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Construction Backlog Falls 3.2% in 4th Quarter
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) recently released its Construction Backlog Indicator (CBI) for the fourth quarter of 2011, which declined 3.2% from the previous quarter, from 8.1 months to 7.8 months, but is still up 10.9% compared to the fourth quarter of 2010. CBI is a forward-looking economic indicator that measures the amount of non-residential construction work under contract to be completed in the future. “Overall, the latest CBI numbers indicate a degree of stalling in the recovery of the nation’s non-residential construction industry, likely due to a combination of the soft patch that developed in the broader economy early last year, a number of seasonal factors, and the winding down of federal stimulus projects,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “But the good news is that, given the recent acceleration in economic and employment growth, CBI is positioned to rebound more forcefully during the quarters ahead. In addition, the most recent data reflect the ongoing expansion in privately funded construction activity as opposed to the contraction of publicly funded construction. Basu noted that the nation’s smaller construction firms are gaining an advantage from this shift, in contrast to the decreased construction activity among the larger firms that had benefited from earlier federal stimulus projects and military-base-realignment-related construction.” Regionally, the construction backlog expanded in the Northeast from the third quarter to the fourth quarter, but declined in the South and West, and was essentially unchanged in the middle states. Also, the construction backlog is higher in every region of the nation compared to one year ago. Companies in the south, some of which are located in high-growth states such as Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas, reported the lengthiest backlog at 8.9 months, up 14.7% from the fourth quarter of 2010. “The disparity between regional construction activity is on the rise,” said Basu. “One year ago, the difference in backlog between the South region, with the lengthiest backlog, and the West region, with the shortest backlog, was 1.98 months. During the fourth quarter of 2011, this gap rose to 2.81 months, with the South reporting a backlog of 8.92 months and the West at 6.11 months. The South appears to be the region most positively impacted by rebounding non-residential construction, largely due to its central importance to the nation’s energy industry.” Basu added that the West “continues to deal with many issues, including the impact of weak residential real-estate markets and stressed state fiscal conditions, both of which impact the vitality of broader regional economies.”

MMWEC, Utilities Receive Energy-efficiency Grant
LUDLOW — A first-time grant of $200,000 from the state Department of Energy Resources (DOER) will enable three municipal utilities and the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Co. (MMWEC) to expand energy-efficiency programs for their commercial and industrial customers. Using the MMWEC energy-efficiency program model, the MMWEC member utilities in Westfield, Chicopee, and Ipswich received grants totaling $142,500, primarily to bolster customer-rebate programs that offset the cost of making energy-efficient improvements. MMWEC received a grant of $7,500 to promote its energy-efficiency program and assist municipal utilities with delivery of related customer services. “This grant is certainly a welcomed contribution to expanding the energy-efficiency services provided by these municipal utilities,” said MMWEC CEO Ronald C. DeCurzio. “We are hoping the allocation of these funds can be expanded in the future to benefit additional municipal utilities and their customers.” MMWEC coordinated the competitive grant-application process for its member utilities in Westfield, Chicopee, and Ipswich, while the Reading municipal utility also received funding for an energy-saving water-heating program. The MMWEC members will use the grants to increase rebates and energy-audit funding for commercial and industrial customers. Generally, the efficiency measures covered include improvements in heating and cooling, windows, boilers and furnaces, lighting, energy-monitoring systems, and insulation. The grants are funded through proceeds from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a regional cap-and-trade, emissions-reduction program that has generated more than $150 million for Massachusetts through the sale of emission allowances. “Westfield is delighted to be among the first municipal utilities in Massachusetts to receive a grant from the DOER,” said Westfield Gas & Electric General Manager Daniel J. Howard. “We have worked hard at initiating a program for our commercial and industrial customers that promotes conservation and energy efficiency while expanding existing programs to our residential customers.” Chicopee Electric Light Manager Jeffrey R. Cady echoed those sentiments. “The DOER grant will enable Chicopee to move forward with expanding programs to better serve our customers and help meet our system needs with energy efficiency and conservation initiatives,” said Cady. “Using energy efficiently is essential in delivering a reliable and economic supply of electricity to Chicopee consumers. This grant will keep us moving in that direction.” MMWEC is a nonprofit, public corporation and political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts that provides a variety of power-supply, financial, risk-management, and other services to the state’s consumer-owned municipal utilities.

Opinion
Making the Most of the Casino Era

Optimize.
That’s word we keep hearing with regard to casinos these days.
Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno used it liberally after the former Westinghouse site off Route 291 was acquired by a casino developer, and people started thinking about the possibility of the City of Homes as the site for a facility. Kevin Kennedy, the city’s recently named chief development officer, used it as well, as he talked with BusinessWest and other media outlets about his goals and aspirations moving forward.
And Stephen Crosby, named chair of the Massachusetts Gaming Commission last fall, and now known as the ‘casino czar’ in some quarters, put that term to work as he talked with us about how he hopes his panel may go well beyond regulating casinos, and also work with them to “maximize the public good” (see story, page 6).
All this talk of optimization is centered on the fact that the time for talking about whether expanded gaming is good for the state is over — casinos are now the law in the Commonwealth. Now, instead, it’s time to discuss how to make casinos good for the state. Or at least better than what many of the naysayers are predicting.
And we hope that this talk is considerably more than just rhetoric, because casinos are much more than a source of jobs and what amounts to a giant ATM machine for the state; they are a potentially disruptive force in the local economy.
Therefore, it’s incumbent upon the state, its casino commission, host communities, and impacted businesses and entertainment venues to not just ‘do’ casinos, but do them right.
Which is why we were encouraged by Crosby’s comments, specifically those about going beyond the role of regulator — although, as he said, his panel will certainly be that — and into the position of partner, or collaborator, with the gaming industry on the broad assignment of getting this right.
To date, so much of the focus has been on where the casinos will be located and which developer is to be chosen. And this is obviously important, especially in the communities where sites have been proposed — Springfield, Holyoke, Palmer, Brimfield, and others — and communities that neighbor those cities and towns.
But what’s potentially much more important is how the casinos will operate, and in what ways they can work with local communities to not simply minimize traffic problems or contribute economically to education systems or other civic priorities.
When Kennedy talked with BusinessWest in the Jan. 16 issue, he spoke of the vast potential of a casino located in the so-called North Blocks section of Springfield, just beyond the arch. Such a facility would be one of the key pieces in a downtown-revitalization strategy, he said, adding that a casino there would also benefit a soon-to-be-revitalized Union Station and its adjoining parking facility. Meanwhile, according to his vision, that North End casino would make use of downtown facilities, such as Symphony Hall, CityStage, and the Paramount for shows, thus spreading the wealth in both a figurative and literal sense.
The odds of such a proposal becoming reality are quite long, to use an industry term, but they are an example of the kind of outside-the-box, or, in this case, outside-the-casino thinking that will be needed in the months and years to come.
As the casino process moves forward, we need ‘optimize’ to become more than a word, more than a goal. It must be a guiding force as expanded gaming becomes reality in this state.

