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40 Under 40 Class of 2022

Communications Director, Office of U.S. Rep. Richard Neal; Age 31

Margaret Boyle remembers her first real taste of politics — and it didn’t exactly go down well.

When she was very young, her father was a Springfield city councilor. She would go along with him to campaign events and even appeared, somewhat reluctantly, in a few of his TV commercials.

“I always said, ‘this is not the life for me,’ she recalled, adding that things changed in a profound way when she arrived at Smith College, and especially when she enrolled in a class at UMass Amherst through the Five College Consortium.

It was called “The Politician and the Journalist,” and it was taught by Congressman Richard Neal. By the end of that semester, Boyle was asking Neal if she could intern in his office. He said ‘yes,’ and that put her on a path that has taken her to the position of Communications director in that office.

This is a big job with many different responsibilities, from issuing press releases to updating Neal’s website on a daily basis; from handling all the social media for the congressman to following up with members of the press doing stories on matters Neal is involved with.

“No two days are alike, which is what I like about this job,” she said, adding that she’s in Washington at least a day or two or month and spends considerable time with Neal visiting some of the 87 cities and towns that make up a massive district that covers parts of five counties.

In addition to her work with Neal, Boyle is very active in the community, especially in ways that honor the memory and legacy of her father, William J. Boyle, who eventually became first justice of the Springfield District Court.

Indeed, with her mother, Rose, brother Martin, and lifelong friends of her father, she founded the William J. Boyle Scholarship Fund to advance educational opportunities for Springfield high-school students. She also played a lead role in creating the annual Run Billy Run 5K road race and one-mile walk, which last year raised more than $35,000 for scholarships. She not only organizes it, she runs in it, thus honoring another legacy — going for runs with her father years ago.

Recently, Boyle joined the board of directors of the Springfield Boys & Girls Club, and she is actively involved in fundraising efforts for the Susie Foundation, which provides families living with ALS with compassionate and enduring support services.

 

— George O’Brien

40 Under 40 Class of 2022

Vice President of Family Support Services, Square One; Age 37

Melissa Blissett brought a lot of personal items along for her 40 Under Forty photo shoot, and for a reason.

There are many things that are important to her, and she wanted to try to represent them all with one image.

She’s big into plants, and also reading. Family is a huge part of her life, and she brought along a portrait of the group, as well as a framed copy of one of her favorite quotes, and a pink elephant, which represents the sorority she belongs to — Delta Sigma Theta, an organization of college-educated women “committed to constructive development of its members and to public service, with a primary focus on the black community.”

There isn’t anything that directly represents her work as vice president of Family Support Services at Square One, but then again, all or at least most of those other items reflect what she does.

In short, her work is all about family, education, service to others, and helping others live the life they’ve always dreamed of while, as that quote goes, “remembering where you came from but never losing sight of where you are going.”

Blissett, who earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Lowell and a master’s degree in social work at Springfield College, told BusinessWest that while Square One is most associated with early-childhood education, the nonprofit has long understood the importance of supporting families. And it is her job to essentially coordinate and deliver that support, which comes in many forms.

“The parent is the child’s first teacher in general, so the goal is to provide educational support,” she explained. “We also want to provide and help them access resources within the community. We want to make sure that the child is safe, that the child is receiving adequate education, and that the family is getting the resources it needs to grow healthy children.”

Blissett first worked at Square One as an intern while working toward her master’s at Springfield College, and later joined the agency as Healthy Families and Supervised Visitation supervisor. She was later promoted to assistant vice president of Family Support Services and is now vice president of that department.

She is also an adjunct professor at Springfield College in the graduate department of Social Work and, as noted, very active with Delta Sigma Theta. She is also active at her church, Shiloh Seventh-Day Adventist Church in Springfield.

 

— George O’Brien

40 Under 40 Class of 2022

Host and Producer, New England Public Media; Age: 31

You could say Zydalis Bauer has been training for her career since second grade.

Back then, her class put on a news show as one of its projects and chose Bauer for the anchor role.

“From that moment, I had a natural curiosity to pursue media,” Bauer said. In 2008, straight out of high school, she became an intern at WGBY (now New England Public Media) through the Latino Youth Media Institute at the station. After pursuing other internships at NEPM while attending college, she was eventually offered part-time and then full-time employment.

“Since that first internship, I never really left,” she said.

When members of the Latino community said they wanted to hear their language on local TV, NEPM responded with its first bilingual series, Presencia, with Bauer as a co-host. Though her family is from Puerto Rico, her first language is English.

“I had always been self-conscious of my Spanish skills, but this was an opportunity to show that I didn’t have to be perfect to speak the language,” she said. The show set out to deliver engaging stories and has won two Telly Awards since it began.

“When Latinos are in the media, it’s too often about issues,” Bauer explained. “Presencia tells inspirational stories that show how much the Latino community in Western Mass. has to offer.”

Bauer’s success with Presencia led to co-host and producer roles on Connecting Point, NEPM’s magazine show on the arts and culture of Western Mass. Last year, she was offered the job as the show’s main host. Though she considers herself shy, she didn’t hesitate to take on the hosting duties.

“Something inside said follow your instinct, and your brain will figure it out later,” she said. “I’ve learned to follow my gut.”

Now a board member for Girls Inc. of the Valley, Bauer appreciates the opportunity to mentor young women in the community. “Girls Inc. is a great organization that helps young people build confidence from their elementary years through college.”

As a student, she took part in NEPM’s Media Lab workshops, and now she runs them.

“It’s come full circle, and now I am the facilitator,” she said, acknowledging those who took the time to help her along the way.

“I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t have mentors,” Bauer added. “My ultimate goal is to give back and open the door a little further for another individual.”

 

— Mark Morris

40 Under 40 Class of 2022

Senior Vice President, UTCA Inc.; Age 37

Meghan Avery says that most people assume the name given the brewing company she co-owns with her husband, Mark, stems from what would be considered her day job as senior vice president with West Springfield-based Unemployment Tax Control Associates.

They would be wrong.

“My husband came up with the name Two Weeks Notice Brewing Company because, quite literally, he wanted the brewery to be a success so he could quit the job that he had,” she explained, adding that he was able to do just that and pursue his passion full-time.

But while her work in the unemployment tax realm wasn’t the source of a corporate name, it has become her passion, and her career, one in which she is following the lead of her mother — Suzanne Murphy, the company’s founder — in all kinds of ways, from her entrepreneurial energy to her commitment to giving back to the community.

At UTCA, Avery handles a wide range of responsibilities, including client services, all aspects of the Claims department, various HR functions, and management-education seminars offered to every client. She also supports the business-development side of the organization.

Meanwhile, at Two Weeks Notice Brewing in West Springfield, she wears an equally large number of important hats, handling finances, marketing, event planning, and brand development. And while all aspects of the company are in a growth mode, the event side of the ledger is really taking off, with the West Springfield location hosting gatherings for YPS, Toys for Tots, Parish Cupboard, the West Springfield Police Department, and the Susan B. Anthony Project, which offers services to those affected by domestic violence and sexual assault. It has even hosted an “adult prom do-over,” which was … well, just what it sounds like — adults doing their prom over.

Sometimes, Avery’s two worlds come together, such as when she organized a free training for local breweries in Massachusetts and Connecticut to educate them about effective sexual-harassment policy and management of these issues in the brewery setting, training that was conducted with the Employers Assoc. of the NorthEast, an agency she partners with frequently in her role at UTCA.

Within the community, Avery is a certified victims advocate for those experiencing domestic and sexual violence. She and Mark have also recently partnered with Brave Noise, an organization geared toward eliminating sexism, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the brewing industry.

 

— George O’Brien

 

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Go HERE to view all episodes

Episode 107: April 11, 2022

George Interviews Darby O’Brien, founder and principal of Darby O’Brien Advertising

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien engages in provocative discussion with Darby O’Brien (no relation), founder and principal of Darby O’Brien Advertising. Speaking from 42 years of experience, Darby believes businesses have become too cautious in their marketing and advertising and far less willing to take on anything approaching risk — to their detriment. The give and take between the two O’Briens is must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local and sponsored by PeoplesBank.

Sponsored by:

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Class of 2022 Cover Story

For 14 years now, BusinessWest has been recognizing the work of individuals, groups, businesses, and institutions through its Difference Makers program, with one goal in mind: to show the many ways one can, in fact, make a difference within their community. Their stories are sure to enlighten and also inspire others to find their own ways to make a difference.

View BusinessWest Difference Makers Special Section HERE

The 2022 Difference Makers

Click on each NAME to read their story!

Tara Brewster

Vice President of Business Development, Greenfield Savings Bank


The Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts


Heriberto Flores

President, New England Farm Workers’ Council


John Greaney

Retired State Supreme Court Justice; Senior Counsel, Bulkley Richardson

Ruth Griggs

President, Northampton Jazz Festival; Principal, RC Communications


Ted Hebert

Founder and Owner, Teddy Bear Pools and Spas


I Found Light Against All Odds and Its Founder and CEO, Stefan Davis


Roca Holyoke and Springfield

Come party with us as we celebrate the 2022 Difference Makers

March 24, 2022, 5-8:30 pm at the Log Cabin in Holyoke

PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS HERE

Tickets cost $75 and can be ordered at businesswest.com. The sponsors for this year’s program are Burkhart Pizzanelli, the New England Farm Workers’ Council, the Royal Law Firm, TommyCar Auto Group, and Westfield Bank

Supporting Sponsors:

Class of 2022

This Unique Nonprofit Helps At-risk Youths Find a Way Out of Darkness

Leah Martin Photography

 

 

Stefan Davis has a scar on his leg.

The mark was left by his stepfather, who lashed at him with a hook of some sort, as he recalls, tearing at the skin. While Davis remembers that physical attack, one of many he endured, he also never forgot what his stepfather then said — and the emotional trauma it created: “if you ever tell anyone about this … you’ll never say anything to anyone again.”

Actually, Davis has several scars. There’s also one above his right eye from when he was beaten out of the gang he joined — the Bloods. And there’s another one on his right wrist from when things became so dark in his life, he attempted suicide.

“I was done … I was ready to give up,” said Davis, now an educator, football coach, and behavioral interventionist for at-risk students and families at Springfield High School of Science and Technology. “And I show this scar to people who are in darkness and think there is no other way out.”

Davis made it out of his dark place — through the help of others, but mostly his own strong will — and into the light. And today, he helps others bearing different types of scars — everything from homelessness to physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, to seemingly insurmountable life challenges — do the same through a nonprofit agency he created called, appropriately enough, I Found Light Against All Odds.

“He always gave me that push that no other teacher would. And he’s been there for hundreds of students. There’s a lot of kids that were in his program who looked at him not as a teacher or as a coach, but as a father figure.”

Its stated mission is to “provide high-risk youth and families with the tools and opportunities to break the cycle of poverty, desperation, and dependence that dominates their lives, enabling them to become contributing members of our society.”

These tools vary, but the most important one is the sheer will and determination it takes to overcome the often very long odds against finding the light. And when you talk to people who have been helped and guided by Davis, or ‘Coach,’ as they all call him, they say he essentially coaxes it out of them, compelling them to find strength and determination they didn’t know they had.

That was certainly the case with Destiny Cortez, who, as she was entering her senior year at Sci-Tech, found out that she was six weeks pregnant. Graduation now became a much steeper climb, she said, but ‘Coach’ helped her find the will to press on and handle all that life was throwing at her.

Stefan Davis is seen here with a group of Sci-Tech students

Stefan Davis is seen here with a group of Sci-Tech students at a recent visit to the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield.

“He always gave me that push that no other teacher would,” she recalled. “And he’s been there for hundreds of students. There’s a lot of kids that were in his program who looked at him not as a teacher or as a coach, but as a father figure.”

Ethan Deleon, a current student at Sci-Tech, tells a similar story.

“Coach gives you that little sense of hope,” he said, adding that hope is often a missing ingredient in the lives of many young people having trouble seeing the light.

Before he launched the nonprofit agency, Davis created a the aptly named Fresh Start program, which would eventually draw praise from President Obama for its work to help students on the verge of dropping out of school. And he also hosted a show on Focus Springfield Community TV called Against All Odds. The show allowed young people and families to share encounters they had during a time in their lives when they overcame and conquered serious issues. The goal was to inspire others, and Davis and his guests accomplished that with shows on topics ranging from teen fathers to incarceration to bullying.

Desiring to reach, inspire, and help a larger audience, Davis launched I Found Light in 2016. The agency has succeeded in gaining the support — both financially and from a volunteer perspective — from a number of area businesses, including Monson Savings Bank.

MSB President Dan Moriarty said the agency’s mission, to help young people with social, emotional, and economic issues in their lives, resonates with the institution, and fits into its broader strategy for giving back to the community.

“That mission really hits home for us,” he told BusinessWest. “Helping out young people, in general, is important, but also, giving the youths who have a difficult situation an opportunity to overcome that and achieve a capacity to do the best they can — that’s very important to us, and this the difficult and important work that I Found Light Against All Odds is doing.”

Such sentiments certainly help explain why this inspiring, life-changing nonprofit has become a true Difference Maker — for young people, families, and this region.

 

‘I’m Them’

Before telling the story of I Found Light Against All Odds, one must first tell Davis’s story — and for many reasons,

He is the founder of the nonprofit and its heart and soul. But beyond that, his story echoes that of so many others he has helped over the years, from the perspective of how one can move from the darkness and into the light.

“I’m them,” Davis said, adding that he was the victim of physical and emotional abuse in his youth, and was in the foster-care system for two months before being sent to live with his grandparents in Beacon, N.Y. He developed a passion for football — “I hid the trauma through sports,” he said — and eventually won a full scholarship to play at American International College.

The problem was … he didn’t know exactly where the school was located.

“I was leaning toward Syracuse, and my coach called and said, ‘come on up to Springfield,’” he recalled. “I said, ‘Springfield, Illinois?’ and he said, ‘no, Springfield, Massachusetts.’”

Davis eventually found his way to the campus on State Street, but found his way into trouble as well.

“I lost that structure — for whatever reason, my past caught up to me.”

“I lost that structure — for whatever reason, my past caught up to me,” he told BusinessWest, adding that, while he eventually lost his scholarship, he stayed all four years, with his grandmother paying for his education. He left with 69 credits and, later, an associate degree, but in the meantime, the ‘street,’ as he called it, started taking over his life.

“It was really dark,” he explained. “I didn’t want to go back home to live because I felt that my grandmother raised me — she did her job — and it is was up to me to deal with my life on my own. Which wasn’t good.”

He joined the Bloods, and gang life led to many problems, but he eventually moved on from the gang (with the scar over his eye to prove it) and landed a position with the Westover Job Corps working with young people to help them find employment opportunities, and then with Brightside for Families and Children.

“And that’s where I found myself,” he went on, “because those young kids I saw every day, and the abuse, the trauma … reminded me of myself, and there was a connection. When people couldn’t connect with a child who was highly at-risk, I went in, and there was like something from God — the child just felt safe and started talking about their issues with me.”

Fast-forwarding a little, Davis would eventually land at the Center School, an alternative school for at-risk youths. He became a liaison to public schools, going to a number of different districts to work with students who were losing their way. Later, he coached at Cathedral High School and Western New England University (WNE), while still battling depression and eventually attempting suicide.

He fought his way through those dark times and landed more coaching opportunities, first during a two-year internship with the NFL’s Houston Texans, and then at WNE, before taking a job at Springfield’s Sci-Tech as a paraprofessional and coaching the football team.

He was encouraged to go back to school to get the degree he needed to teach — and he did. And while teaching, he continued his work with at-risk young people, launching Fresh Start, a credit-recovery program that successfully turned around dozens of students who were close to dropping out of school.

“The program was based around at-risk youths who were about to get kicked out of high school. I was their last alternative; if they couldn’t make it with me, they were going to be kicked out of mainstream and put into the alternative school,” said Davis, adding that these were young people involved with gangs who were skipping school, getting into fights, and landing in trouble.

 

School of Thought

Fresh Start would eventually evolve and expand into I Found Light Against All Odds, which helps today’s young people address social, emotional, and economic issues. The agency acts as a multi-faceted resource, providing information; referrals to partnering agencies such as Mental Health Associates, the Center for Human Development, Unify Against Bullying, and many others; and assistance that comes in many forms, including:

• Individualized trauma-informed care;

• Education counseling and coaching;

• Assistance with employment opportunities;

• Reinforcement of effective daily-living skills;

• Skill development for financial literacy; and

• Creation of a robust ‘transition plan’ for each individual as they move on with the next steps in life.

The agency steps in to help young people and families in all kinds of ways, from scholarships and help finding employment to providing families with turkeys at Thanksgiving and gifts for children — and even Christmas trees — during the holidays.

As she talked about Davis, I Found Light, and how the agency helps those in need, Jenny Lebron, Ethan’s mother, said the agency has helped both her sons find the motivation to move beyond depression and other issues and get to a better place. For her older son, this place was a high-school degree and, now, a solid job as a corrections officer. For Ethan, it was a place where he simply wanted to go to school to do the work needed to graduate.

“He had no motivation left — I couldn’t get him motivated for school, or anything else,” she recalled. “Every time he went to school, his teachers would call; he felt no one understood him, and in his mind, everyone was against him and didn’t understand what he was going through.”

In part because he did know what Ethan was going through, Davis was able to get him motivated.

“He understands my son, and he’s such a big motivation for him,” Lebron said. “Since Coach has been in his life, he talks differently, he acts differently, and he brings everything that Coach tells him and teaches to others.”

Stefan Davis is seen with recent Sci-Tech graduates

Stefan Davis is seen with recent Sci-Tech graduates Cassandra Rivera, left, and Destiny Cortez.

An emerging next chapter for the agency is the I Found Light Against All Odds Lighthouse project, which will support homeless girls in the region. The goal is to create a transitional home for such girls, while also providing a variety of resources to the residents and assisting in the development of self-sufficiency and independent living, said Davis, adding that there is a story behind Lighthouse — or a story that inspired it, to be more precise.

It’s about a girl he identified only as ‘Faith.’

“She was homeless … a beautiful young girl,” said Davis, pointing her out in a photograph of several young girls on display in his office. “She was living in the port-a-potties at Blunt Park — she was homeless for a year and a half. There’s a Dunkin’ Donuts near Sci-Tech … Faith would crawl in the dumpster there to eat.”

Unfortunately, there are more people like Faith in Springfield and other are communities than most people can imagine, he said, adding that there is a real need for a facility where they can not only live, but get the many other types of support they need.

“There’s another type of pandemic that’s going on right now, and that involves homeless teen girls,” Davis said. “And I wanted to be a beacon, or a voice, for those girls, and give them an opportunity to find their potential in themselves, and not worry about whether they’re going to be able to eat tomorrow. I want to be able to give them a home where they’ll have the proper tools to become successful young women. And that’s what the Lighthouse will do for these young women.”

Plans for the Lighthouse are in the formative stage, he said, adding that I Found Light is looking to partner with other agencies to identify potential participants in the program and with area businesses to secure a site and finance the initiative.

Overall, he said his goal is to continually grow I Found Light and expand both its mission and impact across the region — because there are many now in the dark and looking for a way to bring some light into their lives.

 

Shedding Some Light

Davis, both while while speaking to large audiences during motivational talks or conversing with students one-on-one, will talk about the scar on his leg. All of his scars, actually.

He does so to drive home the point that most young people, and especially those who are at risk, have scars themselves, whether they are visible or not.

Such scars are permanent, he stressed, but they can be overcome. He’s living proof of that, and through I Found Light Against All Odds, he has created considerably more proof.

Overcoming challenge, especially in the form of physical and emotional trauma, is never easy, Davis said in conclusion, and no one can really do it alone. A strong, reliable support system is needed, and I Found Light has become one.

And that’s why it is a Difference Maker.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Class of 2022

He’s Always Made a Difference, but Not a Very Big Splash

 

By Mark Morris

Leah Martin Photography

When discussing his favorite movies, Ted Hebert includes the Frank Capra classic and holiday tradition It’s a Wonderful Life.

He says he’s always been inspired the movie’s message about how one person’s life can impact so many others — and he sees a little (or maybe more than a little) of himself in the film’s main character, George Bailey. Indeed, their lives took some similar paths, as we’ll see.

Like Bailey, Hebert — the founder and president of Teddy Bear Pools — has spent his life serving his community and being a Difference Maker for thousands of his neighbors.

Hebert’s office is located above the Teddy Bear Pools and Spas store in Chicopee. Recognition plaques, thank-you notes, and photos cover nearly every inch of every wall in the area leading to his office, where those walls are covered, too.

It’s not unusual for community leaders to devote all or most of their philanthropic efforts to one specific cause or organization. Hebert does not have one favorite, saying “I love all the causes we’ve supported.” Indeed, the walls are lined with dozens of plaques recognizing years of support for the Children’s Miracle Network, the Jimmy Fund, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and several animal-welfare groups.

“As human beings, I feel we have a responsibility and an obligation to take care of our furry friends,” Hebert said, noting that his efforts on behalf of animals have included support of and involvement with agencies ranging from the MSPCA to the Thomas J. O’Connor Animal Control and Adoption Center to the Zoo in Forest Park, which he serves as a board member, an invitation he accepted as a tribute to his mother.

“My mom grew up in the Great Depression, and to earn money for the family, she would babysit neighborhood kids and bring them to Forest Park,” he recalled. “When I was young, she brought me to the zoo, so I have those special memories as well.”

Hebert’s position on the Forest Park Zoo board goes well beyond sitting around a conference table. On the day he spoke with BusinessWest, the zoo had enlisted his help to repair the metal bucket on its Bobcat tractor. Just before this interview commenced, Hebert was making calls to enlist Tom O’Sullivan, a welder friend, to take on the job. When the repair to the bucket was successful, Hebert contacted Bernie Croteau, another friend, and arranged to put four new tires on the tractor.

“I’m blessed to be part of a circle of friends who are good people and whom I respect,” Hebert said. “It’s not about me; they simply helped solve a problem for the zoo. It’s all about helping people.”

For all the high-profile and public contributions that Hebert makes in the community, there are just as many that are, like that fixing of the tractor at the zoo, efforts that are out of the spotlight but critically important to those involved.

“I always share with the audience that I used to stutter and that I still battle insecurity and low self-esteem. All of a sudden, people connect with you because many of them are facing similar struggles.”

When Hebert takes part in community activities, he is often accompanied by his wife, Barbara, who also does a great deal of work in the community. For many years, the couple volunteered to deliver Thanksgiving meals at a senior center in West Springfield.

Rather than just dropping off the food and moving on to the next apartment, the Heberts would introduce themselves, start up a conversation, and spend time with each resident. That extra attention became something the residents looked forward to every year, and they would remark on how the couple made Thanksgiving special for them. Hebert said he and Barbara enjoyed the visits as much as, if not more than, the seniors.

Ted and Barbara Hebert

“What does it cost to give your time?” he asked, adding that he’s spent a lifetime finding ways to give back that go above and beyond writing checks — although he’s done a lot of that, too.

For all these efforts, and for the way he has inspired others to follow his lead, Hebert has certainly earned his place in BusinessWest’s Difference Makers class of 2022.

 

Diving Right In

While many residents know that Hebert started Teddy Bear Pools from his parents’ carport and built it into a hugely successful business, fewer know the insecure kid with the stutter.

Hebert described himself as someone with low self-esteem who felt good only when he was working.

“Whether it was mowing lawns, washing cars, or doing my paper route, having a job made me feel better about myself,” he said. “I liked the feeling, so I kept trying hard to challenge myself. I still do that to this day.”

Hebert’s “first real job” came at age 14 as a busboy at the Hu Ke Lau restaurant after he told the owners he was 16. “They didn’t question my age because my friend worked there.”

In his early 20s, Hebert signed up for karate lessons, which provided another big boost to his self-esteem and self-confidence. All these experiences contributed to gradually overcoming his stutter.

A lifelong car aficionado, Hebert joined a local Corvette club and found himself voted in as the youngest president of the group. One time, at a gathering of Corvette clubs in Vermont, he found his voice.

Clubs from around the Northeast had come to Thunder Mountain racetrack for the event. When announcements were taking place, Hebert wasn’t pleased with the way they were handled and decided that, since he was a good ad-libber, he would take on the emcee role.

“Sure, we’ve had our challenges, but it’s like being in a boxing ring. You take your punches, you get knocked down, and then you get back up.”

“I felt comfortable because these were all racing people just like me,” he recalled. “When I finished, it suddenly hit me — ‘oh my God, I was speaking in front of all these people.’”

Now a confident speaker in demand at settings ranging from swimming-pool industry conferences to local schools, Hebert said his goal in speaking is not to motivate, necessarily, but to inspire others to succeed in their lives.

“I always share with the audience that I used to stutter and that I still battle insecurity and low self-esteem,” he told BusinessWest. “All of a sudden, people connect with you because many of them are facing similar struggles.”

