recently acquired ADNET Technologies Inc. of Farmington, Conn., according to Richard V. Kretz, managing member of the local firm. ADNET is an information-technology firm that specializes in developing and implementing IT solutions for its clients, with measurable returns on investment. With the addition of the new members from ADNET, Kretz noted that the firm can better serve clients with an expansive set of resources “unlike any other accounting, business-consulting, or information-technology company in the region.” Kostin, Ruffkess and Co. also has Connecticut offices in Farmington and New London.

Friendly’s Adds Another Express Restaurant
WILBRAHAM — Friendly’s Express, a unit of Friendly’s new fast-casual concept, will open in Methuen on Sept. 28. The newest Friendly’s Express, located at the Loop at 90 Pleasant Valley St., will offer a fast, fun way for people on-the-go to get the food they crave. The short service time will make Friendly’s Express perfect for quick office lunch breaks, and easy for moms running errands with their children. While guests will place orders at the counter, food will be delivered to each guest’s table. When guests are ready for ice cream, they can place a numbered tag on the edge of their table, and a food runner will bring them their desserts. The 2,338-square-foot restaurant seats 60 and includes additional seating on the patio for seasonal outdoor dining. The Friendly’s Express design incorporates the signature Friendly’s red elements throughout, along with bright tiles and custom pop-art of Friendly’s ice-cream creations. The restaurant features a limited menu of Friendly’s favorites, including SuperMelt sandwiches, Friendly’s Big Beef burgers, salads, Fribbles, kids’ meals, and, of course, ice cream desserts.

Briefcase Departments

Six Vie for Project Manager Services for Union Station
SPRINGFIELD — The City of Springfield recently received six responses to the Springfield Redevelopment Authority’s (SRA) request for owners project manager (OPM) services for the Union Station Regional Intermodal Transportation Center. The services requested also will apply to the transfer of funds from the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority for a portion of the project. The SRA owns Union Station, including the former terminal and adjacent baggage building and the site of the former Hotel Charles, and is retaining the services of an OPM to represent its interests in the design and construction of the proposed transportation center. The firms interested in the project are Arcadis US Inc. of Atlanta, Ga., with a Springfield office; HEERY International Inc. of Burlington; the Louis Berger Group Inc. of Needham; SKANSKA USA Building Inc. of Boston; URS Corp.-New York of Boston; and Western Mass. OPM Services, LLC of Holyoke. Those that meet the minimum qualifications stated in the request will be evaluated and ranked by a review committee designated by the SRA governing board. Top-ranking firms may be interviewed by the committee, which then will submit its list of the top three firms to the governing board. The process is expected to take four weeks. The fee for services will be negotiated between the SRA and the selected firm. Plans call for restoring the main terminal building and using the adjacent site of the former baggage-handling building for construction of a 23-bay bus terminal with a 400-space public parking garage located on the upper levels.

August Retail Sales Up
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Census Bureau recently announced that advance estimates of U.S. retail and food services sales for August, adjusted for seasonal variation and holiday and trading-day differences, but not for price changes, were $363.7 billion, an increase of 0.4% from the previous month, and 3.6% above August 2009. Total sales for the June through August 2010 period were up 4.7% from the same period a year ago. The June to July 2010 percent change was revised from +0.4% to +0.3%. Retail trade sales were up 0.5% from July 2010, and 3.7% above last year. Non-store retailers’ sales were up 10.5% from August 2009, and gasoline stations were up 9.6% from last year. The Advance Monthly Retail Sales for Retail and Food Services for September is scheduled to be released Oct. 15.

Energy-efficiency Training Courses Set
BOSTON — The Mass. Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) recently announced the second round of weatherization workshops under the MassGREEN Initiative, which provides energy-efficiency workforce training for individuals and contracting firms throughout the state. Four state community colleges will host the program’s course for people with little or no background in weatherization concepts or practices, including entry-level workers and residential construction trades seeking to expand their knowledge and services in energy efficiency. Upcoming local training sessions are planned at Springfield Technical Community College, One Armory Square, from Sept. 30 to Dec. 16; and at Greenfield Community College, Franklin County Technical School in Turners Falls, from Sept. 30 to Nov. 20. Successful graduates of the course will be prepared to take the Building Performance Institute Installer exams for air sealing and dense packing, which are up-to-date insulation techniques. For more information on the class schedule, visit the web sites of the local colleges. For more information on MassCEC, visit www.masscec.com