Agenda Departments

‘Music for the Eyes’ Exhibition, Reception
Through April 7: The artwork of Preston Trombly, host of Sirius/XM Satellite Radio’s nationally broadcast Symphony Hall channel, titled “Music for the Eyes,” will be exhibited through April 7 at the Arno Maris Gallery in Ely Hall on the Westfield State University campus. An artist reception at the gallery is planned for Feb. 29 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. On March 7 at 9:30 a.m., Trombly will present a lecture on his work at the gallery titled “Confluence of Creativity: Similarities Between Composing Music and Making Visual Art.” Regular gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday from 2 to 5 p.m., Thursday from 2 to 7 p.m., and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (413) 572-4400 or visit www.westfield.ma.edu/galleries.

Manufacturing Seminar
Feb. 29: Presentations by the Economic Development Council of Western Mass., MassDevelopment, Massachusetts Offices of International Trade and Investment, and Associated Industries of Massachusetts will highlight a seminar titled “Promoting Manufacturing in Massachusetts,” from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Springfield Country Club, 1375 Elm St., West Springfield. A networking reception is also planned. For more information or to register, contact Gloria Fischer at [email protected]

Zonta Club to Fete Gobi
March 12: State Rep. Anne M. Gobi has been chosen by the Zonta Club of Quaboag Valley to receive its Founders Day Award. Gobi will be honored at the club’s dinner meeting at 5:30 p.m. at the Ludlow Country Club, 1 Tony Lema Dr., Ludlow. Gobi was first elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 2001, and represents the 11 towns of the 5th Worcester District. She previously taught in the public school system, and opened her own law practice in 1996. She has worked with Legal Assistance Corporation of Central Mass. to provide free legal services to victims of domestic violence. She is currently a member of the Women’s Caucus, and has co-sponsored bills to update 209A restraining orders to give victims greater protections and enhance the ability of law enforcement to act on the orders. The Founders Day Award is given annually to a woman in the greater Quaboag area who exemplifies the ideals of Zonta International, a service organization of business and professional women. The event is open to the public and tickets must be reserved by March 1. Tickets are $18 payable by March 1, or $20 payable at the door. For more information, contact Marge Cavanaugh at (413) 283-6448 or via e-mail to [email protected], or visit www.zontaqv.org.

Women in Philanthropy Conference
March 13: Women in Philanthropy of Western Mass. will host a conference titled “Growing Philanthropy, New Visions, New Voices,” from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the MassMutual Center, 1277 Main St., Springfield. The event features nationally known leaders in the field of fund development, and is appropriate for women and men who are seasoned professionals or newcomers to the field. Workshops will be led by Penelope Burk, author of Donor-Centered Fundraising; Phil Cubeta, chair in Philanthropy of the American College; and Karen Osborne, president of the Osborne Group. The keynote address, titled “New Leadership for a New Nonprofit Sector,” will be presented by Rosetta Thurman. In addition, sessions will be led by Diana McLain Smith, chief transformation officer of New Profit Inc.; Kristin Leutz and Katie Allan Zobel of the Community Foundation of Western Mass.; Phyllis Williams-Thompson of the Prematurity Campaign of the March of Dimes; Deborah Koch, director of grants at Springfield Technical Community College; Dennis Bidwell of Bidwell Advisors; and Joe Waters and Joanna MacDonald, co-authors of Cause Marketing for Dummies. For more conference details, visit www.wipwm.com. The cost of the conference, with an early discount, is $140. For more information, contact Carol Constant at (413) 222-1761 or [email protected]

Financing Your Business
March 16: The Mass. Small Business Development Center Network will host a lecture titled “Financing Your Business” from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Scibelli Enterprise Center, 1 Federal St., Springfield. Speakers will include Ray Milano of the U.S. Small Business Administration, Gary Besser of First Niagara Bank, and Christopher Sikes, director of Common Capital Inc. Topics include what lenders are looking for, SBA loan programs, new SBA programs, and venture capital and grants. For more information, call (413) 737-6712 or visit www.msbdc.org/wmass. The cost is $40.

Pioneer Valley USO Gala
March 16: The Log Cabin on Easthampton Road in Holyoke will be the setting for the second annual dinner-dance gala of the Pioneer Valley USO. The featured speaker will be American Captain Richard Phillips, who offered himself as a hostage to save his crew from Somali pirates and was freed in a high-seas rescue by U.S. Navy SEALS. The gala theme will be “Proud to be an American.” A cocktail hour at 6 p.m. will be followed by the dinner program at 7. Heroes from each branch of the U.S. Armed Forces and top Pioneer Valley USO supporters will be honored. The Western Massachusetts All Stars Band, led by Joe Pereira, will provide the evening’s entertainment. Tickets are $45 per person and are available online at www.pioneervalleyuso.org or by calling (413) 557-3290. Tickets are limited. The mission of the Pioneer Valley USO is to “lift the spirits of America’s troops and their families.”

Difference Makers
March 22: BusinessWest will stage its Fourth Annual Difference Makers Celebration at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. The program recognizes area individuals and organizations that are truly making a difference in this region. This year’s honorees are:
• Donald and Charlie D’Amour, chairman/CEO and president/COO, respectively, of Big Y Foods;
• William Messner, president of Holyoke Community College;
• Majors Tom and Linda-Jo Perks, officers with the Springfield Corps of the Salvation Army;
• Bob Schwarz, executive vice president of Peter Pan Bus Lines; and
• The Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts.
The awards ceremony will feature entertainment, butlered hors d’ oeuvres, and introductions of the winners. Tickets are $55 per person, with tables of 10 available. For more information or to order tickets, call (413) 781-8600, e-mail [email protected], or visit www.businesswest.com.