During his college years, Hebert spent his summers as a subcontractor working day and night on installing swimming pools — he literally worked at night with spotlights to finish some installations. It’s hard to believe now, but Hebert’s career in swimming pools almost didn’t happen.

After attending Holyoke Community College (where he is currently a trustee), then Springfield Technical Community College, Hebert completed his degree at Worcester State College, and then committed himself (sort of) to continuing a family legacy; 11 generations of Heberts, before his father, were doctors.

Ted had studied pre-med and had above-average scores on his medical boards. He applied to 15 medical schools and received 14 rejections. The University of Southern California extended an invitation only after another candidate dropped out. But Hebert had conflicted emotions about leaving for Los Angeles.

“I had started a little business, I had a girlfriend, and I had planned to travel the country,” he said. The decision became clearer one day, while working at a friend’s house, when he received a call that his mother had been taken to the hospital with an aneurysm.

“I never left, and I have no regrets,” he said.

Like George Bailey, Hebert put off his dreams of traveling to take care of family matters. As his business outgrew the carport, Hebert rented space in a former car wash on Memorial Avenue in Chicopee. When the owner was foreclosed upon, Hebert then bought a vacant building on East Street that once housed a Studebaker dealership back in the 1940s. Today, customers from all over Western Mass., as well as parts of Connecticut and Vermont, know the East Street location as Teddy Bear Pools and Spas.

Since the pandemic hit, homeowners have invested much more in their backyards, which often means adding a swimming pool or hot tub. Business at Teddy Bear has skyrocketed with Hebert’s main challenges, which involve a lack of products due to supply issues and finding installers for all the orders when they arrive.

Though his business is booming, Hebert is quick to empathize with the many businesses that have struggled to survive in the COVID era. “We’ve been blessed to be buried with business,” he said.

It’s easy to look at Hebert’s success today without appreciating the many challenges he faced along the way. Most notably, back in the 1980s, several employees embezzled more than $1 million dollars from the business in two separate incidents. Experiences like this can leave a person cold and cynical, but not Hebert.

“Sure, we’ve had our challenges, but it’s like being in a boxing ring. You take your punches, you get knocked down, and then you get back up.”

For Hebert, it all starts with a belief that, if you have faith, then you can find hope. “I don’t necessarily mean religious faith, but a belief that there is something bigger than us.”

He called being chosen as a Difference Maker one of the more important honors he has received.

“In some ways, Difference Makers brings together all the community efforts Barbara and I have been involved in,” he said. “As much as we appreciate it, we don’t do this for recognition, but because we feel it’s our responsibility as people in our community.”

 

The Deep End

Among the inspirational sayings posted in Hebert’s office is one that reads: “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.”

From the busboy who battled his stutter to the successful businessperson and community leader, Ted Hebert exemplifies the ability to make a new ending and reflects the spirit of a Difference Maker.

“I know it’s a cliché,” he said, “but I believe, as long as you are a good person and treat others like you want to be treated, how can you go wrong?”

Yes, he does sound a whole lot like George Bailey. And he has had a wonderful life.

Class of 2022

This Unique Program Proves That Meaningful, Lasting Change is Possible

 

 

When BusinessWest first caught up with Trevor Gayle in the winter of 2015, he was a relatively new employee of Chase Management in Springfield.

A recent ‘graduate’ of the Roca program, which helps high-risk individuals — those who have been incarcerated, are in gangs, have substance-abuse issues, or have dropped out of school — Gayle was handling a wide range of duties for Chase, a property-management firm, from painting to snow removal to apartment-turnover work.

He was also learning what it took to be a good employee and putting to work lessons learned while in Roca that would help him keep his past — he spent six months in jail for sitting in the seat next to a friend who shot and wounded an individual as he approached their vehicle — from becoming his future.

Today, he is superintendent of a huge — as in 447-unit — apartment complex in Groton, Conn., and has several people working under his supervision.

As he reflects on his Roca experience and how it helped him get from where he was — behind bars — to where he is today, he said simply, “I learned how to be my own leader.”

Not all Roca stories have such positive trend lines, but many of them do. And it is transformations like this that Molly Baldwin had in mind when she started Roca in Chelsea in 1988 to help transform the lives of young, at-risk men. The concept, as summed up in the marketing slogan “less jail time, more future,” is simple — use street outreach, data-driven case management, stage-based education, and employment training to reduce individuals’ involvement in crime, keep them out of jail, and help them get jobs — and perhaps a career.

In recent years, the program has been expanded to include young mothers facing challenges ranging from a lack of education and work experience to gang involvement, drug and alcohol use, violence, abuse, trauma, and more. And the goals for this constituency are the same — to help participants heal from their hurt and anger and gain the tools needed to achieve success later on.

“Our mothers’ program is really about parenting,” said Christine Judd, the indefatigable director of Roca’s programs in Springfield and Holyoke. “It’s helping them be better parents. It’s helping them overcome substance abuse. Many of them are victims of domestic violence, and some are victims of sexual violence. These are trauma-based services aimed at making them better parents.”

Roca’s official mission is to “disrupt the cycle of incarceration and poverty by helping people transform their lives,” Judd said. And it does this through an intense, three- or four-year intervention model (more on it later) that, at its core, recognizes that meaningful, lasting change does not happen overnight.

Hampden County District Attorney Anthony Gulluni

Hampden County District Attorney Anthony Gulluni says Roca works to help people “disentangle” themselves from the trauma in their lives.

And it also does it through partnerships — with constituencies ranging from law-enforcement officials to private business owners and managers who employ participants — that essentially involve the entire community in the work to keep young people on a path to success.

Hampden County District Attorney Anthony Gulluni is one of those partners. Over the years, and especially through a new program he created, the Emerging Adult Court of Hope (EACH), he has helped many at-risk young people find the Roca program.

And what they find, he said, is a support system like none other in this region, one committed to helping them traverse the whitewater in their lives and get on a course that enables them to be productive members of society.

“Our young people, and the young people in EACH in particular, have had so many disadvantages and so many hurdles put in front of them, from day one — lack of parenting, lack of mentorship, lack of positive role models, lack of opportunity — just tough environments,” Gulluni explained. “They’ve suffered so much trauma, and that’s stuff that lives with people. And Roca works to disentangle that and works to support these young people and help them see better things and do better things.”

As noted, a number of area employers have also become partners with Roca, providing employment opportunities to participants. Several area companies, large and small, have hired graduates or have plans to do so. They include manufacturers such as Meredith Springfield in Ludlow, maker of plastic products, and McKenzie Vault in East Longmeadow, which produces cremation urns; distributors such as J. Polep in Chicopee; landscaping firms; municipal public-works departments; and Baystate Health, which expects to soon have some graduates of the program for young mothers working in its Hospitality Department.

AnnaMarie Golden, director of Community Relations at Baystate Health, said the system was already a partner with Roca, with members of its trauma and social-work teams meeting with participants, including those in the young mothers’ program. Through that involvement, the system became aware of another need — for employment opportunities for these women.

“One of the entry doors at Baystate is our Hospitality department — food services and guest services,” she explained. “Our goal is to have them get their foot in the door at Baystate, but the ultimate goal is to have them think about what the next steps might be and consider career steps within the organization if there is interest to stay in the healthcare field.”

Trevor Gayle

Trevor Gayle says Roca has helped him put his past — and the streets — behind him.

It is sentiments like these that certainly help explain why Roca is worthy of that designation Difference Maker. It is making a huge difference in the lives of participants in its programs, and a huge difference in this region as well.

 

Change Agents

Judd told BusinessWest that, while words can be used to sum up Roca’s mission and its importance to the region, numbers tell the story effectively as well. And she has plenty of them at the ready. Here are some, courtesy of a recent study involving participants:

• While more than 85% of Roca’s young men come to the agency with a violent record, four out of five stop engaging in violent crime;

• Only 33% of Roca’s young men who served from 2012 to 2019 recidivated within three years, compared to the state’s recidivism rate of 47% to 56%;

• 54% who practiced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) made measurable emotional-regulation gains;

• 74% who completed the first two years were placed in jobs, and 71% held their job for six months or longer; and

• 95% who completed the first two years were not reincarcerated.

As for the programming involving young mothers:

• 52% of open child-welfare (MA-DCF) cases closed;

• 85% demonstrated workforce-readiness gains;

• 74% who completed the first two years placed in outside jobs; and

• In Springfield, between 2010 and 2020, the program served 761 participants and boasts a 78% employment-placement rate; 82 of participants retained employment for three months or longer, 74% had no new arrests, and 88% had no new incarcerations.

Together, these numbers back up what Gulluni, Golden, Judd, and others said about Roca’s ability to make all-important change possible for its participants.

It does this, Judd said, through an intervention model that is rooted in evidence-based practices of community corrections, deep studies of behavior-change models (stages of change and CBT, among others), brain development, and three decades of critical data collection and on-the-ground work with young people.

“They’ve suffered so much trauma, and that’s stuff that lives with people. And Roca works to disentangle that and works to support these young people and help them see better things and do better things.”

The model, she explained, has five core components: relentless outreach, transformational relationships, tailored programming designed to withstand relapse and the comings and goings of young people in traditional learning or work environments, an engaged-institutions strategy to support young people and help them move out of the criminal-justice system, and performance-based management.

One of the keys to the program, Judd said, is that cognitive behavioral theory, which she described as a way to understand how situations affect what people think and say in their heads, what they feel in their bodies, and what they do in response. Practicing CBT helps individuals identify a cycle, stop, use a skill, and make a choice instead of reacting.

Gayle credited CBT with helping him put street reflexes to situations — those that often lead to violence and incarceration — behind him, to be replaced by more measured, reasoned responses. And he continues to practice CBT in his current position in Connecticut.

 

Finding Hope

Perhaps the best way to fully appreciate how Roca is changing lives is to talk with current participants in the program.

People like Tyreice Harper, 25, from Springfield.

He’s actually in his second stint with Roca. The first came when he was 17, and he admits that he just wasn’t ready for the regimen and the “environment” at the time, and wound up reverting back to a life that landed him in several different Department of Youth Services (DYS) facilities across the region.

“I was locked up … for armed robbery,” he said, adding that, after a three-and-a-half-year stint at the state’s maximum-security prison in Shirley, he was ready to give Roca another try, especially after conversations with ‘lifers’ at the ‘max’ — those who would never be going home — left him yearning for another chance.

“My whole mindset is that I’m not a child anymore, so I want to do better, not just for myself, but for the community and for my child,” he told BusinessWest. He’s now part of a work crew at Roca, handling snow removal and other odd jobs, while also working toward his high-school equivalency.

When asked where he can see himself in a few years, he paused and eventually said, “maybe buying a home and working a real good job,” in a voice that revealed that he knows there’s plenty of hard work ahead to achieve those goals.

And he believes the intervention model at Roca can help him get where he wants to go.

“Roca helps us young men after incarceration to not only get back on our feet, but to keep out of trouble by having work programs and having work crews for us to go on,” he said, adding that there are layers of accountability he has never encountered before, and they are helping him to remain focused.

Mabbie Paplardo agreed. She’s a young mother, age 17, from Holyoke, who found out about Roca from some friends already in the program. She said her advisor helps her with everything from getting her to driving lessons to studying for her HiSET test, or simply to get to the store for formula or diapers.

“There really isn’t a program like this,” she said. “I’ve been in a lot of programs that say they’re going to help, but they really don’t; Roca is different — it’s a support network that is helping me be a much better parent.”

One of the keys to creating real, lasting change for people like Paplardo and Harper is securing employment opportunities, said Judd, adding that the Roca offices in Springfield and Holyoke work with a number of area employers to create such opportunities, and anticipate working with more as the workforce crisis in the region continues.

Many of them, like J. Polep in Chicopee and Meredith Springfield, have hired several Roca participants over the years and have had good success, in part because the program strives to prepare these people for the world of work, stressing the importance of both hard and soft skills, starting with showing up on time, ready to work.

Evelyn Arroyo, a recruitment and retention specialist at Meredith Springfield, agreed. She said the company currently has two Roca graduates currently working as inspector/packers.

“What I like about Roca is that it’s there to not only advocate for these men, but to support them and prepare them for the workforce,” she explained. “They prepare them for what to expect in an interview and what do expect on the job. And, for the most part, those they refer to us are better-prepared than other individuals.”

Golden agreed. “Roca has an approach like no other,” she told BusinessWest. “It works to set up the participants for success long-term.”

 

Taking the Lead

Summing up Roca and its impact within the region, Gulluni said it is meeting a critical need at a critical time.

“We have a young population, young adults and juveniles in this region that need a lot of help,” he noted. “And we are not going to incarcerate our way out of the problems we have in cities like Springfield, Holyoke, and elsewhere. We need organizations and leaders to think creatively and put forth the effort and work to help young people find themselves through so many challenges.”

Roca is an organization that has become a leader in these ongoing efforts to provide that needed help. The numbers listed above regarding everything from recidivism to job placement show that Roca is clearly making a difference.

But it’s stories like Trevor Gayle’s that rise above the statistics. As he said, the program has gone beyond keeping him out of trouble and in a good job. It has shown him how to be his own leader, and as a result, he has been able to change his life in profound ways.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Class of 2022

By Reviving a Beloved Event, She’s Creating a More Vibrant Downtown

Leah Martin Photography

 

Ruth Griggs was having coffee with Amy Cahillane one day in 2017, when Cahillane, who had recently taken charge of the Downtown Northampton Assoc., posed a question.

“She said, ‘what do you think about the Jazz Festival?” Griggs recalled. “I said, ‘what do you mean?’”

Cahillane told Griggs that, in her interactions with people downtown, she kept getting asked questions like, “can we have the Jazz Festival back? We miss live music downtown. What happened to the festival? Can you get it back?”

Griggs had been involved in the first incarnation of the Northampton Jazz Festival, from 2011 to 2015, after returning to her hometown following a three-decade marketing career in New York City. “I went to the shows, and once they got to know I was a marketing professional, I kind of was an advisor to them. I was never on the board, but I was definitely an advisor and helped them out quite a bit, the last two years in particular.”

Then the festival went away for two years, and Cahillane was angling to get Griggs and others who had supported it in the past to bring it back to life, promising to help build stronger relationships between the festival and city leaders and boost marketing and fundraising efforts.

“Having a strong presence downtown and good relationships downtown was really important to me, and I also know all the jazz people who knew how to put on that festival, some of whom had been involved in previous festivals,” Griggs said. “So I set to work to rally some support.”

The biggest challenge at the time, she said, was not losing the event’s 501(c)(3) status, which had been achieved right before the final festival in 2015. “If you let a 501(c)(3) go without any kind of documentation to the feds or the state for three years, it’s gone. And I could not let that happen.”

So Griggs and others formed a board, pulled the festival back from the brink, and started planning for the return of the event in 2018. Oh, and that board put Griggs in charge.

“I really care about the vitality and the economy of Northampton. I’m hoping the Northampton Jazz Festival will continue to reaffirm and reinforce the unique entertainment value that Northampton offers.”

It made sense — since returning from New York in 2011, she had built a marketing firm, RC Communications, that focused on small to mid-sized businesses and especially nonprofits, which are, in many ways, the lifeblood of the region. She has also been a board member with the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce for the past six years and is currently its immediate past vice president.

“I am a marketing strategist by trade, and, as such, I am good at seeing the big picture, keeping my eye on the vision and mission of an organization,” Griggs told BusinessWest. “When you combine that with my work in nonprofits over the last 15 years, that adds up to the type of experience that enables me to lead a nonprofit, which, of course, is what the Jazz Fest is at the end of the day.”

Her leadership in the chamber and her role as an entrepreneur with RC Communications have helped her build a wide network in the business community, she added.

Ruth Griggs announces from the stage of the Academy of Music in Northampton during the headline Jazz Festival concert last October.
Photo by Julian Parker-Burns

“I also just have a knack for getting things done; I am a doer,” she went on. “Fundraising for the Jazz Fest, which is a big part of what I do, benefits from these relationships. As president of the board, I oversee all operations of the festival and keep everyone’s eye on the ball, but I have a particular focus on marketing and fundraising and community relations, with the help of Amy Cahillane.”

Within that model, she leaves the choosing and booking of the musicians and the running of the performances to five producers who serve on the board. And the model works, with the two-day October festival roaring back to life in 2018 and following that with successful outings in 2019 and 2021 as well; pandemic-disrupted 2020 saw a series of virtual performances instead.

But that success isn’t contained to the festival, or even to jazz lovers. As a two-day event held in locations scattered throughout the downtown (more on that in a bit), the event promotes the downtown corridor and boosts its businesses, making the festival’s success a true economic-development story, and Griggs a Difference Maker.

“I really care about the vitality and the economy of Northampton,” she said. “I’m hoping the Northampton Jazz Festival will continue to reaffirm and reinforce the unique entertainment value that Northampton offers.”

 

Taking It to the Streets

One key factor in the festival’s growing impact on downtown Northampton is a change in how it’s staged. From 2011 to 2015, it was presented in the Armory Street Parking Lot behind Thornes Marketplace. Along with the music stage was a beer tent, food vendors, a chef competition, and an art fair. It was a fun, multi-activity event, and attendees enjoyed it, Griggs said.

“What I felt was lacking was, if you were on Main Street, you had no idea anything was going on,” she explained. “It was tucked behind Thornes. It was efficient in that everything took place in one place, but there wasn’t a lot of space for an audience.”

Then, Cahillane and board member Paul Arslanian both came up with the same idea independently for the 2018 festival.

“In order to keep the cost down, which had gotten very high, and to be more all around town, they said, ‘let’s stage it in different places,’” Griggs said of the decision to schedule music acts inside downtown businesses, requiring attendees to move around to see them all.

The Art Blakey Centennial Celebration last October featured five original Jazz Messengers, including Robin Eubanks on trombone, Brian Lynch on trumpet, and Bobby Watson on saxophone.
Photo by Julian Parker-Burns

“The idea was to get people to walk from place to place and stop in at a gallery or stop in at a restaurant or stop in at a café, and we would leave time in between shows so people could do that,” she explained. “Half the mission is supporting the economy of Northampton and bringing vibrancy back, which is what people said they wanted.”

Saturday’s slate of performances ends with the only ticketed show of the festival, a nationally known headliner at the Academy of Music. In recent years, that show has featured the Paquito D’Rivera Quintet in 2018, the Kurt Elling Quintet in 2019, and the Art Blakey Centennial Celebration in 2021, featuring five original members of Blakey’s Jazz Messengers.

The model has worked well, Griggs said, although the board has talked about streamlining it by bringing the venues closer together. One thing that won’t change, however, is the Friday Jazz Strut, which features local and regional bands, including student bands, and overlapping performance schedules.

“We stage the music a half-hour apart, and every band plays for two hours,” she noted. “That definitely gets people all over town, patronizing the restaurants and breweries and cafés. And that’s important.”

Speaking of students, the festival board also supports jazz education through a program called Jazz Artists in the Schools, in which Arslanian secures jazz artists from big cities across the Northeast to workshop with local high-school jazz bands.

“It’s an incredible opportunity for students to learn from musicians who make music, who have successfully made music their life — active, performing musicians,” Griggs said.

While “the board is the Jazz Festival,” she said, noting that it’s certainly a working board with year-round responsibilities, the festival itself also pulls in dozens of young volunteers each year, and she’s been moved by the sentiments they’ve expressed.

Cocomama performs at Pulaski Park in Northampton in October

Cocomama performs at Pulaski Park in Northampton in October, one of many female-fronted acts who played last year’s Jazz Festival.

“One said, ‘I’ll do whatever you need me to do. I’ll be a runner, whatever you need for this to run smoothly; this is important,’” she recalled. A woman who had recently moved from Brooklyn said, “when I found out that Northampton has a jazz festival, I thought, ‘wow, this is a cool down, I want to live here, this is really cool.’

“That’s important for me to hear,” Griggs noted, adding that one vocalist who took part in the Jazz Strut clamored for more involvement and is now serving on the board.

“That’s critically important to me,” she went on. “I want this to last. I’ve been at this now since 2017, and I’ll be darned if, when I step down, it dies. That cannot happen. I would feel I failed if that happened. It’s critically important. So we need to keep bringing in the younger players and the younger musicians and the younger people who really care about keeping it alive. I think the Jazz Festival is now, and will be, an important feather in Northampton’s cap.”

 

Community Focused

Another volunteer and musician noted the 2021 festival’s increased slate of women performers, telling Griggs that was a definite plus for such an event in Northampton. She was impressed by young jazz enthusiasts pointing that fact out. “The goal is to continue to showcase women in jazz.”

Griggs has certainly shone over the years as a woman in marketing. As noted, she worked in New York City for 30 years, marketing for dot-com firms, mutual funds, and large corporations like American Express and Coca-Cola. She and her husband actually owned a firm for eight of those years, doing mostly financial-services marketing.

“That was lucrative, but totally intangible,” she said. “I got so tired of marketing credit cards and things like that.”

Then, while taking her teenage sons on college tours, she fell in love with higher education and the idea of “marketing people.” So she segued into higher-ed marketing for Queensboro Community College in the city.

“It totally changed my life. I felt like I got a crash course in nonprofit marketing and fundraising, because I reported to Development.”

When she returned to Northampton in 2011, she carried that experience with her into her new firm, RC Communications, working with a host of nonprofits in the Valley. She was also part of the Creative, a marketing enterprise she formed with Janice Beetle and Maureen Scanlon.

“But I was getting so involved in the chamber and the Jazz Festival, I felt like I needed to pull back and be semi-retired,” she told BusinessWest. While she still works with a few long-time clients, the rest of her time is split between the Jazz Festival, the chamber, her role chairing the investment committee at Edwards Church, and also Valley Jazz Voices, a group, formed in 2015, of 30 vocalists who sing exclusively jazz throughout region. “I just have so many initiatives I’m doing in the community, I just feel fortunate that I can spend more time doing them.”

She sees a symbiosis in these roles, just as she does between the Jazz Festival and the downtown environment it lifts up, and gets a lift from in return.

“The relationships I’ve made in the chamber are helpful to my business, and also helpful to the Jazz Festival, which is, in turn, helpful to the town. It’s a complete full circle.”

And a full life, one with the controlled, yet exciting, rhythm of a jazz performance — a life of true impact, note by note.

“I feel like I’m making a difference that people see most visibly — in the Jazz Fest — because of all the other things I do,” Griggs said. “It’s all of those things that I think make a difference together.”

 

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

 

Class of 2022

His Decisions, and His Actions, Have Helped Move Society Forward

Leah Martin Photography

Leah Martin Photography

 

 

It wasn’t the most compelling moment in John Greaney’s long and distinguished career behind the bench. And it certainly wasn’t the most controversial.

But it was poignant, and it spoke volumes about who he is and how he does things.

As the opposing sides in a bitter power struggle for control of the Boston Red Sox gathered in Room 1006 of the Massachusetts Court of Appeals on Feb. 14, 1984, Greaney, the recently appointed chief justice of the Appellate Division, and his fellow justices could feel the tension rising.

“We had practically every major lawyer in Boston there either observing or arguing,” Greaney, currently senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, recalled. “[Justice] Ami Cutter, who was sitting next to me, said, as the whole thing ended, ‘this was very tense; can you say something?’”

He did. Speaking specifically to the lawyer in front of him, but also all those present, he said, “it may take into the baseball season before a decision is rendered, so I Ieave you with this thought. I urge all of the disputing parties in the meantime to at least get together to do something about the pitching.”

The next day’s story on the court session in the sports section of the Boston Globe carried this headline:

 

May They Please the Court

Judge Offers Red Sox Litigants Advice on Pitching as Appeals Are Heard

 

The episode also found its way into Sports Illustrated, said Greaney, who said that, while his tongue may have been in cheek, he was speaking for all Sox fans thirsty for a pennant, and with a sense of humor that became a trademark.

Indeed, whether it was while he sat on the state Supreme Judicial Court — his next stop after the Appeals Court — or at the table for a meeting of the Noble Hospital board of directors, Greaney usually had a one-liner (or three or four) and a way of relieving tension in whatever courtroom he was serving in. And that’s just one of his many talents.

Only a small percentage of lawyers enter the profession with the hard goal of one day sitting on the bench, but Greaney did. He said he was influenced in a profound way by his experience serving working for Westfield District Court Judge Arthur Garvey the summer after his first year at New York University School of Law.

“I was basically just hanging around, observing the court,” he recalled. “So every morning, I sat and observed the court, and I was bewitched because he seemed to handle the cases that would come in — driving while intoxicated, small burglaries, those kinds of things — with relative ease. And he had a good demeanor about giving defendants a break; usually, if they had a job and had a family, he didn’t want to incarcerate them, so he’d give them warnings, tell them to behave, and maybe give them probation.

“I said ‘jeez, he’s certainly doing something worthwhile here,” he went on, adding that he went back to law school in the fall committed to finding a career path that would enable him to do the same.