Features
MassMutual Executive Is an Expert in Many Fields

By GEORGE O’BRIEN

Elaine Sarsynski

Elaine Sarsynski, executive vice president of MassMutual’s Retirement Services Division and chairman and CEO of MassMutual International LLC

Elaine Sarsynski says she worked on the family vegetable farm in Hadley until she graduated from college — and she has the biceps to prove it.
She admitted that, more than three decades later, they stay toned through regular and rigorous workouts at the gym, but stressed repeatedly that the foundation was laid from what amounts to bench-pressing 50-pound sacks of potatoes and piling them into pickup trucks, among innumerable other chores.
“I don’t do it anymore, but I used to arm-wrestle boys all the time — and beat them,” joked Sarsynski, executive vice president of MassMutual’s Retirement Services Division and chairman and CEO of MassMutual International LLC. “We had five kids in our family, four girls, and we [girls] had to do whatever our brother did. That’s how it was. Farming is hard work, and I became really strong.”
But Sarsynski’s years on the farm would provide her with much more than rock-hard muscles. There would be many lessons in life and in business, she explained, noting, for starters, that her mother was the real entrepreneur in the family and transplanted some of her considerable business energy, acumen, and instincts to her children.
“She would think beyond picking squash and selling it wholesale, and about what she could do on a more retail level,” said Sarsynski. “She went around to local restaurants and supermarkets and said, ‘if I cut up that butternut squash and put it into half-pound bags, do you think that would sell?’ And they said, ‘yes.’
“Lo and behold, we became one of the first farms to pre-package vegetables,” she continued. “I only wish my mother had taken out a patent on it, because everyone does it today.”
There were many other lessons from those days peeling, slicing, and packaging that squash — “there were always eight to 12 bushels of it waiting for us when we got home from school” — or picking cucumbers, stripping tobacco, and countless other duties. They covered everything from work ethic to effective time management; from pulling one’s own weight to the necessity for diversification in the fields — and business in general.
“We had about 10 crops that we produced from spring through fall, and that was a very important lesson,” she said, “because I remember one season there was a flood, and the majority of our cucumber crop was destroyed. But because of our efforts on the other kinds of crops, we were able to pull through that summer. So I learned very early on that you don’t put all your eggs in one basket.”
Sarsynski applies this lesson and countless others from the farm to her work at MassMutual — where she manages, to one degree or another, more than 2,500 workers and 15,000 agents in Asia — and often touches on them during the many speeches she delivers, including the one she gave at a meeting of the Women’s Partnership just a few hours before she talked with BusinessWest.
She said she spoke on the subject of the glass ceiling and the extent to which she believes it still exists — “if it does, it’s much more subtle than when I started in business 30 years ago” — but also touched on matters ranging from work/life balance to the importance of financial planning, to the need for all those hoping to succeed in business to hone their public-speaking skills.
“It’s important because we must communicate well, in written form, and while speaking in front of audiences,” she explained, adding that time in front of a microphone is a key part of any individual’s brand-building work. “It’s imporant to be able to articulate your position in a calm, thoughtful way, and speaking in front of an audience is one very good way to build that skill.”
For this, the latest installment of its Profiles in Business series, BusinessWest talked with Sarsynski about everything from diversity and inclusion in the workplace to her management style — and most all things in between. And she had much to say on all those topics.