Women’s Leadership Conference
March 23: Keynote speakers Sister Helen Prejean, Marjora Carter, and Ashley Judd will share personal stories, as well as insightful advice and perspectives, during Bay Path College’s annual event at the MassMutual Center in downtown Springfield. The theme for the 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. event is “Lead with Compassion.” Prejean is a member of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Medaille and an anti-death penalty activist, while Carter, an eco-entrepreneur, is president of the Majora Carter Group, and Judd is a film and stage actor and human-rights activist. For more information on the conference or to register, visit www.baypathconference.com or call Briana Sitler, director of special programs, at (413) 565-1066.

Author Lecture
March 28: Internationally acclaimed author Tom Perrotta will read from his upcoming novel, The Leftovers, at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. The talks are free and open to the public. Two of Perrotta’s books, Election and Little Children, have been made into movies, and five novels have been national bestsellers. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

Not Just Business as Usual
April 5: Former NBA player and businessman Ulysses “Junior” Bridgeman will be the guest speaker at the Springfield Technical Community College Foundation’s third annual Not Just Business as Usual event at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield. A cocktail and networking reception is planned from 5:30 to 7 p.m., followed by the dinner program from 7 to 9 p.m. Bridgeman spent most of his 12-year NBA career with the Milwaukee Bucks, but also played for the Los Angeles Lakers. He is the current franchise owner of more than 160 Wendy’s and 120 Chili’s restaurants. The event encourages local businesses to come together for an evening to network, learn from one another, and support student success. Funds from the event will provide students access to opportunities through scholarships, technology, and career direction to be successful future employees and citizens. “It’s a time to celebrate innovations, change, and our region’s success,” said STCC Foundation Interim Director Robert LePage. A variety of sponsorship opportunities are available, and individual tickets are $175 each. For more information, contact LePage at (413) 755-4477 or [email protected]

Constitution Café
April 10: Author and philosopher Christopher Phillips’ latest book, Constitution Café, draws on the nation’s rebellious past to incite meaningful change today. He proposes that Americans revise the Constitution every so often, not just to reflect the changing times, but to revive and perpetuate the original revolutionary spirit. He will present a free lecture at 8 p.m. in the dining hall at Blake Student Commons, on the Bay Path College campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow. The lecture is part of the annual Kaleidoscope series. For more information, call (413) 565-1000 or visit www.baypath.edu.

Marketing Basics Seminar
April 11: The Mass. Small Business Development Center Network will host a lecture titled “Marketing Basics” from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Dianne Doherty of the MSBDC Network will present the workshop that will focus on the basic disciplines of marketing, beginning with research (primary, secondary, qualitative, and quantitative). For more information, call (413) 737-6712 or visit www.msbdc.org/wmass. The cost is $40.

Slam Poet Lecture
April 13: Taylor Mali, a former high-school teacher who has emerged from the slam-poetry movement as one of its leaders, will discuss his performances at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. The talks are free and open to the public. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

Comedy Night to
Benefit Charities
April 21: Smith & Wesson Corp. will host a benefit comedy show to support two local children’s charities, the Shriners Hospitals for Children and the Ronald McDonald House, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Cedars Banquet Hall, 419 Island Pond Road, Springfield. Tickets are $30 per person, and include the show, hot and cold hors d’oeuvres prior to the show, a cash bar, raffles, fund-raising, games, and music. Teddie Barrett of Teddie B. Comedy will emcee the event, featuring professional comedians Bill Campbell, Dan Crohn, and Stacy Yannetty Pema. For tickets or more information, contact Phyllis Settembro, Smith & Wesson, (413) 747-3597; Karen Motyka, Shriners Hospital, (413) 787-2032; or Jennifer Putnam, Ronald McDonald House, (413) 794-5683.

Walk of Champions
May 6: The Goodnough Dike area of the Quabbin Reservoir will be the setting for the seventh annual Walk of Champions in Ware. Participants walk in honor or in memory of loved ones affected by cancer, with the determination to make a difference in those affected by the disease. The event offers a five-mile or two-mile walk, with entertainment and refreshments along the route. For more information, visit www.baystatehealth.org/woc or e-mail Michelle Graci, manager of fund-raising events at Baystate Health at [email protected]

40 Under Forty
June 21: BusinessWest will present its sixth class of regional rising stars at its annual 40 Under Forty gala at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. Nominations are currently being scored by a panel of five judges. The 40 highest scorers will be feted at the June 21 gala, which will feature music, lavish food stations, and introductions of the winners. Tickets are $60 per person, with tables of 10 available. Early registration is advised, as seating is limited. For more information, call (413) 781-8600, ext. 100, or visit www.businesswest.com.

Western Mass.
Business Expo
Oct. 11: BusinessWest will again present the Western Mass. Business Expo. The event, which made its debut last fall at the MassMutual Center in downtown Springfield, will feature more than 180 exhibitors, seminars, special presentations, breakfast and lunch programs, and the year’s most extensive networking opportunity. Comcast Business Class will again be the presenting sponsor of the event. Details, including breakfast and lunch agendas, seminar topics, and featured speakers, will be printed in the pages of BusinessWest over the coming months. For more information or to purchase a booth, call (413) 781-8600, or e-mail [email protected], or visit www.wmbexpo.com.

Departments People on the Move

Carole Desroches

Carole Desroches

Carole Desroches has been appointed Assistant Vice President/Investment Officer at Westfield Bank. She has 16 years of experience in the banking industry, and will work primarily out of the corporate office. She will work with Westfield Bank’s investment portfolio to develop new strategies and provide ongoing analysis.
•••••
EBTEC of Agawam recently recognized nine employees, each with more than 25 years of service, representing 255 years of combined employment at the high-energy-beam-manufacturing facility. Those honored were:
• Christopher English;
• Daniel Hebert;
• Cathy Anderson;
• Mark Modzeleski;
• Mathew Girouard;
• Vincent Mammano;
• Paul Krassler;
• David Maheu, and
• Brian Havens.
•••••
Carla J. Potts has been named Coordinator of Media Relations in the Marketing and Communications Department at Springfield Technical Community College.
•••••
Chicopee Savings Bank announced the following:
• Irene Alves has been promoted to Assistant Vice President of Retail Lending Operations;
• Gloria Faria has been promoted to Assistant Vice President of Retail Banking and also manages the bank’s Ludlow office;
• Clare Ladue has been promoted to Assistant Vice President of Retail Banking and is also managing the main office in Chicopee;
• Becky Elias has been promoted to Portfolio Manager; and
• Sarah Medeiros has been promoted to Credit Officer.
•••••
Dan Carstens, publisher of the Airport News & Bradley International Cargo Guide, will serve as Marketing Consultant to the Connecticut Airport Authority (CAA). His role includes identifying new routes and enhancements for Bradley International Airport and the state’s general-aviation airports. The CAA was established last July to develop, improve, and operate Bradley International and the state’s five general airports (Danielson, Groton/New London, Hartford Brainard, Waterbury-Oxford, and Windham).
•••••
Shaun Dwyer has been named First Vice President and Commercial Team Leader for Berkshire Bank in the Pioneer Valley.
•••••
MassMutual’s Retirement Services Division in Springfield announced the following:
• John Budd has been appointed National Practice Leader covering the division’s institutional retirement products. In this newly created role, Budd is responsible for leading MassMutual’s distribution strategy for its stable-value investment-only and defined-benefit businesses, working with the division’s managing directors and their key advisor relationships; and
• Brian Mezey has joined the division as Managing Director of Institutional Sales. In this role, Mezey is responsible for working with retirement-plan advisors in mid-sized and large markets, and is partnered with Andy Hanlon covering the Eastern New England region.
•••••
Market Mentors in West Springfield announced the following:
• Jessica Lemieux has joined the firm as an Account Executive. She is responsible for managing accounts and client expectations, as well as outreach for new business;
• Karin O’Keefe has joined the firm as Account Coordinator and Manager of Digital Advertising. She will coordinate various accounts and oversee all social networking and digital advertising; and
• Laura Stopa has joined the firm and will assist the Art Director with Web coding and design.
•••••
Charles Frago