And to say that he did would be an understatement. After serving in the military and then working for a decade at the law firm Ely and King in Springfield, Greaney was appointed the presiding judge of the Hampden County Housing Court, the second such court in Massachusetts. In 1976, the was appointed a justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court; in 1978, he was appointed a justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court; and in 1984, as noted, as that court’s chief justice.

“He had a good demeanor about giving defendants a break; usually, if they had a job and had a family, he didn’t want to incarcerate them … I said, ‘jeez, he’s certainly doing something worthwhile here.’”

In 1989, he was appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court, and during his two decades on the court, during which he famously rode a Peter Pan Bus to work most days so he could work during his commute, he participated in many significant decisions, including the landmark Goodridge v. Department of Health, in which he wrote the concurrence to the opinion establishing Massachusetts as the first state to legalize same-sex marriage (more on that later).

He also wrote many other significant decisions, including the 1993 decision that recognized the rights of gay couples in Massachusetts to adopt children, a 1997 decision affirming the unconstitutionality of a statute prohibiting panhandling, and a 2007 decision upholding a $2 million libel verdict against the Boston Herald.

Slicing through all those cases and work on each of those courts, Greaney said he remembered what he learned back in Westfield District Court in the early ’60s and tried to make the same overall kind of impact on people’s lives.

Daniel Finnegan, managing partner for Bulkley Richardson, who nominated Greaney for the Difference Maker award, summed up Greaney’s career, and his broad impact, this way:

“Throughout each phase of his career, Justice Greaney has earned tremendous respect for his intellect, professional integrity, and commitment to the community. He has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice, influenced our societal values and ways of thinking, and continues to be a valuable mentor, sharing wisdom and insight deemed from his impressive career. Greaney has proven that he is a trailblazer, an agent of social change, and a true difference maker.”

 

Court of Opinion

Long before imploring those fighting for control of the Red Sox to get some pitching help, Greaney was making his mark in a different kind of setting.

That would be this region’s housing court, an assignment that would in many ways set the tone for all that would come later.

Indeed, Greaney would essentially create the Housing Court from scratch, making it into what he called a true ‘Peoples Court,’ with the help of an advisory committee that included another member of this year’s Difference Makers class, Herbie Flores (see story on page 30).

“People who came in were not going to be intimidated, if we could help it,” he recalled. “We were going to design simple, plain-English forms to be used in evictions and other actions, and we were going to print them in two languages, Spanish and English, and we were going to allow people to be pro se as much as we could. And I decided in Small Claims that I would write a decision in every case.

“I then took the court on the road, which was unheard of at the time,” he went on, adding that he had sessions in public buildings, such as city halls, schools, and other facilities, to make the court more accessible. Its home base, though, was the courthouse in Springfield, which had no room at the time, he recalled, noting that a small courtroom was eventually secured, and for a clerk’s office, “a janitor was kicked out, and we took that space — but it was a heck of a fight.”

As noted, that Housing Court assignment would enable Greaney to make his mark and forge a reputation as an imaginative, hard-working, people-oriented jurist. And these were some of the qualities that caught the attention of Mike Dukakis, who would play a huge role in his career trajectory.

The two first met when Dukakis was running for lieutenant governor and Greaney, long active with the state’s Democratic party, was a state delegate. Greaney backed Dukakis in that election, and he won the nomination, but the Democratic ticket lost the election. Two years later, Dukakis ran for governor and won, and not long after appointed Greaney to the state’s Superior Court. Later, he would appoint him to the Appeals Court, where he later became chief justice.

“Then he lost the next election to Ed King, and I thought, ‘that’s the end of that,’ Greaney recalled. “But he was back four years later, and he later appointed me to the Supreme Judicial Court, so I owe a lot to Mike.”

Looking back on his career and his legacy, Greaney said he carried on in the spirit of Judge Garrity, and with the same philosophy that defined his work when building the Housing Court.

“Simple principles of decency dictate that we extend to the plaintiffs, and to their new status, full acceptance, tolerance, and respect. We should do so because it is the right thing to do.”

“I was motivated by helping the little guy and helping society move forward, and the SJC gave me a great opportunity to do that,” he said, referring to several of those groundbreaking cases he heard and helped decide.

One was the 1993 decision that recognized the rights of same-sex couples to adopt children, and another was the historic Goodwin v. Department of Public Health case that led to Massachusetts becoming the first U.S. state to allow same-sex couples to marry, a ruling that has influenced many other states that have followed suit and the U.S. Supreme Court as well.

The wording used in his concurring opinion has not only brought tears to the eyes of many gay-rights activists, but they have reportedly found their way into the wedding vows used by many same-sex couples:

“I am hopeful that our decision will be accepted by those thoughtful citizens who believe that same-sex unions should not be approved by the state,” he wrote. “I am not referring here to acceptance in the sense of grudging acknowledgment of the court’s authority to adjudicate the matter. My hope is more liberating … we share a common humanity and participate together in the social contract that is the foundation of our Commonwealth. Simple principles of decency dictate that we extend to the plaintiffs, and to their new status, full acceptance, tolerance, and respect. We should do so because it is the right thing to do.”

Throughout his career, Greaney has demonstrated the right thing to do, whether it was on the bench or in service to the community — on the board of Noble Hospital and the Westfield Academy or while serving on commissions such as the Massachusetts Housing Partnership, the Alternative Dispute Resolution Task Force, and the Massachusetts Gender Bias Study Committee.

Today, he is back where he started with his career — sort of. As senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, he’s been involved with a number of cases, including some involving some area colleges; and some mediation, although there is less call for it now with most courts still being closed; and even some work on the firm’s COVID-19 Response Committee to advise clients on the latest status of the law and matters ranging from vaccines to aid from the federal government.

He works two days a week on average, more if he has active projects he’s working on, and even works remotely on occasion, although he much prefers to be in the office. At 83, he’s still committed to staying busy — and making a difference in any way he can.

 

Bottom Line

While Greaney’s request probably wasn’t the reason, Red Sox ownership did eventually do something about the pitching, and the team delivered an American League pennant in 1986.

That plea for help doesn’t have much to do with Greaney being a Difference Maker, but, then again, it does. Looking back, he was able to seize that moment, as he was with so many other moments over the past 60 years, whether they were in Hampden County’s first Housing Court, on the Supreme Judicial Court, or as a professor of law at Suffolk University after his forced retirement from the bench at age 70. Suffice it to say, he wasn’t ready to leave.

As Finnegan noted, Greaney has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice. And that has made him worthy of inclusion in the Difference Makers class of 2022.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Class of 2022

She’s Put Her ‘Superpowers’ to Use to Help Those in Need

 

Leah Martin Photography

Tara Brewster says she’s probably bought more than 100 copies of the children’s book — and given them all away. She joked that she’s waiting for the author to call and thank her for her consistent support.

It’s called The Three Questions, and it’s based on a story by Leo Tolstoy. It’s about a young boy named Nikolai who sometimes feels uncertain about the right way to act. So he devises three questions to help him know what to do:

• When is the best time to do things?

• Who is the most important one?

• What is the right thing to do?

He then commences asking several different animal characters for the answers, and by book’s end he’s still asking, although one of those characters, a turtle, points out that, through the course of some recent actions — and especially his efforts to save an injured panda and its child — Nikolai had answered the questions himself.

Those answers are: ‘there is only one important time, and that time is now,’ ‘the most important one is always the one you are with,’ and ‘the most important thing is to do good for the one who is standing at your side.’

And these, the turtle notes, are the answers to “what is most important in this world — why we are here.”

Brewster says the book and its message are more than a fun, informational, and inspirational story. The Three Questions sums up quickly and effectively how she has lived her life to this point — and what drives her, if you will, to lend her time and talents to several area nonprofits as a board member, cheerleader, and relentless fundraiser.

“These are questions that I really fall back on a lot in a day,” she explained. “They’re really simple, and they just help me think about what am I doing, who am I impacting, and when am I supposed to be doing the thing that matters most. When I get really stressed out and start thinking, I should do doing this, and I should be doing this, I realize that I can only focus on one thing at a time, and it’s the thing that you’re doing that you should be putting your heart and soul into.”

Brewster, who seems to possess enough energy to power all of Northampton by herself, is involved as a board member with several nonprofits in that area, ranging from the Downtown Northampton Assoc. (DNA) to the Hampshire Regional YMCA; from Double Edge Theatre to Cutchins Programs for Children and Familes.

“I can honestly say that I have never met anyone so dedicated to helping those that are less fortunate in our community than Tara. I’ve seen so many people join local not-for-profit boards for networking opportunities or to strengthen one’s résumé. Unlike anyone I’ve ever met, Tara works tirelessly to gain support and funding for the organizations that she serves.”

But she also volunteers for, and helps fundraise for, the Food Bank of Wester Massachusetts and Monte’s March, Tapestry Development Committee, Safe Passage and its Hot Chocolate Run, and the Cancer Connection and its Mother’s Day Half Marathon.

But it’s not what she does that makes her a Difference Maker, although that’s part of it, but how she does it. Bill Grinnell, president of Webber & Grinnell Insurance, who nominated her for this honor, explained it this way:

“I can honestly say that I have never met anyone so dedicated to helping those that are less fortunate in our community than Tara. I’ve seen so many people join local not-for-profit boards for networking opportunities or to strengthen one’s résumé. Unlike anyone I’ve ever met, Tara works tirelessly to gain support and funding for the organizations that she serves.”

To get some perspective on those comments, one needs only to listen to Brewster as she talks about how she set out to become the top fundraiser for the Hot Chocolate Run, and then made the goal reality.

Tara Brewster, right, poses for a promotional photo for the Treehouse Foundation’s ‘Stir Up Some Love’ fundraiser with A.J. Bresciano

Tara Brewster, right, poses for a promotional photo for the Treehouse Foundation’s ‘Stir Up Some Love’ fundraiser with A.J. Bresciano, first vice president and commercial lender at Greenfield Savings Bank, and Julie Kumble, director of Strategic Partnerships & Development for the foundation.

“Safe Passage has a leaderboard every year, and since I started doing the Hot Chocolate Run in 2009, it’s been my goal to be number one on the leaderboard,” she said. “And two years ago, I finally got there. How did I do that? I asked, and I asked, and I asked people that I knew — friends, family, those in the community — to donate to Safe Passage to help deal with domestic violence.

“That’s what it comes down to: doing what you can, and using your superpowers to help others,” she went on. “And everyone has the power to do something, some good, every day.”

Because she uses her power every single day, it seems, Brewster has earned her place in the Difference Makers class of 2020.

 

Buy the Book

Brewster grew up Florence, not far from where she lives now, which was certainly “not the plan,” she said.

She told BusinessWest that many of those she grew up with were firm of the belief that one had to leave this area to achieve whatever dreams they had made for themselves. And she came to that belief herself.

But her desired next destination was certainly different than most others had in mind.

“I wanted to go to Montana — I think Wyoming and Montana are my two favorites,” she recalled, adding that she had already been to several states by the time she was in high school, and had determined that the Rocky Mountain region was where she wanted to go to college. “I thought I would like Big Sky country and being out in the wilderness; I wanted to be a pediatrician, and I wanted to go the University of Montana Bozeman.”

But fate would keep her closer to home.

Indeed, her mother was diagnosed with stage-4 ovarian cancer when Tara was just 15, a turn of events that would not only alter her plans for college, but inspire her to continuously review how she was living her life, with the goal of reaching higher — professionally, but also in the way she was using her considerable talents to help others who were less fortunate.

“That completely changed the course of my entire life; I have no idea where I would be had that not happened. She fought like hell, and ultimately lost the fight,” she said, adding that, long before her mother died, she gave up the dream of going to Montana, knowing she could not leave her father and brother at that critical time.

Tara Brewster works a United Way annual campaign event with Markus Jones

Tara Brewster works a United Way annual campaign event with Markus Jones, senior Major Gifts officer at Northfield Mount Hermon School.

Brewster would eventually graduate from Smith College, majoring in government and anthropology, and found her way into the men’s clothing business. She started at Taylor Men, which had a store in Thornes Market, while she was at Smith, and would later be regional sales manager for seven stores in the Northeast before moving to Manhattan and working for a men’s wholesale apparel company and becoming what she called a “road warrior.”

Eventually, the road took her back to Northampton and where she started — sort of. Taylor Men in Thornes Marketplace had closed, and she began contemplating owning her own store on that site.

Later, she and partner Candice Connors would open Jackson & Connor, an entrepreneurial venture that would — with her already-significant involvement in the Greater Northampton community — earn Brewster her first honor from BusinessWest: a 40 Under Forty plaque. It would also help set the tone when it comes to how she would be “all in,” as she put it, with both her career and her involvement in the community.

“I call that business my ‘first child,’ because I gave it my all,” she said. “And Jackson & Connor really helped me understand purpose and place of myself as a human, as a community member, and as a business owner; it gave me a clear direction of how I wanted to be in my community and in my region, and how I wanted to use my resources, my influence, and my power to lead and have an impact. And from the epicenter, I’ve grown as a human, as a person, as an employee, as a member of a team.”

 

The Plot Thickens

Eight years after launching Jackson & Connor, the two partners sold the enterprise, which is still operating today, and commenced writing their own next chapters. Brewster segued into consulting before Mark Grumoli, senior vice president and commercial loan officer at Greenfield Savings Bank, who years earlier had helped the partners secure funding to launch Jackson & Connor when he was with Florence Bank, convinced her to become the new vice president of Business Development.

She recalls friends and family members saying she wouldn’t last long in that role, but five years later, she’s still in it. That’s because it gives her what she desires most in a job — a situation where each day is different, a role where she can flex her entrepreneurial muscles, and a position that gives her the time and opportunity to be ‘out in the community,’ in every aspect of that phrase. And it has allowed her to take both her career and her civic endeavors to a bigger stage.

When asked what a typical day is like for her, she said there is no such thing. Each day is different. But each one is filled with conversations — phone calls, e-mails, texts, and some old-fashioned, face-to-face meetings. And only some of them have to do with banking.

“They pertain to connection, encouragement, engagement, assistance, and more,” she explained. “I serve on five boards, and there are probably five boards that I do other things for. So a lot of my conversations are with community members, and nonprofits in particular.

“These nonprofits have a real piece of my heart because I believe that, if you focus on and encourage and support the nonprofits, then more of the people who need help in this world and this region will get the help they need, because they are the helpers,” she went on,” she went on. “The nonprofits, first and foremost, are the ones that are doing the professional helping in a day, so if you want to do something and you don’t feel you have the time or whatever, support a nonprofit — that’s the easiest way to ensure that you’re creating some impact for the people who need it most.”

Brewster has certainly lived by these words, assisting nonprofits in many ways, especially through leadership as board member and with the all-important task of fundraising, which is always critical, but particularly during COVID, when the need is greater and many nonprofits have been hurt financially.

As she does so, she said she draws inspiration from others who, like her, balance work, family, and giving back, and somehow find the time and energy for all three. She mentioned Monte Belmonte, the host and program director at WHMP radio, the creator of Monte’s March, and a Difference Maker himself in 2020.

“He has a job at the radio station that he gets paid for, but then he has this other thing that he doesn’t get paid for — it’s his heart desire, it’s his calling, it’s how he uses his day job to be more and do more, to make a larger stage, to make a greater impact for a call to action,” Brewster said. “I have some people in my life who I’ve looked to for guidance on how to live and how to make a greater social impact with the talents that we have, because we all have these spheres of influence, whether it’s connections, or an employer, or social awareness.

“We all have these superpowers that we have to tap into in order to do greater good, in order to make a difference,” she went on. “And people think, ‘oh, I don’t have anything, I don’t have the time, I don’t have the resources.’ But we do. We all do. We all have connections, we have have these superpowers. We just have to use them.”

 

The Last Word

When asked to list her superpowers, she mentioned ‘connectivity,’ ‘engagement,’ ‘compassion,’ ‘awareness,’ and even ‘caretaking,’ and she traces them to when her mother got sick and after she died.

“For me, I’m acutely aware of sorrow and pain and hardship and loss, and what that means to being a whole self and a whole person — how you show up and how other people show up,” she explained. “It’s impacted the way I serve the community and serve on boards.”

Brewster serves in a way that enables those fundraisers to carry on that work they do and provide the many kinds of help that are needed.

“There’s an old saying … “you only get one life to live, and if you do it right, one is enough,’” she said in conclusion.

She has certainly done it right, and because of that, she has earned her place as a Difference Maker.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Class of 2022

He’s Spent a Lifetime Investing in His Community — and People in Need

Leah Martin Photography

 

 

Herbie Flores could have become hardened, even embittered, by a tumultuous youth.

Instead, he’s spent a lifetime helping people overcome their own difficulties.

“I came from a very poor family in Puerto Rico,” he said, raised by his mother early on after his father died. “At some point, my uncle told my mother and sister it would be better if I had a male role model. That’s a cultural thing. So I ended up in Delaware with my uncle, who was a hardworking guy.”

Back in the ’60s, Delaware wasn’t the liberal bastion it is today, as it grappled, as all states did, with school desegregation and other racial issues. So he learned early on about race relations and the futility of racism.

After moving to Springfield in 1965, Flores entered the Army and shipped off to Vietnam, where certain images stick with him to this day. “It’s not a good feeling killing a human being. But as George Patton said, the mission is to go from point A to point B, and whatever gets in the way, get rid of it.”

He remembers servicemen being spit on and called baby killers back stateside, but he was more haunted by the sheer numbers of U.S. wounded and dying. “You just put that someplace, everything goes to a compartment — it’s the only way. You continue moving on. There were a lot of drugs. Many of my friends did not sleep.”

After his war experience, though, Flores wanted to focus on bettering lives, not dwelling on a war that ruined so many of them.

“Life is short, when you put it in perspective. And the time you have here, what do you do to make it better — not only in a selfish way, but for the next person?”

Specifically, his affinity with migrant farm workers that led to the development of an agency — the New England Farm Workers’ Council (NEFWC) — to help them out with various needs, from fuel assistance to job skills to education.

That agency, launched in 1971, eventually morphed into Partners for Community, a nonprofit with multiple departments under its umbrella, including the Corporation for Public Management, which seeks solutions to welfare dependency, chronic joblessness, and illiteracy, and also focuses on providing services to those with physical and developmental disabilities; and New England Partners in Faith, which seeks to provide sustainable development and capacity building for small faith-based organizations throughout New England through technical assistance and job-related training.

Herbie Flores’ office walls are filled with proclamations, awards, and photos of his interactions with state and national leaders.

Herbie Flores’ office walls are filled with proclamations, awards, and photos of his interactions with state and national leaders.

“All those experiences, from there to here to Vietnam, helped me see that things are bad, but they’re not real bad,” Flores said. “Life is short, when you put it in perspective. And the time you have here, what do you do to make it better — not only in a selfish way, but for the next person?

“I’ve been homeless, I’ve been without food, but you move forward,” he added. “Many people get stuck in the same place, but you can’t stay stagnant.”

For helping people move forward from adversity over the past 50 years, while continually investing in the vitality of Greater Springfield, explains why Flores is certainly a Difference Maker.

 

Taking Root

Established in 1971 as a small organization to support farm workers, NEFWC has become a multi-faceted human-services agency dedicated to improving the quality of life for thousands of low-income people throughout the Northeast.

Among its chief programs are home-energy assistance for income-eligible families in Hampden and Northern Worcester counties; emergency shelter assistance for at-risk families throughout Massachusetts; employment and job training for migrant seasonal workers in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island, as well as welfare-to-work populations in Connecticut; and youth programs providing services to at-risk, low-income youth both in and out of school in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Connecticut.

And its programs, both under the NEFWC name or the Partners for Community umbrella, continue to evolve.

“We have different organizations still tied up with us,” he said, citing, as one example, Gándara Center, which arose from Partners for Community because a population of Latino and Puerto Rican veterans were struggling with heroin. “We were not trained psychologists, but we wanted to help those guys. So we started bringing people in who could.”

Many of the organization’s services, like its fuel-assistance program that helps low-income households with utility bills through subsidies and discounts, and its three homeless shelters for families eligible for emergency assistance, found growing need throughout the pandemic, but a more challenging environment to deliver services.

“I brought life to this building; it was a historical building, but it was empty. I like to use old buildings because you bring back the history.”

Take fuel assistance, for example. “There are federal regulations, paperwork, we give to people who give us money. But a lot of people in state government took off and were working at home. Before, you could talk to a human being. Now, you’re not talking to a human being — they give you a number, you call it, but the telephone is ringing all the time. For days, that information wasn’t transmitted,” he recalled.

“I’d have 1,600 applications here for fuel assistance ready to go, but I can’t get to the right person,” he went on. “And it’s not just me; all the state nonprofit agencies were dealing with that. The bureaucrats went home.

In other words, he said, communication broke down just as needs were rising. “It was tough, but we survived.”

Flores knows something about need. He was intimately acquainted with poverty as his family struggled for sustenance throughout his childhood in Puerto Rico. It was there, he said, that he began to identify himself with economically deprived groups and devote himself to service on their behalf — just as his experience in the military has spurred him to stay active in veterans’ causes; he was named Springfield Veteran of the Year in 2001.

Yet, through all his work with NEFWC and Partners for Community — whose services also extend to young people through HiSET support and mentoring programs, workforce-training programs for job seekers, and programs for adults with developmental disabilities or acquired brain injury — he remains humble.

“Everything we have done … I’m the figurehead, in a sense,” he said. “I have a whole team that works with me.”

 

Growing Recognition

This is the second time BusinessWest has honored Flores with one of its coveted awards; he was named Top Entrepreneur for 2011 for all his community-investment work, but particularly his real-estate projects that focused on urban renewal, housing, and other forms of economic development.

These included the Borinquen project in the impoverished North End of Springfield, which involved the renovation of 41 units of low-income housing, as well as six commercial spaces. The $11 million project combined federal tax credits, private-investment tax credits, Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development funds, city of Springfield HOME funds, and private financing — a good example of the tapestry of players Flores must weave together to turn one of his visions into reality.

“I brought life to this building; it was a historical building, but it was empty,” he said. “I like to use old buildings because you bring back the history.”

About 35 years ago, Flores made his first forays into real estate through Brightwood Development Corp. (BDC), a nonprofit formed with the goal of providing housing and economic development on the north side of Springfield. As president and CEO of the BDC, he developed a $2.5 million shopping center, La Plaza del Mercado, on Main Street in 1995, followed by a $3 million neighborhood medical clinic, El Centro de Salud Medico Inc., the next year. That was immediately followed by a $2 million rehabilitation of blighted, multi-family houses in the North End.

A more current project, a $38 million effort to transform Springfield’s historic Paramount Theater, which opened in 1926, into a performing arts center — and the adjoining Massasoit building, which was constructed before the Civil War, into a boutique hotel — has run into debt issues and delays in recent years, but remains a significant part of Flores’ downtown vision.

In addition to his other endeavors, he is president of the North End Educational Development Fund, which administers the largest Hispanic scholarship fund in New England, providing college scholarships for underprivileged, inner-city Springfield residents — and, hopefully, starts them on their own journeys of success.

All this earned him yet another honor in 2019, the prestigious Pynchon Medal from the Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts and the Pynchon trustees. Now, being named a Difference Maker soon after NEFWC marked 50 years of service is especially gratifying.

“I feel honored and proud to have been chosen by BusinessWest as one of the 2022 Difference Makers,” he said, noting, again, that his board of directors and staff deserves much of the credit for what he’s been able to accomplish. “Our longevity and success is a direct result of their dedication to our clients and our organization. All that I have accomplished is with the assistance of those around me.”

He also credited a number of regional business and nonprofit luminaries; throughout a broad interview, he dropped names like Janis Santos, Dick Stebbins, Leon Pernice, Bill Dwight, Paul Doherty, Joe LoBello, and Ronn Johnson as examples of mentors, supporters, and influences.

“I needed to produce something positive, not for me or for a little group, but for all of society,” he said. “In doing that, you develop relationships.”

He’s also been willing to lend a hand — and his acumen — to other organizations. “I sit on Janis Santos’ board,” he said, referring to the recently retired leader of HCS Head Start. “It’s about the education of children. People like that ask, ‘can you give us some time and help us open some doors?’ Yes, I can.”

Or, as another example, “Sister [Mary] Caritas asked me, ‘Herbie, can you come sit on my board? I need some advice for only three months.’ And three years later, I’m still there.”

 

Harvest of Success

He’s still there, all right — fighting the good fight to help folks who are struggling, and raising the profile and well-being of Springfield as well.

“You might change something a little bit,” he said of his philosophy of taking on new projects. “But it’s better than nothing. If you have a vision, you have to see where it will go.”

Springfield, and its environs, are certainly better off because of the difference Herbie Flores has made over the past half-century.

“It’s our city,” he told BusinessWest. “Let’s make it better, and leave it better for the next generation.”

 

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

 

Class of 2022

This Organization Has Harnessed the Exponential Power of Working Together

Leah Martin Photography

Leah Martin Photography

 

 

Convene and connect.