Crop Circles
The Sarsynski farm still exists, but almost all of the 70 acres are now leased out to other parties. There is a large garden at the homestead, however, in which Sarsynski will work during some of her many visits home.
It’s been more than 30 years since she’s actually worked on the farm, but she certainly hasn’t forgotten much from those days. Consider these comments when asked about the crop Hadley is perhaps best known for, asparagus, and why it carries a high price at the grocery store.
“It takes about four years before you can actually start producing a crop,” she explained. “It’s also susceptable to various diseases, so some of it may not make it till the time you harvest it. The thing I like most about asparagus, even though I don’t like picking it, is that in optimal conditions, meaning when it’s warm and moist, it can grow a foot a day. So, frequently, not only would we get up early to pick it, before we went to school, but we would have to pick it again when we came home. I didn’t like days like that.”
But while Sarsynski’s parents contually stressed the importance of meeting one’s responsibilities in the field, they were even more focused on their children’s education. The four girls would all go on to attend Smith College, while their brother would graduate from Amherst College.
“My parents did not have college degrees, but from very early on, they stressed the importance of us going to college,” said Sarsynski, who would also earn an MBA from Columbia University. “They wanted the best for us, and they stressed that a good education was the key to real success.”
Sarsynski has put her education from the farm and the classroom to good use at career stops that include stints with several financial-services giants, work as a consultant to the real-estate industry, and even two elected terms as chief executive officer of the town of Suffield, Conn.
She started out as an analyst at Morgan Stanley Realty in New York, and eventually joined Aetna, where she spent 17 years and held a number of senior management positions, overseeing segments of the company’s Investments Division and leading the Corporate Finance Department. She also served as corporate vice president of real-estate investments, and was responsible for the direction and oversight of Aetna’s $15 billion mortgage-loan and owned-real-estate portfolios.
By 1998 though, Aetna was going through some changes organizationally and philosophically, and Sarsysnki was looking for a new challenge. Actually, upon leaving the company, she took on several.
She taught real-estate finance at Columbia for a semester, for example, and, at about the same time, created the Sun Consulting Group, LLC, offering consulting services to the real-estate industry. The firm was responsible for helping Connecticut Innovations Inc. to develop and implement Connecticut’s multi-million-dollar biotechnology lending and construction-development program.
While these endeavors were demanding, they left her with more time for her family — and her community, Suffield. And during one talk with the town’s first selectman (CEO) about economic-development matters, he convinced her to apply for the soon-to-be-vacated position of economic development director for the community, which she was awarded.
She never intended to stay long, and didn’t, but in her short stint did succeed in advancing a number of projects and helping Suffield win substantial state and federal grant money. Within a year in that post, she was ready to return to the private sector, but was instead talked into running for first selectman by the man who was getting ready to leave that position.
She won the seat handily, and settled in for what would be four years of service that she found fun and rewarding, while also providing more lessons that would help her thrive in a corporate setting.
“I loved it because we had an opportunity to effectuate change,” she explained, noting that, among other things, she led the town through 9/11 and its profound impact on public safety and national security. “And I was able to continually hone my leadership skills.
“In many ways, this was more difficult than being in the corporate sector,” she continued, “because you had to have people endorse your vision, and endorse what you were accomplishing. You can be the best mayor or town selectman in the world, but you still have to be involved in the political process of being elected. So you always had to be sure you could communicate your vision and the vision of the community, articulate the positions you were bringing to town meeting in such a way that people embraced and supported them so you could get re-elected.”

Planting Seeds
Sarsynski would take these and other lessons back to the corporate world and, more specifically, Babson Capital Management LLC, a MassMutual subsidiary, where she was responsible for the Portfolio Consulting Group. In 2005, she joined MassMutual as senior vice president and chief administrative officer, responsible for corporate services, human resource management, corporate communications, community relations, and MassMutual’s strategy implementation.
In 2006, she was appointed chairman, president, and CEO of MassMutual International LLC, and became responsible for the company’s international insurance operations, including subsidiaries in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Luxemborg, Chile, and China. She assumed added responsibility for the company’s retirement-services business in 2008, and under her leadership, the division achieved its second consecutive year of at least 20% sales growth and its highest annual sales volume in history.
To hit those numbers — and lay the track for more like them — Sarsynski says she’s been applying the many lessons acquired through business school, the farm, elected office, and from those she’s worked for and with over the years.
She said that success for MassMutual or any other company begins with leadership — “it drives the performance of the entire team, and especially the direct reports” — and when asked about her style, she noted, repeatedly, that it is to lead by example.
“I set high standards, and I expect those standards to be met,” she continued. “I think I’m fair and reasonable, yet I really do demand excellence from my direct reports because this is a very competitive industry that we work within, and it’s important that we have exceptional customer service, product development, and execution. People enjoy working in retirement services because we set those high standards, and we’ve been able to achieve them over the past couple of years.”
Sarsynski said her basic philosophy with regard to professional development is to continually reach higher and set new career goals. She encourages those she directs to do the same, and to help them reach their full potential she becomes the supervisor’s equivalent of a chameleon.
“I try to see what will motivate a person to become the best he or she can be,” she explained. “So my management style, and anyone’s management style, should change depending on the audience that you have, the person that you’re dealing with, and creating that unique environment to help them excel, to help them learn, to drive them to perform to the height of their ability.
“So the way I approach my head of marketing might be different than how I approach my head of distribution,” she continued. “In every case, I give them enough rope so that they can manage their organizations, and as they excel, I give them even more rope, because my ultimate goal is to have succession plans in place for all my businesses so that I become obsolete and my successors are extraordinarily well-prepared to continue to produce the kinds of results the organizations wants.”
As she searched her memory bank for an example of how her leadership style, not to mention her farm-honed life lessons, manifest themselves, she mentioned a recent suggestion (more like an edict) that her staff members with long commutes get satellite radio in their cars so they can stay better-attuned to business news and national and international commentary on current events.
“I told them they could hear the thought leaders of the industry talking about where the markets are going and where the global world is going, what Congress is doing, and what the president is doing,” she said, adding that she considers this a better use of their time than listening to rock music or sports talk. “It’s interesting, because they all went out and got it. I believe it’s very important to use time wisely, because we only have 24 hours in a day; you have to prioritize time.”