Charles Frago

Charles Frago has joined Wolf & Co., P.C. of Boston as a Principal on the tax-service team of Wolf’s Financial Institutions group. Frago will focus on tax planning, compliance, mergers and acquisitions, stock-based compensation, and preparing clients for tax examinations.
•••••
John P. O’Rourke has been named Director of Electricity for the Hampshire Council of Governments. He will lead the Hampshire Electricity Program, and work to expand the customer base by providing lower-cost electricity to government entities, school districts, nonprofits, and businesses throughout Western Mass.
•••••
Syeda Maham Al Rafai has joined Hatch Mott MacDonald in Holyoke as an Engineer. She is experienced in AutoCAD and Risa2D beam-column design, and will enroll in the engineer-in-training program for the state of Massachusetts.
•••••
Michael Natale was recently named Vice President of Sales for Leonard E. Belcher Inc. He will oversee all sales operations of the multi-branded, multi-state distributor.
•••••
Thomas W. Barney, Certified Financial Planner, has joined Heaphy Trust Group and Heaphy Investments, which offer investment-management, financial-planning, and fiduciary services to individuals, nonprofits, and retirement plans.
•••••
Susan Barbiasz has been promoted to Manager of the Chicopee Savings Bank Ware branch. She will manage the day-to-day operations of the branch office located at Gibbs Crossing on Palmer Road.
•••••
Michele A. Rooke has been named a Shareholder with the law firm of Doherty, Wallace, Pillsbury & Murphy. Rooke joined the firm in 2002 after serving as an Assistant District Attorney for Hampden County. She represents plaintiffs and defendants in a variety of civil-litigation matters. Her practice also includes criminal defense.

Chamber Corners Departments

Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• March 6: Springfield Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors’ meeting, noon to 1 p.m., TD Bank Conference Center, Springfield.
• March 7: ACCGS Business @ Breakfast, Springfield Marriott. Doors open at 7:15 a.m. Cost is $20 for members, $30 for non-members.
• March 8: ACCGS Board of Directors meeting, 8- 9 a.m., TD Bank Conference Center, Springfield.
• March 9: ACCGS Legislative Steering Committee, 8-9 a.m., TD Bank Conference Center, Springfield.
• March 14: ACCGS After 5, 5-7 p.m.
• March 14: Professional Women’s Chamber Up the Ladder: The Healthcare Business, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., MassMutual Room at the Basketball Hall of Fame, Springfield. Guest Speaker will be Susan Toner, vice president of Development, Baystate Health. Cost is $25 for members, $35 for non-members. Hosted by Max’s Tavern.
• March 21: ERC Board of Directors meeting, 8-9 a.m.,  the Gardens of Wilbraham Community Room, 2 Lodge Lane, Wilbraham.

Amherst Area
Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com
413-253-0700

• March 14: Chamber Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., at the the Courtyard by Marriott. Craig Melin, president and CEO of Cooley Dickinson Hospital, will will be the featured speaker. Sponsored by Cooley Dickinson Hospital and VNA & Hospice of Northampton. Cost is $5 for members, $10 for non-members.
• March 28: Margarita Madness, 5-7 p.m., at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. The public is invited to this margarita-tasting event; guests can sample 12 margaritas and vote for their favorites. The cost is $25 per person, $40 per couple. Chamber members, $20 per person. Sponsored by MassLive.com, the Valley Advocate, Greenfield Savings Bank, Applewood at Amherst, Copycat Amherst, Encharter Insurance LLC, Hope & Feathers Framing, Johnny’s Tavern, Judie’s Restaurant, 30 Boltwood, Lit, the Pub, UMass Fine Arts Center, Your Promotional Consultant/NEPM, and more.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

• March 2: Shining Stars Banquet, 6:30-10 p.m., Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., in Chicopee. Recognizing the Business of the Year — MicroTek Inc.; Citizen of the Year — Vern Campbell of Chicopee Visiting Nurse Assoc.; and Chamber Volunteer of the Year — Ron Proulx of Dave’s Truck Repair Inc. Tickets are $60 each. Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org
• March 21: March Salute Breakfast,  7:15-9 a.m. at the MassMutual Learning & Conference Center, 350 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Tickets are $19 for members and $26 for non-members. Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org
• March 21: Table Top Expo & Business Networking Event, 4:30-7 p.m. at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road in Holyoke. Presented by the Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, Greater Easthampton, and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce. More than 175 exhibitors and 600 visitors are expected. Tickets are $5 pre-registered, $10 at the door. Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org

Franklin County
Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463

• March 23: Monthly Chamber Breakfast Series, 7:30-9 a.m., Greenfield Grille, Federal St., Greenfield. Theme: “Art and Business in Partnership: Fostering Our Local Economy.” The keynote speaker will be Peter Kageyama, authority on community development. Presenters: Meri Jenkins, Mass. Cultural Council; Matthew Glassman, Double Edge Theater; Dee Schneidman, New England Foundation for the Arts; and Erica Wheeler, Soulful Landscape Program. Tickets: $12 for members, $15 for non-members. Sponsored by Greenfield Savings Bank. This is followed by the Creative Economy Summit 3 in downtown Greenfield, March 23 and 24. Theme is “Art and Business in Partnership.” Admission is $35. Features practical workshops for two days, and many noted speakers and presenters; www.creativeeconomysummit.com