Those are the two words you hear most often when it comes to the mission of the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, and how the agency carries it out.

Together, those words explain how and why this organization — one of hundreds of community foundations across the country — does much more than write checks to nonprofits and provide scholarships and interest-free loans to students — although those are certainly parts of what it does.

More crucially, by convening groups, individuals, and institutions from across the 413, and connecting those constituencies as well as donors with resources and opportunities, the Community Foundation is working to identify the issues and challenges confronting the region, and acting as a leader in ongoing work on matters ranging from helping students complete college to helping children get a solid start to their education; from assisting the creative-arts community to helping agencies addressing issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Katie Allan Zobel

Katie Allan Zobel

“Our whole mission is to improve quality of life for everyone in the Valley and create opportunity and equity for all members of our community.”

Add another word — partner — and one can understand the full impact of the foundation. It doesn’t merely support nonprofits and students, it partners with them to improve outcomes — and quality of life — on myriad levels to become what its president and CEO, Katie Allan Zobel has called a “catalyst for change.”

“Our whole mission is to improve quality of life for everyone in the Valley and create opportunity and equity for all members of our community,” Zobel said, noting that most of the foundation’s funding comes from individuals, not large entities. They contribute both while they’re alive and in their wills and estate plans because they recognize how this organization’s model of convening and connecting multiplies the impact of their dollars.

“If they want to support an arts organization that’s much beloved by them, they can do that themselves; they don’t need the Community Foundation,” she explained. “But if they want to support reducing poverty in a particular area, well, that’s hard for one person to do on their own; you have to pool resources. And that kind of effort isn’t going to take a year or two; it’s going to take a sustained effort. We provide an option to individuals to do something they can’t do on their own.”

Paul Murphy

Paul Murphy

“We were able to distribute funds without a formal grant-application process because we had to constantly get the money out the door so we could meet those needs.”

Paul Murphy, chair of the Community Foundation’s board of trustees, noted that the pandemic has not changed the agency’s mission, necessarily, but merely spurred it to pivot, as all businesses and nonprofits have, and look at ways to meet new and emerging needs within the community, including food insecurity, eviction prevention, and mental healthcare.

“The foundation had just completed development of a new strategic plan, and it was all set for adoption by the board of trustees in March of 2020, which was just as the pandemic was hitting,” he recalled. “And part of that strategic plan that we wanted to implement was around leadership, flexibility, and community engagement, and suddenly, even before the plan was officially adopted, we had to put all those things into play because of the pandemic.”

Elaborating, he said the Community Foundation was able to secure what he called “an outpouring of funds” from a variety of sources, and it went about calling nonprofits and elected leaders in the region to identify areas in need. Simultaneously, it streamlined its grant-funding process so it was able to manage applications more quickly — and effectively.

“The foundation brings together philanthropists and helps them understand what the needs are in our community.”

The result was a quadrupling of grant funding over a typical, pre-pandemic year, Zobel said, adding that the team called on partners at organizations like the Women’s Fund and the Davis Foundation and borrowed their program officers to help make decisions, while recruiting volunteers to pitch in as well. “This was a huge collaborative effort. But I’ve always felt the work of the Community Foundation is a total team effort, not just with the staff, but volunteers.”

Once the foundation had the information it needed, Murphy explained, “we were able to distribute funds without a formal grant-application process because we had to constantly get the money out the door so we could meet those needs. That was an example of how the pandemic forced us to pivot, act more quickly, listen more closely to the community, and make sure the needs were met.”

Listening has always been one of the more important qualities at the foundation, said all those we spoke with, and it is just one quality that helps it explain why it has been named a Difference Maker for 2022.

“We’re moving away from being transactional and just handing someone a check.”

Beyond listening, it has acted on what has heard, and in many areas, but especially education and the needs of area students, said Christina Royal, president of Holyoke Community College, a trustee of the foundation, and chair of its education committee. But perhaps its greatest quality, she and others noted, is as a connector.

“That’s a huge piece because there are a lot of organizations and a lot of great work happening in our region, and the foundation acts a connector between donors, students, and nonprofit agencies,” she explained. “The foundation brings together philanthropists and helps them understand what the needs are in our community.”

Denise Hurst, the foundation’s vice president for Community Impact and Partnerships, agreed, saying it’s her job, and the foundation’s mission, to not only write checks, but work to make sure such grants are used in ways that are, in a word, “transformational.”

“We’re engaging with nonprofits and having deep conversations about how the work can be more transformative and impactful,” she explained. “We’re moving away from being transactional and just handing someone a check for money but not necessarily ensuring that they have all the tools and the resources they need to make that money transformational for the region.”

“We came to understand that the majority of arts organizations in our region are quite small, they have really small budgets, a fair amount of turnover … and there was, and is, a real need for capacity support.”

Connecting the Dots

The headlines placed atop recent press releases issued by the agency go a long way toward helping to quantify and qualify its impact within Western Mass. and explain why it is a Difference Maker:

• “Community Foundation Awards $1.3 Million in New Grants for Eviction Prevention, Mental Health, Food Insecurity Programs” (Feb. 11, 2021)

• “Community Foundation Awards $860,000 in New Grants for Immigrant Populations Impacted by COVID-19” (March 5, 2021);

• “Over $818,000 in Grants Distributed by Community Foundation in Latest COVID-19 Response Rounds” (June 22, 2021);

• “Community Foundation Deepens Partnership to Support BIPOC Arts and Creativity Across Massachusetts” (Oct. 20, 2021); and

• “Community Foundation Announces $150,000 Grant to Healing Racism Institute” (June 10, 2021).

Funding for these projects and so many others have increased significantly during the pandemic, Zobel said. “It’s an anomaly, but people have really been incredibly generous. We’ve even received a lot of contributions from outside the community.”

The foundation reported that its FY21 contributions to the community, across all endeavors, totaled $24.6 million and involved 1,668 total donors. That number includes $16.7 million in grants and $1.6 million in scholarships and interest-free loans to 848 students.

Becky Packard

Becky Packard

“We’re not just looking at scholarships, but also looking at what kinds of mentoring and supports can help people cross the finish line.”

Beyond these numbers, and those press-release headlines, are copious amounts of convening, connecting, and partnering, said Zobel, adding that, to properly serve the region and responsibly distribute the funds it raises, with an eye on both today and tomorrow, the Community Foundation must do a lot of listening and then acting on what it hears.

This applies to many of the traditional areas of focus for the foundation, especially education, but also some new ones, such as the arts, through creation of the ValleyCreates program, which serves to connect (there’s that word again) the arts and creative communities across Franklin, Hampden, and Hampshire counties.

“We started with a seed, a planning grant from the Barr Foundation, and we did a number of focus groups and surveys and interviews with key stakeholders in the arts sector in our three counties to understand what kind of support they needed, and also how best we can utilize our dollars to support that sector,” said Nicole Bourdon, program officer for ValleyCreates.

Elaborating, she said those research efforts revealed the need for not only grant writing — and the foundation has awarded hundreds of $1,000 grants that are combined with coaching and business-resiliency webinars — but also collaboration, across counties and across disciplines, to build capacity and enable this important sector to speak with a louder, more effective voice.

“We came to understand that the majority of arts organizations in our region are quite small, they have really small budgets, a fair amount of turnover … and there was, and is, a real need for capacity support,” said Bourdon, adding that the foundation continues to monitor and survey the sector to learn what tools it can offer so it can be what she called a “repository for artists and arts organization where they can gather resources and connect and collaborate.”

Zobel said Western Mass. doesn’t have as many large foundations or private philanthropy as the eastern part of the state, so corraling more support from outside Western Mass., such as the Boston-based Barr Foundation, is critical.

“There isn’t a large source of funding for the arts here,” she added. “That was a place the foundation felt we could be useful. We’ve been building that out and supporting not just the arts, but artists, especially artists of color.”

 

Degrees of Success

In many ways, ValleyCreates illustrates just how the Community Foundation works, said Zobel, adding that it first arms itself with information, then works with various constituencies to develop strategies for addressing region-wide issues and challenges.

Perhaps the best example of this process is the Western Mass Completes program, created with the understanding that it’s not enough to help students enter college — the bigger priority, for them and the region, is to see them to the finish line.

Faced with statistics that the average graduation rate at four-year institutions is 60% — and a staggering 25% at two-year institutions — the foundation commissioned a study and recruited Becky Packard, a trustee and professor of Psychology and Education at Mount Holyoke College, and a leading expert in research on factors that contribute to higher-education persistence, to lead it.

Ten local colleges and universities joined the endeavor, delving into the last eight years of student data on Community Foundation scholarship awardees, gathering information on the resources and systems in place at these schools, and collecting findings from national research and articles.

What became clear is that students often need more time and more resources to complete degrees; many are working full-time while in school and taking a reduced course load, while others are balancing school, work, and family responsibilities. Financial roadblocks create barriers that result in ‘stopping out,’ especially for high-need, first-generation students.

One example, Packard told BusinessWest, is a proliferation of “almost nurses” — nursing students who are close to a degree, “but have to sit out because they can’t afford licensing exams or can’t take the last set of courses because someone in their family lost their job. We’re not just looking at scholarships, but also looking at what kinds of mentoring and supports can help people cross the finish line.”

Royal agreed, noting that the foundation’s work to research the issues related to college completion has been critical in ongoing efforts regarding the direction of scholarships and who would benefit most from the scholarships that are awarded.

“You connect people, they apply, they get a scholarship … but then, what happens to them after?” she asked. “Did it contribute to increased retention or persistence within their educational pursuit? Did they go on to graduate? Being able to look at the impact beyond the scholarship is also really critical. That research contribution is also an important piece.”

Packard said data is still being gathered, and strategies formulated, to boost those graduation rates. She characterized Western Mass Completes as an economic-development issue at a time when companies of all kinds are in dire need of workers with specialized training.

“Usually foundations are charitable organizations and don’t always try to be catalyzers in the region like this, and that’s what I’m excited about.”

In every case — including its annual Valley Gives initiative, which focuses the region’s attention on nonprofits that need support — the foundation is doing this necessary work of convening and catalyzing, in so many critical areas.

“My role is to help convene the nonprofits in the three counties that we serve to help ensure that we are able to help provide them with funding to strengthen organizations that are doing the important work of helping to mitigate food insecurity, to stabilize housing, to provide our residents with opportunities for education, as well as workforce development training,” Hurst explained. “In addition to that, we are really committed to making sure we’re helping these nonprofits thrive and sustain themselves so they can do that important work.”

 

No Time to Rest

Zobel spends a lot of time thinking about inequity — not only in society, but in the philanthropic landscape of Western Mass.

“This is my life’s work: service to community. So I often see what’s missing and where the gaps are, what we’re not doing,” she told BusinessWest. “I guess it’s my job to keep my eye on who’s not part of this and who needs to be, and how to include others. I’m often thinking that way.”

That’s not to say she’s not gratified by this work. But she’s not satisfied, either, and there’s a difference.

“I’m proud of being a part of something that’s a movement for good, and for improvement and change and equity. I’m really proud of that,” she said. “Yet, I know there’s so much more work to do, so I stay focused on that.”

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]west.com

Opinion

Editorial

Thirteen years ago, BusinessWest launched a new recognition program, Difference Makers, as a way to celebrate the many different ways individuals and organizations can make a difference in their community, and Western Mass. as a whole.

And this year’s additions to that list provide still more evidence that there are countless ways to make a difference, and they all need to be celebrated. They include:

Tara Brewster, vice president of Business Development at Greenfield Savings Bank, who has made community service more than a mantra, immersing herself in the work of area nonprofits and causes — not in a slapdash fashion, but putting her heart and soul into whomever she happens to be helping each day;

• The Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, which for 30 years has convened and connected myriad resources in the region to benefit a host of groups, from students trying to pay for college to the arts community to organizations focused on helping people through the pandemic and economic disruption; 

• Heriberto Flores, president of the New England Farm Workers’ Council, who has spent the last half-century operating programs — centered on energy, education, child welfare, workforce development, and more — that help people in need, while at the same time investing in the economic well-being of Springfield;

John Greaney, retired State Supreme Court justice and senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, a judicial trailblazer who, as one peer put it, “has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice, influenced our societal values and ways of thinking, and continues to be a valuable mentor”;

Ruth Griggs, president of the Northampton Jazz Festival and principal at RC Communications, whose business has helped nonprofits reach new levels of marketing and success, and who brought those skills to bear on reviving a beloved music festival that continues to raise the profile of Northampton’s downtown;

• Ted Hebert, owner of Teddy Bear Pools and Spas, who has used his decades of success in the pool business as a springboard to support dozens of causes and organizations throughout the region, through both philanthropy and giving of his time — often in ways few people see;

• I Found Light Against All Odds and Its Founder and CEO, Stefan Davis, who emerged from a very difficult youth to found an organization that brings many resources together to, as its name implies, help young people journey from some dark, difficult times to a promising future; and

• Roca Holyoke and Springfield, an innovative program that helps young people in the criminal-justice system find a better path than recidivism and more time behind bars, by using case management, education, and employment training to get them into jobs and a stable, crime-free life.

As we said, there are no limits on the ways an individual or group can make a difference here in Western Mass. That’s what we’ve been celebrating since 2009, and the celebration continues with the class of 2022.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 99: February 7, 2022

George Interviews Barbara Trombley a financial advisor and CPA with Wilbraham-based Trombley Associates

Barbara Trombley

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Barbara Trombley a financial advisor and CPA with Wilbraham-based Trombley Associates. The two talk about the current volatility on Wall Street, the many different forces behind it, and what investors should be thinking — and doing. Or not doing, as the case may be. It’s all must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

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Community Spotlight Special Coverage

Community Spotlight

By Mark Morris

Chris Brittain

Chris Brittain says several projects in Lee, both town-funded and using ARPA aid, are moving forward.

As the pandemic enters its third year of disrupting life as we knew it, the business community in Lee continues to manage the disruptions of COVID-19 and its variants with a good degree of success. Colleen Henry attributes that to one reason.

“The local people here in Lee are strong supporters of our businesses,” said Henry, executive director of the Lee Chamber of Commerce.

Along with Lenox and Stockbridge, Lee is part of the Tri Town Health Department, which has maintained a mask mandate for all indoor spaces. One upside of the mask requirement is that it enables businesses, as well as town offices, to remain open without interruption.

That’s important, said interim Town Administrator Christopher Brittain, who has been on the job for only four months, yet has a full list of projects in the queue for this year and beyond.

Lee received an allocation of $1.6 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding, which will be spread out among several projects in town. Among them are replacing water lines in a couple of areas and upgrading the municipal website to make it easier for people to conduct town business online.

“When someone sells their home at $20,000 to $30,000 dollars over asking price, every house in that neighborhood increases in value. We can’t control the market, but we were able to lower the tax rate.”

All three towns in the Tri Town Health Department will contribute some of their ARPA money to fund the creation of a new food-inspector position in the department, a position certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as part of a national standards program.

“Obviously, we have inspectors now,” Brittain said. “The new position gives us someone to provide guidance with federal programs and reduce issues with food service and retail food vendors.”

Outside of ARPA funds, Brittain discussed several projects in the works, including paving on Main Street, with $1 million in funding approved at the last town meeting to continue that project into the summer.

Lee at a glance

Year Incorporated: 1777
Population: 5,788
Area: 27 square miles
County: Berkshire
Residential Tax Rate: $13.65
Commercial Tax Rate: $13.65
Median Household Income: $41,566
Median Family Income: $49,630
Type of Government: Representative Town Meeting
Largest Employers: Lee Premium Outlets; Onyx Specialty Papers; the Landing at Laurel Lake; Oak n’ Spruce Resort; Big Y
* Latest information available

One significant project Brittain hopes to see make progress this year involves the former Eagle Mill paper company. Plans to redevelop the site feature 80 units of affordable and market-rate housing, as well as several restaurant and retail stores. The $55 million project has been in the works for several years, though the official groundbreaking was held only three months ago.

“Because of COVID, the Eagle Mill project is moving slower than everyone wants it to,” Brittain said, noting that a significant next step involves six dilapidated houses near the site, which were recently purchased to be torn down. Construction on the mill complex is scheduled to roll out in two phases. “This is a big project that will take up the entire north end of Main Street.”

Additional housing in Lee would certainly be welcome, said Henry, who noted the current supply of available houses is low because sales have been so brisk. “As a result, we have a lot of new residents, and that’s kind of exciting.”

In terms of real-estate taxes, the past year brought both good news and bad news, as the town lowered the tax rate, but selling prices for homes kept boosting valuations, resulting in higher taxes anyway.

“Whether we replace or renovate, we have to do something because the police are running out of space, and the ambulance building needs work.”

“When someone sells their home at $20,000 to $30,000 dollars over asking price, every house in that neighborhood increases in value,” Brittain said. “We can’t control the market, but we were able to lower the tax rate.”

For this year, the tax rate is $13.65 per thousand, down from $14.68 the year before. Because of higher valuations, he explained, the average tax increased by $193.

 

High Times Ahead

One industry relatively new to the tax rolls in Lee is cannabis. Right now, Canna Provisions is the only cannabis facility that’s up and running, but Brittain said the town has 14 permits for various cannabis facilities, with interested parties claiming 13 of them. Activity for future cannabis businesses includes a facility for growing on Route 102 under construction and a dispensary proposed for the former Cork and Hearth restaurant on the Lee/Lenox line.

The revenue from Canna Provisions has begun making a difference for the town. Brittain said the impact on tax revenue has made it possible for the town to consider hiring a full-time school resource officer, add streetlights in town, and begin a study on public-safety facilities.

Right now, Lee’s public-safety departments are in several buildings. The police operate out of two floors in Town Hall, the Fire Department is in an historic firehouse, and the town ambulance is located in a separate building.

“We are doing a study to see if we can consolidate public safety in one new building,” Brittain said. “Whether we replace or renovate, we have to do something because the police are running out of space, and the ambulance building needs work.”

An artist’s rendering of the Eagle Mill redevelopment project in Lee.

An artist’s rendering of the Eagle Mill redevelopment project in Lee.

While the study won’t happen for a while, he noted, thanks to the cannabis revenue, the town can explore its options for whether to invest in what it has or move forward with a new facility.

Before the Omicron variant of COVID hit, businesses in Lee were having a strong fall season. Henry said business was brisk. “We had lots of people come to Lee who were eating in our restaurants, staying in our hotels, and shopping in our stores, so we were pretty happy about the fall.”

Despite new variants of COVID and other disruptions to business, Henry noted that, because restaurants have developed strong takeout systems, they can quickly adapt and keep serving their customers.

“I’ve heard from people in Lee how grateful they were to still be able to get good food and how the restaurants worked to accommodate everyone,” she said, adding that the quick adaptation to takeout kept people employed “even though everyone still needs more workers.”

Looking ahead to other projects in town, plans are moving forward for a bike path that would run along the Housatonic River. The mile-long path would extend approximately from Big Y to Lee Bank. Brittain said it’s not certain if construction will begin this year, but the town is working with MassDOT to keep the project moving.

“We had lots of people come to Lee who were eating in our restaurants, staying in our hotels, and shopping in our stores, so we were pretty happy about the fall.”

Lee has also applied to become an Appalachian Trail Community. According to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy website, when a town along the trail receives designated community status, it is considered a support asset for all who use the trail, and the conservancy encourages people to explore these communities. If accepted, Lee looks to join Western Mass. communities of Cheshire, Dalton, Great Barrington, and North Adams with the designation.

“We’ve been working with the Appalachian Trail folks, and we’re hoping Lee receives its designation by the end of the year,” Brittain said.

 

 

Seeking a Return to Normalcy

For the past two years, Lee had to cancel its annual Founders Weekend celebration — which recognizes the founding of the town back in 1777 — due to COVID concerns. Henry said people in town treat it as a fun birthday celebration, and in 2022, the town will be 245 years old.

Held on the third weekend in September, the community-wide event takes place on Main Street, which is closed to traffic to allow restaurants and other vendors to set up in the middle of the street.

“Founders Weekend always draws a huge crowd, and that’s why we were not able to hold it the last two years. It was too difficult to keep such a large gathering safe,” Henry said.

While there is no guarantee Founders Weekend will happen this year, she has it listed in her event calendar, and both she and Brittain are hopeful the event will take place in September.

“I think people are ready for a fun blowout weekend,” Henry said. “We’re all looking forward to it.”

People on the Move
Tom Bernard

Tom Bernard

Tom Bernard, who just wrapped up his last term as mayor of North Adams, has been selected to lead Berkshire United Way (BUW) as the new president and CEO starting Jan. 24. Bernard earned his bachelor’s degree from Williams College and later his master of public administration degree from Westfield State University. After a decade working in Boston and then as a freelance writer, he began a long career in the nonprofit sector. Bernard first served as development officer at Mass MoCA, followed by nearly 10 years at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts as director of Corporate, Foundation, and Government Relations, then executive assistant to the president, and eventually director of Business Affairs. He was the director of Special Projects at Smith College before becoming mayor in 2018.

•••••

Chelsea Depault

Chelsea Depault

Marjorie Smith

Marjorie Smith

Erica Josephson

Erica Josephson

Tony Worden, CEO of Greenfield Cooperative Bank and its Northampton Cooperative Bank division, announced three promotions within the bank. Chelsea Depault is being promoted to AVP, Commercial Operations officer. She originally started with the bank back in 2007 as a float teller and also worked in the Accounting department before moving on to Commercial Lending, where she has been for the past several years as a credit analyst and then as an AVP, Commercial Lending. In her new role, she will oversee the operations of commercial loan servicing and administration. She holds a bachelor’s degree from UMass. Marjorie Smith is being promoted to senior commercial credit analyst. She has been with the bank since 2010, when she started as a teller. In the years since, she worked for the Residential Lending department in various roles before joining the Commercial Lending side as a credit analyst. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Houghton College. Erica Josephson is being promoted to senior commercial credit analyst. She has been with the bank since 2019, when she joined as a credit analyst with several years of experience in credit underwriting at two other local institutions. Since coming on board, she has played a critical role in shepherding customers’ PPP loans through to forgiveness. She holds a bachelor’s degree from University of Vermont.

•••••

Bulkley Richardson announced that Elizabeth “Liz” Zuckerman has been promoted to partner in the firm’s Litigation department. Zuckerman joined the firm in 2014 as an associate in the Litigation department, where her practice focuses on general commercial litigation, First Amendment issues, and defamation. She has a proven history of successfully litigating complex cases in both state and federal courts. “Liz is an incredible asset to the firm,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner at Bulkley Richardson. “Her keen insight and unshakeable confidence has helped shape her into a formidable lawyer. Not only is she a skilled litigator, but she is compassionate, making her an effective advocate for her clients.”

•••••

Jim Hickey

Jim Hickey

Florence Bank hired a Greenfield native with 25 years of strategic marketing experience with a focus in the banking sector to serve as vice president and director of Marketing Operations. Jim Hickey stepped into the new role in mid-November after keeping his eye on Florence Bank for many years because he respects its creative marketing strategy, customer-focused approach to banking, and community engagement. Previously, Hickey was vice president of Account Service at Communicators Group, a marketing communications firm in Keene, N.H. He has also served as vice president and director of Marketing for Westbank, a financial institution formerly based in West Springfield. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English from UMass Amherst. He has experience in areas that include account management, creative development, media-plan execution, and media buying. He said Florence Bank has a well-established brand, and the challenge for him and the Marketing team moving forward will be paying homage to that brand and evolving it. “Our goal is to keep the brand fresh and take it to the next level.”

•••••

Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. (MBK) announced the promotions of Christopher Soderberg, Ian Coddington, and Briana Doyle to senior associate; Daniel Eger and Brenden Cawley to tax supervisor; and Corey Jenkins, Chelsea Russell, Eric Pinsoneault, Kara Graves, and Matthew Nash to senior manager.

