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Cover Story Healthcare Heroes

Since BusinessWest and its sister publication, Healthcare News, launched the new recognition program known as Healthcare Heroes in 2017, the initiative has more than succeeded in its quest to identify true leaders — not to mention inspiring stories — within this region’s large and very important healthcare sector.

The award was created to recognize those whose contributions to the health and well-being of this region, while known to some, needed to become known to all. And this is certainly true this year.

Indeed, while some of the individuals, programs, and concepts highlighted in the stories below are known to familiar to many in this region, others are not, and they should be.

Collectively, these stories come down to a single word: passion. These individuals and groups have a passion for helping others in need. Their individual stories vary, but the common denominator is a willingness to step in, step up, be counted, and work tirelessly toward making a difference in the lives of others. We find these stories to be compelling and inspirational, and we’re sure you will as well.

Download the digital flipbook of the 2021 Healthcare Heroes HERE

We’re excited to celebrate our Healthcare Heroes on Thursday, Oct. 21 at the Log Cabin in Holyoke. Details on the protocols for that event will be announced in the coming weeks.

The Healthcare Heroes program is being sponsored by: presenting sponsors Elms College and Baystate Health/Health New England, and partner sponsor Trinity Health Of New England/Mercy Medical Center.

Presenting Sponsors

Partner Sponsors

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 79: Sept. 13, 2021

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien interviews David Godaire, president and CEO of HassHire Holyoke

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with David Godaire, president and CEO of HassHire Holyoke. The two discuss the ongoing labor shortage impacting virtually all businesses in the region, the many different forces behind it, and the outlook for the short term as federal unemployment benefits, specifically the $300 weekly bonuses expire.  It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

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Class of 2021 Special Coverage

In early May, BusinessWest, in keeping with a spring tradition, introduced its 40 Under Forty class of 2021.
Another tradition is to stage the gala to celebrate that class in late June. This year, due to COVID-19 and pending changes to the restrictions regarding large events, the gala was moved to Sept. 23. As that sold-out event nears, we thought it appropriate to reintroduce this stellar class of young leaders in the community.
They were the top scorers from a strong field of more than 200 unique nominations — a near-record number that made for a stern challenge for a panel of five judges.
As for the class of 2021, the honorees — 26 women and 14 men — hail from a host of different industries, from law to engineering; from education to healthcare; from energy to media, just to name a few. But there are, as always, some common denominators, including excellence within one’s profession, a commitment to giving back to the community, dedication to family and work/life balance, and a focus on what else they do in each of those realms.View this year’s 40 Under Forty digital flipbook here!


The class of 2021 will be celebrated on Thursday, Sept. 23 at the annual 40 Under Forty Gala at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. That gala will also feature the announcement of the winner of the seventh annual Alumni Achievement Award, a recognition program that salutes the 40 Under Forty honoree who has most impressively added to their accomplishments in the workplace and within the community, as chosen by a panel of judges.

Presenting Sponsor

Sponsors

Alumni Achievement Award

When BusinessWest launched its 40 Under Forty program in 2007, it did so to identify rising stars across our region – individuals who were excelling in business and through involvement within the community –and celebrate their accomplishments. In 2015, BusinessWest announced a new award, one that builds on the foundation upon which 40 Under Forty was created. It’s called the Alumni Achievement Award (formerly the Continued Excellence Award). as the name suggests, will be presented to the 40 Under Forty honoree who, in the eyes of an independent panel of judges, has most impressively continued and built upon their track record of accomplishment.

This year’s nominations are CLOSED. Nominate next year’s Alumni Achievement Award recipient HERE.

2021 Alumni Achievement Award Presenting Sponsor

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 76: August 23, 2021

George O’Brien interviews Peter Rosskothen

Peter Rosskothen

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Peter Rosskothen, owner of the Log Cabin Banquet & meeting House, the Delaney House restaurant, and other hospitality-related businesses. The two talk about the changing numbers when it comes to the pandemic, the emergence of the Delta variant, and what all this could mean for businesses already facing a number of challenges as they seek a return to something approaching normal. It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

Sponsored by:

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Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

144 Steady Lane
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Joshua H. Porter
Seller: Norbert J. Salz
Date: 07/19/21

366 West Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $772,000
Buyer: 366 West Road LLC
Seller: Cynthia L. Holley
Date: 07/19/21

BUCKLAND

121 Ashfield Road
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Russell E. Donelson
Seller: Charles Unaitis
Date: 07/21/21

CHARLEMONT

145 Main St.
Charlemont, MA 01339
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Levi Janssen
Seller: Ashley R. Drake
Date: 07/14/21

DEERFIELD

408 Greenfield Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Brandon Hale
Seller: Alfred J. Dray
Date: 07/22/21

144 North Main St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $490,000
Buyer: John Bysiewski
Seller: Janet M. Kelley
Date: 07/22/21

North Main St.
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: John Bysiewski
Seller: Yazwinski, Walter J. Jr., (Estate)
Date: 07/22/21

4 Sugarloaf St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $875,000
Buyer: J2K Realty LLC
Seller: Merlyn Property LLC
Date: 07/16/21

ERVING

38 Old State Road
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Rich Young Property Management Inc.
Seller: Rich Young Property Management Inc.
Date: 07/20/21

GILL

22 Hickory Hill Road
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $870,000
Buyer: Stuart B. Marsh
Seller: Duncan J. Elliott
Date: 07/16/21

GREENFIELD

32 Cleveland St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Andrew Petitdemange
Seller: Jeffrey M. Lively
Date: 07/16/21

237 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Colrain Bunker Group LLC
Seller: Douglas Sky-Wight
Date: 07/19/21

40 Cooke St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $342,000
Buyer: Debra Arch
Seller: Lee B. Gilman
Date: 07/21/21

252 Davis St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $320,500
Buyer: Mary A. Westervelt
Seller: Steven E. Adam
Date: 07/15/21

3 Earl Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Eduardo I. Monzon-Perez
Seller: Jeffrey D. Jackman
Date: 07/12/21

183 Fairview St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Coreen R. Demers
Seller: Janice Sparko
Date: 07/16/21

31 Forest Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Edin Barone-Thompson
Seller: Tigran Ayrapetyan
Date: 07/16/21

19-21 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $349,000
Buyer: Samuel Plotkin
Seller: Kimball & Kimball LLC
Date: 07/15/21

33 Holly Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Annmarie Hannon
Seller: Fotini Ninos
Date: 07/14/21

79 Hope St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $212,500
Buyer: Astrid M. Burke
Seller: Daniel Y. Khan
Date: 07/12/21

119 Montague City Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $318,500
Buyer: Choon K. Teoh
Seller: Celeste Chickering
Date: 07/15/21

10 Vernon St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Ann M. Dobosz
Seller: Lea Wulfkuhle
Date: 07/15/21

28 Vernon St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $162,500
Buyer: Paul D. Viens
Seller: Jessica E. Greene
Date: 07/21/21

MONTAGUE

86-88 4th St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Kevin B. Gendreau
Seller: Barry M. Elbaum RET
Date: 07/23/21

15 Chester St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $276,000
Buyer: Chad Demers
Seller: Raymond R. Tuttle
Date: 07/16/21

154 East Chestnut Hill Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Frederick A. Grossberg
Seller: Jane E. Stein
Date: 07/23/21

36 Green Pond Road
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Aidan C. Connelly
Seller: Ragus LLC
Date: 07/13/21

70 Old Sunderland Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Solomon Goldstein-Rose
Seller: Kimberlee A. Gilhuly
Date: 07/22/21

108-R South Prospect St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Nicholas L. Williams
Seller: Jonathan T. Rawls
Date: 07/21/21

77 Swamp Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $676,000
Buyer: Mariah I. Shore
Seller: David B. Lampron
Date: 07/16/21

28 Taylor Heights
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Matthew C. Duncan
Seller: Stark NT
Date: 07/22/21

NORTHFIELD

291 Birnam Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $152,557
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

292 Birnam Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $176,186
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

53 Birnam Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $301,000
Buyer: Bridgman Homestead RT
Seller: Allen, James C. Est
Date: 07/16/21

7 Bolton Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $355,274
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

13 Bolton Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $355,274
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

44 Highland Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $186,550
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

75 Highland Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $176,186
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

81 Highland Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $185,306
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

181 Millers Falls Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Mary E. Searles
Seller: Maida D. Goodwin
Date: 07/19/21

461 Mount Hermon Station Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Holly M. Anderson
Seller: Karen L. Kendrick
Date: 07/21/21

12 North Lane
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $181,990
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

14 Pine St.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $203,547
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

148 Winchester Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $182,404
Buyer: Thomas Aquinas College
Seller: Northfield Mount Hermon School
Date: 07/12/21

ORANGE

39 Dewey Conrad Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Tyler D. Chaplin
Seller: Marcia M. Conkey
Date: 07/22/21

23 Eagleville Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Rodney J. Cofske
Seller: Peach RT
Date: 07/19/21

166 East Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Richard Noel
Seller: Steven B. Curtis
Date: 07/23/21

344 Mayo Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $397,500
Buyer: Scott E. Hume
Seller: Francis J. Barszcz
Date: 07/13/21

174 Pleasant St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Sydney M. Caron
Seller: Olivia A. Kimball
Date: 07/16/21

167 School Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $196,500
Buyer: Scott A. Barden
Seller: Pioneer Valley Inc.
Date: 07/15/21

310 Walnut Hill Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Kaitlyn M. Chuba-Kraner
Seller: Kelsie M. Bardsley
Date: 07/22/21

SHELBURNE

88 Old Greenfield Road
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $357,000
Buyer: Bart Gottesdiener
Seller: Corey D. Paul
Date: 07/16/21

652 Patten Road
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $371,000
Buyer: Nicole Durant
Seller: Ellis INT
Date: 07/12/21

453 Pratt Corner Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Jonathan Bennis-Roberts
Seller: John Rathbun
Date: 07/19/21

323 Shelburne Center Road
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Eric A. Vassar
Seller: Dylan Schoelzel
Date: 07/14/21

268 West Pelham Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Zebediah Smith
Seller: Valentine, John Est
Date: 07/19/21

SHUTESBURY

27 Ames Haven Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $518,000
Buyer: John E. Coffin
Seller: Paul M. Danielovich
Date: 07/14/21

SUNDERLAND

35 North Plain Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $527,000
Buyer: Steven Bobbitt
Seller: Benjamin M. Barr
Date: 07/16/21

WENDELL

146 Montague Road
Wendell, MA 01379
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Robert J. McKinney
Seller: Susan English
Date: 07/14/21

WHATELY

336 Haydenville Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $399,000
Buyer: Stephen P. Ezequelle
Seller: J2K Realty LLC
Date: 07/14/21

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

45 Birch Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $442,000
Buyer: Gail Catjakis
Seller: Sergey Savonin
Date: 07/23/21

91 Campbell Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jackelin Cotto
Seller: Edward C. Hitchcock
Date: 07/23/21

84 Carr Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Alahna Seymour
Seller: Heather M. Salerno
Date: 07/22/21

29 Central St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $307,000
Buyer: Patrick M. Hogan
Seller: Nicolas Vassel
Date: 07/15/21

87 Country Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $339,900
Buyer: John F. Amatruda
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 07/14/21

27 Coyote Circle
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: Dmitriy Burkovskiy
Seller: Damaris Morales
Date: 07/23/21

31 Greenock St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Kimberly Wyckoff
Seller: Jarvis, Ruth (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

69 Hayes Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $336,000
Buyer: Bruce A. Embry
Seller: Marilyn R. Colby
Date: 07/20/21

32 Horsham Place
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Peter C. Marino
Seller: Steven W. Marasi
Date: 07/23/21

85 Liswell Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Yaovi Aziaha
Seller: Alexander Figliola
Date: 07/23/21

379 North Westfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $266,000
Buyer: Sharline Gonzalez
Seller: Cynthia A. Rickard
Date: 07/15/21

309 North St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $284,000
Buyer: Wilson C. Fuller
Seller: Diane J. Labbe
Date: 07/15/21

175 Parkedge Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Kathleen M. Kraas
Seller: Richard W. Kresock
Date: 07/16/21

92-94 Sheri Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Pavel Cotorobai
Seller: Mark J. Danalis
Date: 07/22/21

205 South St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Vashon Robinson
Seller: Guglielma Fazio
Date: 07/13/21

78 Sylvan Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $359,900
Buyer: Sharleen Diaz
Seller: Domenick R. Pisano
Date: 07/16/21

69 Tracy Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Ryan C. Johnson
Seller: Dirk G. Gendron
Date: 07/23/21

35 Valley Brook Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $372,500
Buyer: Pierre J. Saintilus
Seller: Nicole M. Karam
Date: 07/15/21

BLANDFORD

3 Crooks Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: David Perez
Seller: Sutherland, Pete (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

 

BRIMFIELD

44 Little Alum Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $364,000
Buyer: Katherine E. Poirier
Seller: Herbert F. Seymour
Date: 07/16/21

29 Prospect Hill Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Shaina R. Labonte
Seller: Raymond F. Labonte
Date: 07/16/21

CHESTER

35 Ingell Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Brian McPheron
Seller: Harry E. Sanner
Date: 07/15/21

101 Middlefield Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Harry E. Sanner
Seller: Jeffrey S. Wundt
Date: 07/23/21

8 William St.
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Kristina L. Colby
Seller: Cassandra L. Kendall
Date: 07/16/21

CHICOPEE

131 Beauregard Ter.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Christopher N. Acevedo
Seller: David O. Brodeur
Date: 07/12/21

50 Beverly St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Germika Davis
Seller: Roman M. Stanczak
Date: 07/23/21

136 Blanchard St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: DGL Properties LLC
Seller: Boucher, Gail A. (Estate)
Date: 07/14/21

78 Boucher Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $262,262
Buyer: Brian J. Kennedy
Seller: Krystyna Kane
Date: 07/14/21

269 Britton St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Julia Ross
Seller: Erin A. Slott
Date: 07/14/21

88 Cora Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: RM Blerman LLC
Seller: Freedom Mortgage Corp.
Date: 07/20/21

27 Grant St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Brandon M. Pavoni
Seller: Gary B. Beaudry
Date: 07/21/21

80 Jean Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $306,500
Buyer: Joseph R. Lapointe
Seller: Mark Normand
Date: 07/23/21

81 Laclede Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Mark McCarthy
Seller: Yazmilie Stanley
Date: 07/23/21

63 Ludger Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Meaghan Farrell
Seller: John F. Simmons
Date: 07/19/21

1260 Memorial Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: 1260 Memorial Drive LLC
Seller: Nevin G. Bastin
Date: 07/21/21

684 Montgomery St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $261,500
Buyer: Hollie A. Smith
Seller: Robert L. Gramolini
Date: 07/23/21

23 Moore St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Valerie Peters
Seller: Johnston, Christine (Estate)
Date: 07/12/21

106 Muzzy St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Yomaris Ramos
Seller: Blue Sky Investment Group LLC
Date: 07/12/21

3 Naomi St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $261,000
Buyer: Zunaira Butt
Seller: MCN New Wave LLC
Date: 07/13/21

416 New Ludlow Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Aimee Richards-Correa
Seller: Wendy Morera
Date: 07/16/21

71 Orchard St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $188,500
Buyer: 71 Orchard RT
Seller: Janik, John J. (Estate)
Date: 07/23/21

29 Paradise St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Tamira Goodstein
Seller: Robert Boesch
Date: 07/21/21

187 Prospect St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Lycaste LLC
Seller: City Of Chicopee
Date: 07/15/21

42 Sandra Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $244,500
Buyer: Kasara Martin
Seller: Robert L. Scribner
Date: 07/21/21

3 Sherwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Donald T. Leighton
Seller: Shannon E. Riley
Date: 07/23/21

43 Van Horn St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Kimberly Lockwood
Seller: Mark T. Hnitecki
Date: 07/23/21

EAST LONGMEADOW

23 Chadwyck Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $489,900
Buyer: John P. Goodwin
Seller: Robert A. Johnson
Date: 07/23/21

7 Colorado St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01118
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Alycar Investments LLC
Seller: Alicia A. Deronck
Date: 07/13/21

35 Day Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Tabitha Gerber
Seller: 35 Day Avenue LLC
Date: 07/21/21

74 Kibbe Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Aneta M. Sucharski
Seller: Geoffrey R. Frost
Date: 07/13/21

29 Lori Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Nicole A. Bourgeoise
Seller: Russell FT
Date: 07/16/21

3 Niagara St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Charles J. Hoffman LT
Seller: Vashon B. Robinson
Date: 07/13/21

15 Murray Court
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Anthony Hernandez
Seller: Michael Robert
Date: 07/23/21