Greater Easthampton
Chamber of Commerce
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

• March 8: Networking by Business Card Exchange, 5-7 p.m., at Harley-Davidson of Southampton, 17 College Highway, Southampton. Sponsored by Puffer Printing and Copy Center. Door prizes, hors d’ouevres, host beer and wine. Tickets: $5 for members, $15 for future members.
• March 16: St. Patrick’s Day Luncheon, noon-2 p.m., at the Clarion Hotel & Conference Center, One Atwood Dr., Northampton. Honored guest: Molly Bialecki, Distinguished Young Woman of Greater Easthampton. Sponsored by Easthampton Learning Foundation and Finck & Perras Insurance Agency. Tickets are $21.95 for members, $23.95 for non-members.
• March 21: 18th annual Table Top Exposition & Business Networking Event, 4:30-7 p.m, at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Presented by the Greater Easthampton, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce. Exhibitor table fee: $100 (must be a member). Contact participating chambers for more info. Attendee-only tickets: $5 in advance, $10 at the door.

Greater Holyoke
Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

• March 1: Leadership Holyoke opening session, 8 a.m. Hosted by Holyoke Community College.
• March 15: St. Patrick’s Salute Breakfast, 7:30 a.m., at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. Cost: $20.
• March 19: Checkpoint Legislative Luncheon, 11:30 a.m., at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. Presented by Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of Commerce. Keynote speaker will be U.S. Sen. Scott Brown. Sponsored by Charter Oak Insurance and Financial Services Co.; Associated Industries of Massachusetts; Sullivan, Hayes & Quinn, LLC; Columbia Gas of Massachusetts; Mestek Inc.; GZA Proactive by Design; and Westfield Bank. Cost: $35 for members of presenting chambers, $45 for non-members.
• March 21: Table Top Expo, 4:30-7 p.m. (March 28 snow date), at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. Presented by the Greater Holyoke, Chicopee, Greater Easthampton, and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce. Annual event with up to 180 exhibitors and 700 attendees. Tables (members of presenting chambers only) are $100. Attendee cost: $5 in advance, $10 at the door. For a list of sponsors, check the BusinessWest ad.

Greater Northampton
Chamber of Commerce
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

• March 7: March Arrive @5, 5-7p.m., at the Montessori School of Northampton, 51 Bates St,, Northampton; $10 for members. Casual mix and mingle with colleagues and friends. Sponsored by King Auto Body.
• March 9: Annual Meeting, noon-2 p.m., at the Clarion Hotel & Conference Center, 1 Atwood Dr., Northampton.
• March 21: 18th Annual Table Top Exposition & Business Networking Event, 4:30-7 p.m., at the the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Tickets are $5 in advance, $10 at the door.

Northampton Area
Young Professional Society
www.thenayp.com
(413) 584-1900

• March 8: NAYP Monthly Networking Event, 5-8 p.m., at Spare Time Family Fun Center, 525 Pleasant St., Northampton. Free for members, $5 for guests.

Greater Westfield
Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• March 5: Mayor’s Coffee Hour, 8-9 a.m. Meet Mayor Dan Knapik and learn about what’s happening in Westfield. Open to the public. Hosted by Tighe & Bond, 53 Southampton Road, Westfield. To register, contact Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 or [email protected]
• March 16: Annual St. Patrick Day’s Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m. at Westfield State University, 577 Western Ave., Westfield. Guest speaker will be George O’Brien, editor of BusinessWest Magazine. Entertainment by some of the Dan Kane Singers. Cost: $25 for chamber members, $30 for non-members. To reserve tickets, contact Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 or [email protected]
• March 19: CheckPoint 2012 Annual Legislative Luncheon at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Keynote speaker is U.S. Sen. Scott Brown. A collaboration between the Greater Westfield, Chicopee, and Greater Holyoke chambers of commerce. Cost: $35 for chamber members, $45 for non-members. To reserve tickets, contact Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 or [email protected]
• March 28: WestNet Plus One!, 5- 7 p.m. Come and network with fellow chamber members and meet new members and businesses in the area. Guest speaker will be Patrick Berry, president of the Westfield News. Hosted by PeoplesBank, 281 East Main St., Westfield.  Cost: $10 for chamber members, $15 cash for non-members. Don’t forget your business cards! To register, contact Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 or [email protected]
• March 31: 2012 Spring Southwick Economic Development Commission (EDC) Home & Business Show, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Southwick Town Hall, 454 College Highway. This tabletop exhibit of Southwick businesses is free to the public, and the EDC will be collecting non-perishable food items for the local food pantry. Several free seminars will be held. Visit www.southwickma.info for more information.

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com

• March 10: 2nd Annual “Young Professionals Cup” Dodgeball Tournament, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.,  Springfield College. The YPS is partnering up with Springfield College to bring the Pioneer Valley the most epic dodge ball tournament of this decade. The battle for the Young Professionals Cup will consist of 48 coed, eight-person teams. The tournament will be a points-based, round-robin format, with each team playing a minimum of three games.
• March 15: March Third Thursday Networking/Social Event, 5-7 p.m.,
the Still Bar & Grill,  858 Suffield St., Agawam. This event is, as always, free for YPS members and $10 for non-members, and will include food and a cash bar.

Departments Picture This

Send photos with a caption and contact information to:  ‘Picture This’ c/o BusinessWest Magazine, 1441 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103 or to [email protected]

Watt’s Happening

WMECOCheckPresentation7587The $296 million expansion of Baystate Medical Center, opening in early March, promises to offer the latest in medical technology, patient care, and comfort. However, it represents the latest thinking in another area, too — energy efficiency in major building construction. Energy efficiency was a top priority for Baystate in conceiving, designing, and building the facility; architects and builders put in advanced cooling and heating systems, energy-efficient lighting, and a green roof to save on energy costs. In recognition of these efforts, Western Mass. Electric Co. President and COO Peter Clarke, left, presented a $426,373 incentive check to Baystate CEO Mark Tolosky. This is the largest energy incentive awarded by WMECo for 2011. Thanks to Baystate’s commitment and WMECo’s support, these changes will save 3,282,269 kWh and about $459,000 in operating costs each year.