The Root to Success
During one recent trip to Hadley, Sarsynski actually took a moment to thank her mother for stressing education early on — and also for farm lifestyle and all that it gave her.
“It was a terrific way to grow up,” she said. “I was very close to my entire family, and we learned lessons in management, in commerce, wholesale, and retail. We learned work ethic that you can only learn in an environment where you get up early and go to bed late and your livelihood depends on the produce of the farm.
“It was a very wholesome way; there was no question of whether you were going to roll out of bed at 5:30 to pick asparagus — you just did it,” she continued, adding that, while she is three decades removed from those experiences, that ‘way,’ as she called it, is still very much with her.
“It’s there in terms of work ethic, frugality, focusing on the value of a dollar, asking if we are efficiently producing work at MassMutual, and focusing on the value of the individual and achieving the mission of the team.”
In other words, Sarsynski still has the muscles she earned on the farm, but she has many other ways to show how strong — mentally and physically — she’s become.

George O’Brien can be reached
at [email protected]

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

n Oct. 1: Hampden/Wilbraham Golf Classic. Hosted by the Country Club of Wilbraham. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 6: ACCGS October [email protected], 7:15 to 9 a.m. Hosted by the Cedars, 419 Island Pond Road, Springfield. Cost: members, $20; non-members, $30. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 13: ACCGS October After 5, 5 to 7 p.m. ‘Be Your Best Self’ Table Top Expo, the Mind, Body & Spirit Expo. Hosted by MassMutual Center. Cost: members, $10; non-members, $20. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 23: UMass vs. UNH Bus Trip to Gillette Stadium, 11:00 a.m. bus departure. Cost: ticket to the game, $20; ticket and bus ride, $40; ticket, bus, and food, $50.
n Oct. 29: Super 60 Awards Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Hosted by Chez Josef, Agawam. Keynote dpeaker: Steven Little. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com
n Oct. 21: Third Thursday, 5 to 8 p.m. Hosted by the Munich Haus Restaurant, 13 Center St., Chicopee.
n Oct. 23: The Down Syndrome Resource Group of Western Massachusetts ‘Buddy Walk.’ This group provides information about family support, resources, parent training, and social opportunities. Its mission is to discover, encourage, and embrace the potential of all individuals with Down syndrome. Registration for the walk to begin at 10 a.m., with coffee and light refreshments available. Two-mile walk to begin at about 11 a.m., followed by a complimentary lunch and entertainment.

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

n Oct. 4: Checkpoint 2010, 7:30 a.m. Hosted by Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Keynote Speaker: U.S. Sen. Scott Brown. Presented by the Chicopee and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Cost: members, $25; non-members, $30. To reserve tickets, contact the Chicopee Chamber of Commerce at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org
n Oct. 20: October Salute Breakfast. Hosted by Summit View Banquet & Meeting House, Holyoke. Guest speaker: political consultant Tony Cignoli. To reserve tickets, contact the chamber at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org
n Oct. 27: After 5 Business Card Swap – Speed Networking, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Hosted by the Delaney House, 3 Country Club Road, Holyoke. Limited to 24 people; registration ends on Oct. 25. Cost: members, $25; non-members, $35. To reserve tickets, contact the chamber at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