25 Old Pasture Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Stephen A. Crane
Seller: Shaji P. Daniel
Date: 07/23/21

5 Peachtree Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $610,000
Buyer: Jeffrey Temkin
Seller: Nathanael L. Rosario
Date: 07/21/21

34 Pembroke Ter.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Nathanael Rosario
Seller: Gopal C. Sarker
Date: 07/21/21

466 Porter Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Walter August
Seller: Steven C. Wheeler
Date: 07/14/21

5 Savoy Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Ashley M. Heeb-Schnell
Seller: Ben Roncarati
Date: 07/16/21

27 Shaw St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Kyle Maskell
Seller: SRV Properties LLC
Date: 07/19/21

254 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Northeast Asset Management LLC
Seller: Dino C. Calcasola
Date: 07/14/21

55 Thompson St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Aimee J. Palmer-Mooneyham
Seller: Wayne D. Freeman
Date: 07/21/21

11 Voyer Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $337,000
Buyer: Drew C. Trebbe
Seller: Miner, Raymond E. (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

9 William St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $268,400
Buyer: Lisa J. Goodrich
Seller: Mary G. Lavoie
Date: 07/22/21

GRANVILLE

54 Granby Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Brendan M. Guidi
Seller: Robert M. O’Connor
Date: 07/15/21

HAMPDEN

3 Hickory Lane
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Louise A. Difillippo
Seller: Clark-Thornton, D. J. (Estate)
Date: 07/22/21

59 North Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Steven V. Haldeman
Seller: McDarby, James D. (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

17 South Ridge Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Michael Farrell
Seller: Richard J. Bertheaud
Date: 07/15/21

HOLLAND

23 Cherokee Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Mollie Ohara
Seller: Maple Ledge Assocs. Inc.
Date: 07/16/21

4 Linder Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Hailey Harding
Seller: Melissa M. Kelley
Date: 07/22/21

122 Old County Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Hannah M. Prescott
Seller: Patrick R. Doyle
Date: 07/13/21

34 Union Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Steven Ives
Seller: Thomas O’Connor
Date: 07/22/21

HOLYOKE

11 Alderman St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $229,000
Buyer: Maya Rivera
Seller: Malia Homebuyers LLC
Date: 07/23/21

133-135 Beech St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $292,000
Buyer: Haseena Sibdhanny
Seller: 133-135 Beech St. Assocs.
Date: 07/12/21

18 Canby St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Keishla M. Montalban
Seller: Amer Ahmed
Date: 07/19/21

63 Cherry Hill
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $432,500
Buyer: Scott L. Geiger
Seller: Brittnie L. Aiello
Date: 07/20/21

237-239 Clemente St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

249 Clemente St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

275-277 Clemente St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

Clemente St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

19 Evergreen Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: K. Godfrey Equities LLC
Seller: Kevin A. Lyons
Date: 07/16/21

47 Fairfield Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Andrew D. Haigh
Seller: William J. Daisy
Date: 07/22/21

63 Franklin St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $238,000
Buyer: Kendall Dunn-Lasane
Seller: Idali Rodriguez
Date: 07/14/21

29-31 Gilman St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $284,000
Buyer: David Moonan
Seller: William C. Koczocik
Date: 07/15/21

156-162 High St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: 156 High Holyoke MA LLC
Seller: John C. Almonte
Date: 07/21/21

45 Lexington Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Alexandra Carlson
Seller: Szalkuchi, Balbina (Estate)
Date: 07/19/21

50 Lindbergh Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Maureen Dooley-Lawrence
Seller: Barbara M. Brooksbank
Date: 07/12/21

466-480 Main St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

514 Main St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

156 Nonotuck St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Rebecca R. Knobe
Seller: Jacqueline M. Garcia
Date: 07/20/21

491 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $306,500
Buyer: Sean F. Norton
Seller: Nicholas R. Ryder
Date: 07/20/21

1785 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Waah Realty LLC
Seller: Saundra B. Reilly
Date: 07/14/21

7 Peltiah St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $387,000
Buyer: Kimberly A. Casineau
Seller: Francis S. Bey
Date: 07/23/21

37 Sherwood Ter.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $232,500
Buyer: Melanie Wicken
Seller: Danielle T. Belliveau
Date: 07/21/21

568 South East St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Haddad Capital LLC
Seller: Ale Ventures LLC
Date: 07/16/21

56-58 Sargeant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Antonio Albericci
Seller: Holyoke Machine Co. Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

335 Walnut St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Alma C. Santiago
Seller: FNMA
Date: 07/19/21

LONGMEADOW

152 Belleclaire Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $459,000
Buyer: Wesley T. Fernandes
Seller: Ryan E. Watson
Date: 07/15/21

154 Brookwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $352,500
Buyer: Bernard N. Njoroge
Seller: Rubin, Allen I. (Estate)
Date: 07/22/21

19 Chatham Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $565,000
Buyer: James Dorschner
Seller: Melvin P. French
Date: 07/15/21

15 Dartmouth Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $349,000
Buyer: Kayla R. Berthiaume
Seller: Marcella A. Beane
Date: 07/19/21

29 Dartmouth Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $595,000
Buyer: Benjamin R. Baraldi
Seller: Peter Olesen
Date: 07/16/21

67 Dover Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $520,000
Buyer: Diana Vuong-Thomas
Seller: Danielle F. Wehrli
Date: 07/14/21

81 Eunice Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Richard H. Black
Seller: Geoffrey M. Neigher
Date: 07/23/21

115 Fenwood Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Michael R. Massie
Seller: Adeline M. Santinello
Date: 07/16/21

888 Frank Smith Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $438,000
Buyer: Melissa E. Buscemi
Seller: Thomas A. Mierzwa
Date: 07/23/21

965 Frank Smith Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Michael Abrams
Seller: Kathleen G. Boehm
Date: 07/15/21

70 Green Willow Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Amy Grodsky-Ratner
Seller: Todd C. Ratner
Date: 07/14/21

63 Hawthorne St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Christopher N. Allen
Seller: Leland S. Fallon
Date: 07/15/21

120 Homestead Blvd.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Alfred Azar
Seller: Peter Tran
Date: 07/15/21

25 Knollwood Circle
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $525,650
Buyer: Sumonu Arobo
Seller: Vladislav Beznos
Date: 07/23/21

619 Laurel St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $452,000
Buyer: Mickey Benson
Seller: Roberta L. Curzio
Date: 07/19/21

80 Mill Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $524,900
Buyer: Gary B. Mantolesky
Seller: William J. Linville
Date: 07/14/21

46 Mohawk Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: David R. Prickett
Seller: Caren J. Demarche
Date: 07/16/21

60 Nevins Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Allea Cortina
Seller: Sarah A. Kenney
Date: 07/21/21

132 Rugby Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $875,000
Buyer: Sarah A. Hanson
Seller: Gregory J. Faust
Date: 07/19/21

148 Warren Ter.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Peiyi Wang
Seller: Joseph P. Harty
Date: 07/23/21

36 Whitmun Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Dianne B. Hayes
Seller: Sarkis S. Kalashian
Date: 07/23/21

186 Williams St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Katrina Martin
Seller: David P. Buscemi
Date: 07/23/21

103 Woodside Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Cecelia Blackwood
Seller: Ki-Young Jeong
Date: 07/23/21

LUDLOW

49 Eden St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Diane R. Dos-Santos
Seller: Joyce T. Lucey
Date: 07/21/21

81-83 Howard St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Kathleen Sweeney
Seller: David J. Gomes
Date: 07/23/21

148 King St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $377,000
Buyer: Nestor Osorio
Seller: Jose M. Dias
Date: 07/16/21

59 Lockland Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Andrew Durand
Seller: Victor L. Rodrigues
Date: 07/15/21

25 Norwood St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $290,500
Buyer: Jose M. Dias
Seller: Yvonne C. Dacruz
Date: 07/16/21

63 Power Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Jennifer L. Duncan
Seller: Kathryn A. Galuszewski
Date: 07/15/21

106 Prospect St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $308,000
Buyer: Kyle Richard
Seller: Pierre J. Grenier
Date: 07/14/21

128 Swan Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $296,000
Buyer: Andrea C. Perez
Seller: Kathleen Sweeney
Date: 07/23/21

42 Warwick Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $222,400
Buyer: Christopher Royce
Seller: Royce, Nancy-June S. (Estate)
Date: 07/21/21

362 Winsor St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Amandio Fernandes
Seller: Gremio Lusitano Inc.
Date: 07/22/21

MONSON

10 Carriage House Lane
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $590,000
Buyer: Corey D. Paul
Seller: John G. Lapointe
Date: 07/16/21

22 Lower Hampden Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $149,100
Buyer: Edwin Velez
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 07/23/21

255 Main St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Matthew Weldon-Thibodeau
Seller: Robert S. Thibodeau
Date: 07/13/21

10 Old Stagecoach Dr.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Robert L. Wilson
Seller: Dylan J. Thomas
Date: 07/22/21

8 Palmer Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Heather Chaiffre
Seller: Christopher Glista
Date: 07/13/21

9 Stebbins Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Gabriel P. Johnson
Seller: Wesley T. Fernandes
Date: 07/15/21

168 Wales Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Randy Dimitropolis
Seller: Justin M. Butler
Date: 07/23/21

107 Woodhill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $386,200
Buyer: Change Li
Seller: Steven R. Harris
Date: 07/21/21

PALMER

16 Knox St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Thaddeus A. Razdow
Seller: Christine A. Bachand
Date: 07/12/21

3115 Hillside Dr.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Jeff Gill
Seller: Scott A.Tardy
Date: 07/20/21

1008 Oak St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Edmund Traub
Seller: Cody J. Brodeur
Date: 07/15/21

1016-1018 Pleasant St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $329,000
Buyer: Linda A. Beasley
Seller: Jobern Housing LLC
Date: 07/16/21

3025 South Main St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Johanna A. Castro
Seller: Robert E. Williams
Date: 07/16/21

10 Strong St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Cerberus RT
Seller: Stone Bear LLC
Date: 07/21/21

1133 Thorndike St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Randy Auclair
Seller: Amanda M. Babinski
Date: 07/12/21

RUSSELL

490 Westfield Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Adam T. Grabowiec
Seller: Michael Sullivan
Date: 07/14/21

SPRINGFIELD

41 Aldmore St.
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Jodarys Dominguez
Seller: Carlos M. Colon-Lebron
Date: 07/19/21

27-29 Annawon St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Caleb Gladden
Seller: Thomas M. Belton
Date: 07/23/21

529-531 Armory St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $273,000
Buyer: Richard C. Ferullo
Seller: Xiuyu Ma
Date: 07/14/21

50 Ashland Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Ivette G. Terrero
Seller: Carlos Aguasvivas
Date: 07/21/21

45 Bacon Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Olivia M. Morales
Seller: Margo G. Jergensen
Date: 07/15/21

49 Bartels St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $258,000
Buyer: Vanessa Dejesus
Seller: Hassan Mourad
Date: 07/15/21

105 Bellevue Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Jnaye Wise
Seller: Donna L. Conlogue
Date: 07/15/21

253 Belmont Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Damian Bialonczyk
Seller: Qiong Wang
Date: 07/12/21

823 Belmont Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Keshu Realty LLC
Seller: Mara Bapa LLC
Date: 07/14/21

18-20 Belvidere Ave.
Springfield, MA 01030
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Zenaida Rodriguez
Seller: Jose A. Rodriguez
Date: 07/12/21

80 Bennington St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Cameron G. Lovett
Seller: Rosemary F. Collamore
Date: 07/13/21

130 Benz St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Tamika Hoo-Fah
Seller: Robert Frazier
Date: 07/16/21

620 Bradley Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $237,660
Buyer: Shawna M. Willoughby
Seller: DJD Real Estate LLC
Date: 07/13/21

134 Buckingham St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $206,000
Buyer: Samira L. Fernandes
Seller: Christian A. Stuetzel
Date: 07/19/21

476-478 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: JJJ 17 LLC
Seller: Silvio S. Nubile
Date: 07/20/21

940 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Marcos Serrano
Seller: CIG 4 LLC
Date: 07/20/21

86 Caseland St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Muryah D. Torres
Seller: Scriven L. King
Date: 07/16/21

642 Cooley St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Jaim 4 Realty LLC
Seller: FNMA
Date: 07/23/21

96 Crestmont St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Mildalys Nunez
Seller: Xaver Sierra
Date: 07/23/21

23 Dawes St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Tanisha L. Daniels
Seller: Natha L. Brown
Date: 07/13/21

483 Dickinson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Candice Haynes
Seller: Joseph Santaniello
Date: 07/16/21

608-610 Dickinson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Danilo R. Caceres
Seller: Long K. Tran
Date: 07/23/21

55 Edendale St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Equity Trust Co.
Seller: Ronald S. Pollender
Date: 07/12/21

58 Emeline Court
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Craig Cowles
Seller: Michael R. Breton
Date: 07/19/21

45 Emerald Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Lauren M. Lynch-Hamre
Seller: Carmine Maione
Date: 07/20/21

245 Fair Oak Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Kimberly J. Ammons
Seller: Kelly J. Keenan
Date: 07/15/21

178 Gillette Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Samantha S. Hamilton
Seller: Eric Fraser
Date: 07/13/21

48 Fellsmere St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Peter Mason
Seller: Nicholas J. Alberto
Date: 07/23/21

44 Fenway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $249,000
Buyer: Jessica M. Del-Negro
Seller: Darren H. Krzynowek
Date: 07/19/21

141 Firglade Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Victor Pacheco
Seller: Christopher Barnes
Date: 07/20/21

89 Firglade Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: JJJ 17 LLC
Seller: Brital 1987 LLC
Date: 07/20/21

97 Florence St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Adaku Chikezie
Seller: Georgette A. Cardano
Date: 07/21/21

361 Forest Hills Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Sherry Washington
Seller: Malia Homebuyers LLC
Date: 07/21/21

161 Garland St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $152,500
Buyer: PAH Properties LLC
Seller: Belmira R. Tash
Date: 07/23/21

75 Gillette Circle
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Luiz A. Diaz
Seller: Daniel Triggs
Date: 07/19/21

77 Grenada Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Katherine Ramos-Moreta
Seller: Alexander Mejia
Date: 07/16/21

7 Groton St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Vilmary Rodriguez-Alicea
Seller: Michael S. Cafarella
Date: 07/20/21

60-62 High St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Om Sai Property Investment LLC
Seller: Minas S. Alitbi
Date: 07/19/21

35 Intervale Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $130,410
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Thomas J. Quick
Date: 07/12/21

77 Johnson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Round 2 LLC
Seller: Donald E. Moran
Date: 07/22/21

89 Kensington Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Spectra S2 LLC
Seller: Michael Molinari
Date: 07/12/21

11 Kosciusko St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Angel Andino
Seller: Hector R. Cortes
Date: 07/20/21

39 Lafayette St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Jose Pietter
Seller: NRES LLC
Date: 07/16/21

37 Lafayette St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Nancy Cabrera
Seller: Johanna Sanchez-Espinosa
Date: 07/21/21

95 Liberty St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Amount: $3,150,000
Buyer: IBEW Local 7 Realty Co. Inc.
Seller: Pearson-Liberty Development Co. LP
Date: 07/20/21

35-37 Longfellow Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Edward Roman
Seller: Lar RT
Date: 07/22/21

105 Lyons St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $251,000
Buyer: Kristen S. Ramirez
Seller: Victor L. Rodrigues
Date: 07/16/21

2914-2916 Main St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Onstar Properties AA LLC
Seller: Nolava LLC
Date: 07/16/21

91-93 Malden St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Jessica Chiba
Seller: Kelnate Realty LLC
Date: 07/20/21

49-51 Mansfield St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Samantha Diaz
Seller: Steven L. Martin
Date: 07/21/21

133 Maple St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $216,200
Buyer: Rising LLC
Seller: Norma Rodriguez
Date: 07/20/21

134 Massachusetts Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $248,000
Buyer: Jose Bonilla
Seller: Ivy M. Samuels
Date: 07/21/21

14 Medford St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Onstar Properties AA LLC
Seller: Nolava LLC
Date: 07/16/21

64-66 Moulton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Jaim 4 Realty LLC
Seller: Stanley H. Czaplicki
Date: 07/20/21

68 Old Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Tammi S. Bailey
Seller: Michael J. Lyon
Date: 07/16/21

51 Oregon St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Maxine Weisgrau
Seller: Janice M. Drootin
Date: 07/12/21

16 Pearson Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $363,100
Buyer: Tara M. Johnson
Seller: Julius E. Kenney
Date: 07/12/21

55 Perkins St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $201,000
Buyer: Santana Real Estate Inc.
Seller: US Bank
Date: 07/19/21