Christopher Soderberg

Christopher Soderberg

• Soderberg has been a member of the Audit department at MBK since 2018. He primarily focuses on not-for-profit, commercial, taxation, and HUD engagements. In his new role as a senior associate, he will take on a larger leadership position at the firm. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounts and management, as well as an MBA with a concentration in financial planning, from Elms College. He is a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Ian Coddington

Ian Coddington

• Coddington is a licensed certified public accountant in Massachusetts who has been working in the firm’s audit department since 2018. His work is predominantly focused on review and compilation, commercial, not-for-profit, employee benefit plans, and business valuation. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Westfield State University and an MBA from Fitchburg State University. He is a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Briana Doyle

Briana Doyle

• Doyle started working at MBK in 2018. As a member of the firm’s Audit department, she works on employee benefit plans, not-for-profits, HUD, and commercial engagements. She holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a master’s degree in accounting from Nichols College. She is a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Daniel Eger

Daniel Eger

• Eger has been with MBK since 2005, working primarily with large companies and corporations as well as high-net-worth individuals. He has more than 20 years of accounting experience, handling many of the most complicated tax-preparations in these areas, including multi-state tax preparation. He leads the tax intern program at MBK, which has resulted in numerous hires in the firm. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from American International College and is member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Brenden Cawley

Brenden Cawley

• Cawley joined MBK in 2020 after spending eight years as a tax professional at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP in Boston. He provided tax and consulting services for large investment companies with a focus in private equity and credit funds. He received a bachelor’s degree in finance and accounting from Boston College and is an enrolled agent with the Internal Revenue Service, as well as a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Corey Jenkins

Corey Jenkins

• Jenkins joined MBK in 2019 after spending five years as a public accountant in New York. She is a leader within the firm’s NFP division, working primarily on audits of not-for-profit organizations and multi-family housing entities. She received her master’s degree in accounting from the University at Albany and her bachelor’s degree from the College of Saint Rose in Albany. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants as well as the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and is a certified public accountant in Massachusetts and New York. She is also a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Chelsea Russell

Chelsea Russell

• Russell began her career with MBK as an intern in 2015 and has been working full-time in the Accounting and Audit department since June 2016. In her role as manager, she is a key player in the Accounting and Auditing department and primarily focuses on not-for-profit, commercial, and employee benefit-plan engagements. She received a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Westfield State University and her master’s degree in accounting from Bay Path University. She is licensed as a certified public accountant in Massachusetts and is a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. She also co-leads the firm’s community-outreach program.

Eric Pinsoneault

• Pinsoneault joined MBK in 2018. Before that, he worked in public accounting in the Greater Boston area for BDO USA, LLP. He has experience providing audit and attest services for a variety of industries, including technology, manufacturing, transportation, and energy. He currently works closely with many privately held businesses in Western Mass. He received an MBA and a master’s degree in accounting from UMass Boston. He is a certified public accountant in Massachusetts and is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants.

Kara Graves

Kara Graves

• Graves is a licensed certified public accountant in Massachusetts and has been with MBK since 2011. She holds a bachelor of accountancy degree from Roger Williams University and a master of accountancy degree from Western New England University. She is a member of the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and CPAmerica and serves on the audit committee for the United Way of Hampshire County.

Matthew Nash

Matthew Nash

• Nash has been with MBK since 2011 and focuses on audit, review, and compilation engagements. He is a key leader on the commercial, not-for-profit audit, and pension engagement teams. He is presently a senior manager leading engagement teams on a day-to-day basis. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Nichols College and an MBA from Elms College. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and has been a certified public accountant in Massachusetts for the past three years. He is also a board member and treasurer for Springfield School Volunteers, where he also serves on the investment and finance committee, as well as a Ronald McDonald House Golf Tournament committee member.

•••••

Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. also recently welcomed Danny Krasin, Olivia Calcasola, Anthony Romei, and Samantha Calvao to the firm.

Olivia Calcasola

Olivia Calcasola

• Calcasola is an associate in the firm’s Taxation department. Prior to MBK, she worked for two years as a senior corporate tax associate for a Boston-based firm. She received a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in accounting from UMass Amherst.

Danny Krasin

Danny Krasin

• Krasin joined the Accounting and Audit department at MBK. He started his career in private accounting and transitioned to public accounting in 2018. In his role as an associate, he will focus on a vast array of audit engagements, including not-for-profit, commercial, employee-benefit plans, and HUD. He received his bachelor’s degree in accounting from American International College and his master’s degree in accounting from Southern New Hampshire University.

Anthony Romei

• Romei joined the firm’s Accounting and Audit department. He began his career on public accounting in 2019, and will primarly focus on not-for-profits and HUD engagements. He received his bachelor’s and masters degrees in accounting from Elms College.

Samantha Calvao

Samantha Calvao

• Calvao joined the firm as a paraprofessional. She received her associate degree in accounting from Holyoke Community College and is a candidate to receive her bachelor’s degree in accounting from the University of Southern New Hampshire this summer. She was also recently awarded the PwC LLP Scholarship by the Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants.

•••••

Western New England University (WNE) President Robert Johnson announced the appointment of Kristine Goodwin as the university’s vice president of Student Affairs. Goodwin is charged with developing and maintaining an energized approach to cultivating an engaged student environment where learning, academic success, career readiness, and personal development are top priorities. She will oversee the university’s departments of Athletics, Career Education, Residence Life, Community Standards and Education, Student Involvement and Leadership Development, Inclusive Excellence, and the Center for Health and Wellness. Goodwin earned a bachelor’s degree from Westfield State University and a master of education degree from UMass Lowell before graduating magna cum laude from the UMass School of Law in 2020. A senior executive in higher education for more than 20 years at multiple institutions, most recently having worked as an attorney and adjunct faculty member teaching ethics, Goodwin succeeds interim Vice President for Student Affairs Bryan Gross, who will return to his previous position as vice president for Enrollment Management and Marketing.

•••••

Mark Esposito

Mark Esposito

Shatz, Schwartz and Fentin, P.C. announced Attorney Mark Esposito as a new shareholder in the firm. Esposito joined the firm in 2017 and has a wide-ranging, litigation-focused practice. He represents clients in general, commercial and probate litigation, labor and employment matters, administrative law, and criminal cases. He has counseled various public-sector labor unions and employees in collective bargaining, arbitration, and litigation, and represents clients in state and federal courts as well as before administrative agencies. A summa cum laude graduate of Boston University School of Law, Esposito was a member and note editor of the Boston University Law Review. Prior to law school, he graduated magna cum laude from Williams College, where he was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa society.

•••••

Vanessa Martínez

Vanessa Martínez

Holyoke Community College (HCC) Professor of Anthropology Vanessa Martínez is the recipient of the 2022 Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award from Campus Compact, a national coalition of colleges and universities committed to the public purposes of higher education. Through academic work that focuses on storytelling, culturally responsive instruction, and cultural humility, Martínez invites diverse groups of students to learn about community-based organizations, advocate and fundraise for community needs based on engaged research, and think critically about the role they play in their communities. One example is the Women of Color Health Equity Collective, a Springfield-based nonprofit organization she co-founded that seeks to provide communities of color better access to maternal health, therapeutic services, and support. Through the collective, students learn about the social determinants of health and the role social inequality plays in health outcomes while researching community needs and developing advocacy plans to help create change. Martínez is also coordinator of HCC’s Honors Program and leads a new community leadership certificate program at the college to give students formal training to continue work at community organizations and take on leadership roles. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbus State University, a master’s degree from Georgia State University, and a PhD from UMass Amherst. In 2011, she received the Latino Teaching Excellence Award from then Gov. Deval Patrick, and in 2015 she was selected as a leadership fellow by the American Anthropological Assoc. In 2020, she received the Elaine Marieb Award for Teaching Excellence, HCC’s highest faculty honor. She has been teaching at HCC since 2006.

•••••

The Springfield Museums announced that Emilie Czupryna has joined the staff as director of Development. She arrives in her new role ready to build a strong development team as the Museums focus on their new strategic plan, which includes the objective of long-term fiscal sustainability. She assistant director of External Affairs for Communication & Events, and was promoted to associate director of College Events. In 2017, she was selected for the position of assistant director of Development and in 2018 was promoted to associate director of Development. “I am thrilled to be working with such a wonderful team here at the Springfield Museums,” Czupryna said. “I look forward to enhancing the vision and strategic goals of the Museums through individual philanthropic support and corporate partnerships.”

•••••

Brittany deRonde

Brittany deRonde

OMG Roofing Products, a leading manufacturer of fasteners, adhesives, and installation-productivity tools for the commercial roofing industry, named Brittany deRonde to the newly created position of Product Development chemist. In her new role, deRonde will work with the product managers and development team to address unmet market needs with innovative new adhesive and sealant solutions based on advanced engineering. She reports to Cecile Mejean, director of New Product Development & Innovation. She comes to OMG with significant technical experience. Most recently, she was with ProAmpac in Westfield, where she was a Product Development engineer. Earlier, she worked for Mondi Tekkote of Leonia, N.J. in various engineering and technical management positions supporting product-development efforts. She holds a Ph.D. and master’s degree in polymer science and engineering, both from UMass Amherst, and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Rutgers University.

•••••

Ruth Banta

Ruth Banta

Pathlight’s executive director, Ruth Banta, announced her retirement after almost 20 years with the organization. Pathlight, established in 1952 and headquartered in Springfield, is a pioneer in services for children, teens, and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities throughout the four counties of Western Mass. Banta came to Pathlight in 2003 and served 14 years as its chief financial officer and vice president of Administration. She was named executive director in 2016. In her tenure as executive director, she has led Pathlight through a period of growth, as well as steering it through the rocky waters of a global pandemic. Some of the highlights of her tenure as director include revenue growth of 14% and 22% growth in net assets, leaving Pathlight in a strong financial position. Under her leadership, Pathlight created the first program in this part of the state to serve an individual in a community residence who needed full-time ventilator support. Pathlight also acquired 13.5 acres of previously state-owned land to replace two antiquated community homes with three modern, five-bedroom homes for people with intellectual disabilities. The Milestones day program, located in Hadley, grew by 55%, while there was a 100% increase in adult services through Family Support and Autism Connections. Banta also supported the development of an innovative sexuality and relationship curriculum through Whole Selves. Most recently, she oversaw the purchase of a new building in Northampton to house programs in Hampshire County, including Whole Children, Milestones, and Family Empowerment. She also supported infrastructure developments for remote services and work, electronic health records, and online training.

•••••

 

Jessica McGarry

Jessica McGarry

Country Bank announced that Jessica McGarry has been promoted to first vice president, team lead for its Commercial Lending division in the East. McGarry, who joined Country Bank in 2017, has more than 20 years of experience in financial services focused on commercial lending. She earned her bachelor’s degree in business from Nichols College, was a recipient of the Forty Under 40 designation in 2014 from Worcester Business Journal, and was a member of the Leadership Worcester class of 2015-16.

•••••

Jonathan Van Beaver

Jonathan Van Beaver

The Diocese of Springfield hired Jonathan Van Beaver as the new director of Development. Van Beaver will be responsible for all diocesan fundraising efforts, including overseeing the Annual Catholic Appeal (ACA), which funds ministries that help the elderly; mothers and families in crisis; the homeless; and youth. He will also oversee the Foundation Grants, which support Catholic schools, the Newman Catholic Center at UMass Amherst, and lay and social ministries. A graduate of Providence College and convert to Catholicism, Van Beaver most recently worked for Guidance in Giving, which provides fundraising services to Catholic dioceses and schools nationwide. He has worked with the Diocese of Providence, helping to raise more than $2 million. He also helped the Diocese of Worcester, raising $6 million during the pandemic. In addition to working with the diocese, Van Beaver will assist parishes.

•••••

Cheryl Malandrinos

Cheryl Malandrinos

Cheryl Malandrinos was installed as the 2022 president of the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley (RAPV), a nonprofit trade association with more than 1,800 members. The installation of officers and directors was held on Jan. 14 at the RAPV headquarters and was also livestreamed on Facebook. Malandrinos started her professional real-estate career in 2014 and quickly became involved in RAPV. She has served on the board of directors for three consecutive years and has been involved in several committees. The RAPV named her Realtor of the Year in 2019. In addition to her association involvement, she devotes her time to other community-outreach programs such as Rick’s Place in Wilbraham, Christina’s House in Springfield, and as treasurer for WriteAngles Inc. The following individuals were installed as 2022 officers: Lori Beth Chase of LAER Realty Partners as president-elect, Arlene Castellano of Maria Acuna Real Estate as treasurer, Peter Ruffini of RE/MAX Connections as secretary, and Elias Acuna of Maria Acuna Real Estate as immediate past president. Directors include Shawn Bowman of Trademark Real Estate, Brenda Cuoco of Brenda Cuoco & Associates, Peter Davies of Borawski Real Estate, Janise Fitzpatrick of Jones Group Realtors, Luci Giguere of Landmark Realtors, Sharyn Jones of Executive Real Estate, Michelle Stegall of Property One, and Clinton Stone of Property One.

•••••

John Anz

The Loomis Communities announced that John Anz, former director of Development and interim executive director for the Springfield Symphony Orchestra (SSO), has joined Loomis as director of Development and Community Engagement. He will be responsible for fund development and outreach to the three Loomis-affiliated senior-living communities: Applewood in Amherst, Loomis Village in South Hadley, and Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing in Springfield. Anz joined the SSO as Development director in 2019 and served as interim executive director of the organization from April through December 2021. He has a 20-year career in development that includes independent schools, the YMCA, and music and the arts. Prior to joining the SSO, he worked as director of Development at Berkshire Hills Music Academy in South Hadley.

Company Notebook

Legacy Counsellors, P.C., Gove Law Office Merge

EASTHAMPTON — Legacy Counsellors, P.C. and Gove Law Office announced the merger of their firms in order to expand the estate- and tax-planning and real-estate services they offer to clients. The Gove Law Office team will complete the transition to join the existing Legacy Counsellors, P.C. firm in January. This merger also creates the new division of Legacy Title & Escrow, to handle residential and commercial real-estate transactions. Legacy Counsellors, P.C., founded in 1994, focuses on helping clients protect and perpetuate their savings and assets. Its mission is to empower clients to preserve their legacy through services including trust, estate, and asset-protection planning, elder law and Medicaid planning, and probate administration. Gove Law Office has provided practical, solutions-oriented guidance to clients in the areas of residential and commercial real estate, estate planning, business representation, and family law since 2013. The expanded firm of Legacy Counsellors, P.C. and Legacy Title & Escrow includes four attorneys, along with paralegals and client-services coordinators. Attorney and Legacy founder Kevin Quinn will remain president, with attorney and Gove Law Office founder Michael Gove joining as vice president and partner. The merged firm has five office locations throughout Hampshire, Hampden, Worcester, and Hartford counties.

 

Original Car Detailing Open for Business in Agawam

AGAWAM — Original Car Detailing and its mobile auto-detailing operation recently pulled into shop space at 71 South Ramah Circle in Agawam. The move has allowed owner Nick Riccitelli and his team to expand their operation and provide more services this winter. Original Car Detailing (OCD) has an expanded menu that includes ceramic coatings, remote starters, heated seats, winter prep packages, and vehicle cleaning and sanitizing, along with its continued mobile detailing services. A shortage of new cars and trucks has put an emphasis on vehicle maintenance, as people are now keeping their cars longer than ever. Protecting and enhancing the appearance of customers’ vehicles, including commercial fleets and equipment, allows for a much longer service life, reducing overall costs to the owner substantially, Riccitelli noted. Original Car Detailing offers trade-in reconditioning packages to provide more leverage for its customers when selling or trading in their cars or trucks. The packages also minimize any additional condition fees when turning in leased vehicles.

 

Boston Bud Factory Questions Springfield’s Cannabis Process

SPRINGFIELD — Boston Bud Factory has filed a Freedom of Information request with the city of Springfield Procurement Department, specifically requesting documents related to phase 2 of adult-use applications and Cannabis RFP/Q No. 21-107. Boston Bud Factory submitted a proposal for a retail store in East Forest Park, along with all the required documentation related to RFP/Q No. 21-107. Boston Bud Factory would like to better understand the ranking process and the scoring system for each submission, as well as which proposal was improperly scored. Boston Bud Factory is a participant in the state’s social-equity program and was the first social-equity establishment to open in Western Mass. Boston Bud Factory co-owners Frank Dailey and Carlo Sarno live in Western Mass., and the business has no outside investors or startup financing. Dailey was born in Springfield, is an economic-empowerment applicant, and previously served on the East Forest Park Civic Assoc. board. He is also an active volunteer at several local charities, including the Springfield Rescue Mission. In addition, Boston Bud Factory has been very active educating the community and the city of Springfield, holding the first cannabis educational event in East Forest Park in 2017 and then going on to host four local and successful Pioneer Valley Cannabis Industry Summits.

 

Hazen Paper Captures International Holography Award

HOLYOKE — The International Hologram Manufacturers Assoc. (IHMA) honored Hazen Paper for the second year in a row for Best Applied Decorative/Packaging Product at the 2021 Excellence in Holography Awards. The awards, presented at the Holography Conference Online, recognize “outstanding achievement … in holographic products or techniques which represent the best in the industry for innovation and commercial potential.” Hazen captured the judge’s attention with the 2020 enshrinement yearbook produced for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield. The award-winning yearbook employed holography to create a dynamic, three-dimensional image of the Hall of Fame’s iconic dome and spire and its panoramic interior, which was overprinted with a collage of the year’s inductees in action. The combination of two contrasting yet complementary techniques served to amplify the engaging power of holography, as well as to draw attention to the honorees in the foreground. The back cover featured eye-catching holographic treatment of Connecticut’s Mohegan Sun, the location of the enshrinement ceremony. Hazen produced the unique cover holography wholly within its vertically integrated facility. The custom hologram was originated in Hazen’s holographic laser lab, micro-embossed and transfer-metallized onto 12-point WestRock Tango C2S using Hazen’s environmentally friendly Envirofoil process. Envirofoil is manufactured with less than 1% of the aluminum of traditional foil laminate, reuses the film carrier multiple times, and is recyclable as paper. Agency GO of Hartford, Conn. designed the limited-edition yearbook cover, which was printed and individually numbered for authenticity on an HP Indigo 5500 digital press by Starburst Printing of Holliston.

 

Bousquet Mountain Opens First Floor of New Base Lodge

PITTSFIELD — Bousquet Mountain is opening the first floor of its new base lodge today, Jan. 7, for ski operations. Tickets, rentals, bootup and warmup areas, and restrooms will be available in the lodge from noon to 9 p.m. today. Food trucks will be available at the mountain until food and beverage service in the building launches. The 17,500-square-foot building features a multi-purpose area for comfortable breaks from the slopes, a quick-service dining option in addition to the full-service restaurant, a rental shop with full-service ski-tuning operation, and retail space. Multiple high-definition screens are featured throughout the lodge, enabling live streaming of on-mountain races along with viewing of high-profile sporting events. Heated walkways, firepits, and a large patio area provide numerous options for outdoor enjoyment of the base area in addition to the second-floor outdoor deck. Bousquet will launch Lift Bistropub, a full-service bar and restaurant, on the second floor of the lodge in early February. Open year-round, Lift Bistropub expects to provide service to both indoor and outdoor seating, with the second-floor deck providing panoramic views of the mountain. The lodge is part of a substantial investment in the nearly 100-year-old ski area by Mill Town, the owner of the mountain. Other new features this year include new terrain, added tubing lanes, upgraded lighting, and a full overhaul to the mountain’s snow-making system.

 

Thunderbirds, Peoples United Bank Continue Community Partnership

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Thunderbirds, AHL affiliate of the St. Louis Blues, have carried on their mission of being pillars of the Springfield community, with continued support from People’s United Bank. Since the start of the 2021-22 regular season, the Thunderbirds have made more than 60 appearances in the community, in addition to charitable initiatives such as Hockey Fights Cancer, Toys for Tots toy drives, and Teddy Bear Toss donations. Many of these events have featured interaction in the community from the team mascot, Boomer. In the month of November, the Thunderbirds went lavender across their platforms to spotlight the NHL and AHL’s Hockey Fights Cancer initiative. Proceeds raised throughout the month went on to benefit a wide array of local cancer-based charities, including the Sister Caritas Cancer Center, CHD’s Cancer House of Hope, Baystate Children’s Hospital, and the Hockey Fights Cancer charity itself. Highlighting a busy month of December, the Thunderbirds collected more than 5,000 stuffed animals in the club’s annual Teddy Bear Toss on Dec. 11. In a showing of holiday spirit, Thunderbirds staff and Boomer delivered donations of those bears to a wide range of area charities, including the Springfield Boys & Girls Club, Ronald McDonald House, YMCA of Greater Springfield, CHD, Martin Luther King Jr. Family Services, and the Boys & Girls Club Family Center. Furthering the team’s heartfelt gestures, Thunderbirds captain Tommy Cross, together with teammates Michael Kim and Drew Callin, also provided a meaningful gesture at holiday time when the trio purchased a plethora of presents for three local families who were recently displaced from their homes. This marked the second time in his two Thunderbirds seasons that Cross has led such a mission. Boomer and the team were active in numerous other charitable affairs throughout the fall and early winter. The T-Birds partnered with local elementary schools for yet another successful kickoff to the team’s Stick to Reading program, with support from MassMutual. The initiative promotes literacy among elementary-school students in the Western Mass. community. Schools participate in a six-week reading program during the Thunderbirds’ regular season, with a reward of tickets to a game for students who complete their reading goals.

 

Greater Northampton Chamber Announces New Gift-card Kiosk

NORTHAMPTON — The Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce has installed a new, state-of-the-art gift-card kiosk on the second floor of Thornes Marketplace in downtown Northampton. The kiosk allows shoppers to buy a Northampton Gift Card or check the balance on an existing card any time Thornes is open to the public. The Northampton Gift Card program, which has been celebrating its 15th anniversary all year long, enables card holders to redeem their cards at more than 70 participating restaurants, retailers, salons, and other services throughout the Great Northampton area. Since its inception, the program has infused almost $5 million into the local economy. The new self-service kiosk at Thornes is the latest investment and replaced the previous machine, which was at least 12 years old. Another big investment in the program earlier this year was Keiter Corporation’s $10,000 donation and the ‘Keiter Card’ promotion that allowed shoppers to buy a $50 gift card for just $25.

 

Jewish Family Service, Yad Chessed Partner to Help Jewish Households

SPRINGFIELD — Jewish Family Service of Western Massachusetts (JFS) is partnering with Yad Chessed to expand its offerings to Jewish individuals and families in Western Mass. struggling with financial insecurity. As a social-services agency rooted in the Jewish values of kindness (chessed) and charity (tzedakah), Yad Chessed is committed to helping those in need navigate a path toward financial stability while preserving their privacy and dignity. This partnership will bring new resources to the Western Mass. community, including emergency financial aid, monthly food cards, and ongoing support. In 2020, JFS was the recipient of a Jewish Poverty Challenge grant from the Network of Jewish Human Service Agencies, and has been working to build a sustainable response to Jewish poverty in Western Mass., including food insecurity, unemployment, childcare and health crises. With the goal of raising awareness and building partnerships, JFS is excited to be partnering with Yad Chessed. Individuals or families in need of assistance should contact Rosalind Torrey at [email protected] or (413) 737-2601.

 

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Amidou, Moumouni Noma
6 The Hamlet, Apt. F
Enfield, CT 06082
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/07/2021

Bernier, David H.
178 Glendale Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/15/2021

Chesapeake Boutique Bags
Mayewski, John D.
Bard, Virginia L.
111 Daniel Shays Highway
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/07/21

Cwiok, Michael J.
1115 Overlook Dr.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/13/21

Haberern, John E.
221 Pinehurst Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/03/2021

K Painting
TEK Paint
Davis, Kevin S.
11 Summit Ave.
Adams, MA 01220
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/06/2021

Lander, William J.
Lander, Jennifer
747 Pecks Road
PO Box 848
Pittsfield, MA 01202
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/14/2021

Marcinczyk, David Peter
P.O. Box 4
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/14/2021

Perry, Kati
74 Holmes Road
Lenox, MA 01240
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/06/2021

Prince, Kyleigh Lauren Margaret
a/k/a Letourneau, Kyleigh Lauren Margaret
682 Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/10/2021

Przybyla, James J.
14 Lorraine St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/14/2021

Rivera, Rosa Lee
416 Orange St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/14/2021

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 96: January 17, 2022

George Interviews State Senator Eric Lesser

Eric Lesser

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with State Senator Eric Lesser. The two talk about everything from the prospects for high-speed rail finally becoming reality, to Lesser’s recent decision to run for lieutenant governor. There’s a lot to unpack, and it’s all must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

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Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 95: January 10, 2022

George Interviews Paul Stelzer, president of Appleton Corp

Paul Stelzer

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Paul Stelzer, president of Appleton Corp. The two talk about the region’s commercial real estate market and the powerful forces driving it, especially COVID and its many side-effects. It’s a compelling discussion and must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

 

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Joining the Fight Against Cancer

Employees of UMassFive College Federal Credit Union raised more than $16,000 for the UMass Cancer Center through participation in the 23rd annual UMass Cancer Walk and Run at Polar Park in Worcester. UMassFive employees join together annually as Team UMassFive to raise funds for the cause, both personally and in branch locations. In 2021, fundraising efforts included the Hadley branch hosting its annual Crafting for a Cure Boutique. Other branch efforts included raffle baskets, bake sales, candy sales, and jewelry sales.

 


Supporting Care for Children

A three-state fundraising effort and matching company contribution by City Tire and Auto Centers recently netted Baystate Children’s Hospital and Shriners Hospitals for Children – Springfield donations of $10,000 each. The company raised the funds through contributions on specific auto services for the past six months. Pictured at the Shriners check presentation, from left: Peter Greenberg and Daniel Greenberg, president and vice president, respectively, of City Tire; and Stacey Perlmutter and Lee Kirk, the hospital’s director of Development and administrator, respectively.