By the Book

booksphotoHampden-based Rediker Software recently teamed up with the local nonprofit organization Link to Libraries as part of their Caring Community Project to assemble literacy book bags for children entering kindergarten in Holyoke and Springfield public schools. Pictured, from left, are Rediker Chief Financial Officer Gayle Rediker, Stacie Ann Walker, Ofelia Cruz, and David Tivoli. Link to Libraries has assembled more than 2,800 Welcome to Kindergarten literacy kits and donated more than 50,000 new books since the organization’s inception in 2008.


WMAS Radiothon at Baystate

Radiothon-Susan-and-DJAbove, Susan Toner, vice president of Development at Baystate Health and executive director of the Baystate Health Foundation, speaks with Chris Kellogg, morning host of the Kellogg Krew on 94.7 WMAS, during the 94.7 WMAS Radiothon to benefit Baystate Children’s Hospital. The 11th annual Radiothon was held from Feb. 16-18. Bottom, Amy Weiswasser, whose son, Alex, was born prematurely and spent time in the Davis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Baystate Children’s Hospital, speaks with Kellogg during the event. Weiswasser serves as a member of Baystate’s Family Advisory Council and NICU Parent to Parent.

Opinion
They Make a Difference in So Many Ways

We could call this the ‘year of the acronym.’ But we probably won’t.
That’s because doing so doesn’t come close to telling the story beyond the veritable alphabet soup of programs and initiatives that involve this year’s distinguished class of Difference Makers.
Let’s start with the Y-AIM program, initiated by the Springfield YMCA with a huge assist from Big Y Foods. It places youth advocates in Springfield high schools with the goal of helping students stay in school, inspire them to go on to college, and “move toward personal, family, and community advancement.”
There’s also LIPPI, the Leadership Institute for Political and Public Impact, started by the Women’s Fund of Western Mass. with the goal of providing women with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to become civic leaders in their communities, as well as the PAFEC (Picknelly Adult & Family Education Center) in the old downtown fire station in Holyoke. A collaboration between Holyoke Community College, Peter Pan, the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority, and other partners, it provides GED preparation and testing, adult basic education, workforce-development classes, English for speakers of other languages (ESOL), tutoring, mentoring, career counseling, and other services.
Then there’s TWO (Training and Workforce Options), a unique collaboration between HCC and Springfield Technical Community College established to support the workforce-training needs of the region’s businesses and nonprofits. And don’t forget BTG (Bridging the Gap), a program run by the Springfield Corps of the Salvation Army. It was created to assist first-time offenders in Greater Springfield and get them back on the right course. Since its inception, roughly 90% of its graduates have stayed in school and stayed out of further trouble with the law.
What all these acronyms and others do is help explain what this year’s class of Difference Makers does extremely well — to show that there are, indeed, many ways in which one can make a difference, and they all matter.
This simple fact was the driving force behind BusinessWest’s decision to create the Difference Makers program in 2008, and this year’s class uses all those acronyms and more to effectively bring home the point.
• Donald and Charlie D’Amour, the chairman/COO and president, respectively, of Big Y, are Difference Makers for myriad reasons — from Y-AIM to their work with area institutions like Baystate Health and the Springfield Library & Museums; from education initiatives such as the Homework Helpline and scholarships to huge donations of food to area pantries and food banks.
• Bob Schwarz has been making a difference for more than 30 years, through his work to create the PAFEC, but also his award-winning efforts to address homelessness not through shelters, but by creating far-more-permanent solutions.
• Bill Messner, president of Holyoke Community College, is making a difference through initiatives like TWO and the PAFEC, but also, and in more broad terms, by inspiring needed changes at the institution that have made the school more accessible and much more of a force in the communities it serves.
• The Women’s Fund of Western Mass. is making a huge difference through LIPPI, which has already inspired a number of women to seek elected office, but also through donations to countless area groups and what its leaders call “investments” in women and girls.
• The Salvation Army? Well, 2011 provided a window to the seemingly endless list of ways it can make a difference — from its Coats for Kids program to its tireless work providing food, supplies, clothing, and hope to last spring’s tornado victims; from the award-winning BTG to the rapid and multifaceted response to last August’s hurricane and the freak October snowstorm.
Taken together, all those capital letters and the numbers behind them paint a very powerful picture, one of groups and individuals who have found innumerable ways to improve quality of life in this region — and, best of all, continue to look for more ways to make a difference.
Congratulations to the class of 2012 and also to all those who have helped them achieve this distinction.

Opinion
The Jobs Market: Is the Worst Over?

The latest jobs report was a welcome surprise. Jobs increased in January by 243,000, cutting the unemployment rate to 8.3%. The question remains: is this a blip, or has the economy turned a corner?
Earlier in the week, the Congressional Budget Report put out a more pessimistic report, showing unemployment rising to 8.9% by the final quarter of this year (which happens to include Election Day) and peaking at 9.2% in early 2013.
According to the CBO, we won’t return to pre-recession employment levels until 2019. Why the grim picture? CBO assumes more budget cutting as the Bush tax cuts sunset, the deficit keeps declining, and there is no further offsetting stimulus.
Though the short-term jobs numbers have been above expectations for both December and January, there is no assurance that this good news will continue in the absence of additional stimulus.
And the risk remains of either a spike in the price of oil, as a byproduct of the escalating conflict with Iran, or further troubles in Europe. Either could weaken this hopeful trend.
The European Union, wedded to an even more perverse brand of austerity economics than the U.S., remains our biggest export market. And even a modest hike in the price of oil is like a tax on purchasing power.
For now, a prime engine of economic growth is the Federal Reserve, which has pledged to keep interest rates at near zero for the next three years. That itself is both recognition of how fragile this recovery is and also a necessary tonic.
Astoundingly, senior House Republicans spent one recent morning morning raking Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke over the coals for his refusal to let the economy fall off a cliff. The ever-clueless Paul Ryan, chair of the House Budget Committee, attacked Bernanke for failing to pay sufficient heed to inflation. The Fed’s policy, Ryan opined, “runs the risk of fueling asset bubbles, destabilizing prices, and eventually eroding the value of the dollar.”
On what planet does this man live? Bondholders are now willing to lend the government money for 30 years with returns of under 4%. If investors were worried about inflation, the interest rate on Treasury bonds would be rising, but it has been steadily falling for two years. The more serious risk is prolonged deflation.
As Bernanke, nobody’s idea of a Bolshevik, told the committee, “We still have a long way to go before the labor market can be said to be operating normally. Particularly troubling is the unusually high level of long-term unemployment.”
And if Ryan and his fellow Republicans want to be sure that low interest rates don’t cause asset bubbles, the remedy is financial regulation — of the sort that Republicans relentlessly oppose.
The Fed has done all it can to fight unemployment — you can’t push interest rates below zero. More public investment is needed. The latest jobs report showed that the public sector actually shed a net 14,000 jobs last month.
And a much more aggressive policy of mortgage relief would reverse the current problem of sinking housing values dragging down the rest of the economy.
Still, let’s celebrate good news when it comes — and hope it continues. There is much still to be done to help these encouraging trends turn into a durable recovery.