92 Pidgeon Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Nicholas M. Vumbaco
Seller: Michael G. Vumbaco
Date: 07/21/21

265 Pheland St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $237,000
Buyer: C. R. Melendez-Rodriguez
Seller: Daisy Gomez
Date: 07/12/21

112 Princeton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Ahmed Al-Jashaam
Seller: Faruma S. Williams
Date: 07/16/21

8 Putnam St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $270,500
Buyer: Nicole Kynard
Seller: Brital 1987 LLC
Date: 07/14/21

277 Redlands St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Phoenix Development Inc.
Seller: Eleanor M. Difiore
Date: 07/16/21

32-34 Rittenhouse Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Keishla M. Diaz-Olavarria
Seller: Ganga Tiwari
Date: 07/23/21

75 Rochford Circle
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Omid Djavi
Seller: Christopher Nascembeni
Date: 07/14/21

28 Rush St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Manuel Rodriguez
Seller: Kenneth Fitzgibbon
Date: 07/23/21

67 Saint James Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Charles F. Bogues
Seller: Juan Santana
Date: 07/19/21

1150 Saint James Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Aida Bonilla
Seller: Evan R. Tardy
Date: 07/15/21

36 Shady Brook Lane
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Thomas Blais
Seller: Arlene M. Lafreniere
Date: 07/23/21

27 Sherbrooke St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $284,000
Buyer: Luis M. Felix
Seller: Michelle Stuart
Date: 07/23/21

95 Sierra Vista Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $124,000
Buyer: John Martin
Seller: Fred J. Lessard
Date: 07/21/21

72-74 Silver St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Wanda Tiburcio-Duran
Seller: Lois A. Miller
Date: 07/22/21

45 Slumber Lane
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Alexander Lozada
Seller: Sean P. Garvey
Date: 07/23/21

248 Stapleton Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $206,000
Buyer: Jose Badillo
Seller: Camille Moreno
Date: 07/21/21

705 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: 970 Chicopee Street RT
Seller: Anthony Daniele
Date: 07/16/21

50 Tamarack Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Sirjeffory R. Smith
Seller: Shawn A. Campbell
Date: 07/19/21

103 Thompson St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Sergio Arroyo
Seller: TM Properties Inc.
Date: 07/13/21

79 Tavistock St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Analese Perez
Seller: Jodarys Lopez-Ortiz
Date: 07/19/21

50 Upton St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $239,000
Buyer: Dominga Cintron-Torres
Seller: Gloria J. Salemi
Date: 07/16/21

35 Verge St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Angel M. Mercado
Seller: Anthony Perez
Date: 07/16/21

45 Wachusett St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Kyara Cortes
Seller: Jennifer M. McCarthy
Date: 07/23/21

45 Wakefield St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Desiree Rivera
Seller: Nicholas J. Trudell
Date: 07/21/21

68 Waverly St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Robert Monegro
Seller: 72 Waverly Street LLC
Date: 07/20/21

18 Wayside St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Kathryn Frett
Seller: Alexander O. Berthiaume
Date: 07/19/21

288 West Allen Ridge Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Anthony R. Lorenzano
Seller: Roger J. Chicoine
Date: 07/19/21

142 West Canton Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Adam B. Baskin
Seller: Bruce M. Hadley
Date: 07/15/21

17 Wexford St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Phuc Tran
Seller: Thanh-Huong A. Tran
Date: 07/22/21

74 Wheeler Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Frank Rogers
Seller: Jorge Maldonado
Date: 07/14/21

218-220 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Van A. Nguyen
Seller: Tu C. Pham
Date: 07/20/21

81 White Oak Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Elbert Scott
Seller: Nicholas C. Milionis
Date: 07/16/21

156 Whittum Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Julie Batista
Seller: Dana L. Tilli
Date: 07/14/21

1455 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $248,900
Buyer: Nathan J. Madeira
Seller: Michael King
Date: 07/14/21

191 Windemere St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Ariana Lugo
Seller: Humboldt Realty LLC
Date: 07/21/21

133 Winton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Springhouse Property LLC
Seller: Jeffrey A. Herbele
Date: 07/15/21

51-53 Woodlawn St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Duc V. Nguyen
Seller: Marino, Anthony J. Jr. (Estate)
Date: 07/23/21

SOUTHWICK

86 Berkshire Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $800,000
Buyer: Meghann Burr
Seller: John R. Ferraro
Date: 07/23/21

23 Birchwood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Brandi A. Hoover
Seller: Doris H. Krzykowski
Date: 07/22/21

3 Dewitt Circle
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: Eric Niedziela
Seller: Kenneth M. Lavine
Date: 07/23/21

314 Granville Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Megan Harder
Seller: Joshua A. Lightcap
Date: 07/13/21

5 Honey Bird Run
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $675,000
Buyer: Denise Faircloth
Seller: Hamelin Framing Inc.
Date: 07/16/21

5 Kline Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $560,000
Buyer: Vito M. Demarinis
Seller: Pari Hoxha
Date: 07/14/21

29 Lakemont St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Michael W. Hadley
Seller: Janice S. Lafrance
Date: 07/16/21

22 Meadow Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $895,000
Buyer: Cynthia L. Holley
Seller: John A. Jeneral
Date: 07/19/21

WEST SPRINGFIELD

14 Albert St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $312,000
Buyer: Eric H. Balslov
Seller: Ardizoni, Muriel N. (Estate)
Date: 07/12/21

116 Apple Ridge Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $521,500
Buyer: Joseph M. Werner
Seller: Gerald F. Solitario
Date: 07/23/21

10 Brooks Place
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Alberto F. Burgos
Seller: Sergey Zhupikov
Date: 07/23/21

45 Christine Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $553,500
Buyer: Bakhtiyer Kasimov
Seller: Donna D. Cauley
Date: 07/14/21

553 Elm St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Lawrence Meccariello
Seller: Ronald J. Halley
Date: 07/23/21

245 Greystone Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Kerri Cmiel
Seller: George J. Cmiel
Date: 07/15/21

118 Labelle St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Zyina Volkinski
Seller: Peter V. Prewandowski
Date: 07/23/21

190 Lower Beverly Hills
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Eva Nabifwo-Simiyu
Seller: Keith B. Lee
Date: 07/12/21

45 Oakland St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: William C. O’Neill
Seller: Guild Mortgage Co. LLC
Date: 07/13/21

29 Sheridan Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Stephen C. Edelman
Seller: Julianne Crum
Date: 07/15/21

87 Valley View Circle
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $376,000
Buyer: Donna D. Cauley
Seller: Kimberly M. Rosa
Date: 07/15/21

WESTFIELD

13 Allen Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: April Esposito
Seller: Foster M. Leavitt
Date: 07/15/21

126 City View Blvd.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $326,000
Buyer: Frank L. Fay
Seller: Nancy Laumbach-Lois
Date: 07/14/21

28 Darby Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Amanda Provost
Seller: Jeffrey Goncalves
Date: 07/16/21

5 Dubois St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Oscar A. Saeteros
Seller: Wayne MacDonald
Date: 07/19/21

18 Dubois St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Freedom Spire Holding LLC
Seller: Niles R. Lavalley
Date: 07/15/21

8 Greylock St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $164,000
Buyer: Jeffrey C. Keating
Seller: Taylor, James K. (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

55 East Silver St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Susan Mazzola
Seller: TM Properties Inc.
Date: 07/22/21

16 Heritage Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Kyle Racicot
Seller: Eugene S. Bacon
Date: 07/23/21

174 Holyoke Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Alexandra Caisse
Seller: Zlotek, Stanley E. (Estate)
Date: 07/21/21

257 Holyoke Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $296,000
Buyer: Nicholas Capalbo
Seller: Marcie L. Arona
Date: 07/12/21

504 Holyoke Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Anthony Deven
Seller: Snow, Stanley M. (Estate)
Date: 07/15/21

8 Howard St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Kyle R. Duquette
Seller: Megan M. Harder
Date: 07/12/21

42 Kittredge Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $289,000
Buyer: Ira Gaudette
Seller: Victor G. Gomes
Date: 07/16/21

67 Kittredge Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Nico Paolucci
Seller: Jeremie Lambert
Date: 07/19/21

109 Ridgeway St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Nathan Miles-Hogan
Seller: Ivan A. Guzman
Date: 07/13/21

76 Montgomery St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Taylor Lyford
Seller: John Joyce
Date: 07/23/21

35 Oakcrest Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Minming Zheng
Seller: Patricia A. Cavanaugh
Date: 07/23/21

20 Pequot Point Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Gail M. Paquette
Seller: Sheila E. Paquette
Date: 07/20/21

120 Roosevelt Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Gabriella C. Hernandez
Seller: Kyle D. Racicot
Date: 07/23/21

Sackville Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Taylor Lyford
Seller: John Joyce
Date: 07/23/21

10 Sterling St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Olson
Seller: Peter J. Ryan
Date: 07/16/21

883 Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $126,200
Buyer: Wicked Deals LLC
Seller: James Senecal
Date: 07/23/21

WILBRAHAM

12 Apple Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $569,900
Buyer: Ashley L. Berthume
Seller: Hamid A. Mahdavy
Date: 07/23/21

3281 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Thomas Abel
Seller: Give Them Sanctuary Inc.
Date: 07/16/21

4 Cliffside Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Michael E. King
Seller: Peter J. Lavelle
Date: 07/15/21

10 Deepwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $579,000
Buyer: Dianne E. Grunes
Seller: Scott L. Denne
Date: 07/19/21

5 Drumlin Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $530,900
Buyer: Tony L. Desousa
Seller: Kathleen C. McLaughlin
Date: 07/16/21

25 Eastwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $540,000
Buyer: Joseph M. Kane
Seller: Matthew C. Trudeau
Date: 07/23/21

11 Fernwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $386,500
Buyer: William D. Dupre
Seller: Naldo D. Mammarelli
Date: 07/20/21

28 Fernwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Roger J. Chicoine
Seller: Ryan J. O’Keefe
Date: 07/19/21

3 Park Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $449,900
Buyer: Michael D. Powers
Seller: Heather Wrisley
Date: 07/13/21

43 Pleasant View Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Hope Morley
Seller: Michael J. Walker
Date: 07/16/21

660 Ridge Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $404,500
Buyer: James Nowakowski
Seller: Patullo, Nancy (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

2 Severyn St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: John R. Donkoh
Seller: Jacob R. Motyl
Date: 07/21/21

Tinkham Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Xi N. Li
Seller: Anne M. Theocles
Date: 07/16/21

6 Wagon Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $685,000
Buyer: Sheldrick L. Streete
Seller: Charles A. Sommer
Date: 07/19/21

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

52 Blackberry Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $429,900
Buyer: Wei Zhang
Seller: Mary E. Shaughan
Date: 07/15/21

12 Edge Hill Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $317,500
Buyer: Judith Hirsh-Kane
Seller: Ramona Hamblin
Date: 07/22/21

88 High Point Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Tammy L. Wilson
Seller: Debra J. Lamonica
Date: 07/12/21

30 Hillcrest Place
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Nicole M. Hendrix
Seller: Nicholas J. Dufresne
Date: 07/16/21

86 Leverett Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Kelly Buttrick
Seller: Eric C. Desbien
Date: 07/12/21

65 Mount Pleasant
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $577,000
Buyer: Alivia-Anne Novak-Zappas
Seller: Jennifer E. Siddall
Date: 07/16/21

267 Shutesbury Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $740,000
Buyer: Brittany M. Hutson
Seller: Andrew N. Winter
Date: 07/22/21

910 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $1,085,000
Buyer: Juan A. Pizzorno 2019 RET
Seller: Abida Adnan
Date: 07/14/21

36 Western Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $225,835
Buyer: Deutsche Band
Seller: Halim L. Cruz
Date: 07/13/21

7 Willow Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Chung J. Hsu
Seller: Chung-Huei Hsu
Date: 07/15/21

33 Woodlot Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $598,000
Buyer: V. M. Scaramella TR
Seller: Carol Bloom
Date: 07/13/21

BELCHERTOWN

692 George Hannum Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: James N. Broderick
Seller: Lockwood, Nancy L. (Estate)
Date: 07/23/21

3 Metacomet Circle
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Heather L. St.Germaine
Seller: Peter J. VanBuren
Date: 07/21/21

574 North Gulf Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $501,500
Buyer: Michael A. Henson
Seller: Hilary Woodcock
Date: 07/20/21

55 Old Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $445,000
Buyer: Christine Trudell
Seller: John Rakouskas
Date: 07/21/21

79 Orchard St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Justin Clarke
Seller: Devon L. Kelting-Dias
Date: 07/15/21

148 South Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Todd A. Sussman
Seller: Robert J. Vanzandt
Date: 07/12/21

560 South Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $428,300
Buyer: Shane L. Lashway
Seller: Joseph J. Dull
Date: 07/23/21

390 Springfield Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $486,000
Buyer: Theodore Groves
Seller: Kimberly B. Longridge
Date: 07/12/21

381 State St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $429,900
Buyer: Kristy Stallman-Reese
Seller: Girard Homes Inc.
Date: 07/13/21

Sycamore Circle #CP
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: J. N. Duquette & Son Construction
Seller: Hickory Hills Realty LLC
Date: 07/20/21

Sycamore Circle #CR
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: J. N. Duquette & Son Construction
Seller: Hickory Hills Realty LLC
Date: 07/20/21

EASTHAMPTON

417 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Jesse Casinghino
Seller: Seth A. Menkel
Date: 07/19/21

8 Lord St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $351,000
Buyer: Saskia I. Fabricant
Seller: Pamela J. Linscott
Date: 07/23/21

212 Loudville Road
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $402,000
Buyer: Carl S. Growhoski
Seller: Barbra L. Eaton
Date: 07/20/21

164 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: James P. Robitaille
Seller: Stephanie F. Davis
Date: 07/21/21

233 Park St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Hill-Ture TR
Seller: Andrew Gaylord
Date: 07/15/21

26 Spring St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $566,500
Buyer: Janivette Alsina
Seller: M. E. Ticknor TR
Date: 07/15/21

GRANBY

58 Amherst St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $495,000
Buyer: Ridvan Turan
Seller: Stephen W. Slapski
Date: 07/16/21

17 Easton St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $327,000
Buyer: Adam M. Ulrich
Seller: Robert W. Driscoll
Date: 07/23/21

87 Ferry Hill Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $556,000
Buyer: Owen B. Murray
Seller: Robert S. Killin
Date: 07/14/21

23 High St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Robert C. Lafreniere
Seller: Keller, Ruby L. (Estate)
Date: 07/16/21

79 South St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $530,000
Buyer: Michelle Snow
Seller: Michael N. Gagnon
Date: 07/16/21

173 Taylor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $490,000
Buyer: Ethan J. Harmon
Seller: Steven M. Kopinsky
Date: 07/22/21

HADLEY

101 Honey Pot Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $477,000
Buyer: Barbara J. Tomlinson
Seller: Douglas B. Ramsay
Date: 07/21/21

18 Maple Ave.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $499,500
Buyer: Daniel Navarro
Seller: Marianne A. Filkoski
Date: 07/13/21

12 Russell St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Exotic Auto Service & Sales LLC
Seller: Jeremy D. Ober
Date: 07/15/21

HATFIELD

6 Bridge St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: Matthew S. Hunt
Seller: Gerome A. Miklau
Date: 07/12/21

80 Elm St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Kyle Sosebee
Seller: Bielunis, Paul J. (Estate)
Date: 07/20/21

1 Prospect Court
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Kyra Sanborn
Seller: Ellen Miller
Date: 07/14/21

HUNTINGTON

18 Basket St.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Steven T. Slowey
Seller: Rosalind J. Fouli
Date: 07/16/21

20 Laurel Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Clark R. Chattin
Seller: James Adams
Date: 07/20/21

2 Maple St.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Danny L. Suloff
Seller: Barbara J. Sikop
Date: 07/19/21

NORTHAMPTON

89 Autumn Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Nina Rogowsky
Seller: Edward J. Gallivan
Date: 07/21/21

98 Brierwood Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $363,000
Buyer: Chloe Weaver-Vilain
Seller: An J. Hoeyberghs
Date: 07/15/21

26 Carolyn St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $492,000
Buyer: Adam L. Larson
Seller: Shannon M. Finnessey
Date: 07/15/21

48 Chestnut Ave. #48
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $499,000
Buyer: Edward D. Melillo
Seller: Shawn Willey
Date: 07/16/21

46 Claire Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Drewcilla Annese
Seller: John J. Murray
Date: 07/22/21

206 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $760,626
Buyer: Beverly J. Bates
Seller: Sunwood Development Corp.
Date: 07/22/21