 


Tackling Food Insecurity

State Sen. Eric Lesser was recently joined by state Rep. Bud Williams and Jodi Manning, manager of the Farmers’ Market at Forest Park, to announce $75,000 in funding secured to support staffing, website development, outreach, and education for the Farmers’ Market. Lesser acted as lead sponsor in the Senate, securing this state funding in the ARPA spending bill signed into law last month.

 

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Carmody, Jennifer Ann
43 Spruce Circle
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/28/2021

Consic-O’Connor, Myla J.
91 Hinckley St.
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 13
Date: 11/30/2021

English, Donald A.
English, Diane M.
21 Echo Lane
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/22/2021

Ewing, Francine E.
5 Treehouse Circle, Apt. 3
Easthampton, MA 01027-8011
Chapter: 13
Date: 11/29/2021

Fontaine, Susan M.
103 May Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/24/2021

Horizon Personal Training
Centers of Newington, LLC
Fischman, Daniel K.
5 Millbrook Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/22/2021

Jordan, Matthew C.
342 Southwick Road, Apt. D4
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/30/2021

Kogut, Ronald J.
88 Edward St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/30/2021

Levy, Jessica Ann
47 Lamb St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/23/2021

Mayes, David Alan
128 Avery St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/01/2021

Moran, Jorge
137 Mayflower Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/23/2021

Morrow, Joshua Alan
Morrow, Sarah Helen
a/k/a Choiniere, Sarah Helen
22 Nashawannuck St., Apt. 7B
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/30/2021

Ng, Jack
209 Woodcrest Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 13
Date: 11/28/2021

North Quabbin Sales
Davis, Brian G.
P.O. Box 362
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/02/2021

Peris, Robert P.
2326 Old Turnpike Road
Oakham, MA 01068
Chapter: 13
Date: 11/29/2021

Purdy, Brenda A.
188 Wheatland Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/22/2021

Salas-Jimenez, Abimael
101 Knollwood St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/02/2021

Scanlon, Christopher Neal
4 West Green St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Date: 11/24/2021

Weimann, Susan J.
1 Rocky Brook Dr.
Huntington, MA 01050
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/03/2021

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 94: December 27, 2021

George Interviews Rick Sullivan, President and CEO of the Western Mass. Economic Development Council

Rick Sullivan

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Rick Sullivan, president and CEO of the Western Mass. Economic Development Council. The two talk about the year that was … and what the region might expect in 2022 when it comes to everything from the workforce crisis to supply chain issues to attracting individuals and businesses to Western Mass.  It’s a compelling discussion and must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

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Opinion

Editorial

 

Well, that year was … something.

It was certainly something different than 2020, when COVID-19 took everyone by surprise, not only launching a serious health crisis, but disrupting the economy in ways both immediate — many businesses were shut down for weeks and even months — and in the longer term (the broken supply chain).

Everyone learned to pivot — yes, the word everyone got sick of in 2020 — and that made us all more resilient during 2021, a year when business began getting back to normal in some ways, while in other ways, we wondered if we’d ever see normal again.

Take remote work, which may prove to have the longest legs when it comes to trends that emerged from COVID. By the fall of 2020, employers were crafting plans to bring homebound workers back to the office. Plenty of those workers didn’t want to return, and made it clear they were perfectly productive without a commute or face-to-face contact with co-workers. More than a year later, many of those employers have backed off and have made remote work, or at least a hybrid schedule, a more or less standard model.

We certainly hope supply-chain and inflation challenges don’t prove to have the longest legs, because those are problems no one can afford to live with forever. We’ll see what the federal response is in 2022 — rising interest rates seem inevitable — and how these issues continue to depress the ability of businesses to invest and grow.

The other factor suppressing business growth, of course, is an ongoing workforce crunch — a combination of older workers retiring early and younger ones wielding newfound leverage in surprising ways. Whatever the factors, the Great Resignation is real, and will continue to reverberate into 2022.

That said, all that pivoting created a more resilient business culture in Western Mass. this year, one that has become more nimble, more adaptable, and more entrepreneurial. Sectors like tourism rebounded nicely, while cannabis continued its unimpeded progress. .

But back to that hard-earned sense of resilience. Whatever industry we covered this year — construction, auto sales, manufacturing, nonprofits, you name it — when we spoke with business leaders, no one shied away from the lingering pandemic and its global side effects, and how those factors continue to make it difficult to do business.

But there’s a sense of optimism in the air, too. Many feel like, if they’ve made it this far, 2022 can only get better, even if no one can be sure when the pandemic and its ill effects will recede. They’ve survived, they’ve rebounded, they’ve learned — and they know their customers want to get back to normal, to buy and invest and experience as they used to.

In some ways, it’s frustrating to think we’d be in better shape than we are now, on many levels. But for most, things did get a little better in 2021 — and we’re sensing plenty of optimism for 2022. And we’ll stay on top of it, as always. Happy holidays from BusinessWest.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 92: December 13, 2021

George Interviews Mark Keroack, President & CEO of Baystate Health

Peter Rosskothen

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Peter Rosskothen, owner of the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House, the Delaney House restaurant, and other hospitality-sector businesses.  The two talk about everything from the state of the pandemic and its many implications for that sector to the ongoing workforce crisis in the region, to the price of steak, and how it keeps going up.  It’s a compelling discussion and must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

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Open for Business

Officials cut a ceremonial ribbon on Nov. 30 at Town Common, the mixed-use facility created at the former United Bank building in the center of West Springfield. The property is now at nearly full occupancy, with a tenants that include Tandem Bagel Co., Future Health, Seven Hills Foundation, Kindred Healthcare, and many others. Doing the honors are, from left, state Rep. Michael Flynn; Tyler Saremi, president of Saremi LLP; West Springfield Mayor William Reichelt; and Kevin Saremi, a partner in the project.

 


 

Every Dollar Counts

Carr Hardware recently donated $5,272.12 to the Berkshire Humane Society, first by donating the sales of more than 300 buckets to the Humane Society, and then offering customers the option to round up their purchases to the nearest dollar for the first two weeks of November. Pictured: Carr Hardware President Bart Raser (left), Berkshire Humane Society Executive Director John Perreault, and Bowser.

 


 

Recognizing Successes

State Rep. Mindy Domb (left) recently attended the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual legislative breakfast to recognize the work of chamber Executive Director Claudia Pazmany (second from left) and Gabrielle Gould, executive director of the Amherst Business Improvement District (right). Together, Domb noted, these community leaders have been largely responsible for bringing in more than $2.1 million in state grants to small businesses in Amherst, scheduling vaccination clinics for restaurant workers, developing a microgrant program for small businesses, and implementing an innovative program of  purchasing hundreds of meals from local restaurants last winter and distributing them to families facing food insecurity. Also pictured: John Page, former marketing and membership manager at the chamber.

People on the Move
Catherine Rioux

Catherine Rioux

Monson Savings Bank announced the recent promotion of Catherine Rioux to commercial portfolio officer. She will be based out of the Monson Savings Bank Loan & Operations Center at 75 Post Office Park in Wilbraham. Rioux is very involved in the local communities. She is a member of the Ludlow Rotary Club and the Monson High School scholarship committee, and volunteers with local organizations, including St. Patrick’s Church and I Found Light Against All Odds. She is a graduate of Western New England University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration. She is also a graduate of the New England School of Financial Studies and the Springfield Regional Chamber Leadership Institute. Rioux has had the unique opportunity of working in many departments of the bank, gaining vast knowledge of the industry. In 2006, she started her career with Monson Savings Bank as a high-school intern in the Human Resources department. When her internship ended, she accepted a position as a receptionist, shortly after moving to the Retail department. In 2013, she joined the Residential Lending department as a residential loan servicer. In early 2015, she accepted a position in the Commercial department as a commercial loan servicer. She thrived in this department and would go on to become a junior credit analyst before being promoted to credit analyst. Prior to this most recent promotion, she served as commercial portfolio manager.

•••••

Matt Eddy

Matt Eddy

UMassFive College Federal Credit Union recently introduced the newest leader of its Northampton VA Medical Center branch, Matt Eddy. Eddy began his career at UMassFive three years ago as a member service specialist at the credit union’s King Street, Northampton branch, where his standards for outstanding service quickly created a rapport among the Northampton membership and built the foundation for his promotion to manager of the Northampton VA Medical Center branch. In his new position, he now oversees the day-to-day operations of the Northampton VA Medical Center branch, including leading a team that cultivates a positive banking experience with each member interaction. He is also in charge of maintaining branch compliance.

•••••

Lachlan Harris

Lachlan Harris

Florence Bank promoted Lachlan Harris to the position of information security administration officer. Harris joined Florence Bank in 2016. Prior to his recent promotion, he had served as the information and cybersecurity administrator. In his new role, he will be responsible for security protocols throughout the bank’s information infrastructure. He is a certified information systems security professional and also a member of the Global Information Assurance Certification Advisory Board.

•••••

Jewish Family Service of Western Massachusetts (JFS) announced the appointment of Gabriela Sheehan as its new Berkshires resettlement coordinator. Sheehan comes to JFS with master’s degree in career and technical education from Northern Arizona University, and more than 10 years of experience teaching in the Pittsfield public-school system. In addition, she served on the United Educator of Pittsfield board for two years, and recently taught ESL to multilingual students in grades 5-8 at Du Bois Middle School. She will join JFS’ New American Program to facilitate the reception and placement of Afghan evacuees in Berkshire County, including coordinating with legal, housing, education, government, advocacy, and social-service agencies and businesses to advance opportunities for refugees to survive, integrate, and thrive in Berkshire County. She will also work closely with volunteer leaders and organizations taking part in resettlement efforts. She will begin her new position on Dec. 6. Sheehan credits growing up in a multi-lingual, bicultural home, and her late father, Ramiro Guerrero, who was a champion for justice for the Latino community in the Berkshires, for giving her the incentive to become a strong advocate for immigrant families. She looks forward to sharing her passion for cultural diversity with the greater community.

•••••

Cecile Mejean

Cecile Mejean

OMG Inc., a Steel Partners company and a leading manufacturer of fasteners, adhesives, and construction-productivity tools marketed through its FastenMaster and Roofing Products divisions, named Cecile Mejean director of the New Product Development & Innovation Department for its OMG Roofing Products division. She will lead the new-product development team, driving product and application innovation for the division. In addition, she will lead the Technical Services organization in delivering technical product support and managing codes and approvals. She reports to Peter Coyne, senior vice president and general manager. Mejean joins OMG Roofing Products from Saint-Gobain High-Performance Materials. She spent the past nine years in research and development and business-leadership roles, most recently as business manager for the electronic market. Before Saint-Gobain, she held research positions at Yale University Medical School and Harvard University. She holds a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and materials science from Yale University and master’s degrees in soft matter, colloids, and polymers from the University of Bordeaux and in chemical engineering from the Ecole National Superieure de Physique et Chimie de Bordeaux, both in Bordeaux, France.

•••••

Mike Kelly

Smith Brothers Insurance hired Mike Kelly as private client practice leader. He is responsible for private-client growth initiatives, client service, and enhancing the company’s people-focused culture. Kelly brings 15 years of experience in the insurance industry on the agent, broker, and carrier sides, with key leadership roles in high-net-worth personal lines. Most recently, he was vice president, regional executive for PURE Insurance, a carrier that specializes in financially successful families.

•••••

Dr. Simone Alter-Muri

Dr. Simone Alter-Muri, Springfield College’s director and professor for Art Therapy/Counseling and Art Education Programs, recently received the American Art Therapy Assoc. (AATA) 2021 Outstanding Creative Applied Practice Award (OCAPA). Alter-Muri received her honor during the AATA’s recent 2021 virtual awards ceremony. The criteria for this award included personal art making that emphasized social justice, resilience, and the promotion of art therapy in the community. Alter-Muri’s art making has demonstrated a commitment to creative practice and has significantly influenced the art-therapy community with these art-based practices. She has demonstrated support for the value of art in art therapy as evidenced by both personal and professional practice as an artist and art therapist. The OCAPA is designated for an active member of the AATA whose contributions as an artist and art therapist (or student in a current art-therapy program) have significantly influenced the art-therapy profession. The AATA is dedicated to the growth and development of the art-therapy profession. Founded in 1969, the association is one of the world’s leading art-therapy membership organizations. Its mission is to advance art therapy as a regulated mental-health profession and build a community that supports art therapists throughout their careers.

•••••

Diane Brunelle

Diane Brunelle

Dennis Duquette

Dennis Duquette

Mark O’Connell

Mark O’Connell

The Elms College board of trustees appointed three regional leaders — Diane Brunelle, Dennis Duquette, and Mark O’Connell — to serve on the board. Brunelle, a 1984 alumna, is president of the Elms College Alumni Assoc. and has been a member of the association since 2012. She is a retired nurse executive who has more than 30 years of experience serving in leadership positions at acute healthcare facilities in both Massachusetts and Vermont, including Shriners Hospital for Children, Baystate Health, Holyoke Medical Center, and Brattleboro Memorial Hospital. She has served on numerous boards throughout her career and was the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award from Elms in 2013. Brunelle was a member of the college’s first RN-to-BSN class. She also received her master’s degree in nursing administration from the University of Massachusetts and is a graduate of the Wharton Nursing Leaders Program through the Wharton School and Leonard David School of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. Duquette is head of Community Responsibility for MassMutual in Springfield and president and CEO of the MassMutual Foundation. He and his team are responsible for setting corporate community-relations strategy development and driving community investments, philanthropy, and community-impact program management for the firm nationally. Duquette has worked in financial services for 40 years; he began his career at MassMutual just out of college and then worked for Fidelity Investments in Boston for 27 years. He returned to MassMutual in his current role in 2016. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Boston College, graduating cum laude with a double major in communications and English. He earned a master’s degree in administrative studies, also from Boston College, and later earned a master’s degree in public policy and administration from Northwestern University. He currently serves on the board of directors at the Jump$tart Coalition in Washington, D.C. as well as the community and government relations committee for the Springfield Museums. O’Connell is a principal in Wolf & Company’s assurance group and is the firm’s president and CEO, responsible for leading Wolf’s overall strategic direction. He has more than 40 years of experience providing audit and financial reporting services to both privately held and publicly traded financial institutions, as well as holding companies (including community banks and mortgage banking institutions) across New England. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Western New England University and is a former board member and board president with the Children’s Study Home in Springfield.

•••••

Marylou Fabbo

Marylou Fabbo

Timothy Murphy

Timothy Murphy

Amelia Holstrom

Amelia Holstrom

Meaghan Murphy

Meaghan Murphy

Skoler, Abbott & Presser, P.C. announced that two of its attorneys, Marylou Fabbo and Timothy Murphy, have been selected to the 2021 Massachusetts Super Lawyers list in the field of employment and labor law. Additionally, attorneys Amelia Holstrom and Meaghan Murphy were named to the 2021 Massachusetts Rising Stars list. Fabbo has been selected to Super Lawyers 11 times and was twice prior named to the Rising Stars list. A partner and head of the firm’s litigation team, she represents employers in litigation before state and federal courts as well as agencies in Massachusetts and Connecticut. She also has more than 25 years of experience providing legal advice to clients to reduce the risk they will unknowingly engage in illegal employment practices. Murphy was selected to Super Lawyers for the third time after twice being named to the Rising Stars list. Focusing his practice on labor relations, union campaigns, collective bargaining and arbitration, employment litigation, and employment counseling, he has been included in The Best Lawyers in America every year since 2013 and was named Lawyer of the Year in 2015, 2019, 2020, and 2021. He is very active within the local community, sitting on boards of directors for several area organizations, including the Human Service Forum and Community Legal Aid. Holstrom and Murphy have both been selected to the Massachusetts Rising Stars list for the fourth time. Massachusetts Rising Stars recognizes no more than 2.5% of the lawyers in the state. Holstrom defends employers against claims of discrimination, retaliation, harassment, and wrongful termination, as well as actions arising under the Family Medical Leave Act and wage-and-hour laws. She also frequently provides counsel to management regarding litigation-avoidance strategies. She was awarded the Massachusetts Bar Assoc. Community Service Award in 2016, and was named in 2017 as an Up & Coming Lawyer by Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly at its Excellence in the Law event. Murphy advises clients regarding all employment-related matters, including compliance with state, federal, and local laws, as well as discipline of employees. She also creates workplace policies for clients and represents them in various forums, including at the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, government agencies, and in state and federal court.

•••••

Antonio Dos Santos

Antonio Dos Santos

Crear, Chadwell, Dos Santos & Devlin, P.C. announced that Partner Antonio Dos Santos was selected to the 2021 Massachusetts Super Lawyers list in the field of real estate. Dos Santos focuses his practice on all facets of commercial real estate, commercial finance, and general business law. He has significant experience representing developers, investors, and lenders regarding complex commercial real-estate transactions, including acquisitions, dispositions, leasing, financing, zoning, and permitting. Additionally, he represents many closely held businesses regarding entity formation, succession planning, mergers and acquisitions, and financing. Active in the community, Dos Santos currently serves as general counsel for a local nonprofit organization, providing advice for all its day-to-day operations, including its development of affordable housing in Massachusetts and throughout the U.S. He also currently serves as chairman of the Westmass Area Development Corp. board of directors.

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 91: December 6, 2021

George Interviews Matt Yee, a principal with Enlite, a Northampton-based adult-use cannabis dispensary

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Matt Yee, a principal with Enlite, a Northampton-based adult-use cannabis dispensary. The two talk about that this new business venture, the state of the cannabis industry in Western Mass., and its prospects for continued growth.  It’s a compelling discussion and must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

Sponsored by:

Also Available On

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 90: November 29, 2021

George Interviews Tracye Whitfield, one of BusinessWest’s recently named Women of Impact for 2021

BusinessTalk, BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Tracye Whitfield, one of BusinessWest’s recently named Women of Impact for 2021, several of whom have been spotlighted in recent weeks. The two talk about everything that went into this honor, from her passion for service on the Springfield City Council to her recent appointment as Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion officer in West Springfield to her work mentoring young people. It’s a compelling discussion and must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.
 

Sponsored by:

Also Available On

Giving Guide Special Coverage

2021 Annual Giving Guide

To Our Readers

While philanthropy is a year-round activity, the holidays are a time when many of us think about those who are in need, and how, in general, we can help make Western Mass. a better community for all who call this region home.

To help individuals, groups, and businesses make effective decisions when it comes to philanthropy, BusinessWest and the Healthcare News present their annual Giving Guide. In this section are profiles of several area nonprofit organizations, a sampling of the region’s thousands of nonprofits.

These profiles are intended to educate readers about what these groups are doing to improve quality of life for the people living and working in the 413, but also to inspire them to provide the critical support (which comes in many different forms) that these organizations and so many others so desperately need.


View the 2021 Giving Guide PDF Flipbook HERE


And while the need to support these nonprofits is constant — year-round and every year — at this challenging time, the need is even greater. Indeed, the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a huge toll on many of the nonprofits in this region, at a time when the collective needs within the community have perhaps never been greater, not just because of COVID, but also a struggling economy, inflation, and even natural disasters.

These profiles within the Giving Guide list not only giving opportunities — everything from online donations to corporate sponsorships — but also volunteer opportunities. And it is through volunteering, as much as with a cash donation, that individuals can help a nonprofit carry out its important mission within our community.

BusinessWest and HCN launched the Giving Guide to 2011 to harness this region’s incredibly strong track record of philanthropy and support of the organizations dedicated to helping those in need.

The publication is designed to inform, but also to encourage individuals and organizations to find new and imaginative ways to give back. We are confident it will succeed with both of those assignments.

 

George O’Brien, Editor and Associate Publisher

John Gormally, Publisher

Kate Campiti, Sales Manager and Associate Publisher

 

The Giving Guide is Presented by:

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 


 

A Bright Night for Springfield

“Cherry Blossoms Under the Moonlight” was the theme of the 2021 City of Bright Nights Ball on Nov. 13 at MGM Springfield.

 

Shawn Pace, site manager with Eastman, the event sponsor

Shawn Pace, site manager with Eastman, the event sponsor

 

Judy Matt, president of Spirit of Springfield, which presents the ball each year

Judy Matt, president of Spirit of Springfield, which presents the ball each year

 

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno with Abe Berry, vice president of Hospitality at MGM Springfield

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno with Abe Berry, vice president of Hospitality at MGM Springfield

 

from left, Dr. Stanley Glazer, U.S. Rep. Richard Neal, Candy Glazer, and state Sen. Eric Lesser

from left, Dr. Stanley Glazer, U.S. Rep. Richard Neal, Candy Glazer, and state Sen. Eric Lesser

 

a gathering of event sponsors

a gathering of event sponsors

 


 

Saluting Veterans

As part of American Eagle Financial Credit Union’s month-long celebration of veterans, their families, and the organizations that support them, the credit union donated $5,000 to Easterseals Capital Region & Eastern Connecticut, Veterans Rally Point, a program committed to the successful reintegration of active military, National Guard, Reserve, veterans, and their families into all aspects of civilian life.

Pictured, from left: Brig. Gen. Ron Welch of Veterans Rally Point, Teresa Knox of American Eagle Financial Credit Union, and Wendy Archer of Easterseals Capital Region & Eastern Connecticut.

Pictured, from left: Brig. Gen. Ron Welch of Veterans Rally Point, Teresa Knox of American Eagle Financial Credit Union, and Wendy Archer of Easterseals Capital Region & Eastern Connecticut.


 

Closer to Launch

From left, state Sen. Eric Lesser; Kay Simpson, president and CEO of the Springfield Museums; Mike Kerr, director of the Springfield Science Museum; and state Sen. Adam Gomez gathered to announce $100,000 in funding secured for the construction of the International Space Station exhibit as well as other upgrades in the Springfield Science Museum. Lesser acted as lead Senate sponsor in securing this state funding in the FY22 budget, signed into law in July.

 


 

Having a Ball

Springfield Ballers held its first annual Ballers’ Ball on Nov. 13. Springfield Ballers provides affordable opportunities to youth in athletics through programs that promote academic achievement and overall health and wellness for the purpose of creating a complete and well-rounded student athlete.

Pictured, from left: Thomas DeVane, James Gee, Amy Royal, Alethea Stevenson, Jennifer Wallace, Michelle Torchia, Michael Anderson, and Marion Illouz.

Pictured, from left: Thomas DeVane, James Gee, Amy Royal, Alethea Stevenson, Jennifer Wallace, Michelle Torchia, Michael Anderson, and Marion Illouz.

 


 

A+ Awards

The Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce presented its annual A+ Awards on Nov. 10 at the newly refurbished UMass Amherst Student Ballroom. Each year, the chamber bestows A+ Awards to individuals and organizations that enrich the life of the community through their work in business, education, and civic engagement.

 

the family of Andy Yee of the Bean Restaurant Group, who won this year’s Legacy Award posthumously

The family of Andy Yee of the Bean Restaurant Group, who won this year’s Legacy Award posthumously

 

Sid and Isabel Ferreira of Amherst a Better Chance (third and fourth from left), winners of the Community Service Award, pictured with, from left, state Rep. Mindy Domb, Jamilla Ferreira, Cid Ferreira, Mila Ferreira, and Mary Custard from Amherst Regional High School

Sid and Isabel Ferreira of Amherst a Better Chance (third and fourth from left), winners of the Community Service Award, pictured with, from left, state Rep. Mindy Domb, Jamilla Ferreira, Cid Ferreira, Mila Ferreira, and Mary Custard from Amherst Regional High School

 


 

Daily News

 

CHICOPEE — The Polish National Credit Union (PNCU) headquartered in Chicopee, and Premier Source Federal Credit Union (PSFCU), headquartered in East Longmeadow, have signed a definitive merger agreement. PNCU will be the continuing credit union and acquire PSFCU’s 4,526 members and nearly $70 million in assets.

Under the terms of agreement, PSFCU will merge “with and into” PNCU, under the charter, bylaws, and name of The Polish National Credit Union. The PSFCU headquarters will become the East Longmeadow branch of PNCU.

“This is a win-win situation for both PNCU and PSFCU,” said Jim Kelly, CEO of PNCU. “The joining of these two organizations makes sense for several reasons. First, we are able to grow our geographic presence and access for both members. Second, we are able to preserve the credit union culture by combining with a congenial partner, like PSFCU. And third, we are able to take advantage of the enhanced scale to focus on selecting the best systems and processes to benefit the credit union and our members going forward.

“When choosing a merger partner, PSFCU turned to PNCU due to its strong financials, expanded line of products, digital and technological advancements, but most importantly, its commitment to members,” Kelly went on.

This year, PNCU celebrates 100 years of service and has approximately $700 million in assets. Upon completion of the merger, PSFCU members will enjoy full use of PNCU’s seven full-service branches and access to business banking services, investment services, and insurance products.