n Oct. 1: Casino Night, 7 to 11 p.m., at One Cottage St., Easthampton. Major sponsors: Easthampton Savings Bank and Finck & Perras Insurance Agency. Cost: $25 in advance; $30 at the door. See www.easthamptonchamber.org for more information.
n Oct. 13: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange, 5 to 7 p.m. Co-hosted and co-sponsored by Nashawannuck Gallery and Harry King Rug & Home, 36-40 Cottage St., Easthampton. Hors d’ouevres by Sunshine Bakery, beer and wine, door prizes. Cost: members, $5; non-members, $15.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

n Oct. 14: Fall Salute Breakfast, 7:30 a.m., at the Log Cabin, Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by Holyoke Medical Center and Comcast. Cost: $18; tables reserved for parties of eight.
n Oct: 20: Chamber After Hours, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by Holyoke Children’s Museum, 444 Dwight St., Holyoke. Sponsored by All Sales Consulting, LLC. Cost: members, $5; non-members, $10 cash.

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

n Oct. 6: Annual Chamber Open House, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. It’s the don’t-miss chamber event of the year. More than 300 people regularly attend. Food and drink donated by member restaurants. Cost: $10 for members.

Northampton Area Young Professional Society
www.thenayp.com
(413) 584-1900

n Oct. 14: NAYP Party with a Purpose, 5 to 8 p.m., at KW Home. Cost: members, free; guests, $5.

Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce
www.qvcc.biz
(413) 283-2418
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

South Hadley/Granby Chamber of Commerce
www.shchamber.com
(413) 532-6451

n Oct. 15: Legislative Breakfast, 7:15 to 9 a.m. Hosted by the Courtyard by Marriott. Sponsored by Western Massachusetts Electric Co.
n Oct. 27: After 5, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by Hickory Ridge Country Club. Sponsorships available.

Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce
www.threeriverschamber.org
(413) 283-6425

n Oct. 4: Chamber Meeting, 7 p.m. Hosted by Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce office, Palmer Technology Park, Springfield St., Palmer.
Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

n Oct 13: WestNet After 5 Networking Octoberfest, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield. Cost: members, $10; non-members, 15. Bring plenty of business cards for exchange, and bring a gift to highlight your business. For more information, e-mail [email protected], call (413) 568-1618, or check out www.westfieldbiz.org
n Oct. 16: ‘Bring Back the 80s’ Dance, 7 to 11 p.m. Hosted by Westwood Restaurant and Pub, 94 North Elm St., Westfield. Featuring Orange Crush, the 80s Dance Party Band. Cost: $20. Prizes awarded for most authentic dressers and raffles.

Departments Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AMHERST

The Sub & Pizza of Amherst Inc., 33 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002. Roula Davila, 10 South Maple St., Enfield, CT 06082. Restaurant.

TMD Inc., 1-3 Pray St., Amherst, MA 01002. Thomas Murphy, 109 Wagon Wheel Dr., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Operation of a pub/restaurant.

EASTHAMPTON

Wingspan Woodworking Inc., One Cottage St., Room 105, Easthampton, MA 01027. Gregory Dillard, 34 North Main St., Belchertown, MA 01027. Woodworking shop.

FEEDING HILLS

U.S. Furniture Warehouse Inc., 15 Amherst Ave., Feeding Hills, MA  01030. Lubna Basher, same. Retail furniture sales.

LENOX

Your Color Connection Inc., 36 Pittsfield Road, Lenox, MA 01240. Ann Lebier, 80 Navin Ave., Lee MA 01238. Printer, manufacturer, production, and assembly of marketing materials.

SOUTHAMPTON

Western Mass Public Health Association Inc., 146 Valley Road, Southampton, MA 01073. Barry Searles, 73 Russellville Road, Southampton, MA 01073. Organization designed to foster public health by providing service to board of health and related agencies whether public or private by public education, publicity and publication, by advice and appropriate action on legislation and governmental affairs.

SPRINGFIELD

Travis Best Foundation Inc., 55 Maple St., #7, Springfield, MA 01105. Jasmine Turner, 2029 Century Park East, Suite 3000, Los Angeles, CA 90067. To improve the lives of children by character training through sports.

Two Bits Inc., 271 Main St., Great Barrington, MA 01230. Stephan Vilot Jr, 68 Ridge Ave., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Full-service barber shop.

United Auto Sales Inc., 874 Berkshire Ave., Springfield, MA 01151. Joseph Nigro, 21 Grove St., Southwick, MA 01077. Auto sales.

Universal Windows Direct Inc., 192 Berkshire Ave., Southwick, MA 01077. Sales and installation of windows, siding, and doors as well as other home improvements.