11 Greenleaf Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $625,000
Buyer: Devon L. Kelting-Dias
Seller: Maureen Sturman
Date: 07/16/21

42 Harrison Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $875,000
Buyer: Jeffrey M. Mast
Seller: Wilson FT
Date: 07/15/21

35 Hinckley St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Julie P. Meyer
Seller: Debra A. Dombrowski
Date: 07/14/21

118 Hinckley St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $650,000
Buyer: Simon E. Henin
Seller: Theodore P. Kallman
Date: 07/22/21

4 Lawn Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $662,500
Buyer: Eliezer Hutton
Seller: Birch Hill LLC
Date: 07/15/21

4 Madison Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $577,500
Buyer: Adam E. Roth
Seller: Thomas H. Gelb
Date: 07/19/21

51 Marshall St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Maya Nigrosh
Seller: Elizabeth M. Myrick-Towle
Date: 07/23/21

110 Morningside Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $589,000
Buyer: Amy Sugihara
Seller: Irving S. Weisenthal
Date: 07/23/21

5 Munroe St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $580,000
Buyer: Jesse D. Watson
Seller: L. P. Gould Residuary TR
Date: 07/22/21

168 North St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Lisa L. Sandri
Seller: Diane A. Maloney RET
Date: 07/21/21

38 Orchard St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Jeremy D. Ober
Seller: Sharon C. Switzer
Date: 07/16/21

12 Perkins Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $496,000
Buyer: Jaime Levy
Seller: Llama Maynard
Date: 07/15/21

35 Revell Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $366,200
Buyer: Juan Burwell
Seller: Horst Henning Winter RET
Date: 07/23/21

42 Rustlewood Ridge
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $322,500
Buyer: C. Washington-Ottombre
Seller: Paul H. Kolbjornsen
Date: 07/12/21

956 Ryan Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Wendy Forbush
Seller: Thomas Barnes
Date: 07/16/21

31 Trumbull Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $1,720,000
Buyer: Simple Abode LLC
Seller: TJS Properties LLC
Date: 07/23/21

12 Warner St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $609,000
Buyer: Martha F. Hoopes
Seller: Nu-Way Homes Inc.
Date: 07/15/21

35 West Farms Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Property Advantage Inc.
Seller: Aaron Cook
Date: 07/21/21

PELHAM

62 Daniel Shays Hwy.
Pelham, MA 01007
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kelly A. Scroggins
Seller: Samantha E. Haughey
Date: 07/19/21

SOUTH HADLEY

6 Bardwell St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Jennifer Consedine
Seller: Scott Family Properties LLC
Date: 07/14/21

2 Joan St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Rachael M. Fleurent
Seller: Thomas S. Stepniak
Date: 07/23/21

41 Judd Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: James R. Barron
Seller: Dustin Blair
Date: 07/15/21

50 Lyman St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Bret A. Lafrance
Seller: Osetek FT
Date: 07/20/21

4 Lyon Green
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $485,720
Buyer: Patrick S. Sabbs
Seller: J. N. Duquette & Son Construction
Date: 07/21/21

31 Woodbridge St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $576,000
Buyer: Joshua McKinley
Seller: Elizabeth E. Berard
Date: 07/14/21

SOUTHAMPTON

307 College Hwy.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Ryan H. Hodder
Seller: Gregory L. Bennett
Date: 07/15/21

290 Main Ave.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Gregory M. Balog
Seller: Jocelyn VanBokkelen RET
Date: 07/21/21

WARE

19-21 Aspen St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Eurides Batista
Seller: Scudder Bay Capital LLC
Date: 07/14/21

121 Bacon Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Peter A. Millet
Seller: Luis A. Mejias
Date: 07/16/21

10 Campbell Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $352,006
Buyer: David M. Hannus
Seller: Mandi Souza
Date: 07/19/21

8 Cherry St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Eurides Batista
Seller: Western Mass Realty LLC
Date: 07/15/21

13 Cherry St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Thomas Abel
Seller: Ware Housing Cooperative Inc.
Date: 07/14/21

20 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Jimeana Richardson
Seller: James R. Barr
Date: 07/23/21

21 Lovewell St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Deno Harold
Seller: Aaron J. Desantis
Date: 07/15/21

40 Moriarty Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Jordin L. Corriveau
Seller: Daniel W. Long
Date: 07/13/21

48 Pleasant St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Eurides Batista
Seller: Mark A. Andrews
Date: 07/15/21

65-69 Pleasant St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Nallett FT
Seller: Breton Realty LLC
Date: 07/12/21

45 South St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Mackenna Hogan
Seller: Lorrie J. Rowan
Date: 07/19/21

125 West Main St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Ryan Malakie
Seller: Claudia A. Shields
Date: 07/23/21

17 Westbrook Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Ali Bulut
Seller: Moryl FT
Date: 07/16/21

WILLIAMSBURG

57-R Adams Road
Williamsburg, MA 01039
Amount: $565,000
Buyer: Adin S. Maynard
Seller: Michael D. Gudejko
Date: 07/16/21

7 Nash Hill Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Martin E. Howell
Seller: Alfred J. Albano
Date: 07/23/21

23 Old Goshen Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $409,000
Buyer: Jennifer E. Reagan
Seller: Thomas H. Lynn
Date: 07/22/21

WESTHAMPTON

290 Southampton Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Jeffrey J. Burke
Seller: Thomas Raschi
Date: 07/22/21

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 75: August 16, 2021

George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Mary Flahive Dickson

Mary Flahive-Dixon

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Mary Flahive Dickson, chief development officer and chief medical officer for Golden Years Homecare Services. The two talk about what has become a very serious workforce crisis in healthcare, the reasons behind it, the impact on area healthcare providers, and the outlook for the future. It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

Sponsored by:

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Cover Story

The Road Ahead

In late May, after 15 months of living through a global pandemic, the state entered into a phrase the governor called “a new normal.” A few months later, most businesspeople would say this ‘normal’ isn’t everything they expected or wanted. Indeed, while business has picked up in many sectors, from hospitality to healthcare, there are myriad challenges facing the business community, from what can only be called a workforce crisis to shortages of goods and rising prices; from a new and very potent strain of the coronavirus to issues with when and how to bring employees back to the office. To get a sense of where things are and, especially, where we may be headed, BusinessWest convened a panel of area business leaders — Deborah Bitsoli, president of Mercy Medical Center; Harry Dumay, president of Elms College; Patrick Leary, a partner with MP CPAs; Elizabeth Paquette, president of Rock Valley Tool in Easthampton; Tom Senecal, president and CEO of PeoplesBank; and Edison Yee, a principal of the Bean Restaurant Group. Their answers to a series of questions on the economy and the forces shaping it are certainly eye-opening.

 

BusinessWest: How is the process of returning to ‘normal’ proceeding at your business?

 

Bitsoli: “It does appear that patients are coming back; our Emergency Department is really returning back to the volumes it had before the pandemic. On the surgical side, the same thing is occurring. I do think there is a lot of caution about the fall, but for the time being, patients are seeking the appropriate level of care, including a lot of the screenings they put off. That’s the good news in terms of a public-health policy standpoint. At the hospital, we’re still wearing masks, and we’re still relying heavily on Webex; we have some meetings face to face, but we still have masks on. As for returning to normal, we continue to have a focus on patient safety, and we have an expansion planned in our Emergency Department. Overall, we are trying to return to normal, but everyone is looking to the fall, and there is caution there. The one big difficulty is hiring staff.”

 

Dumay: “At the college, ‘normal’ for us would mean getting back to the high-touch, nurturing, vibrant, in-person environment for teaching and learning. Returning to normal means having everyone on campus in the same mode we had pre-pandemic. The process for preparing for that is the same as we had last year, with the ElmsSafe Plan for making sure that employees and students are safe. That begins with a level of vaccination that we need to accomplish. That’s why we came out very early and required vaccinations for our students and employees. The challenges are to ensure that we’re getting to that level of vaccination that the state considers optimal for campuses, which is roughly 90%. We are gearing up for the fall, to have full in-person learning and all of our faculty and staff on campus. We have a task force that is meeting on a regular basis to come up with all the elements of the ElmsSafe plan so that we can make sure our campus is safe and as back to ‘normal’ as possible.”

 

Harry Dumay

Harry Dumay

“For the traditional undergraduate, first-time freshman, we had a record deposit year, and we are looking at potentially a record enrollment year for first-time freshmen, so that has come back better than it was before.”

 

Leary: “We have found that our biggest challenge to returning to normal is a big investment in software. When we all went remote in March of 2020, we found the flaws in our system, we found out where we were falling down and where our system couldn’t handle the stress of people working remotely, etc. So we had a big investment in software across the board — we’ve replaced really all of our systems, so we met the challenge of not only keeping up with workload, but having people keep up with workload while also learning new software. The other challenge involves getting back to the office; being a CPA, we can work from just about anywhere — I can be in my office, or I can be sitting in the Caribbean, which, unfortunately, is not what I’m doing now. This presents us with a lot of challenges. We have a very young workforce — half our staff is 30 or younger — so they’re very much tuned into the social aspects of being in the office and like being in the office, which is great. Our greatest challenge is going to be how we incorporate our client-service work with the protocols of each of our clients; each one presents its own unique circumstances — our staff can’t be stagnant and say ‘this is how we’re going to do things.’

 

Paquette: “We’re a machine shop that manufactures parts for aerospace, defense, sports, and leisure, blow-mold and extrusion. When everything hit in the spring of 2020, we were getting letters from larger customers saying ‘you can’t shut down — you have to stay working.” So we were very busy, but at the same time, we had seven of our 43 employees leave for one reason or another due to COVID, so we had this intense workload, and we had to scrounge and fill the gaps in our workforce. And then, in mid-June, our largest aerospace customer said, ‘we don’t have anything to send anymore,’ and by the end of the summer, we had laid off a total of 13. Now, with things a little more normalized, we’ve been able to bring back some of those we had to lay off. So when we talk about returning to normal, we’re just trying to work our way through this crisis and keep people’s mental health in mind and … just keep working.”

 

Senecal: “Overall, I don’t know if ‘normal’ is the right word at this point — it certainly is a new normal. We’re going back to a hybrid method for our workforce — we’re going to allow people to work from home as well as work in our building. I’m a firm believer in culture, and I’m a firm believer in some sort of work in the office. The challenges with that hybrid workforce include dealing with office space — that’s going to affect a lot of our customers — and technology needs; how do we adapt to technology, and how do we use technology? One of the biggest ones is communicating expectations when you go to a hybrid model — how do you communicate with people expectations of what is expected of them, for meetings, for hours worked, for a lot of things? How do you evaluate good performance from a remote-workforce perspective? Those are all a challenge. Also, getting people comfortable with and without facemasks — we’re going back to work in this new normal, and people aren’t sure of the expectations when it comes to facemasks. It’s challenging getting people comfortable in those settings.

 

Tom Senecal

Tom Senecal

“I think we’re all going in the right direction, and there’s nothing but good news ahead as long as inflation stays in check.”

 

Yee: “For restaurants, it’s a new normal as well. Outdoor dining is very much prevalent, but customers are starting to return to the dining rooms. And while they are beginning to feel more comfortable doing so, not everyone has made that transition — although a lot of them have. Our late-night business has not come back yet, but we feel that might change as time progresses. But to be frank, it was a messy way to get into COVID, and coming out of it has been messy as well, with lots of disruption in supply chain, with labor shortages, and other issues. We’re adjusting, as we always do, in the restaurant business, with much more takeout business as part of our overall sales, and with using technology to help us smooth out the rough edges from not having enough frontline workers.”

 

BusinessWest: How has this year been business-wise, and what is your forecast for the rest of this year?

 

Bitsoli: “Business is almost back to normal, but it will very interesting to see what happens in the fall when we hit flu season and everyone goes back into the office. And we still have a large number of people who haven’t been vaccinated. Directionally, we’re moving back to normal, but everyone is looking to see what happens when we migrate back inside. Internally, while the volumes of business have returned, people are tired because of the duration of this and the expectation of what’s going to happen in the fall. So we’re investing a lot of resources right now in things like a Zen room, spot yoga, massage chairs … so that is a new normal for us in terms of something we’re going to need to continue on with until we come to the end of this pandemic.”

 

Dumay: “For the traditional undergraduate, first-time freshman, we had a record deposit year, and we are looking at potentially a record enrollment year for first-time freshmen, so that has come back better than it was before. For continuing-education students, those who come to us from community colleges, that’s a population that often doesn’t enroll until the last minute, so we’re still watching that, but it looks a little softer than it had been previously. And graduate-school enrollment is very much looking to be a record year in terms of enrollment. One area where students and families may still be hesitating is a return to residential living.”

 

Yee: “For restaurants, we like to compare numbers to 2019, our last ‘normal’ year. And for quarter one, it was lower, when you’re looking at year-over-year numbers. It wasn’t until the vaccinations reached the general population that things started improving; in the second quarter, the sales have bounced back to a much higher level, better than 2019. We anticipate that this trend will continue.

 

Edison Yee

Edison Yee

“We’re very optimistic about the last two quarters of the year and going into 2022. We’ve seen a lot of positive results during this summer, which is traditionally our slower time of year. It’s been a very strong summer to date and much higher than 2019 levels.”

 

Paquette: “While we had lost work in aerospace, we’ve started to see some of it comes back. For us, workload is good and steady, and we project that this will continue through the rest of the year. The workload is good for the number of people we have.”

 

Senecal: “In the past 18 months, our deposits are through the roof. We are up more than 35% in a little over a year. And the balances are not going down. As we talk about demand and this influx of demand and a surge in spending, I’m not seeing it from people’s deposit accounts — those numbers are not going down. We’re up over a little more than $1 billion over the past 18 months in deposits. That’s a function of a lot of things — PPP money, stimulus money, people not going out and spending. We have an enormous amount of money in the system, and the government continues to put money into the economy. That adjusts to inflation, and that’s showing up everywhere in our economy — food, transportation, supplies, inventory, computer chips … it’s showing up everywhere, and I think it’s going to have an impact. We see good times ahead as long as inflation can be kept in check and interest rates stay relatively low.”

 

Leary: “The need for our services greatly increased in 2020 because of the PPP program and other initiatives and trying to help clients understand the rules, what qualifies for forgiveness, and so on. There was great demand for our services, and it’s continued into this year. As for our customers … most of them are doing OK post-pandemic, but I’m concerned that the federal money that these businesses have received is masking how they are doing financially. And as demand starts to grow, will these businesses be able to find the staffing to supply the products and provide the services?

 

BusinessWest: That’s a good segue to the next question. Attracting and retaining workers has become the dominant challenge for 2021. How has your business been impacted?

 

Yee: “There is virtually no one applying for jobs, and the people we do have working are tired from working extended hours, so we’re trying to give them breaks by closing an extra day during the week or sometimes two, which we’ve never done in the past. But we’ve found that’s one of the only ways we can deal with this labor shortage — giving people some extra time for that work-life balance.

 

Senecal: “I received a résumé the other day from a headhunter for a position we were looking to fill … the person was very well-qualified and has all the right skill sets. But in big, bold letters on the résumé, it said this person is only interested in working remotely. I don’t think I’ve ever seen on that on a résumé before, but it’s an indication of the world to come.”

 

Patrick Leary

Patrick Leary

“I’m optimistic about the rest of 2021 and 2022, at least the first half. It will be interesting when the government programs start to dry up and slow down and we see how people react to that when it comes to their spending habits.”

 

Leary: “We’re seeing the same thing many of our customers are seeing. As tax laws change and accounting rules change, we have a great demand for people, and it’s not for entry-level people, but more experienced people. And it’s very challenging to find them. But what we’ve found is that, because of the ability to work remotely, instead of searching for someone and saying, ‘we want you to work in our Springfield office or our Connecticut office,’ we can say, ‘you can work anywhere in the country — we have the ability to let you work wherever you want.’”

 

Dumay: “I haven’t looked at the comparisons closely, but it certainly seems, anecdotally, that we have more open positions than we normally have. For some, we’re seeing good pools of candidates, and for others, the pools are not as strong as we would like. So in many ways, we’re like everyone else. There is a higher level of vacancy at the college, and for many positions, the pool of applicants is simply not as robust.”

 

Bitsoli: “From a business standpoint, the thing that’s very different for us and most all businesses is the staffing. It really is different. There are people who retired early, people who decided to change career paths … so we’re dealing with quite a few staffing challenges, like everyone else. One of the things I’ve heard anecdotally is that, because of the incentives being offered by the state, for people at a lower level, like dietary, housekeeping, nurse aides, and other positions, it’s almost better for them financially to stay at home than it is to work. I’ve also heard anecdotally that there’s a group of people that are gathering resilience over the summer, and they plan on coming back after Labor Day.”