“Since 1941, Premier Source Federal Credit Union has taken great pride in serving our community and our membership,” said PSFCU CEO Bonnie Raymond. “It is not often you find organizations that support a member-first philosophy and for that reason, it was in PSFCU’s best interest to merge with PNCU. We are confident this will be a seamless transition and look forward to the many opportunities this merger will provide to our community and our members,”

Having negotiated a definitive merger agreement, both credit unions will now seek regulatory approval from the Mass. Division of Banks, National Credit Union Administration, the Mass. Credit Union Share Insurance Corp., and approval from their memberships. The merger is expected to be completed in the spring of 2022. For further developments, visit www.pncu.com.

Daily News

 

SPRINGFIELD — MGM Springfield will ring in the holiday season on Nov. 26 with its annual tree lighting ceremony to mark the opening of its Holiday Winter Wonderland on Armory Square, featuring the city’s only outdoor skating rink.

Guests are invited to join the celebration beginning at 6 p.m., led by MGM Resorts Northeast Group President and COO Chris Kelley and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno. There will be special appearances by the Dan Kane Singers, the New England Patriots Cheerleaders, and Santa Claus.

A hot chocolate bar and festive adult beverages will be available, along with a special to-go menu from TAP Sports Bar. Local favorite Hot Oven Cookies will also have its food truck on location.

Tickets for the ice rink can be purchased in person. Hours are: Monday and Tuesday, closed; Wednesday and Thursday, 4 p.m.-10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 1 p.m.-10 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 10 p.m.

The MGM Springfield Skating Rink will be open Nov. 26 to Jan. 2. Holiday hours are 4 p.m.-10 p.m. on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

A coordinated holiday tree light and music show will be on display every hour on the hour from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week, from Nov. 26t through Jan. 2.

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 


 

 

Sock It to MA

From left, Lenny Underwood, founder of Upscale Socks; Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, and state Sens. Eric Lesser and Adam Gomez joined Chris Russell, executive director of the Springfield Business Improvement District, for the unveiling of Upscale Socks’ new Massachusetts sock. The design, created by Underwood, features some of what the Commonwealth is known for: basketball, the Knowledge Corridor, mountains, the state flower, and the state fruit.

 


 

 

Thank You for Your Service

House of Heroes and Johnson Brunetti Retirement & Investment Specialists recently provided no-cost home repairs and updates for veteran Sylvia McGiver of Enfield, Conn. McGiver served both at home and overseas in Japan as an Army nurse, treating wounded soldiers during the Vietnam War and eventually earning the rank of captain before her discharge in 1970. This marked the third straight year Johnson Brunetti has partnered with House of Heroes to thank local veterans with a home-improvement project.

 


 

 

Supporting Local Care

Greenfield Cooperative Bank recently made a $75,000 donation, one of the largest in the bank’s history, in support of Baystate Franklin Medical Center’s new Department of Family Medicine. This new UMass Medical School – Baystate-affiliated program will train future family doctors in Greenfield to ensure a legacy of long-term, sustainable, high-quality primary healthcare for the citizens of Franklin County and surrounding towns.

 

 


 

 

 

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

CHICOPEE

Nova Home Improvements Inc., 35 Fletcher Circle, Chicopee, MA 01020. Gleb Leiderman, same address. Home improvements.

Parker K. Properties Inc., 39 Dale Court, Chicopee, MA 01013. Jason Kramer, 19 Fuller Road, Marlborough, CT 06447. Rental real estate.

EASTHAMPTON

Farm Bug Cooperative Inc., 116 Pleasant St., Suite 226, Easthampton, MA 01027. James Jasper, same address. Agriculture.

HOLYOKE

Octavian Group Inc., 68 Winter St., Holyoke, MA 01040. Michael Mottola, 16 Western Circle, Westfield, MA 01085. Real estate property management.

LONGMEADOW

Power House Interior Design Inc., 24 Bliss Road, Longmeadow, MA 01106. Kerry Koerner, same address. Interior design consulting and services.

NORTHAMPTON

Community Growth Partners Delivery Inc., 20 Ladd Ave., Northampton, MA 01060. Charlotte Hanna, same address. Cannabis delivery business.

SOUTHWICK

Salon Sage Inc., 320 College Hwy., Southwick, MA 01077. Makila R. Messier, 17 Drummond Road, Enfield, CT 06082. Hair salon.

SPRINGFIELD

DOSTI Corp., 932 Worthington St., Springfield, MA 01105. Syed B. Burhan, 46 Columbia St., Apt. 5B, Chicopee, MA. Convenience store.

ELIM Enterprises Inc., 212 Wollaston St., Springfield, MA 01119. Keisha Lindsay, same address. Asset-management services.

Enriquez Therapy and Healing Inc., 43 Sullivan St., Springfield, MA 01104. Jeannette Enriquez, 26 Rankin Ave., East Longmeadow, MA 01028

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Pit Stop Food n’ Fuel Inc., 61 Appaloosa Lane, West Springfield, MA 01089. Hardki Gogri, same address. Retail sales of gasoline and convenience store.

Spring Travel Inc., 203 Circuit Ave., Suite 129, Box 116, West Springfield, MA 01089. Zhonghkai Wang, same address. Travel agency.

WILBRAHAM

Mass Lash and Brow, Co., 60 Chilson Road, Wilbraham, MA 01095. Audrey Li, same address. Mobile beauty salon.

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

BERNARDSTON

116 South St.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Mother Goose Properties LLC
Seller: Ellen Fay-Cadran
Date: 10/12/21

290 West Mountain Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Jamie P. Cross
Seller: Frank R. Squillante
Date: 10/12/21

BUCKLAND

32 Hog Hollow Road
Buckland, MA 01370
Amount: $717,000
Buyer: William Creelman
Seller: Norman P. Toy
Date: 10/15/21

43 Upper St.
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $608,675
Buyer: Lindsay M. Allen
Seller: Purinton, Mark L., (Estate)
Date: 10/04/21

CHARLEMONT

224 Avery Brook Road
Charlemont, MA 01339
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Jonathan Mirin
Seller: Bragdon-Bingham INT
Date: 10/05/21

CONWAY

1126 Ashfield Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Benjamin Lucia
Seller: Patrick A. Falla
Date: 10/15/21

104 Mathews Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $449,000
Buyer: Patrick Tompkins
Seller: Steven L. Zakon-Anderson
Date: 10/15/21

361 Route 8A
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Robert Schaentzler
Seller: Voytko INT
Date: 10/15/21

DEERFIELD

1 Beaver Dr.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Timothy S. Kuzdzal
Seller: Daysal INT
Date: 10/15/21

ERVING

143 North St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Matthew Ziomek
Seller: Jarred M. Talbot
Date: 10/06/21

193 North St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Alexandra A. Darcy
Seller: Brian S. Price
Date: 10/15/21

GREENFIELD

79 Beech St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Jason M. McKinnon
Seller: Gordon D. Dubois
Date: 10/07/21

113 Beech St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Laurence Klein
Seller: Angelo L. Thomas
Date: 10/14/21

654 Bernardston Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $452,500
Buyer: Servicenet Inc.
Seller: Larry & Caron Yost LT
Date: 10/14/21

359 Colrain Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Ashley M. Podlesny
Seller: Jane M. Butynski
Date: 10/13/21

57 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Vanessa L. Torrado
Seller: Sandi H. Graves
Date: 10/15/21

77 Lincoln St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Maria R. Tramontozzi
Seller: Marilyn A. Matysiewicz
Date: 10/15/21

36 Revere Circle
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $323,000
Buyer: Robert Ward
Seller: Jenna Skutnik-Sheffield
Date: 10/14/21

192 Shelburne Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $239,000
Buyer: Sheela Patel
Seller: Freedom Hill RT 3
Date: 10/15/21

244-246 Wells St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Doug W. Laroche
Seller: Layne V. Floyd
Date: 10/05/21

MONTAGUE

19 Park St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Jose F. Villafana
Seller: Maria R. Christenson
Date: 10/15/21

2 Pinewood Circle
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $252,500
Buyer: Jonathan C. Macomber
Seller: Ethan M. Balk
Date: 10/06/21

8 Richardson Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $406,000
Buyer: Leela J. Joy
Seller: Katherine A. Hart
Date: 10/07/21

NORTHFIELD

44 Highland Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Michael L. Augros
Seller: Thomas Aquinas College
Date: 10/08/21

654 Pine Meadow Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $337,750
Buyer: Kyle Provencal
Seller: Amanda C. Skalski
Date: 10/06/21

ORANGE

280 Holtshire Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $181,975
Buyer: Anthony Gemma
Seller: Bonnie Taylor
Date: 10/08/21

64 Memory Lane
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Thomas A. Russell
Seller: DC Brooks FT
Date: 10/08/21

100 Summit St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Adam J. Wuoti
Seller: Kelly Vaillancourt
Date: 10/12/21

114 Warwick Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $162,950
Buyer: AMLN Revocable RT
Seller: Normand Dallaire
Date: 10/13/21

 

SHELBURNE

26 Mechanic St.
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Bragdon-Bingham INT
Seller: Joseph G. Chadwick
Date: 10/07/21

SHUTESBURY

40 Kettle Hill Road
Shutesbury, MA 01002
Amount: $511,050
Buyer: Jill Clemmer
Seller: Nancy P. Damato
Date: 10/08/21

WARWICK

315 Wendell Road
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Andrew S. Hagie
Seller: Boone, Bradford I., (Estate)
Date: 10/05/21

WHATELY

204 Long Plain Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $243,000
Buyer: Nathan E. Smith
Seller: William J. Smith
Date: 10/08/21

WENDELL

250 Lockes Village Road
Wendell, MA 01379
Amount: $277,500
Buyer: Brian Comfort
Seller: Louanne Soos
Date: 10/15/21

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

56 Columbus St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Volodymyr Yakymenko
Seller: Paula A. Boisclair
Date: 10/12/21

25 Farmington Circle
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $620,000
Buyer: Eduardo Suarez
Seller: Johnny Ramos
Date: 10/15/21

38 Forest Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Plato O. Plomo Inc.
Seller: Patricia R. Perry
Date: 10/08/21

807 Main St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Nathalie Champagne
Seller: John T. Langevin
Date: 10/15/21

30 Memorial Park
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: George Sweat
Seller: Lee M. Racine
Date: 10/15/21

612 North St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Jose A. Gonzalez
Seller: David J. Zurlino
Date: 10/15/21

75 Pheasant Run Circle
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $329,000
Buyer: Kenneth Ramos
Seller: Joanne M. Brochetti
Date: 10/15/21

53 Provin Mountain Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $379,900
Buyer: Christopher J. Peltier
Seller: James B. Lockwood
Date: 10/12/21

853 Silver St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: 853 Silver Street RT
Seller: Baldyga, Paul, (Estate)
Date: 10/04/21

48-50 South Westfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $188,586
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Byron W. Zinn
Date: 10/04/21

37 Valentine St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Samantha Ford
Seller: Andrea L. Scalise
Date: 10/12/21

BRIMFIELD

62 Old Palmer Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Joshua Chaples
Seller: Frank Della-Rosa
Date: 10/08/21

160 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Hannah T. Lazo
Seller: Jerrold Bennett
Date: 10/15/21

CHESTER

Goss Hill Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $341,903
Buyer: National Farm & Forestry LLC
Seller: Goss Road Estates LLC
Date: 10/14/21

CHICOPEE

13 Baril Lane
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Ahmed Aljashaam
Seller: Mary Liszka
Date: 10/13/21

50 Beauchamp Ter.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: M. Russell-Masterson
Seller: Lisa J. Russell
Date: 10/14/21

41 Bemis St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Valerie Calderon
Seller: Maria D. Dybski
Date: 10/15/21

28 Bonner St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $189,900
Buyer: Brital 1987 LLC
Seller: Jeffrey A. Larochelle
Date: 10/13/21

25 Boutin St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Gerald Michon
Seller: Jeffrey M. Picard
Date: 10/07/21

62 Britton St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $401,000
Buyer: Roberto C. Jimenez
Seller: Viktor Moshkovskiy
Date: 10/08/21

181 Broadway St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $1,584,000
Buyer: Sunlight Apartment LLC
Seller: James Cherewatti
Date: 10/07/21

443 Broadway St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Kelvin Maldonado
Seller: Jennifer L. Johnson
Date: 10/05/21

1237 Burnett Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: James D. Deary
Seller: Laurie J. Rousseau
Date: 10/13/21

220 Casey Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Madeleine J. Riel
Seller: Andres Otero
Date: 10/15/21

6 Charles St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $162,495
Buyer: Blue Sky Investment Group LLC
Seller: Jeremy Houlihan
Date: 10/05/21

93 Clairmont Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Imari L. Silva
Seller: Aaron Beaulieu
Date: 10/15/21

Columba St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $369,500
Buyer: City Of Chicopee
Seller: Western Mass. Electric Co.
Date: 10/06/21

17 Dakota Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Claude Labrie
Seller: Sean P. Welch
Date: 10/04/21

64 Dobek Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $342,000
Buyer: Moses M. Ehiabhi
Seller: Scott R. Pepin
Date: 10/08/21

303 Fairview Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: J&E Real Estate LLC
Seller: Angela M. Vatter
Date: 10/15/21

22 Farmington St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Karimar Vargas-Ramirez
Seller: James M. Horniak
Date: 10/12/21

92 Felix St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Antonio H. Pantaleon
Seller: Marie M. Gower
Date: 10/04/21

81 Green St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Single Source Services LLC
Seller: Noel G. Laflamme
Date: 10/15/21

70 Lachine St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $221,000
Buyer: Kathleen Robinson
Seller: Mary J. Matras
Date: 10/15/21

542 Montgomery St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Yasser H. Mahdy
Seller: Kelly R. Ryan
Date: 10/06/21

18 Ogden St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $336,000
Buyer: Sharon M. Ruth
Seller: Alexis Rodriguez
Date: 10/08/21

54 Ondrick Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Julianne Sporbert
Seller: Michael A. Trumbull
Date: 10/15/21

15 Railroad Row
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $1,584,000
Buyer: Sunlight Apartment LLC
Seller: James Cherewatti
Date: 10/07/21

82 Rivers Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $940,000
Buyer: Prime Living Properties LLC
Seller: James Cherewatti
Date: 10/07/21

88 Rivers Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $940,000
Buyer: Prime Living Properties LLC
Seller: James Cherewatti
Date: 10/07/21

20 Riverview Place
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Hash Properties LLC
Seller: James Cherewatti
Date: 10/05/21

50 Shepherd St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Nedie J. Ramirez
Seller: Walter L. Wood
Date: 10/13/21

28 Spence St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Reynaldo Santiago
Seller: Christina M. Santinello
Date: 10/07/21

25 State St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Miroslav Nesterchuk
Seller: Joan D. Bissonnette
Date: 10/05/21

61 State St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $292,000
Buyer: Luis D. Brignoni
Seller: JBD Empire LLC
Date: 10/06/21

24 Sycamore Lane
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Michael D. Berardelli
Seller: Grandview Development Assocs. LLC
Date: 10/06/21

7 Washington St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $1,584,000
Buyer: Sunlight Apartment LLC
Seller: James Cherewatti
Date: 10/07/21

172 Woodcrest Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $283,000
Buyer: Wladyslawa Lizak
Seller: James J. Desautels
Date: 10/08/21

EAST LONGMEADOW

72 Colony Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Carol A. McNally
Seller: Edwin E. Lempke
Date: 10/05/21

17 Donamor Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: David Melanson
Seller: Hubert W. Pfabe
Date: 10/08/21

215 Dwight Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01108
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Makeida Leverett
Seller: David J. Proulx
Date: 10/07/21

7 Elizabeth St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $376,000
Buyer: David J. Proulx
Seller: Thomas B. McGowan
Date: 10/07/21

331 Elm St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Nilda D. Wotton
Seller: John M. Nathan
Date: 10/08/21

14 Hillside Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Amieland B. Singh
Seller: Thomas S. Sophinos
Date: 10/08/21

433 Porter Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $204,100
Buyer: Mandi Safford
Seller: Theresa A. Williams
Date: 10/15/21

848 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Ichigo T. Mai
Seller: Ronald J. Cauley
Date: 10/08/21

56 Woodbridge Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Christina Rivera
Seller: Dennis M. Farioli
Date: 10/07/21

GRANVILLE

Gorge Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $128,400
Buyer: James Adams
Seller: Bannish Lumber Inc.
Date: 10/08/21

HAMPDEN

151 Ames Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $519,000
Buyer: Nickolas Stone
Seller: Wayne M. Goodwin
Date: 10/06/21

20 Mill Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Antonio Morales
Seller: Kent R. Beach
Date: 10/05/21

10 Mountainview Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $284,500
Buyer: James G. Lyon
Seller: Amy M. Bohan
Date: 10/12/21

46 Mountainview Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Amber M. Pelletier
Seller: Warren Spears
Date: 10/15/21

16 South Ridge Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $1,025,000
Buyer: Phillip J. Rodrigues
Seller: James W. Walsh
Date: 10/07/21

HOLLAND

28 Leno Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Ryanne K. Nixon
Seller: Ronald Lapierre
Date: 10/12/21

47 Leno Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Peter C. Perez
Seller: Chestnut Hill Homes LLC
Date: 10/15/21

242 Mashapaug Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Michael S. Burns
Seller: Scott Alexander
Date: 10/15/21

HOLYOKE

5 Appleton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $762,500
Buyer: Maxx Consultant Inc.
Seller: Mao Moon LLC
Date: 10/08/21

10 Briarwood Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $606,000
Buyer: Ryan G. Ramos
Seller: Patricia A. Ouellette
Date: 10/08/21

41 Cabot St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: MD Holyoke Realty LLC
Seller: Margaro Crespo
Date: 10/08/21

333 Canal St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,500,000
Buyer: 3DS Group LLC
Seller: E&L Corp.
Date: 10/08/21

665 High St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $267,100
Buyer: Kalipa Asset Capital LLC
Seller: Kevin Cruz
Date: 10/08/21

338-340 Hillside Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Stephen D. Lucero
Seller: Christopher J. English
Date: 10/14/21

415 Homestead Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Kevin Smith
Seller: Kevin F. Joyce
Date: 10/15/21

5 Jeane Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Claudio A. Perez
Seller: Prattico, Joseph R., (Estate)
Date: 10/07/21

888 Main St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Betty Gomez
Seller: Revampit LLC
Date: 10/07/21

85 Mountain Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Juan L. Andujar
Seller: Guylene N. Matthes
Date: 10/15/21

1649-1/2 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $132,358
Buyer: Jeffrey G. Clayton
Seller: Martin J. Clayton Insurance Agency
Date: 10/06/21

1693 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Gallagher Properties LLC
Seller: Aarib Inc.
Date: 10/08/21

2075 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Maria E. Gomez
Seller: Marta Romero
Date: 10/05/21

28 O’Connor Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: John Defonte
Seller: Stephen L. Johnson
Date: 10/05/21

179 Pine St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Javier Maldonado
Seller: Stephen Bosco
Date: 10/07/21

9-11 Portland St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Anthony B. Antonellis
Seller: Harry H. Thayer
Date: 10/08/21

47 Pynchon Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Pah Properties LLC
Seller: Maureen A. Harbilas
Date: 10/12/21

23 Wellesley Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Cecily Wiswall
Seller: Rachael Smith-Ramos
Date: 10/15/21

LONGMEADOW

25 Andover Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: 11 Pineridge Dr RT
Seller: Kaufman Family LLC
Date: 10/12/21

8 Brookwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $324,000
Buyer: Razia Siddiquee
Seller: Geoffrey P. Adams
Date: 10/08/21

169 Crescent Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Kristin Russell
Seller: Elizabeth O. Dunn
Date: 10/07/21

8 Deerfield Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Gladysh Capital LLC
Seller: Kevin A. Kruser
Date: 10/06/21

54 Fernleaf Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Fabricio Ochoa
Seller: Thomas E. Clark
Date: 10/15/21

108 Greenmeadow Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $535,000
Buyer: Susan Muhaimin
Seller: Rohit Rattan
Date: 10/04/21

679 Laurel St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Corrine P. Ryan
Seller: Yong Han
Date: 10/15/21

18 Lexington Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $253,500
Buyer: Yong J. No
Seller: Michael Sorrell
Date: 10/08/21

1203 Longmeadow St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $387,000
Buyer: Ruotao Huang
Seller: Gregory S. Burstein
Date: 10/13/21

67 Parkside St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Benjamin E. Fredette
Seller: Rory Buxton
Date: 10/14/21

164 Viscount Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Michael D. McLane
Seller: Frances P. Regnault
Date: 10/04/21

107 Wenonah Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Magni Properties LLC
Seller: Hillary Coughlin
Date: 10/08/21

68 Wimbleton Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Alice Pizzi
Seller: Rudy M. Dagostino
Date: 10/08/21

17 Woodside Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $704,000
Buyer: Joan J. Carra 2004 FT
Seller: Richard J. Ianello
Date: 10/15/21

LUDLOW

39 Arnold St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $268,000
Buyer: Andrew Doming
Seller: Daniel J. Parker
Date: 10/06/21

90 Barre Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Paul R. Mailhott
Seller: Mary E. Debarge
Date: 10/04/21

42 Bristol St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Heather Marini
Seller: Stephen Vicencio
Date: 10/05/21

77 Cislak Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $720,000
Buyer: Michael Wegner
Seller: Gerald S. Bolduc
Date: 10/14/21

17 Deponte Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $449,000
Buyer: Mark E. Kifer
Seller: Kenric D. Gallano
Date: 10/14/21

89 Edgewood Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Paulo L. Roxo
Seller: Rosemary P. Conui
Date: 10/08/21

45 Franklin St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Manh Home Buyers LLC
Seller: Joseph A. Nunes
Date: 10/13/21

90 Haviland St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Susan Martinelli
Seller: Robert J. Schroeter
Date: 10/14/21

56 Hillcrest Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $334,900
Buyer: Liam Powers
Seller: Cathleen M. Morris
Date: 10/14/21

193 Jerad Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $685,000
Buyer: Yang Liu
Seller: Robert Nadeau
Date: 10/14/21

110 Kirkland Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $217,500
Buyer: Lacie Collins
Seller: Jeremy J. Guinipero
Date: 10/12/21

68 Michael St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $284,000
Buyer: Ellen J. Pollock
Seller: Vance, Hubert R., (Estate)
Date: 10/13/21

45 River St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Maria D. Dybski
Seller: Fabio X. Conceicao
Date: 10/15/21

22 Ronald St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Troy Martins
Seller: Shanna M. Moutinho
Date: 10/08/21

Sunset Ridge #19
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Luis Martins
Seller: Jeremy J. Procon
Date: 10/07/21

89 Woodland Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Matthew A. Coelho
Seller: Lisa M. Martin
Date: 10/14/21

MONSON

170 Hovey Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Premier Home Builders Inc.
Seller: Anthony T. Sattler
Date: 10/14/21

19 Lakeshore Dr.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $359,013
Buyer: Susan B. Cohen
Seller: Barbara J. Stein
Date: 10/15/21

7 May Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Phillip Simpson
Seller: Craig R. Levesque
Date: 10/05/21

4 Park Ave.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Hiram D. Serpa-Espino
Seller: Shawn Bronson
Date: 10/15/21

42 Washington St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Richard Blain
Seller: Michael Smith
Date: 10/15/21

PALMER

10-12 State St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Crystal L. Goddu
Seller: Jessica M. Pieciak
Date: 10/14/21

SPRINGFIELD

Arcadia Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $246,500
Buyer: Ninotchka Sastre-Diaz
Seller: Nils B. Dahl
Date: 10/05/21

555-557 Armory St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $278,250
Buyer: OM Belmont Ave. LLC
Seller: Kelnate Realty LLC
Date: 10/08/21

2248 Baptist Hill Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $333,420
Buyer: Caroline Brusger 2020 IRT
Seller: Stephen M. Rondeau
Date: 10/15/21

33-35 Battery St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Molly M. Ronan
Seller: Mary C. Joyce
Date: 10/08/21

641 Bay St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Christopher S. Gibeau
Seller: Bettye J. McGhee
Date: 10/15/21

34-36 Beechwood Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Vijayakumar Paramasivam
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 10/06/21

85 Belvidere St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Wanda I. Hernandez
Seller: Paul R. Campbell
Date: 10/08/21

34-36 Berkeley St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Gilbert R. Blake
Seller: Michael Noad
Date: 10/15/21

43 Berkeley St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: BRVS LLC
Seller: Strela Builders Corp.
Date: 10/05/21

309 Berkshire Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Berkshire Springfield LLC
Seller: Berkshire Realty LLC
Date: 10/04/21

36 Birch Glen Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $239,500
Buyer: Danielle Ellis
Seller: Jose S. Borges
Date: 10/07/21

108 Birchland Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Sekar S. Dhanasekaran
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 10/15/21

97 Brewster St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Carlos R. Cabrera
Seller: Moltenbrey Builders LLC
Date: 10/08/21

144 Buckingham St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Ronald Wallace
Seller: Sandra A. McCarroll
Date: 10/06/21