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of the American Prospect.

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
Jerry Cruz v. Shirin Jewelers and Yousef Al-Ryati
Allegation: Breach of contract to sell jewelry: $16,000
Filed: 11/3/11

Platinum Choice Staffing Inc. v. Wellman Healthcare d/b/a Palmer Healthcare Center
Allegation: Breach of contract for services rendered: $3,690.37
Filed: 11/15/11

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
Ann C. Gatti v. National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh
Allegation: Breach of contract for failure to pay death benefit: $42,000
Filed: 12/28/11

Jesse Bennefield v. Applied Proactive Technologies Inc.
Allegation: Employment discrimination: $25,000+
Filed: 12/29/11

Northeast Solite Corp. v. Connecticut Valley Block Co. Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract and failure to pay outstanding invoices for concrete aggregate product: $111,464.90
Filed: 12/28/11

Patricia E. St. Armand, William F. Julian, and Maureen T. Julian v. Willie Ross School for the Deaf Inc., et al
Allegation: Property damage and personal injury: $304,200
Filed: 12/28/11

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Alpine Landscape Co. Inc. v. Spillane’s Nursery and Landscape Co. Inc. and Nauset Construction Corp.
Allegation: Breach of contract for landscape construction services: $39,959.37
Filed: 1/12/12

Boulanger’s Plumbing and Heating Inc. v. Aecon Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods and services provided: $30,747.26
Filed: 12/15/11

Ronald S. Meck v. UMass Five College Federal Credit Union
Allegation: Violation of consumer-protection laws: $85,203
Filed: 12/22/11

HOLYOKE DISTRICT COURT
Clara DeJesus v. Stop & Shop Supermarket, LLC and Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc.
Allegation: Negligence in property maintenance causing slip and fall: $3,127.69
Filed: 10/28/11

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
M&S Electric Inc. v. Sackrey Construction Co., LLC
Allegation: Non-payment of labor and materials: $17,000
Filed: 11/7/11

Preferred Mutual Insurance Co. as subrogee of Allen and Judith Davis v. Amherst Maintenance Co.
Allegation: Plaintiff seeks to recover monies paid under the property-damage portion of an insurance contract: $10,952.12
Filed: 11/14/11

PALMER DISTRICT COURT
B.A.C. Sales Inc. v. Turnpike Acres and George Dupuis
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $16,658.64
Filed: 12/12/11

Norman J. Buehler v. Complete Restoration Solutions Inc. and Joe Gillette
Allegation: Breach of contract: $19,164.79
Filed: 11/25/11

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
ABC Supply Co. Inc. v. Agass Systems and Donald Mitchell
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $6,735.32
Filed: 12/28/11

Dewayne and Mary Lou Devos v. Bob the Roofer and Robert Kelley
Allegation: Failure to perform work as required in contract: $9,682.00
Filed: 12/15/11

Sturdy Home Improvements Inc. v. Brook Valley Investments Inc. and David Reynoso
Allegation: Breach of contract and fraud: $18,685
Filed: 12/28/11

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the month of January 2012.

AGAWAM

Holy Community Church
152 South Westfield St.
$3,500 — Create two new rooms

Mice, LLC
850 Springfield St.
$35,000 — Repair damage from car hitting building

CHICOPEE

City of Chicopee
6 Springfield St.
$450,000 — Stabilization of party wall

Country Trading Post
771 Burnett Road
$46,000 — Strip and re-roof

JCB Associates, LLC
609 Chicopee St.
$2,300 — Demolish garage

Main Street Property
340 McKinstry Ave.
$23,500 — Interior renovations

EAST LONGMEADOW

Creative Woodworking Corporation
310 Prospect St.
$20,000 — New roof

Stop & Shop
470 North Main St.
$491,000 — Interior renovations

Tiger Press
50 Industrial Dr.
$118,000 — New roof

HOLYOKE

Holyoke Mall Company, L.P.
50 Holyoke St.
$255,000 — Remodel The Gap store

ISO New England
1 Sullivan Road
$38,000 — Alterations to existing office space

LUDLOW

Brookside Café
6-8 Fuller St.
$14,000 — New roof

Lyon Offices, LLC
17 Moody St.
$1,600,000 — New commercial construction

Rick Tereso
447 Center St.
$9,000 — Re-shingle

NORTHAMPTON

James H. Graham
20 Ladd Ave.
$20,000 — Interior renovations

Judith Dunaway
11 Pleasant St.
$28,000 — Buildout for Bubble Teahouse

Gerrit T. Stover
17 New South St.
$40,000 — Interior renovations

Christine E. Henriques
89 Market St.
$9,000 — Replace siding and windows

Smith College
44 College Lane
$3,112,400 — Renovate classrooms and labs

Smith School
Haydenville Road
$35,000 — Install antennas and related equipment

SOUTHWICK

Dunkin Donuts
208 College Highway
$400,000 — New building

SPRINGFIELD

Chung Neugen
797 Belmont Ave.
$17,000 — New roof

Franklin Realty Partnership, LLC
357 Cottage St.
$9,000 — Construct new ramp to building

Springfield Center1 Assoc., LP
1333 Liberty St.
$25,000 — New antennas and radio equipment

Springfield Redevelopment
3-7 Elm St.
$12,000 — New roof

Tinkham Management
88 Industry Ave.
$18,000 — New roof

Bankruptcies Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Appleby, Ralph
16 Fredette St.
Chicopee, MA 01022
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Beaulieu, Marie L.
82 Jennings St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Bellofatto, Robert A.
Bellofatto, Sarah E.
46 Biltmore Ave
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/13/12

Big Branch Builders
Alpi, Lance
825 Hancock Road
Williamstown, MA 01267
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Bohl, Shawn M.
200 Eagle St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/07/12

Boisclair, Daniel J.
Boisclair, Paula A.
56 Columbus St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Brower, Mark D.
Brower, Kathleen A.
352 Crescent St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/13/12

Brunelle, Susan Julie
33 Woodcliff Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Camilleri, Richard
14 Upland Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/03/12

Candido, Dominic J.
170 Coyote Circle
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/12/12