VG Construction Corp., 1159 Westfield St., Apt. B2, West Springfield, MA 01089. Victor Gavriliuc, same. Construction, remodeling, and improvement of personal property and associated services.

Worthington Management Inc., 254 Worthington St., Springfield, MA 01103. Margarita Monsalve, same. Property management.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Western Mass Dental Hygiene Services Inc., 226 Belmont Ave., West Springfield, MA 01089. Alice Jalal, same. Dental practice.

Bankruptcies Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Ali, Hassan R.
115 Bellevue Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Alicea, Patricia
10 Willow St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Arbuzov, Tamara L.
21 Nassau St., 2nd Floor
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Bargalla, Thomas M.
21 Cottonwood Lane
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Barrus, Alan
Barrus, Norma
1467 Barre Road
Gilbertville, MA 01031
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Beaudoin Group Ltd.
Beaudoin, Lawrence A.
Beaudoin, Julie C.
P.O. Box 1473
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Beaulieu, Michael G.
217 Parker St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Bednarzyk, William
29 Parker St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/17/10

Berthiaume, Rita C.
95 North Westfield St.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Bissonnette, Jon N.
Bissonnette, Tabitha N.
75 Ashgrove St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Boudreau, Edmund A.
Boudreau, Coleen A.
316 White Pond Road
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Britton, Bruce S.
Britton, Jessica A.
913 Shaker Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Camilleri, Richard P.
P.O. Box 334
Holyoke, MA 01041
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Carr, Tiffany M.
145 Harvard St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Chandler, Robert L.
372 Crescent St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Chartier, Julie
59 Reed St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Chilson, Phillip E.
P.O.Box 48
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Christopher, Kathryn A.
a/k/a Wilkens, Kathryn A.
P.O.Box 2752
Amherst, MA 01004-2752
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Claffey, Mary R.
20 Cross St. Unit D
Pepperell, MA 01463
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Clapper, Ann M.
7 Grant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/25/10

Claudio, Dorcas
356 Allenpark Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/17/10

Cone, Kate A.
a/k/a Flanagan, Kate
a/k/a Guthrie, Kate
3 Newton St.
P. O. Box 84
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Cotto, Jaime
a/k/a Cortez-Cotto, Jaime
42 Thames St.
Springfield, MA 01005
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/29/10

Coville, Diana M.
100 Stafford Holland Road
Wales, MA 01081
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Coyer, Nicole L.
a/k/a Charette, Nicole L.
52 Howard St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/25/10

Croteau, Linda Y.
30 Higgins Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/31/10

Davis Construction
Davis, Thomas R.
13 Onondaga St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/23/10

DeJesus, Beverly M.
161 Main St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Dion, Kathy A.
96 St. James Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Dixon, Virginia L.
14 Herbert Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Dominick, Arthur R.
Dominick, Judith
50 Holy Family Road, Apt. 119E
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/31/10

Dubilo, Adam J.
Dubilo, Jennifer
Gamache Dubilo, Jennifer E.
7 East Circle Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/27/10

Dubuc, David A.
7 Spring St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/29/10

Dyer, Samuel R.
P.O. Box 362
Westfield, MA 01086
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/21/10

Enright, Robert D.
Enright, Elaine F.
45 Burke Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Erickson, Thomas A.
1343 Riverdale St. #56
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Fontaine, Gary E.
43 Bray Park Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

George, Helen S.
1384 Barre Road
Gilbertville, MA 01031
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Gravel, Richard A.
3 North Hampshire St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Grise, Christina A.
391 Main St., Apt. 301
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/17/10

Hall, John J.
Hall, Linda L.
8 Revere Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/25/10

Hall, Noel E.
299 Nottingham St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Hall-Cotto, Jennifer M.
17 Liswell Dr.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/29/10

Harris, Margaret I.
15 Buel St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/17/10

Hebert, Paul D.
Hebert, Angela M.
120 Glendale Circle
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Hegy, Michael D.
29 Baltimore Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Helenek, James J.
Helenek, April M.
124 State St.
Shelburne Falls, MA 01370
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Howard, Dawn I
a/k/a Ford, Dawn I
40 Briarwood Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Hyde, William D.
Hyde, Judith A.
235 Main St.
PO Box 267
Gilbertville, MA 01031
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/23/10

Karlik, Gregory M.
Karlik, Heather J.
340 Broadway
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/28/10