89 Carol Ann St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Tony Younes
Seller: Wilmington Trust
Date: 10/14/21

54 Catharine St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Carmen D. Trinidad
Seller: Siam Williams Investment Group LLC
Date: 10/04/21

38 Chase Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Cleon D. Lowe
Seller: B&B Properties LLC
Date: 10/14/21

18-20 Cleveland St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Jonathan Ramos
Seller: Pedro J. Aguirre
Date: 10/13/21

34 Clifton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: K. M. Martinez-Ortolaza
Seller: Clifton Ave LLC
Date: 10/08/21

50 Cocoran Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Johan Cotto
Seller: Cage Enterprises LLC
Date: 10/04/21

30 Craig St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $135,300
Buyer: Pennymac Loan Services LLC
Seller: Christopher K. Frey
Date: 10/04/21

17 Dalton Place
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Equity Trust Co.
Seller: Robert Finnegan
Date: 10/15/21

78 David St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Eternity Desarae-Thomas
Seller: Julianne Sporbert
Date: 10/15/21

202 Davis St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: Reinaldo Rivera
Seller: Damian Cieszkowski
Date: 10/15/21

100 Derryfield Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Kendall J. Brea
Seller: Hang Vu
Date: 10/06/21

116 Donbray Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Shaoging Ni
Seller: Antonieta Mathieson
Date: 10/13/21

38 Dresden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Lisbeth Hernandez
Seller: Ronald A. Watt
Date: 10/13/21

520 Dutchess St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $231,000
Buyer: Sheila Willard
Seller: Colleen Matchett
Date: 10/12/21

459 Dwight St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Amount: $595,000
Buyer: Lumpkin & Markarian Holding
Seller: 459 Dwight Street LLC
Date: 10/06/21

397-399 Eastern Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Josias Victorio-Morales
Seller: Erasmito Gonzalez
Date: 10/15/21

25 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Christine Flores
Seller: Malachi Torres
Date: 10/15/21

74-76 Edendale St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Mark Delnegro
Seller: Jeremy Houlihan
Date: 10/04/21

15 Eldert St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Norma Reyes
Seller: Alycar Investments LLC
Date: 10/05/21

29 Eldridge St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Zacha Figueroa
Seller: Khambrel D. Wilson
Date: 10/08/21

44 Ellsworth Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Techia Lamoure-Francis
Seller: Jenna L. Dziok
Date: 10/08/21

164 Ellsworth Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: John I. Hedegaard
Seller: Clifford Robinson
Date: 10/15/21

64-66 Ferris St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Maynard Hamre Investments LLC
Seller: Brian P. McCabe
Date: 10/05/21

103 Flint St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Lisandra Zeno
Seller: Zurc, Alexis K., (Estate)
Date: 10/12/21

41 Forest St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: La Isla Mas Grande LLC
Seller: Janet M. Kline
Date: 10/12/21

31 Fremont St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $313,000
Buyer: Jean Vazquez
Seller: Luz Bobadilla
Date: 10/05/21

175 Garland St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Autumn E. Mathieu
Seller: Wilfred F. Mathieu
Date: 10/06/21

297 Gilbert Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $449,900
Buyer: Melva Dejesus
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 10/12/21

11 Greenacre Square
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Linda Beckett
Seller: Thomas, L., (Estate)
Date: 10/13/21

54 Groton St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Angel J. Padilla-Pacheco
Seller: Gina Milambo
Date: 10/08/21

132 Hanson Dr.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Jeremy D. Borgatti
Seller: Antonio Morales
Date: 10/05/21

18 Homestead Ave.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Janice Gauthier
Seller: Winslow W. Reed
Date: 10/04/21

41 Johnson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Henry Chhim
Seller: Glenn R. Pittsinger
Date: 10/15/21

69 Kenwood Park
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Felix D. Menendez
Seller: Evan R. Nyman
Date: 10/13/21

80-82 Kenyon St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Starling Diaz-Agramonte
Seller: Equity T. Co
Date: 10/08/21

166 King St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Adrian Delgado
Seller: London Realty LLC
Date: 10/14/21

152 Lake Dr.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: ZF SPV LLC
Seller: Meghan K. Lightbrown
Date: 10/08/21

45 Leitch St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Jose M. Serrano
Seller: Alvaro Rodriguez
Date: 10/14/21

116-118 Malden St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Luis O. Serrano
Seller: Amat Victoria Curam LLC
Date: 10/15/21

68 Maryland St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $137,579
Buyer: Dong Phuong Group Inc.
Seller: Raymond C. Bevivino
Date: 10/14/21

71-73 Maryland St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Jeralmi Delgadillo
Seller: Celeste Diede
Date: 10/05/21

11 Merida St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Imari Hernandez-Garcia
Seller: Lisa C. Rivers
Date: 10/13/21

113 Michon St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Thomas Pedraza
Seller: Aleksandr Tsvor
Date: 10/15/21

 

89 Middle St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Yachira Olivo
Seller: Lorraine Holmes-Spruell
Date: 10/04/21

90 Monticello Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Julio A. Hernandez
Seller: Tascon Homes LLC
Date: 10/15/21

181 Newhouse St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Edgardo Perez
Seller: Chad M. Bassett
Date: 10/05/21

35 Norman St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Denise Bolanos
Seller: Kylah Stanton
Date: 10/08/21

350 Nottingham St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Norma S. Perez
Seller: Gerald Roncalli
Date: 10/14/21

150 Old Farm Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Jonathan St.Amand
Seller: Donald K. Husson
Date: 10/08/21

77 Oregon St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $248,000
Buyer: Benjamin T. Griffin
Seller: Markus M. Neugebauer
Date: 10/14/21

2127 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Joshua Sanabria
Seller: Phillip Vivenzio
Date: 10/08/21

39 Parkwood St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Anna L. Bloom
Seller: Ellen J. Pollock
Date: 10/13/21

45 Pilgrim Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Warren E. Clark
Seller: Russell A. Clark
Date: 10/08/21

130-132 Prentice St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Ricardo A. Perez
Seller: Ann M. Pastula
Date: 10/13/21

121 Princeton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $159,000
Buyer: Margare Waisome-Sinclair
Seller: Washington, C. E. B., (Estate)
Date: 10/15/21

85-91 Putnam Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Elasha Naylor
Seller: Hedge Hog Industries Corp.
Date: 10/05/21

37 Revere St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Eastcoastbuyers LLC
Seller: Emtay Inc.
Date: 10/08/21

59 Rosemary Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Chloe S. Roldan-Guzman
Seller: Liliya Gerasimchuk
Date: 10/08/21

241 S. Branch Pkwy
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Ravin S. Acharya
Seller: Nepal Tamang
Date: 10/07/21

130 Spear Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Stephanie Serrano
Seller: Daniel B. Leiper
Date: 10/06/21

102 Tamarack Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Charles Youmans
Seller: Kenneth Ramos
Date: 10/15/21

237-239 Tyler St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Mikayla Brunson
Seller: Felix Antigua
Date: 10/15/21

70 Vermont St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $156,000
Buyer: JJJ 17 LLC
Seller: Dias Properties LLC
Date: 10/07/21

39 Wendell Place
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Yikerta Mamushet
Seller: Carlos Rivera
Date: 10/05/21

68-70 Westford Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Ana Y. Mejia
Seller: Vincent Cardillo
Date: 10/15/21

35-37 Whittier St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Pah Properties LLC
Seller: Ricardo N. Hylton
Date: 10/08/21

215 Winton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $299,500
Buyer: Tilak Upadhaya
Seller: Roberto C. Jimenez
Date: 10/12/21

215 Winton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $266,000
Buyer: Tilak Upadhaya
Seller: Roberto C. Jimenez
Date: 10/08/21

188-190 Woodlawn St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Cesar Lopez
Seller: Meredith G. Shepard
Date: 10/08/21

1093 Worcester St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Jeimy O. Rodriguez
Seller: Lawrence R. Marti
Date: 10/15/21

SOUTHWICK

535 College Hwy.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Depalma Realty Inc.
Seller: Tynan Realty LLC
Date: 10/14/21

10 Depot St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $249,000
Buyer: Ryan B. Chapman
Seller: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Date: 10/04/21

23 Feeding Hills Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $190,377
Buyer: Laelia LLC
Seller: Priscilla M. Silkey
Date: 10/06/21

36 Fernwood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: David Drake
Seller: James H. Saalfrank
Date: 10/08/21

99 Foster Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Audrey Dufresne
Seller: David T. Plakias
Date: 10/13/21

204 Hillside Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Melissa Morrow
Seller: David W. Gunn
Date: 10/04/21

98 Sheep Pasture Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Joshua Lightcap
Seller: Melissa Morrow
Date: 10/04/21

1 Silvergrass Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $474,747
Buyer: Frank A. Cavallo
Seller: Hamelin Framing Inc.
Date: 10/08/21

TOLLAND

156 S. Village Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Austin Rybacki
Seller: William C. Walters
Date: 10/08/21

WALES

57 Main St.
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $136,400
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Michael W. Bowden
Date: 10/04/21

2 Woodland Heights
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $289,000
Buyer: Sean Valley
Seller: Michael Byrnes
Date: 10/04/21

WEST SPRINGFIELD

51-53 Bridge St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Anton A. Yunikov
Seller: Tatyana V. Myakushko
Date: 10/04/21

60 Chilson Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Mariana Ditoro
Seller: Anthony L. Calabrese
Date: 10/07/21

669 Dewey St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Shawn M. Ciborowski
Seller: Michelle K. Alfano
Date: 10/07/21

34 East School St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Emad Almastou
Seller: Suren Tumasyan
Date: 10/06/21

179 Forest Glen
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Patrick Sady
Seller: Julianne Larkin-Leissner
Date: 10/15/21

490 Gooseberry Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $287,500
Buyer: Albert Stasiak
Seller: Diane M. Ayr
Date: 10/07/21

21 High St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $205,500
Buyer: Brianna Gibbs
Seller: Jacqueline K. Rosner
Date: 10/06/21

126 High Meadow Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $627,000
Buyer: Joseph C. Kelley
Seller: Andri V. Laizer
Date: 10/12/21

66 Hillside Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Elija Gurung
Seller: Nicholas A. Gero
Date: 10/15/21

35 Queen Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Mark Taylor
Seller: Travis W. Chaput
Date: 10/04/21

80 Robinson Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Lynn M. Mancha RET
Seller: Rosemary Eger
Date: 10/14/21

44 Thomas Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $319,000
Buyer: Joseph R. Ramos
Seller: Jasmine D. Barreto
Date: 10/15/21

17 Tiara Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Rajendra Patel
Seller: Mohammad A. Burhan
Date: 10/15/21

57 Tiara Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $630,000
Buyer: Ryan J. Bradley
Seller: Joseph C. Kelley
Date: 10/12/21

2610 Westfield St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Meghan Lemay
Seller: Daniel P. Taibbi
Date: 10/15/21

WESTFIELD

47 Barbara St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Peter R. Beloin
Seller: Nancy Schenna
Date: 10/07/21

12 Blueberry Ridge
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Jerry Ramsay
Seller: Brendan P. Wilson
Date: 10/04/21

8 Foss St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $266,000
Buyer: Michelle Dyke
Seller: Zachary Howell
Date: 10/13/21

263 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Kimberly M. Bourque
Seller: Jason W. Sheehan
Date: 10/08/21

37 Greenwood St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Naples Property Group LLC
Seller: Rebecca L. Beggs
Date: 10/04/21

19 Jefferson St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Michael Geary
Seller: Angelo Liquori
Date: 10/05/21

19 Laro Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $306,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Vaclavicek
Seller: Ashlee Bard
Date: 10/15/21

606 Montgomery Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Karl R. Reuss
Seller: Evelyn M. Pratt
Date: 10/08/21

7 Nancy Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $555,000
Buyer: Thomas M. Jarry
Seller: Robert J. Morin
Date: 10/15/21

86 Pequot Point Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Katelyn Crogan
Seller: Ronald C. Baldwin
Date: 10/13/21

49 Pleasant St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $367,500
Buyer: William Sanfardino
Seller: Benjamin N. Koenig
Date: 10/05/21

251 Ponders Hollow Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Rebecca M. Rouse
Seller: Szuba, Edward F., (Estate)
Date: 10/12/21

137 Rachael Ter.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $565,000
Buyer: Artem Dyachvok
Seller: Sandra L. Wadsworth
Date: 10/04/21

24 Reed St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $328,500
Buyer: Charles F. Snyder
Seller: Yelena L. Moody
Date: 10/06/21

22 Rosedell Dr. Ext.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Ruben Colon
Seller: Caitlin E. Fields
Date: 10/07/21

61 Russell Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: John Woods
Seller: Revitalized Renovations
Date: 10/07/21

146 Sackett Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $291,000
Buyer: Peter Zaleski
Seller: Christopher Adamczyk
Date: 10/14/21

56 Shannon Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Gregory J. Falconer
Seller: Douglas B. Falconer
Date: 10/08/21

33 South Maple St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Robert Davis
Seller: Jesse Stanley
Date: 10/06/21

169 Southwick Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Nathan Hopson
Seller: Sarah G. Perreault
Date: 10/15/21

48 Washington St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Ashley Pacheco
Seller: Orville R. Libanan
Date: 10/12/21

West Parish Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $128,400
Buyer: James Adams
Seller: Bannish Lumber Inc.
Date: 10/08/21

451 West Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Michelle M. Usher
Seller: Michael Bartlett
Date: 10/07/21

67 Western Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $260,500
Buyer: Loi T. Tong
Seller: Robert L. Rea
Date: 10/08/21

WILBRAHAM

1155 Glendale Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $630,000
Buyer: Brian M. Rigali
Seller: Rebecca S. Tirabassi
Date: 10/12/21

949 Glendale Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $1,100,000
Buyer: Michael V. Tirabassi
Seller: Matthew W. Jackson
Date: 10/12/21

5 Herrick Place
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $457,000
Buyer: Thomas A. Rosati
Seller: Timothy F. Walsh
Date: 10/14/21

2 Highview Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $690,000
Buyer: Alida Garcia
Seller: Kristine M. Rodrigues
Date: 10/05/21

212 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Juana I. Quinones
Seller: Nancy E. Piccin
Date: 10/15/21

965 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $471,000
Buyer: Stephen E. Debruyn
Seller: Peter L. Fitzgerald
Date: 10/15/21

8 Old Farm Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Eric M. Koslik
Seller: Alfred E. Ouimet
Date: 10/04/21

4 Sawmill Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Kelvin Rivera
Seller: Marilyn H. Murray
Date: 10/15/21

22 Sunnyside Ter.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $461,000
Buyer: Ryan P. Balicki
Seller: Christian A. Barthelette
Date: 10/08/21

50 Weston St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Gary Payton
Seller: Philip E. Pace
Date: 10/04/21

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

127 Columbia Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Reinaldo Roman
Seller: Marion T. Rosenau
Date: 10/07/21

38 Lessey St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $115,580
Buyer: Gunter Kallmann
Seller: Margaret J. McLaren
Date: 10/15/21

57 Lindenridge Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: G. W. & M. L. Slowiaczek RET
Seller: Mazzoco RT
Date: 10/12/21

30 North East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: 30 North East St. LLC
Seller: Julie M. Tajima
Date: 10/13/21

44 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $825,000
Buyer: Milo & Cooper LLC
Seller: Marie E. Desch
Date: 10/07/21

46 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $825,000
Buyer: Milo & Cooper LLC
Seller: Marie E. Desch
Date: 10/07/21

747 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Wendy McDowell
Seller: Paul A. Huijing
Date: 10/06/21

BELCHERTOWN

248 Amherst Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Angela A. McMahon
Seller: Jason Gagnon
Date: 10/15/21

279 Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: James J. Spellman
Seller: Robert L. Hislop
Date: 10/06/21

137 Boardman St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $297,000
Buyer: Paul L. Beaulieu
Seller: Raymond A. Contois
Date: 10/15/21

7 Cloverhill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $430,000
Buyer: Tianning Huang
Seller: Michael J. Lamoureux
Date: 10/15/21

1317 Federal St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $401,000
Buyer: Umbra Property LLC
Seller: Federal Street Properties LLC
Date: 10/07/21

282 Franklin St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $526,000
Buyer: Robert A. Passaretti
Seller: Dean H. Adam
Date: 10/13/21

215 Jabish St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jabish Hill Enterprises LLC
Seller: Wilson, Brian A., (Estate)
Date: 10/07/21

41 Pine St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $382,500
Buyer: Allison B. Thorpe
Seller: Darlene E. Bonner
Date: 10/14/21

50 Rockrimmon St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $461,000
Buyer: Andrew P. Ristaino
Seller: Kenneth L. Miron
Date: 10/04/21

28 Sarah Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Glenn E. Burrows
Seller: Shelterwood Management LLC
Date: 10/15/21

581 State St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Robert Cameron
Seller: Dillon F. Monroe
Date: 10/15/21

CHESTERFIELD

48 South St.
Chesterfield, MA 01012
Amount: $610,000
Buyer: Nancy W. Hitzig
Seller: Ronald P. Imig
Date: 10/15/21

CUMMINGTON

237 Stage Road
Cummington, MA 01026
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Anthony Lake
Seller: Beth T. Eisenberg
Date: 10/08/21

EASTHAMPTON

65 Clark St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Scott Fitzmeyer
Seller: Robert F. Tremble RET
Date: 10/05/21

33 East Maple St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Ryan Carey
Seller: Denise L. Carey
Date: 10/04/21

12 Laurel Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Geoffrey A. Kuter
Seller: Cavallari FT
Date: 10/04/21

32 Line St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Norwich Properties LLC
Seller: Lebeau, Richard L., (Estate)
Date: 10/08/21

10 Orchard St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Christian D. Bodley
Seller: Peter T. Scibak
Date: 10/06/21

9 Paul St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $340,700
Buyer: Carmen J. Macchia
Seller: Jackson K. Weber
Date: 10/14/21

8 Pinebrook Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: BJR IRT
Seller: Donald R. Teres
Date: 10/05/21

105 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Nicholas D. Duprey
Seller: Mark J. Hanson
Date: 10/12/21

91 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Willem J. Doeleman
Seller: Thomas D. Wallace
Date: 10/15/21

GOSHEN

93 Hyde Hill Road
Goshen, MA 01032
Amount: $756,000
Buyer: Mitchell Schoch
Seller: Kelly A. Poppen RET
Date: 10/07/21

34 Pond Hill Road
Goshen, MA 01096
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Gerald A. Hinkle
Seller: Janice R. Ellis
Date: 10/15/21

116 Spruce Corner Road
Goshen, MA 01032
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Cecelia H. Thomas
Seller: Jennifer L. Thomas
Date: 10/06/21

GRANBY

29 North St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $297,000
Buyer: Cari M. Wiater
Seller: Wayne A. Gagnon
Date: 10/13/21

243 Taylor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $529,900
Buyer: Coree Caporale-Aussant
Seller: Robert A. Lapointe
Date: 10/14/21

HADLEY

1 Grand Oak Farm Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $601,000
Buyer: Matthew Hosen
Seller: Daniel J. Young
Date: 10/12/21

111 Russell St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Gohyang Family LLC
Seller: 111-113 Russell St. LLC
Date: 10/13/21

115 Russell St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Gohyang Family LLC
Seller: 111-113 Russell St. LLC
Date: 10/13/21

HATFIELD

58 West St.
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $332,000
Buyer: Gisella Holinka
Seller: Darlene M. Omasta
Date: 10/08/21

HUNTINGTON

Goss Hill Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $341,903
Buyer: National Farm & Forestry LLC
Seller: Goss Road Estates LLC
Date: 10/14/21

NORTHAMPTON

72 Bliss St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $204,668
Buyer: MHFA
Seller: Jeremy Hewat
Date: 10/13/21

200 Federal St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Samuel M. Thomson
Seller: Linda K. White
Date: 10/15/21

23 Grandview St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $324,000
Buyer: Enid Blechman
Seller: Stephen D. Chevalier
Date: 10/07/21

23 Higgins Way
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $652,850
Buyer: B. S. & Nancy Ryburn RET
Seller: Sunwood Development Corp.
Date: 10/15/21

88 Hillcrest Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $705,000
Buyer: Douglas J. Wheat
Seller: 5498 Gleason RET
Date: 10/06/21

42 Lexington Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: W. David Rosenmiller
Seller: Truskinoff, Debra B., (Estate)
Date: 10/15/21

91 Moser St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $603,000
Buyer: Andrew E. Smith
Seller: Armagan Gezici
Date: 10/06/21

420 North Main St.
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Christopher R. Jacobs
Seller: Sharon Mayberry
Date: 10/06/21

258 Old Wilson Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $379,000
Buyer: Beth Gillis
Seller: Pine Meadows Properties LLC
Date: 10/08/21

70 Sherman Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $126,500
Buyer: Mathena Morrissey
Seller: Christopher Karney
Date: 10/04/21

PELHAM

31 Harkness Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: William Sherr
Seller: Joseph Cox
Date: 10/05/21

SOUTH HADLEY

13 Hunter Ter.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $254,000
Buyer: Edward K. Lundrigan
Seller: Kevin W. Dalton
Date: 10/08/21

40 Lyon Green
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $497,500
Buyer: David C. Casey
Seller: JN Duquette & Son Construction Inc.
Date: 10/08/21

8 Michael Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Heather Menard
Seller: William R. Sasseville
Date: 10/15/21

22 Midway St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $309,310
Buyer: Amanda F. Geno
Seller: Patriot Living LLC
Date: 10/07/21

20 Mountain View St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Kelly M. Omasta
Seller: Christopher A. Cote
Date: 10/12/21

93 Pearl St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Kelly C. Dewall
Seller: Healy, Robert F., (Estate)
Date: 10/08/21

5 Ridge Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Lisa M. Finn
Seller: David W. Menard
Date: 10/15/21

22 School St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $238,000
Buyer: Elisha G. Church
Seller: James M. Murphy
Date: 10/04/21

31 Searle Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $218,000
Buyer: Gerard F. Lachance
Seller: Margaret M. St.Martin
Date: 10/13/21

17 Valley View Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $770,000
Buyer: George B. Witman
Seller: Donald J. Baptiste
Date: 10/06/21

75 Washington Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Zadkiel RT
Seller: Du Con Properties LLC
Date: 10/13/21

48 Westbrook Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Brian J. Greaney
Seller: Eugene T. Greaney
Date: 10/14/21

8 Westbrook Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Priya McCoy
Seller: Susan R. Martinelli
Date: 10/14/21

SOUTHAMPTON

127 Middle Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Jeremy R. Labrie
Seller: New England Remodeling
Date: 10/07/21

8 Nicole Circle
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $605,000
Buyer: Donna L. Lynn
Seller: Donald J. Delphia
Date: 10/15/21

55-A Pomeroy Meadow Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $332,600
Buyer: Richard R. Boyle
Seller: James F. Boyle
Date: 10/13/21

WARE

102 Bondsville Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Jessica Coelho
Seller: Jomaria Velez
Date: 10/15/21

30 Cherry St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Michael Mahoney
Seller: Brian D. Provencher
Date: 10/04/21

55 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Church Ware LLC
Seller: Kenneth H. Schroeder
Date: 10/15/21

23 Coffey Hill Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $369,000
Buyer: Robert A. Westbrook
Seller: Andrew Ghali
Date: 10/13/21

72 Coffey Hill Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Eric M. Duprey
Seller: Shannon L. Hall
Date: 10/04/21

7 Monroe St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: David Guerra
Seller: Theresa Hansen
Date: 10/08/21

105 Monson Turnpike Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Kristina R. Gambino
Seller: McCoy, Susan A., (Estate)
Date: 10/08/21

23 Sczygiel Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $276,000
Buyer: Ellen M. Eggenberger
Seller: Homer M. Bessonette
Date: 10/12/21

39 South St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: David Guerra
Seller: Theresa Hansen
Date: 10/08/21

WILLIAMSBURG

8 River Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Gerald D. Lashway
Seller: Robert W. Torrey
Date: 10/15/21

WESTHAMPTON

155 Edwards Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $620,000
Buyer: Vlad Grechka
Seller: L. Phyllis Allen TR
Date: 10/14/21

192 North Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $239,000
Buyer: Maitri Learning LLC
Seller: Leo W. Aloisi
Date: 10/14/21

Business Talk Podcast Special Coverage

We are excited to announce that BusinessWest, in partnership with Living Local, has launched a new podcast series, BusinessTalk. Each episode will feature in-depth interviews and discussions with local industry leaders, providing thoughtful perspectives on the Western Massachuetts economy and the many business ventures that keep it running during these challenging times.

Episode 87: November 8, 2021

George Interviews Bob Nakosteen, a professor of Economics at UMass Amherst

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien has a lively, wide-ranging discussion with Bob Nakosteen, a professor of Economics at UMass Amherst. The two talk about everything from the recent jobs report and what it means, to soaring inflation; from supply chain issues and how they will impact the rate of recovery, to projections for the year ahead. It’s a compelling discussion and must listening, so join us on BusinessTalk, a podcast presented by BusinessWest in partnership with Living Local.

 

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