 

BusinessWest: What are the forces — workforce, inflation, inventory, COVID, and more — that will determine where the local economy goes?

 

Senecal: “I think we’re all going in the right direction, and there’s nothing but good news ahead as long as inflation stays in check. Businesses are opening and growing, and with the levels of demand we’re seeing, that’s a good problem to have. And I think things will start to open up from a supply-chain perspective. We talked a little about unemployment benefits ending in September; let’s see if that pushes people back to work and brings the labor situation closer to normal. Overall, as long as COVID stays under control and we don’t go back to shutdowns — such shutdowns are devastating for the economy — I feel very positive about the fourth quarter and going into 2022.”

 

Dumay: “I second that optimism and emphasize the ‘as long as’ comment regarding COVID. The only thing that is sobering or bringing caution to my optimism is the slowdown in the rate of vaccination across the country, especially in areas of the country where it’s very low. Also, with the CDC looking at potential mask mandates and people getting alarmed about another surge … that could slow down what is looking to be an optimistic time and an opportunity to really get back to normal.”

 

Yee: “We’re very optimistic about the last two quarters of the year and going into 2022. We’ve seen a lot of positive results during this summer, which is traditionally our slower time of year. It’s been a very strong summer to date and much higher than 2019 levels. We’re really positive about what’s to come, but there are many challenges that could slow things down moving forward, like labor shortages, inflation, and supply-chain disruptions … those are all major concerns. We’re eager for everyone to get to normal so we can see a higher level of business than we have and, we hope the pent-up demand generates business across the area.”

 

Bitsoli: “People are looking for optimism, and I think as long as the economy holds out, and if we can get more people vaccinated, things should continue to improve. With the new variants out there are certainly concerns, and there are questions about whether the vaccines are going to continue to keep people healthy even when they’re exposed to the variants and keep them out of the hospitals and from getting severe complications.”

 

Deborah Bitsoli

Deborah Bitsoli

“As a leader, what I’ve learned is the importance of that human connection. We’ve all talked about the fact that Webex is great from a technology standpoint, but that relationship building and that ability to look someone in the eye … I really realize that there’s something to that, and it’s quite big.”

 

Paquette: “It’s really business as usual for us now. Our biggest concern is trying to hire people who are skilled — which means we’re like everyone else. But we’re seeing a lot of people who are interested in growing their skill set, and that, to me, is a positive; I’ve never had as many people enrolled in school and training programs as we do now. We’re rebuilding, we’re in a good space, and we’re growing. It feels much different than a year ago.”

 

Elizabeth Paquette

Elizabeth Paquette

“I had to spend a chunk of my time with a remote first-grader, so I had that stress at home while trying to be at work. So I found that employees function better if we’re able to meet them where they’re at.”

 

Leary: “I’m optimistic about the rest of 2021 and 2022, at least the first half. It will be interesting when the government programs start to dry up and slow down and we see how people react to that when it comes to their spending habits. But as we heard, deposits are way up, which means people have money to spend; they have disposable income. So I think people will start to spend as they get out and feel more comfortable going to restaurants or getting on an airplane. I see that continuing for the next year or so, but who knows after that what will happen? We need to have supplies free up, and we need to push for everyone to get vaccinated.”

 

BusinessWest: Finally, what have you learned during this pandemic, and how has this made you a different and perhaps better leader?

 

Bitsoili: “As a leader, what I’ve learned is the importance of that human connection. We’ve all talked about t the fact that Webex is great from a technology standpoint, but that relationship building and that ability to look someone in the eye … I really realize that there’s something to that, and it’s quite big. Also, I knew this before, but now I really know it: you really have to lead from the heart because employees want to feel the empathy and the caring from leadership. Lastly, it’s visibility and the ability to connect with people on their turf and really be able to listen to issues and immediately follow up with resolution. These are all things I knew, but this pandemic has caused me to reflect and overemphasize the need to do those things.”

 

Dumay: “I realized the importance of connecting with the people with whom I work, the faculty and staff at Elms College, and be present and pay attention to what people are experiencing and have that be relevant to my decision making. Also, I’ve learned the importance of giving people some answers, even if they don’t have the complete answer. There was a lot of uncertainty during the past year, and people were looking for the leaders of organizations to provide some answers. For someone who likes to completely process things and share them when they’re finalized, I had to learn to provide answers that are sometimes incomplete and need to be finalized. That was important to me.”

 

Leary: “One thing that I learned is that each person is very unique with regard to what their circumstances are — they might be a single parent with high-school children, or they may have a newborn … there are so many factors, and we can’t have a one-size-fits-all policy. We have to be flexible when it comes to work-life balance.”

 

Paquette: “I had to spend a chunk of my time with a remote first-grader, so I had that stress at home while trying to be at work. So I found that employees function better if we’re able to meet them we’re they’re at. Everything was remote to me outside the shop, but in the shop, it just seemed important that people had someone that they could look to make them feel better. We definitely improved our transparency with employees to let them know where we were at. It was probably so scary to see so many people laid off, some by choice, but some by our choice. I held meetings with people just so they would know what was going on and that they had as much information as I had in that moment. And the response was pretty good. Most people stayed, and they kept at it at a time when it was hard to keep at it.”

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]


 

Supporting Education

Elms College announced it has named its center dedicated to improving fairness and opportunity in K-12 education as the Cynthia A. Lyons Center for Equity in Urban Education (CEUE). Lyons has been a member of the Elms College board of trustees for the past 15 years, serving the last seven as board chair. In addition, the Lyons family committed $1 million in support of the CEUE, which was launched in 2019 to help bridge the 800-teacher annual gap across K-12 schools in Chicopee, Holyoke, and Springfield, especially in the STEM fields. Pictured, from left: William Lyons III, Cynthia Lyons, Elms President Harry Dumay, and Paul Stelzer, incoming chair of the Elms College board of trustees.

 


 

Heritage Week

Mercy Medical Center celebrated its Heritage Week on July 19-23, a time when the organization reflects on its early days and the many contributions the Sisters of Providence have made to the local community. Pictured: Mercy President Deborah Bitsoli presents a bouquet of flowers to Sister Mary Caritas, Mercy board member and former Mercy Hospital president, at a colleague barbeque, where Caritas recounted stories about the beginnings of the health ministry and thanked colleagues for their continued commitment to providing a healing environment.

 


 

Round Up for Change

Wild Oats Market in Williamstown recently celebrated the one-year anniversary of its Round Up for Change program with a $3,353.57 donation to the Williamstown Farmers Market’s Community Essentials Initiative. The program allows customers to round up their total purchase amounts at checkout to benefit a local nonprofit. All funds collected go directly to that month’s featured partner. Since initiating the program in June 2020, Wild Oats has donated more than $38,000 to 13 different organizations. Pictured, from left: Netse Lytle (center) of Wild Oats Market presents a check to MaryEllen Meehan (left) and Anne Hogeland from Williamstown Farmers Market.

 

 


 

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 73: August 2, 2021

George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Meghan Rothschild, president and owner of Chikmedia and one of five finalists for BusinessWest’s coveted 40 Under Forty Alumni Achievement Award

Meghan Rothschild

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Meghan Rothschild, president and owner of Chikmedia and one of five finalists for BusinessWest’s coveted 40 Under Forty Alumni Achievement Award. The two talk about her business, but especially her efforts to mentor and coach women in business and also her work within the community and to support many of the region’s nonprofits. It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

Sponsored by:

Also Available On

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 72: July 26, 2021

George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Hampden County District Attorney Anthony Gulluni, another of the finalists for BusinessWest’s coveted Alumni Achievement Award

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Hampden County District Attorney Anthony Gulluni, another of the finalists for BusinessWest’s coveted Alumni Achievement Award. The two talk about a number of the D.A.’s recent programs and initiatives, from work on cold cases, to the Emerging Adult Court of Hope, to efforts to curb everything from drug addiction to human trafficking to elder abuse. It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

Also Available On

Alumni Achievement Award Cover Story

In 2015, BusinessWest introduced a new award, an extension of its 40 Under Forty program. It’s called the Alumni Achievement Award, and as that name suggests, it recognizes previous honorees who continue to build on their résumés of outstanding achievement in their chosen field and in service to the community. Recently, a panel of three judges identified the five finalists for the 2021 award — Tara Brewster, Gregg Desmarais, Anthony Gulluni, Eric Lesser, and Meghan Rothschild. The winner for this year will be unveiled with Alumni Achievement Award presenting sponsor Health New England at the 40 Under Forty Gala on Sept. 23 at the Log Cabin in Holyoke. As the profiles that begin on page 7 reveal, all five finalists embody the spirit of this award. Their stories convey true leadership and are truly inspiring.

 

Tara Brewster

Vice President of Business Development, Greenfield Savings Bank


Gregg Desmarais

Vice President and Senior Private Client Relationship Manager


Anthony Gulluni

Hampden County District Attorney


Eric Lesser

State Senator, First Hampden and Hampshire District


Meghan Rothschild

President and Owner, Chikmedia

 


Past Alumni Achievement Award Winners:

2020

Carla Cosenzi
President, TommyCar Auto Group, Class of 2012
Peter DePergola
Director of Clinical Ethics, Baystate Health, Class of 2015

2019

Cinda Jones
President, W. D. Cowls, Inc., Class of 2007

2018

Samalid Hogan
Regional Director, Massachusetts Small Business Development Center, Class of 2013

2017

Scott Foster
Attorney, Bulkley Richardson, Class of 2011
Nicole Griffin
Owner, ManeHire, Class of 2014

2016

Dr. Jonathan Bayuk
President of Allergy and Immunology Associates of Western Mass. & Chief of Allergy and Immunology at Baystate Medical Center, Class of 2008

2015

Delcie Bean
President, Paragus Strategic IT, Class of 2008

People on the Move
Nadzeya Shkoda

Nadzeya Shkoda

Jonathan Cohen-Gorczyca

Jonathan Cohen-Gorczyca

Melanson announced the promotion of two of its newest managers: Nadzeya Shkoda, CPA, and Jonathan Cohen-Gorczyca, CPA. Shkoda has been in the accounting profession for almost a decade and is a part of the Governmental Services team out of the Greenfield office. She joined Melanson in 2014 and works on approximately 15 municipal audits annually. She enjoys participating in the Governmental Accounting Standards Board group and how auditing presents new challenges each day. She received a master of science in accountancy degree at Westfield State University in 2011. She holds memberships with the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants (MSCPA) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Cohen-Gorczyca has been working at Melanson for more than nine years. As part of its Commercial Services team in Greenfield, he advises businesses and individuals on tax, management, compliance, and other accounting and planning matters. Over the last year, he has been particularly focused on helping clients with their Paycheck Protection Program loans. He received his master of science in accountancy degree from Western New England University in 2013 and is a member of MSCPA and AICPA. He also serves on the board of trustees for the Greenfield Public Library as well as his condo association.

•••••

Alan Tabin

Alan Tabin

Local home builder and developer Alan Tabin, announced he has joined B & B Real Estate in Holyoke as a licensed real-estate agent. Tabin has been active in the real-estate industry throughout his adult life. As co-owner of Home Improvement Associates, LLC, he grew a successful construction business over three decades. His expertise as a builder includes custom homes, investment property, rehabbing, and residential and commercial renovations. His experience in real-estate development includes a residential subdivision of new homes and a 25-unit condominium project in South Hadley known as Jacob’s Edge. “I am excited to offer my unique expertise as a builder to home buyers, sellers, and potential investors,” Tabin said. “My knowledge of construction, local building resources and contacts, and the real-estate market can be valuable to anyone wanting to buy, sell, or invest in real estate.”

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Nicole Stuart

Nicole Stuart

Deliso Financial and Insurance Services announced that Nicole Stuart has joined the firm as practice coordinator. She will be responsible for providing service to Deliso’s clients as well as performing day-to-day administration and operational functions for the firm. “I am excited and proud to join the Deliso Financial & Insurance Services team,” Stuart said. “Their reputation demonstrates the level of quality resources and service standards that align with my goals to execute the most advantageous and expedient financial solutions for our clients’ needs.” Stuart attended Bay Path University, where she received an MBA in entrepreneurship and innovative practices. She brings more than 20 years of professional experience in finance, banking, and bookkeeping. “Nicole’s background and experience will complement our core service offerings,” said Jean Deliso, CFP, president and owner of Deliso Financial and Insurance Services. “She is client-focused, and her enthusiastic personality and strong organizational skills are a perfect fit with the rest of our team. We look forward to her support in our efforts to expand our capabilities and becoming an integral part of Deliso Financial & Insurance Services.”

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Josh Kelly

Josh Kelly

Brent Fournier

Brent Fournier

Elli-Ann Oskar

Elli-Ann Oskar

OMG Inc. recently promoted Josh Kelly to senior vice president for Business Development and Brent Fournier to director of Procurement. Meanwhile, OMG Roofing Products hired Elli-Ann Oskar as Sales and Marketing assistant. In his new role, Kelly will focus on strategic growth opportunities, including mergers and acquisitions, product development, licensing, as well as strategies to expand OMG’s business. He started with OMG in 1991 as a project coordinator and has held several positions within the roofing division, including key account manager, vice president of Marketing, general manager, and, most recently, vice president of Product Development and Innovation. Kelly is a member of the Single Ply Roofing Industry trade association, a past president of the Roofing Industry Alliance, and a current member of the board of directors for the National Roofing Contractors Assoc. He holds a bachelor’s degree from UMass Amherst and an MBA from Western New England University. In his new role, Fournier will develop and implement procurement strategies that meet OMG’s customer demands by focusing on customer service, reduced supply-chain risk, as well as stronger supply partnerships across the value chain. Fournier started with OMG as part of the Tiger Claw acquisition in 2011, as a service delivery manager, and was promoted to manager of Purchasing in January 2014. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Eastern Connecticut State University and an MBA from the University of Phoenix. In her new role, Oskar is responsible for a wide assortment of administrative functions to support the sales and marketing teams, as well as the company’s key account managers and Customer Service department. Prior to joining OMG, she was a Business Development assistant at Teracode. She has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Westfield State University.

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The Girl Scouts of Central & Western Massachusetts (GSCWM) elected eight new members to board of directors at its virtual annual meeting on June 23. The new board members, all of whom will serve a two-year term, include Carla Carten, executive director of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Strategy for Mass General Brigham Health Care; Ella Grant, senior Girl Scout and student at Tantasqua Regional High School; Lisa Greene, director of Patient Accounts/HIM for AdCare Hospital of Worcester; Kate Kane, Wealth Management advisor for Northwestern Mutual; Shirley Konneh, assistant director at the Center for Career Development at the College of the Holy Cross; Laura Marotta, co-founder and executive director of Creative Hub Worcester; Roberta McCullough-Dews, director of Administrative Services within the Office of the Pittsfield Mayor and Public Information officer for the City of Pittsfield; and Addison Witkes, senior Girl Scout and student at Wachusett Regional High School. “I am pleased to welcome, and thrilled to have the privilege to serve on the board with, these new members,” said Joan Bertrand, GSCWM board president. “They are dynamic individuals with diverse talents and experiences to help oversee the operations of the Girl Scouts of Central and Western Massachusetts and further our mission to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.”

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Lisa Cohen

Lisa Cohen

Health New England announced the recent appointment of Lisa Cohen to the role of vice president of Finance and Chief Financial Officer. In this position, Cohen is responsible for leading Health New England’s financial strategy, accounting, actuarial, underwriting, and financial reporting, ensuring its ability to provide cost-effective healthcare coverage while maintaining high-quality member care. Cohen joins Health New England’s executive leadership team and reports directly to Richard Swift, president and CEO. Cohen comes to Health New England from Fallon Health in Worcester, where she was vice president of Financial Planning and Accounting Operations, and served as interim chief financial officer in 2019. Prior to Fallon Health, Cohen was chief financial officer for Ascentria Care Alliance. She also served as chief financial officer at the PACE Organization of Rhode Island. Cohen earned her bachelor of science in accounting and MBA degrees from the UMass Dartmouth. She has been a member of the American Institute of CPAs for more than 20 years, and maintains active certification as a certified public accountant and certified global management accountant.