Keenan, James M.
Keenan, Nancy E.
6 Hawthorne Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Knowles, Michael T.
226 Pearl St., 2R
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Kuschka, Aaron T.
Carey, Mary Ellen
212 Prospect St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Laboy, Juan A.
a/k/a Flores, Juan L.
a/k/a Laboy, Juan A
Laboy, Isabel E.
a/k/a Laboy, Sanchez Isabel
36 Greenleaves Dr. #46
Hadley, MA 01035
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/16/10

LaPerle, Donna D.
a/k/a Melhorn, Donna D.
79 Dana St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Latour, Stephanie A.
a/k/a Pooler, Stephanie A.
50 Hazen St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/17/10

Laverty, Jason M.
20 Woronoco Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Lawrence, Beverly A.
PO Box 406
Barre, MA 01074
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/23/10

Lewis, George E.
Lewis, Marilyn E
151 West King St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Lopez, Jose J.
Pinto, Julia
a/k/a Pinto-Lopez, Julia
76 Ardmore St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/25/10

Malvezzi, Gina
20 Hampton Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Manfredi, Theresa H.
a/k/a Goodrow, Theresa
332 Lancaster Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/17/10

Martinez, Julia
31 Emily St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

McNierney, Sandra L.
a/k/a Dupuis, Sandra L.
a/k/a Bushey, Sandra
35 Scenic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/23/10

Mendrala, John M.
Mendrala, Donna
603 Springfield St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Munro, Stephen P.
Munro, Beverly A.
9 Devils Lane
Brimfield, MA 01010
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Must Love Dogs,
Abbruzzese, Cathy A.
338 Mayo Road
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/20/10

O’Rourke, Shannon L.
83 Bell St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/16/10

Page, Denise M.
30 Higgins Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/31/10

Parks Enterprise
Parks, Doreen M.
7 Chestnut St.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Pate, Susan M.
43 Bray Park Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Peterson, Jean M.
PO Box 1214
Warren, MA 01083
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/21/10

Petrizzi, Robert Charles
810 Fairway Ave.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Picard, Kevin E.
Picard, Barbara J.
96 McKinley Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Pilon, Donald
144 Cabot St., Apt. 10
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Profio, Richard A.
507 Sunderland Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Ramos, Sue Ellen
323 Stony Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/31/10

Romano, Anthony G.
120 Elizabeth Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Roth, Dorothy W.
15C Highland Village
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Santiago, Maritza
102 Santa Barbara St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Scalise, Joseph P.
32 Charlemont Road
Charlemont, MA 01339
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/31/10

Schmidt, Mark A.
114 Franklin St
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Schultz, Steven David
1118 St James Ave. G28
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Shattuck, Chester R.
Shattuck, Jean M.
28 Gula Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Sibley, Louis F.
Sibley, Elaine M.
14 Gould Road
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/25/10

Sierra, Victor Armando
134 Union St. Apt. 49
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Skawski, Thomas P.
Skawski, Kristen M
356 Belmont Ave. Apt. 24
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Skillings, Anne Haskell
84 Cross Brook
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Superior Floor Covering
Wood, Jason P.
2275 Palmer Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Tanguay, Marie A.
172 Colemore St.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Threlfall, Robert Jason
28R Fairfield Ave.
Haydenville, MA 01039
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/23/10

Tobin, Kyle E.
Tobin, Shawna E.
a/k/a Diemand, Shawna
247 Ryan Road
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/18/10

Toczko, Gregory P.
162 Nash Rd
Cummington, MA 01026
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Torres, Adilmar E.
136 Allen St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Touponce, Carol E.
44A Russell St.
Great Barrington, MA 01230
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/30/10

Tramore Chip Shop
Quaglia, Gabriel
Quaglia, Sara K.
13 Harrison Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/20/10

Varady, Kathleen
5 Alice St.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Vardakis, Christopher D.
Vardakis, Karen F.
28 School St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Vega, Wanda L.
69 Longhill St., Apt.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10

Walton, Nelson F.
52 Boucher Circle
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Warzocha, Robert R.
150 Ashland St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/31/10

Williford, Karen Ann
P.O. Box 103
Huntington, MA 01050
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/27/10

Witek, Linda J.
27 Meadow Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/24/10

Woolley, Mason K.
18 Main St., Apt. 3C
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/19/10

Wright, Richard T.
Wright, Carol A.
17 Shepard St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 08/26/10