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Lara Sharp

Lara Sharp

Lara Sharp has been named dean of the School of STEM at Springfield Technical Community College. Sharp’s professional experience includes six years at St. Petersburg College in Clearwater, Fla., as the program director for Engineering, Manufacturing and Building Arts, and also serving as the acting dean of Natural Sciences, Engineering, Manufacturing, and Building Arts. From 2013 to 2015, she was at the Corporate College of Polk State College in Winter Haven, Fla., managing National Science Foundation and Department of Labor grants in advanced manufacturing and engineering technology. Sharp spent more than 11 years teaching chemistry, natural science, and engineering to high-school students at various locations. Sharp also brings industry experience, having worked at Specialty Minerals Inc. as a process engineer and an operator technician as well as an educational consultant for PASCO Scientific. She has been recognized for her outstanding teaching as well as her community engagement, including a STEM Woman of the Year Award from Girls Inc. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 71: July 19, 2021

George Interviews Massachusetts State Sen. Eric Lesser

Eric Lesser

George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Massachusetts State Sen. Eric Lesser, one of five finalists for BusinessWest’s coveted 40 Under Forty Alumni Achievement Award. The two tackle a wide range of topics, including high-speed rail, the new Future of Work Commission Lesser now sits on, and redistricting and what it might mean for Springfield and the rest of Western Mass. It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

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Daily News

Most cyberattacks — from a small, local breach to the major ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline — start with phishing scam. It can take just one email to hook a recipient into providing access to valuable information.

To address growing concerns of cyberattacks, Are You Vulnerable to a Phishing Scam? will be presented by Lauren C. Ostberg, an attorney in Bulkley Richardson’s cybersecurity group, and Chris Wisneski, IT Security and Assurance Services manager at the accounting firm Whittlesey on July 15 at noon.

To attend the virtual presentation, registration is required at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gihuwqIDTbSkyCFgVq_yXA.

This webinar is a continuation of Bulkley Richardson’s CyberSafe series aimed at providing critical information to businesses and organizations on topics of cybersecurity.

Daily News

EASTHAMPTON — Matthew S. Sosik was recently elected to the 20-member Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Bankers Association (MBA). Founded in 1905, the MBA is the only association representing FDIC-insured community, regional, and nationwide banks serving consumer and business clients across the Commonwealth.

Sosik is the CEO of Hometown Financial Group Inc., a $3.4 billion mutual multi-bank holding company based in Easthampton. He also serves as president and CEO of bankESB, a subsidiary of Hometown Financial Group.

“As a dynamic industry, it is essential that the association have perspectives of banking leaders like Matt Sosik who provide expertise and experience that enable us to achieve our priorities of exceptional advocacy representation on Beacon Hill and in Washington, DC; high quality and timely training and education for professionals in the banking industry; and communications and services that help strengthen our members,” said MBA’s President and CEO, Kathleen Murphy. “The market knowledge that Matt brings enables the association to anticipate and respond to emerging banking needs and trends that help our members as they serve a very large consumer and business footprint across the Commonwealth.”

Said Sosik: “I am excited and honored to work with this talented group of individuals to help shape the banking industry in Massachusetts. Banks continue to be there for their individual and small business customers as well as their communities, especially during the pandemic. I look forward to ensuring our industry continues to make a big and positive impact in communities all across the Commonwealth.”

Sosik joined Hometown Bank, now bankHometown, in 1996 after five years as a bank examiner with the FDIC. In 2013, he became the president and CEO at bankESB and began to build Hometown Financial Group through a combination of organic growth strategies and merger and acquisition transactions.

 Sosik is also a board member for The Massachusetts Housing Partnership (MHP), whose mission is to work with communities to create innovative policy and financing solutions that provide affordable homes and better lives for the people of Massachusetts. He also serves on the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council and is a member of the Board of Directors of COCC Inc., a technology company headquartered in Southington, CT, that serves the financial industry.

Daily News

 SPRINGFIELD — By leveraging their organizations’ complementary services, Springfield-based Mental Health Association and Agawam-based Cambridge Credit Counseling Corp. are working cooperatively to provide a range of mental health and financial counseling services to their clients, current employees and new hires.

For example, MHA now is able to refer employees and/or clients who find themselves financially stressed directly to Cambridge, a non-profit debt relief agency while Cambridge Credit Counseling Corp is able to refer clients who are experiencing “debt stress” to MHA’s Emotional Health and Wellness Center, Bestlife.

“People who are struggling with their financial health often find themselves facing high levels of stress,” said Gordon Oliver, director of Business Development for Cambridge Credit Counseling Corp. “There’s actually a name for what they’re experiencing: debt stress. The concerns arising from their financial situation can leave them ridden with anxiety. Because so many people with debt problems feel so much stress, I wanted to see about how MHA and Cambridge could work together to make mutual referrals. In addition to supporting MHA employees who are facing debt stress, I was also interested in exploring opportunities where Cambridge staff members working with clients may sense that they may benefit from having a conversation with a Best Life clinician.”

Said Kimberley Lee, vice president of Resource Development & Branding for MHA, “it’s remarkable how much our missions are aligned. Cambridge Credit Counseling is also a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of those they serve. Now one of the ways MHA can help people live their best life is by partnering with Cambridge to help them mitigate their debt stress with a combination of guidance, support and experience working with lenders to create debt relief solutions. MHA is excited about teaming up with Cambridge to help with our staff and participants who may be struggling with their finances. And Cambridge will have access via referral to mental health counseling and support services offered by Team MHA.”

One thing that people experiencing debt stress need is hope,” said Alane Burgess, MA, LMHC, clinic director for MHA’s Bestlife Emotional Health & Wellness Center. “With our new connection through Cambridge Credit Counseling, people have access to the mental health support services via a referral that can help provide that sense of hope. For people wondering how they will ever get out of their debt or how they will learn to manage their finances, Best Life clinicians and mental health counselors can start a conversation geared toward helping them see how it can get better because they are taking smart, solid steps to reach their goals. Building that understanding is a fundamental component of relieving stress.”

Oliver pointed out that, for a variety of reasons, debt levels actually went down throughout the pandemic.  “Many people got unemployment compensation and stimulus payments, and some were making more money than when they were working,” he explained. “But those supports are ending and people are starting to wonder what is coming down the road. If people have debt problems, they can reach out to Cambridge. A key piece of advice we’re giving now is to be careful with overspending on summer vacations and activities. Yes, people have been cooped up and with COVID easing they want to celebrate in a big way. The difficulty comes when they overextend financially by borrowing more than they can easily repay. Also remember that student loan payments, which were deferred during the pandemic, are coming back and you need to include those payments in your budget. Especially now, it’s important that you create a budget and stick to it.”

According to Lee, the partnership between MHA and Cambridge Credit Counseling blossomed as a result of Cambridge choosing to support MHA’s work with a $5,000 sponsorship of the Wellness Classic Golf Tournament, MHA’s largest annual fund-raising event.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 70: July 12, 2021

George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Ray Berry, founder and owner of White Lion Brewing

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively discussion with Ray Berry, founder and owner of White Lion Brewing, author of one of the region’s more intriguing, and thirst-quenching, stories of entrepreneurship. The two talk about everything from the recent opening of the company’s tap room and restaurant in Tower Square, to the many challenges this business has overcome over the years, to the immense, and still growing, level of competition within the craft beer world. It’s must listening so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

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Opinion

Editorial

 

It’s only July, just a few months after the governor essentially reopened the state and things started returning to normal. We have a long way to go before we can even begin to know the full impact of the pandemic on the local business community and individual communities.

But to many, it’s already apparent that new and intriguing uses will have to be found for spaces in the office towers and some of the other buildings in downtown Springfield. It seems clear that many of those already in those office towers will be downsizing or moving out when their leases expire. Meanwhile, there are few if any signs that retail can stage any kind of meaningful comeback, as the current vacancies along Main Street clearly show.

These indicators make it clear that creativity, with a generous amount of patience as well, will be needed when it comes to bringing new life to the properties downtown. Old answers and traditional ways of thinking won’t work. People should be thinking not about what these properties were designed to be — office spaces, for the most part — but what they can be.

If the pandemic has done anything, it has probably only accelerated a process that has been in place for years now. Indeed, downtown vacancy rates have been consistently, and somewhat disturbingly, high, with new inventory, at locations like 1550 Main Street and Union Station, only adding to the challenges facing those owning and managing property in and around Main Street.

There has been some movement in recent years when it comes to office-space absorption — Wellfleet Group moving into several floors in Tower Square, the Community Foundation moving out of Tower Square and onto street-level offices on Bridge Street, and the Dietz architecture firm moving into Union Station — but much of it is the kind of ‘musical chairs’ action that has defined the commercial real-estate scene for years now.

Looking forward, there is certainly potential for downtown to become more of a destination when it comes to office space, especially with regard to the manner in which the pandemic has shown business owners that they don’t necessarily have to be in downtown Boston or New York, paying sky-high lease rates, to conduct business. They can work from anywhere — including Springfield.

Unfortunately, every city in the country is sending out that same message, including communities with larger, deeper workforces, better climate, and more vibrant central business districts.

There are steps being taken to try to convince elected leaders to move some state offices to Springfield, again in recognition that they don’t need to be in Boston or even the Boston area. There is some optimism regarding these efforts, and the argument makes a great deal of sense, but we wonder if there can be any meaningful movement when it comes to agencies that have been headquartered in the eastern part of the state forever — and when it might come.

Beyond these initiatives, it’s clear that some real creativity in the form of imaginative new uses will needed. We’ve seen some already downtown with the YMCA of Greater Springfield, two colleges, and now White Lion Brewing moving into Tower Square, but we’ll need more.

That’s because traditional office-space users — law firms, accounting firms, insurance agencies, financial-services firms, and even nonprofits — will almost certainly need less of that space in the years to come. It’s time to look at a host of options, including residential, hospitality, healthcare, education, and others. Perhaps a live/work type of facility, such as the type being proposed for 1350 Main Street, can be one of the answers.

We’re not sure what the future will look like, but we’re reasonably sure it won’t look like what we have now. So something else will be needed. Something creative.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 69: June 21, 2021

George O’Brien talks with Charlie Christianson, president of East Longmeadow-based CMD Technology Group

BusinessWest editor George O’Brien talks with Charlie Christianson, president of East Longmeadow-based CMD Technology Group. The two discuss the recent spate of high-profile cyber attacks and how they have served to drive home the point that small businesses — and large businesses as well — need to do all they can to be prevent such breaches and properly respond when and if they do happen. It’s must listening, so tune in to BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

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Class of 2021

Attorney, Fitzgerald Attorneys at Law; Age 34

Nick Amanti grew up in a family business where he learned life lessons he still follows.

For 60 years, his family has owned Advance Manufacturing, which provides precision-manufactured parts for a number of industries. Amanti was taught to treat the people who work for Advance like family. Though his career is outside the company, Amanti provides legal services for many different business owners and feels a true connection with them.

“I know how much they care about their business and how much they care about their employees,” he said, adding that it’s an honor to help his business clients. “It takes so much courage to actually start a business and take on the responsibility for yourself, as well as to help others support their families.”

Amanti’s decision to pursue a legal career was the result of a near-tragic event. When he was 18 years old, his father, David, suffered a brain tumor. Many of the people who came to their house were lawyers who worked hard to get all the family’s affairs in order. Amanti called this episode a turning point in his life.

“Watching them, I realized I could help people in their time of need, and I could help businesses through tough times,” he said. “Whether it was my family or other individuals, I felt this is something I could do.”

This story has a happy ending because his father survived the brain tumor, has returned to work, and these days enjoys golfing with his sons.

As an attorney, Amanti provides legal counsel to businesses from inception through all the services they need while they are up and running, to guidance at the end when a company decides to wind down.

He helped local businesses keep their doors open during the worst of COVID-19 by helping them claim federal PPP grants totaling more than $3 million. And when restaurants and taverns were hit hard by loss of business, he appealed to the state licensing board to allow them more time to pay their bills without penalty.

Meanwhile, among his many civic roles, he volunteers with the YMCA of Greater Westfield and bikes in the Pan-Mass Challenge, personally committing to raise a minimum of $5,000 for the Dana-Farber Cancer Center and the Jimmy Fund.

Through all that, his advice for a good life is simple. “Take pride in your work, show respect to others, and enjoy the ride.”

 

—Mark Morris

Class of 2021

Regional Director of Marketing & Communications, Trinity Health of New England; Age 38

Amy Ashford got her start within the healthcare sector not in marketing, but in human resources. It was a chance conversation in the ladies’ room with the CEO of the hospital where she was employed that changed the trajectory of her career.

“She said, “we have a position in marketing, and I think you’d be a really great fit for it; would you consider it?’” Ashford recalled, adding that she had lunch with the director of that department, and … well, that was not only the start of a friendship that continues to this day, but the next important step in a journey that has taken her from a supporting role with a hospital in New Hampshire to her current role as regional director of Marketing & Communications for Trinity Health of New England.

There were steps in between, and all that accumulated knowledge and experience has certainly been needed during what Ashford described as the most difficult test, and in some ways the most rewarding experience, of her career — coordinating the region’s communications efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Those first several months, it was basically crisis communications and trying to keep the community as updated as possible,” she recalled, adding that she and other administrators were hunkered down (safely) in an incident command center. “Things were changing quickly, and it was our duty, and our responsibility, to communicate with people as much as possible.”

While excelling in her field — she recently received the Society for Health Care Strategy and Market Development’s Rising Star Award — Ashford is also active within the community. She has been the second vice president of the board of directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampden County since 2014, and is also a former board member for Symphony Hall and CityStage.

Returning to her relationship with the woman who first hired her to do marketing, Ashford said she remains a mentor to this day, and the experience has prompted her to seek out opportunities to mentor young people in this profession, which she finds quite rewarding.

“That lesson has really stuck with me, and I take very seriously the opportunity to mentor younger people in the marketing field,” she said. “I enjoy helping them grow and advance their careers.”

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

CEO and Founder, Tech180; Age 39

To borrow a phrase from the industry it serves, Easthampton-based Tech180 has certainly taken off over the past few years.

Indeed, the company, founded by Chris Bakker — one of the true entrepreneurs in the class of 2021 — and now located in the Paragon Arts & Industry building in Easthampton, is gaining altitude in a highly competitive industry through his efforts to modernize and streamline the necessary but inefficient process of testing and certifying flight-worthy vehicles.

As Bakker, who earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California at Berkeley, explained it, “an aircraft has a lot of different computers on it that handle all sorts of things, like the flight controls, the engines … anything that moves on the aircraft has its own computer. And that computer has software on it that needs to be tested.

“To test that product, you don’t want to just put it on an airplane and then hope it doesn’t crash,” he went on. “You want to be able to test in a laboratory environment and make sure it’s completely vetted and safe before it goes on an aircraft.”

By creating such an environment, or testing system — one that “simulates the airplane” — Bakker and his team have enabled the company he and a few partners started in 2018 to grow to 30 employees and expand its footprint for a third time, adding a large warehouse and more manufacturing capacity to its suite of offices and existing manufacturing space.

In late 2020, the company announced an official partnership with NI (formerly National Instruments) and SET, two companies in the test industry. This partnership has brought Tech180 access to a larger pool of potential clients.

Such access is needed because, while COVID-19 hit every industry hard, it hit aerospace really hard, Bakker said. The company has responded by diversifying and adding military clients — flexibility that should serve it well when the market picks up again, which experts predict it will.

When asked what he does when he’s not working, Bakker joked that he “doesn’t do anything besides work.” What ‘spare’ time he does have is reserved for family — his wife, Rebecca, and daughters Inara and Juno — and also for sustainability and environmental causes.

Indeed, Bakker has served on the board of Grow Food Northampton and is currently involved in efforts to promote solarization, including at the mill buildings where Tech180 and other businesses are located.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Program Manager, Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts; Age 35

Samantha Bilal is no stranger to making real, street-level change.

For most of her professional life, she did so with Martin Luther King Jr. Family Services in Springfield, where she gradually progressed from lead camp counselor to director of Operations.

In her 15 years there, Bilal supported prevention initiatives around gang violence, substance abuse, and teen dating violence, while training young people who successfully advocated for the passing of laws raising the legal tobacco-use age to 21. She also implemented youth safe-haven programming, education around domestic and dating violence, and annual community-engagement events.

These days, she’s impacting the community in a different way, managing the Live Well Springfield Coalition, a program of the Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts, through which she leads the Climate Change and Health Equity initiative, which aims to create strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, improve health outcomes for those in marginalized communities directly impacted by climate change, and dismantle systemic racism.

She has also led the institute’s Transforming Community initiative, which promotes health equity by targeting issues like nutritious food access and safer streets, and the Age-Friendly City initiative, which focuses on issues of housing, transportation, social services, and health to make Springfield a more livable city for older adults, so they can age in place.

“All these are very different, but they all impact community, and they all engage residents,” Bilal said, emphasizing the social-equity aspects of each. “I’m really passionate about community engagement and making sure residents are uplifted as champions — because we won’t make the biggest changes without their advice and their advocacy.

“I’m always excited to see the fruits of our work manifest into policy changes,” she went on. “That means we’re having a great impact and not just talking about ideas, but finding ways to implement change. That’s my biggest pride at work — seeing the changes in our community over time.”

Away from work, Bilal is the co-founder of A Queen’s Narrative, a personal-enrichment program for women and girls of color, which uses narrative power and storytelling to harness self-empowerment and self-awareness.

“I love youth and empowering young women — there’s so much value in uplifting people and helping them find their voice and making sure they have access to opportunities they normally wouldn’t have gotten,” she said. “When we come together to share these narratives with each other, we find commonality, but also find ways to better collaborate.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

Class of 2021

Assistant General Counsel and Director of Legal Services, Health New England; Age 37

When asked why she became a lawyer, Ashley Bogle started by explaining why, for a long time, she didn’t want to become a lawyer.

“I thought that all attorneys did was argue — like on Law & Order. I’m not really a fighter, so I really didn’t want to do that,” she explained, adding that she took a different route and became a pre-pharmacy major. She eventually worked in a pharmacy and didn’t enjoy what she was doing, to put it mildly, so she went to work for a law firm as a legal assistant, an experience that changed her perspective — and her career track.

Meanwhile, Bogle found Health New England through a staffing agency in 2010 and, after graduating from UConn School of Law, worked her way up at HNE to the twin duties of assistant general counsel and director of Legal Services. She described her work as a “mixed bag,” everything from reviewing contracts to keeping track of the regulatory filings with respect to maintaining licenses and accreditation.

But there is another important aspect to her work at HNE. Indeed, Bogle co-chairs the company’s diversity, inclusion, and belonging (DEIB) committee, which guides the organization toward its goals of embedding DEIB into its mission, operations, community outreach, and practices in several areas, including associate engagement, corporate social responsibility, recruitment and retention of diverse talent, advancing health outcomes, and community engagement. Bogle has initiated a diversity and inclusion e-mail inbox to allow associates to share feedback about DEIB within the organization, and regularly shares updates to all HNE associates via biweekly town halls.

“We want to push forward a diversity mindset and an equity mindset,” she explained. “It’s been a lot of work, but it’s been very exciting, and the organization as a whole has been very supportive of these efforts.”

In 2020, Bogle was appointed to represent HNE in the Massachusetts Assoc. of Health Plans’ recently established Racial Disparities Work Group, advancing the work of two important initiatives on behalf of MAHP’s member health plans.

Meanwhile, she is also very active within the community, volunteering for meal service at Friends of the Homeless, taking part in community-service projects through the United Way’s Day of Caring, and fundraising and organizing events for Go Red American Heart Assoc. Heart Walks.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Primary-care Physician, Health Services for the Homeless; Age 34

It’s called ‘street outreach.’

That’s what Dr. Jessica Bossie calls the work she does on Thursday afternoons and Fridays, and it’s aptly named.

That’s because she is, quite literally, on the streets — and also under bridges, in homeless camps, and in other locations, bringing needed healthcare directly to the homeless population in Western Mass.

“Sometimes it’s Main Street in Northampton or some of the drags in Springfield — we know where our patients panhandle; we know where they go,” she explained. “If we need to find them for something serious, we’ll go find them — and we do.”

Street outreach is part of an extremely broad set of responsibilities for Bossie, the only primary-care physician working within a Springfield-based but regionally focused program called Health Services for the Homeless.

Others include seeing patients at both the Worthington Street homeless shelter in Springfield on Mondays and Wednesdays, and the homeless shelter in Northampton on Tuesdays and Thursdays; acting as a repository of information for a transient population that crosses many city and county lines; directing a harm-reduction program for the homeless patients who suffer from chronic alcohol abuse; and even overseeing and operating all aspects of an 800-square-foot community vegetable garden in Barre.

Her work is difficult to describe in much detail in this space. Suffice it to say it is 24/7 and involves caring for and advocating for the homeless population in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties, work that involves both treatment and prevention. This work resonated with the judges for this year’s 40 Under Forty program, as Bossie was the highest scorer among nearly 200 nominees.

A graduate of Boston University School of Medicine and the mother of three young girls, Bossie said she always intended to serve underserved populations, and was specifically interested in substance-abuse treatment. She had some direct exposure to Boston’s highly acclaimed healthcare program for the homeless, and has brought many of its best practices to this region.

When asked what she found most rewarding about her work, she said it’s the “human component,” the relationships she’s made with her patients.

“It’s wonderful to be able to help them in ways they’ve been wanting but haven’t found a way to get before,” she said. “Even after they move on, some of my patients travel hours just to come back and see me. It’s really flattering, and we develop these really amazing, really strong relationships.”

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Supervisor of Science, Technology, and Engineering, Westfield Public Schools; Age 32

Growing up in Westfield, Lauren Figy Cadigan was interested in pursuing medicine or some other field where she was helping people.

“But I had a knack for science,” she said. “What I enjoyed about it was the inquiry, being excited about figuring things out. So I started doubling up on science in high school, taking as many classes as I could.”

It’s a fervor she shares with other young people today as supervisor of Science, Technology, and Engineering for Westfield Public Schools. “I have a passion for helping people and really encouraging students to go into STEM.”

After graduating from Ohio Wesleyan University and working in the Columbus, Ohio school system, Figy Cadigan returned to her home state and taught at the High School of Commerce in Springfield, then went through a master’s in education program focused on organizational management.

That opened a door to an assistant-principal job in Westfield, and eventually her current role, where she has authored or co-authored successful grant applications including $55,000 in partnership with MassHire to get students interested in healthcare professions and obtain their CNA licenses; $30,000 to create a biomedical career pathway in the public schools; and $97,000 for a pilot program in engineering career pathways.

In all of this, she has sought to expose students to science, medical, and engineering careers they might not have considered before, and to cross-pollinate STEM fields that are traditionally male-dominated and healthcare careers that attract mostly women. “We’re making sure kids are getting a sampling of each, instead of society telling them what bucket they should fit into.”

That also goes for underserved demographics like special-education students and English-language learners. “All students can be successful, and we want these opportunities to be available to them as well.”

Figy Cadigan serves her community in other ways, too, volunteering with the YMCA of Greater Westfield, the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Westfield, Amelia Park Arena, Our House, and an annual Thanksgiving food drive.

But she’s especially gratified by the impact her efforts are having on the future leaders of STEM.

“The best part about being in education is five or six years later, when kids write back to you about what they’re doing now,” she said, adding that she’s especially excited about the future of her own daughter, expected to arrive this summer. “This is the education I want for her.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

Class of 2021

Chief of Operations, West Springfield Mayor’s Office; Age 25

Carly Camossi has grown up in West Springfield — in more ways than one.

Yes, it’s her hometown, but she’s also forged a satisfying, multi-faceted career here, starting as a soccer referee for the Park & Recreation department when she was just 14 years old — with her role quickly expanding over the next few years to office intern, gym supervisor, dance staff member, babysitter training course instructor, and more.

Meanwhile, she was helping care for her younger sister, Corey, who would pass away in 2015 from cerebral palsy at age 17. Carly coordinated a fundraiser for the Special Olympics in honor of her sister, which caught the attention of West Springfield Mayor Will Reichelt.

“He was like, ‘I want her to work for me.’ My involvement in his office just stemmed from there,” she recalled. As his outreach coordinator starting in 2017 — when she was still just 21 — she provided professional assistance and advice, represented the mayor at meetings, and performed a host of other tasks.

Meanwhile, in volunteer roles, such as blood-drive coordinator for the Red Cross, she gained keen insight into the ways local nonprofits can connect with the resources available in town, and work in tandem to benefit residents.

This past February, Camossi was promoted again, to chief of Operations in the mayor’s office, where she oversees certain town projects; investigates problem situations; handles marketing, press activity, and advertising for the town; and acts as a liaison among the mayor, town departments, the Town Council, and state officials, just to name a few roles.

“I think very highly of people who live in the community they work for,” she said. “When I’m in the grocery store, I’ll see someone I know who’ll ask me a question — if taxes are going up, or if they’re looking for a service in the community. It’s awesome to have that personal connection.”

She recognizes the same passion for service in her co-workers as well — especially over this past, very challenging year.

“You don’t always hear good things about municipal employees, but in pandemic times, it’s refreshing that we were able to take everything in stride and figure out how to streamline our processes and run our activities under COVID guidelines,” Camossi said. “Everyone stepped up and played key roles in making sure people’s needs were taken care of. We never skipped a beat.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

 

Class of 2021

Director of Business Systems, Clinical & Support Options Inc.; Age 32

Jes Charette-Fallon’s path to her current career has been a winding one; she originally studied political science and thought about becoming an attorney, and eventually earned a degree in art therapy.

But she then enrolled in a graduate program for mental-health counseling at Springfield College, where her time as a resident director laid bare some common needs. “I was responding to a lot of mental-health crises and got really involved in that; it felt like a natural fit.”

As part of her master’s program, she interned at Clinical & Support Options (CSO) in 2012, then came on board as an employee in 2013. “I loved working with the Springfield population; to be able to work with such a diverse population was incredibly meaningful.”

Charette-Fallon moved up quickly in the organization, first as a clinical supervisor and most recently as director of Business Systems, a senior leadership position created out of a need to have someone with a clinical background handling the administration of electronic health records.

“People questioned my transition from the clinical area because I have such a strong calling, but it really is the best of both worlds,” she said. “I’m able to have an impact on a larger scale, helping clients across all services, and also making the lives of our staff easier.

“We probably spend more time in our electronic health records than we spent with our family and friends,” she went on. “If our experience using that interface is not a positive one, we’re probably not going to deliver the best service to clients.”

At the same time, she keeps her hand in the clinical world at CSO, leading a support group for parents who have experienced trauma, and carrying a small caseload as well. “That keeps me connected to our very, very important mission,” she said, adding that she has advanced-practice certification in trauma-informed care, which is the organization’s treatment model in every program.

In her spare time, Charette-Fallon is an avid runner. “I was significantly overweight, and I lost 100 pounds after I started running,” she said. “I never thought I could run a marathon; then I did, and I kept doing it. It’s been one of the most rewarding and stress-relieving experiences, and I’m really passionate about it. If I can do something that hard, I know I can do anything.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

Class of 2021

Special Programs Coordinator, Gateway to College, Holyoke Community College; Age 39

Julissa Colón can certainly relate to those individuals she assists through the Holyoke Community College (HCC) Gateway to College program.

Indeed, when she was 19, she left college when she had her first child. She thought the opportunity to earn a college degree had passed her by.

She was wrong, of course. She now has an associate degree from HCC and a bachelor’s degree in Latin American studies from Smith College, with a minor in history. What she needed to earn those diplomas was some encouragement and a path forward — and that’s exactly what she helps provide to others who have left traditional education.

“These are students who have already left high school or are on the verge of leaving,” Colón said. “They don’t leave because they’re not smart, they don’t leave because they’re not capable; they leave because of life. Some of them have had to go to work; some of them have stayed back so many times they feel too old to be in traditional school; some are homeless; some have had children, or they’re ill, or their parents are ill.

“What they all have in common, though, is that they don’t want to give up — they do want their high-school diploma, they do want to be successful, they do have dreams,” she went on, adding that Gateway exists to build a unique pathway to success for each student.

Colón joined Gateway a decade ago and has been instrumental in transforming the program, according to Vivian Ostrowski, the program’s director, who nominated her for this award. She said Colón is also a big reason why the program now enjoys an 83% graduation rate for those who left traditional school.

While rising in the ranks from clerk to office manager to Special Programs coordinator, she has drawn on her own experiences, and also her mother’s (she came to Holyoke from Puerto Rico) to help her understand and appreciate her students’ experiences, and also to help guide them and keep their dreams alive.

She said students often ask her to describe her role, and her answer is usually something like this: “I’m like your high-school guidance counselor and your college advisor and your auntie and a social worker — I’m all those things wrapped into one.”

She’s something else as well: a tremendous role model.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Director of Communications & Development, Community Action Pioneer Valley; Co-owner, F45 Training Hampshire Meadows, F45 Training Riverdale; Age 33

Jessye Deane often asks her kids a simple question: “how are you going to make the world a better place?”

She lives out her own answer in her dual careers, with the anti-poverty agency Community Action Pioneer Valley and two F45 Training franchises. “We strengthen our communities in different ways, but both are impactful.”

Deane has worked at Community Action for 11 years, wearing a number of hats over that time. Currently responsible for all communications and private fundraising efforts for six departments and 40 programs, she has increased private funding more than 16-fold.

“So many mini-miracles happen every day because of our staff,” she said of an organization that serves 30,000 low-income neighbors each year. “I am so honored to work with people I consider to be heroes and get to help them do that work. It’s something I don’t take for granted.”

Meanwhile, she and her husband, Danny (a 40 Under Forty honoree last year), despite both having other careers and three children under age 4, launched F45 Training Hampshire Meadows in Hadley in 2018, and doubled down in 2020 — yes, during the heart of the pandemic — by opening a second location in West Springfield. Jessye oversees all aspects of member relations; recruitment, hiring, and supervision of 18 employees; and marketing and social-media campaigns.

“At the same time Danny and I founded the F45 franchise, my mom was having open-heart surgery, and it really scared me,” she recalled. “But I wanted our kids to see us prioritizing our health and to create a place where everyone felt supported and encouraged to become the healthiest versions of themselves. F45 really does change lives — mine included. Because of F45, I am now someone who wakes up at 3:50 a.m. to work out — and likes it.”

It’s a busy life, she admits. “But having three hilarious kids, coffee, and a minivan really helps.”

What really keeps her going, however, is passion.

“I’m so lucky to be in a position to help people and see the life-changing impacts of our work,” she said. “At F45, we’ve had people lose more than 100 pounds. At Community Action, we have single moms who are no longer homeless. I’m given opportunities where I’m able to help, which is the reason I wake up every morning.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

 

Class of 2021

Associate Director of Diversity Recruitment and Enrollment, UMass Amherst; Age 33

Xiomara Albán DeLobato had to pack up a lot of things for her 40 Under Forty photo shoot. She wanted to tell her story visually and explain what’s important her.

That’s Brody the boxer, her best friend, on the other end of the leash. That’s the Ecuadorian flag to the left; her parents emigrated from there to the U.S. And that’s the LGBTQ flag to the right, which represents who she is and symbolizes a core driver of the work she does.

The pennants? They explain where she works (UMass Amherst), where she worked previously (Elms College, Springfield College, and the University of New Hampshire), and where she’s earned degrees (Elms and UNH). There’s also signage for Girls Inc., which she serves as a board member and Development chair, and also as sponsorship chair of the agency’s annual Spirit of Girls event, as well as for Veritas Prep Charter School, which she’s a trustee, and the Springfield Public Forum, where she sits on the board of directors.

As for the books, they represent some of the reading she’s been doing when it comes to her work, which has also become … a passion.

Indeed, DeLobato is the first person to hold her job title at UMass Amherst — something that speaks volumes about the growing importance of this role — and it’s a title that effectively and succinctly sums up what she does.

Sort of.

There are many responsibilities attached to this position, but she smashed it all down to a simple and powerful sentence. “We want to create a sense of belonging.”

As she explained, “universities are seeing the need for their communities to be inclusive. It does take intentionality — you can’t just say, ‘we’re a diverse place and an inclusive place’ without mindfully and very intentionally creating spaces that are inclusive for all our students. We need to do our very best to make people understand that this is a place where they belong.”

This is the real meaning of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) and the foundation of all of her work, which includes everything from developing strategic DEI goals to actively shifting the culture within the enrollment-management division to focus on DEI.

Yes, DeLobato had to pack up the car for her photo shoot. But, by doing so, she helped explain who she is — and why she’s a member of the class of 2021.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Director of Nursing, Mercy Medical Center; Age 35

Lindsey Gamble doesn’t have any trouble recalling the time and the circumstances when she first decided she wanted to be a nurse.

She was 12 years old, and her mother was pregnant with her fourth child. Lindsey made up her mind that she wanted to witness the birth of that child, and successfully lobbied those at the hospital for the right to be in the room. She’s very glad she did.

“It was the best day of my life,” she said. “I immediately knew I wanted to become a nurse and hopefully deliver babies at one point — but definitely nursing. It was a really positive experience.”

She used it to propel herself into a career in nursing, one that eventually did include a stint as a labor and delivery nurse before she made the transition to management roles within the Nursing Department at Mercy Medical Center.

Today, Gamble is director of Nursing, a broad role that carries with it many responsibilities, including staffing, budgeting, training, and ongoing education of the nursing staff. And that list became even longer during the past 14 months of COVID-19.

Indeed, at the start of the pandemic, Gamble implemented a daily huddle to keep the day and night shifts up to date on the changing protocols and testing for the virus, while also collaborating with the departments of Respiratory Therapy and Education to cross-train nurses to perform certain duties to relieve the workload for respiratory therapists. She also coordinated ‘resiliency rounds’ to allow frontline staff to decompress and take care of themselves, and worked with the Philanthropy team to coordinate the many food donations and deliveries to frontline workers.

She also played a key role in the opening of Mercy’s Innovation Unit, designed to ensure that families of COVID patients stay connected with the patient and the care team during their hospital stay — a connection that became especially important when the hospital could no longer allow visitors.

Gamble is also active in the community, especially at the school her children attend, Enfield Montessori. There, she’s a volunteer — handling everything from reading in the classroom to teaching gym to working in the cafeteria — and also serves on the advancement committee.

Meanwhile, at Mercy, she has been instrumental in the hospital’s annual holiday campaign to collect hygiene products and clothing items for the homeless.

In other words, she’s a true leader — in all aspects of her life.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Assistant Dean of Student Initiatives, Springfield Technical Community College; Age 35

Once Kiyota Garcia walked onto the Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) campus, she never really left.

Her first exposure was taking summer classes there while working toward a bachelor’s degree at Bay Path University. Then, as a graduate student at American International College, she took a job at STCC in the Academic Advising and Transfer Center. She’s been there ever since.

And it’s her job, she said, to make sure STCC has the same sort of drawing power for today’s students.

“I’m trying to come up with new, fun, and interesting ways to keep students engaged, keep them retained, and get them really focused,” she said of her latest role, as assistant dean of Student Initiatives. “We know how to get the students in — now, how can they be successful? We’re don’t just want to retain them — we want to see completion as well.”

That concept doesn’t apply only to graduation, Garcia added, but to all the smaller goals along the way, from passing a class to simply passing a test. After all, small roadblocks to success can snowball into big ones — and she wants to help students smooth their path.

Her background in psychology — she holds a doctorate of education in educational psychology, a master’s degree in clinical psychology, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology — has been helpful in her approach to working with students, but just as important is a commitment to keeping them connected. That might mean personal check-in calls from a professor or coach, or surveys on what kinds of non-academic supports they might need, which have been especially critical during the pandemic.

Through one program, called Survive and Thrive, “we tap into students when they first arrive at STCC and give them the resources they need to be successful, whether it’s financial aid, meeting their adviser, test-taking strategies — really touching the student at whatever level they need.”

Active in the community, Garcia volunteers with the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts and is a board member for Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School of Excellence, among other roles. But her most gratifying is making sure students succeed at STCC.

“It’s a big family on campus,” she said. “People develop personal connections you don’t get everywhere. And I think the culture at STCC has allowed us to do that.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

Class of 2021

Director of Production and Technology, Focus Springfield Community Television; Age 25

When Comcast ceased offering public-access television a decade ago and Focus Springfield Community Television rose up in its wake, Brendon Holland, then a high-school student, was on the scene, helping dismantle the old Comcast studio and create a new one on Main Street.

When he returned to Springfield after graduating from Brigham Young University — with considerably more production experience under his belt — he started working at Focus Springfield again, as the station was evolving from an old, analog enterprise to a modern, digital media-production facility. He relished the transition.

“At Brigham Young, we had an insane budget for audio-visual equipment, millions of dollars, and we could buy whatever we wanted, top-of-the-line stuff. Back in Springfield, we’ve been able to do high-end production on a smaller budget.”

The station’s impact, however, has been anything but small, especially during the pandemic. Holland designed and maintained the city’s remote municipal meeting system, which helped Springfield become the only community in Massachusetts — out of 351 — to have never stopped any essential municipal business during COVID-19.

Meanwhile, he produced all nine of the city’s virtual high-school graduations last year. During normal years, he helps residents access recordings and streaming of signature events like the Jazz & Roots Festival and the Hoophall Classic. “We put community first and show up when it matters. We’ve really been able to integrate ourselves into a lot of households in the city.”

Two aspects of his job are especially gratifying, he said. “First is when people come into the station to create media and video, when the lightbulb clicks and they understand how all the audio, lighting, video, and editing come together.”

Second, simply put, is providing a community service no one else can. “Without us, no one would hear about some of the positive things happening in Springfield. We’ve been great at changing the perception of a city that needed a facelift, but that I grew up in and love.”

While his wife, Morgan Drewniany Holland (a 40 Under Forty honoree in 2017), is certainly a fan of his work, Brendon is also quick to credit his golden retriever, Cooper.

“I owe pretty much every single thing I do at work to my dog,” he said. “I come up with the best ideas on evening and morning dog walks. When I’m stuck in a rut, I’ll go for a walk, and it totally makes sense.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

Class of 2021

Director of Procurement, Logistics, and Special Projects, Auxiliary Enterprises, UMass Amherst; Age 39

Chris Howland says it was a phone call that ultimately “changed the trajectory of my life’s path.”

It was 2003, and he was a senior at UMass Amherst, working toward a degree in animal science. Looking for some needed pocket money, he made a call to the university’s Auxiliary Enterprises in hopes of getting part-time job. Long story short, he did. But what he really found was a very rewarding career.

“I had aspirations to maybe become a veterinarian or work in a lab,” he told BusinessWest. “But I really didn’t know what I wanted to do. Once I graduated in May, those in Auxiliary Services invited me to stay on through the summer, and then in the fall … I just continued on and kept taking on more responsibilities and moving my way up in the ranks.”

That’s putting it mildly.

Today, he’s director of Procurement, Logistics, and Special Projects for Auxiliary Enterprises, which includes residential and retail dining (the largest and most-awarded collegiate food service on the country; Princeton Review has ranked it number one for ‘Best Campus Food’ for five years running) as well as catering, concessions, food trucks, the University Club in Amherst, conference services, and more. He currently oversees an annual spending budget of more than $30 million (in a normal, non-pandemic year) and a staff of 10 who administer bids, contracts, vendor payments, accounts payable, and much more.

It’s intriguing work, with “a number of moving parts,” as he put it, with one of the more intriguing — and rewarding — being the ability to work directly with many of the farms he worked with, and learned from, as a student majoring in animal science, like Mapleline Farm in Hadley, which provides milk to the university.

“It’s like coming full circle for me to be able to understand their business, help them with sourcing their milk, and telling their story,” Howland said. “And I’ve been able to do that with a lot of different farmers.”

While his work keeps him busy, as in very busy, he says weekends are reserved for family time, and he, his wife Karen, and two daughters, Emma and Violet, are looking forward to the day when loosened pandemic restrictions will allow for more day trips to museums, zoos, aquariums, and other places that blend fun with learning.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

BSEP Program Coordinator and Mobile Health Bus Project Coordinator, Baystate Medical Center; Age 36

Kelly Lamas has always taken a street-level view of healthcare delivery — in some ways, quite literally.

“I grew up wanting to do something to help people,” she said, and that passion eventually led her into the world of public health, most notably her role with the Baystate Springfield Educational Partnership (BSEP), starting in 2017.

“I run most of the high-school programming for students after school,” she said of the 13-year-old partnership between Baystate and Springfield’s public schools, providing career-exploration courses in medicine, nursing, and allied health.

Lamas brought a public-health perspective to the program at a time when Baystate Health was more broadly embracing a population-based healthcare model and building bridges to public-health initiatives in the community.

“We’re having students really look at health through different lenses, root causes, social determinants of health, and we created a couple of project-based classes,” she explained. Specifically, in partnership with Focus Springfield Community Television, students created PSAs on topics like distracted driving and mental health.

Through BSEP, she also developed partnerships with organizations like Gardening in the Community and the Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts, and helped develop a community health worker certificate program at Holyoke Community College.

Now Lamas is shifting gears — again, both literally and figuratively — by leading Baystate’s mobile health unit. TD Bank awarded Baystate Health a $1 million grant to fund, outfit, and operate a mobile health clinic that will improve access to preventive care in underserved urban and rural communities.

“Transportation is the biggest barrier to healthcare for people, whether they live in urban or rural areas. So we started thinking about meeting communities where they are,” she said.

The unit will provide prevention, education, and screening services while offering on-the-ground training for hundreds of nurses, medical students, pharmacists, and other health professionals every year. Many individuals are not currently receiving these needed services because of financial and transportation barriers or a lack of providers in their neighborhoods.

“This is all about meeting people where they are,” said Lamas, who was also recently elected to the Ludlow Board of Health. “We’re changing the way education is delivered, too. The students, who will eventually be doctors, nurses, and pharmacists, are working together and communicating in teams to deliver the best care. They’re seeing the vital role each member of the team brings and moving the needle toward healthier outcomes.”

 

—Joseph Bednar

Class of 2021

Academic Matters Coordinator, Graduate and Professional Programs, Isenberg School of Management, UMass Amherst; Age 32

As a student in UMass Amherst’s sport management program, Matt Kushi harbored dreams of being an athletic director at a small college or high school. Such dreams never came to pass, but Kushi has forged an intriguing and rewarding career nonetheless.

Actually … two of them.

By day, he’s Academic Matters coordinator for the graduate and professional programs at the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst. And by … well, day and night, actually, he operates Kushi Farm and North Hadley Chili Pepper Co., LLC, which, as that name suggests, specializes in hot peppers and hot-pepper products, including jelly.

Both pursuits came about as he was trying to figure out what to do with his life after graduation from UMass in 2010 into a down economy where jobs, especially those in sport management, were scarce.

At Isenberg, Kushi serves as a liaison between his office and faculty and staff for several graduate and professional programs. He also coordinates academic matters such as scheduling courses, classroom technology needs, and course evaluations.

As for the peppers … well, that’s a continuation of a family tradition, and family business, that goes back a century or so, one that Kushi, who also majored in history, discovered while doing some research for Hadley’s 350th birthday. Indeed, his great-grandfather grew tobacco and asparagus (the crop for which Hadley is famous) on land Kushi now tills (and lives on) today.

“I found that very interesting, that I had farming in my blood,” he said, noting that he started dabbling in growing vegetables and giving them to people in 2010. “The next year, I took a 20-by-20 plot in the family garden and started growing a few things like peppers and cucumbers and started selling them to people, and found I could make a few dollars.”

Today, he sells his peppers, which he describes as “middle-hot” jalapenos and hot red cherry peppers, wholesale, mostly to regional distributor Pioneer Valley Growers. It’s a business that’s taken root (pun intended), but is only one of many passions competing for his time.

Kushi is also chair of Amherst’s Agricultural Commission, a member of the Massachusetts Farm Bureau, coordinator of Hadley’s holiday tree-lighting ceremony, and owner and president of the MDK Initiative, which operates a special-projects entity with a focus on disability, diversity, and inclusion, and educational resources for families of individuals with disabilities.

 

—George O’Brien

Class of 2021

Founding Executive Director, Teach Western Mass; Age 39

When two local school districts faced a severe teacher shortage, they called in Pema Latshang.

She began her career as a middle-school teacher in the Bronx and worked her way up as an education administrator. After nearly 10 years, Latshang, a Western Mass. native, returned to the area to live closer to her family and raise her two children where she grew up.

In 2015, she was hired as director of Professional Learning and Educator Leadership for Holyoke’s public schools. “In that role, I worked on professional development with teachers and figuring out how to provide more resources to support educators in Holyoke,” she explained.

In 2016, Springfield and Holyoke schools were both facing huge teacher shortages. Between the two cities, nearly 300 vacancies were emerging every year. On top of that, many of the shortages were in licensed areas such as special education, English as a second language, math, and science.

“Think about what it takes to find that many teachers,” Latshang said. “It was a huge issue that was putting a real strain on the schools.”

Administrators from the two cities formed a collaborative called Teach Western Mass (TWM), but they did not have anyone to run it, so they approached Latshang to be the founding executive director of the organization.

“We founded it with an objective of quantity, quality, and diversity,” she said. “So our aim is for highly capable teachers who represent diverse populations in our cities.”

In addition to recruiting, TWM has a residency program that provides training and licensing in specific areas of teaching. In its first year, the residency program placed 20 new teachers, then followed with 30 the following year and 40 last year.

“We hope to place more than 50 teachers this year from the residency,” she said. “That’s on top of our general recruiting, which can also be up to 50 teachers.”

Latshang knows that schools and communities have the potential to be inclusive places that accept and empower everyone to be their best. In her role with TWM, she works hard to make that potential a reality.

“I believe in seeing the good in people and building on their strengths,” she said. “Everyone is doing their best, so how can we help them achieve their goals?”

 

—Mark Morris

Class of 2021

Operations Manager, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Springfield Technical Community College; Age 39

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

That’s a framed quotation in Vonetta Lightfoot’s office at Springfield Technical Community College (STCC). Spoken by the Lorax, a Dr. Seuss character, it’s a guiding principle in her life.

“I keep that quote in my mind to make sure I do my part to inspire people, engage students, and help them be global citizens,” she said.

Last year, as the world reacted to the killing of George Floyd and Black Lives Matters protests gained momentum, Lightfoot wondered aloud to her husband, “how does it feel to be a man of color in the country right now?”

She processed that thought further, discussed it with colleagues, and eventually turned the idea into “Heart of a Man,” a discussion series designed to explore issues that affect men of color.

Lightfoot has expertise in organizing events and bringing people together, but COVID-19 restrictions forced her to quickly learn Zoom and reimagine the series as a virtual discussion.

“The sessions are centered on a main topic with three or four men and a moderator, then we open it to the audience for questions,” she explained. Topics have ranged from healthy masculinity and being a father to police violence.

“Heart of a Man” has received a great response on campus and with community partners. By recording and posting each discussion on YouTube, the series has been viewed more than 4,200 times. Its success has led to a second season of discussions, presentations at other local colleges, and a focus group on campus.

The virtual format turned out more positive — and impactful — than Lightfoot could have imagined. “It’s easier to participate virtually than coming to campus, and with YouTube, we reach more people than we could have with an in-person event.”

An initiative like this is just one reason Lightfoot loves her job at STCC, because it gives her the chance to “dream things up and then make them happen.” After creating “Heart of a Man” in that spirit, she almost echoed the Lorax as she explained why she pursued the idea.

“I feel like, if I don’t care, how will things get done? How is it going to get better?”

 

—Mark Morris

Class of 2021

Author; Associate News Editor for Digital Content, UMass Amherst; Age 32

When Crystal Maldonado was a child, she dreamed of someday writing a book.

“As I got older, I didn’t know if that was possible,” she said. But, even as she began a journalism career, she never let go of that dream. Then, around 2016, “I had this idea for a story that was loosely based on how my husband and I met when we were in high school.”

That idea became her debut novel, Fat Chance, Charlie Vega, a coming-of-age story — and a heavily fictionalized version of her own teen years — published earlier this year by Holiday House Publishing.

“I had never read a story for young adults that featured a fat, Puerto Rican character,” she said. “I wanted, selfishly, to make someone who looks like me the heroine of the story. And I’m really glad I did.”

Recalling her own youth, Maldonado said she faced criticism, shame, and ridicule from her peers and in the media and constantly struggled with her self-image. Over time, however, she learned to come to terms with who she was and to celebrate what makes her … well, her.

“I wrote this story for teens who don’t often see themselves reflected in a lot of media — not just books, but TV and movies, too,” she said. “I want to keep writing stories that often get overlooked by mainstream media, to create stories for teens that are truly relatable and highlight their experience in a way they don’t often see. That’s my big goal — to make people feel seen and heard.”

Meanwhile, in her day job at UMass Amherst, Maldonado manages and executes content, including photography and video, for university accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Spotify, Giphy, and more, dramatically increasing engagement with the university on these channels. She also mentors students, helping them develop their own portfolios and offering guidance on jobs, writing, and photography.

“Honestly, it’s great fun — I get to be really creative, and I love having the chance to talk to the students,” she said. “They’re so intriguing — they all have incredible stories about how they ended up at UMass. And they’re so busy; they’re launching businesses, doing this and that — they do so much more than I did when I was a student. It’s incredible.”

Young people with big goals — Maldonado can relate to that.

 

—Joseph Bednar