Cook, James T.
30 Kane Brothers Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Deveno, William C.
Deveno, Kate
16 Blandford Hill Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Dupuis, Suzanne M.
Dupuis, Donald
P.O. Box 13
Granville, MA 01034
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Dusseault, Monica
20 Mount Carmel Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Fujan, Rhonda J.
60 Backman Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Gibbs, Dean
2 Cherry St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/10/12

Gonneville, Stephen M.
Gonneville, Doreen A.
19 Magnolia Ter.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Grover, Francis T.
8 Westwood Ter.
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/04/12

Hampden Realty Partners
Tragakis, William C.
128 Wilbraham Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/12/12

Hardy, Stephen
Hardy, Karen K.
a/k/a Knight, Karen S.
342 Southwick Road, A-6
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/10/12

Holley, John William
8 King St., Apt. 2
Hatfield, MA 01038
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/11/12

Jameson, Sue Ann
102 Cote Road
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/06/12

Johnson, Steven M.
128 Dewitt St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/05/12

Jurczyk, Magdalena
97 Simonich Circle
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/08/12

LaMountain, Steven W.
LaMountain, Katharine S.
35 Cooley St
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/12/12

Leger, Armand Arthur
Demers-Leger, Michelle Marie
35 Worthen St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Leuthner, James L.
12 Feeding Hills Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Levrault, Gregory
P.O. Box 691
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/11/12

Lisee, Rodney G.
95 Benz St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/13/12

Lucas, Brenda L.
32 Dickens Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Lucia, Grace M.
61 Prospect Hill Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/11/12

Martin, Joshua A.
91 Norwood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/04/12

Mateo, Domingo
Mateo, Marilyn J.
16 Fairgrounds Road, Apt. 10
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/10/12

Matthews, Alan Curtis
Matthews, Patricia Lise
a/k/a Langlois, Patricia L.
274 Papermill Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/12/12

McCormack, Thomas D.
38 Hilltop Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/08/12

Mercure, Patricia J.
41 Beaumont Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/11/12

Monette, Denise J.
216 Prentice St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/03/12

Navarro, Eduardo
Navarro, Virgenmina
5 O’Connell St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/02/12

Peterson, Carl P.
48 Dean Circle
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Phaneuf, Jennifer J.
47 Broad St., Apt. B19
Westfield, MA 01085-2948
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/06/12

Provost, Sarah A.
128 Dewitt St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/05/12

Rahab, Sammy
a/k/a Rehab, Oussama
26 Main St.
Hatfield
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/04/12

Rodriquez, Juan R.
Vasquez, Maria
656 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/06/12

Rogalski, Jennifer J.
252 New Boston Road
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Roque, Angel M.
a/k/a Roque Rodriguez, Angel M.
116 Sierra Vista Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/10/12

Ruiz, Ricardo
Ruiz, Jamaries V.
13 Conner Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/03/12

Santiago, Jose A.
Santiago, Edna
248 Lyman St., #2
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/04/12

Sarna, Angela C.
PO Box 361
Gilbertville, MA 01031
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/31/11

Sedona, Louise T.
1055 Worcester St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/05/12

Serra, Michelle Anne
68 Lake St., 1st Fl.
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/06/12

Serrano, Carlos R.
13 Beverly St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/04/12

Shuback, David T.
360 Grove St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/02/12

Smith, Lorne
74 Ely Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Toye, Shannon E.
191 Ashland St., Apt. #111
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/10/12

Velez, Hector L.
71 Cornwall St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/11/12

White, Edward A.
52 Hamilton Circle
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/03/12

Williams, Pauline Ada
86 Scarsdale Road
Springfield, MA 01129-1416
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/08/12

Wrzosek, Lawrence B.
11 First St.
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/13/12

Wysocki, Jr., Francis M.
32 Emerson Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/09/12

Yestramski, Francis J.
75 Laurel St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/03/12

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the month of January 2012.

AGAWAM

Actuarial Litigation Consulting
35 Rugby Road
Kevin Reopel

David J. Maisey
335 Walnut St.
David J. Maisey

The J.W. Home School Network
404 Barry St.
Trina Davis

The Spiced Pumpkin
1325 Springfield St.
Christian Dyckman

CHICOPEE

Atlas Legends of Polynesia
705 Memorial Dr.
Mokihana Ripley

Car Credit 1st
536 East St.
Frank DeCaro

Diana Sobieras Photography
140 Hendrick St.
Diana M. Sobiera

Grease Monkey Auto Repair
1057 Montgomery St.
Ivan Vlasyuk

HOLYOKE

Jo-Ann Fabrics & Crafts
2267 Northampton St.
Jeff Peters

Kim’s Holiday Cleaners
20 Forestdale Ave.
Wooil Kim

Pearl Bridal Boutique
1 Open Square Way
Ryan Mainville

Reyes Income Tax & Bookkeeping
476 Appleton St.
Enrique Reyes

NORTHAMPTON

All About You
2 Conz St.
Kimberly Demerski

B & H Education Inc.
58 Pleasant St.
Rashed Elyas

Brave One
351 Pleasant St.
Jesse Mayhen

Grub Sandwich Shop
88 Pleasant St.
Elizabeth Martinez

KC on Track Investigations Inc.
29 O’Donnell Dr.
Kathleen Lafountain

L & R Cleaning Services
21 Wilson Ave.
Richard Tucci

Lhasa Café Inc.
159 Main St.
Thondup Isering

New Karma Yoga
71 Olander Dr.
Victoria Healy

Northampton Airport Wright Flight
160 Old Ferry Road
Daniel M. Bergeron

Sledge
106 Cardinal Way
Alex Sledzieski

Spectrum Wellness
49 Gothic St.
Allison Filepp

PALMER

A Plus Landscaping & Construction
1132 Thorndike St.
Robert Taylor

Dayspring Home Health Care
60 Dunhampton Road
Emilie Brodeur

SOUTHWICK

Bill’s Home Improvement
15 Pineywood Road
William Alaimo

Darling’s Energy Service
151 Vining Hill Road
Charles Darling

The Growth Spurt
175 Berkshire Ave.
Tricia St. Pierre

SPRINGFIELD

Perez and Perez Construction
93 Allen St.
Senei Perez

Pleasant Snack Bar
174 Main St.
Valentim A. Porfirio

Precision Auto Repair
70 Union St.
James U. Stephenson

Presto Digital Transfer
472 Main St.
Christopher David

Puerto Rican Master Barber
602 Page Blvd.
John W. Stevens

Quinn Evaluation Consulting
28 Virginia St.
Paula M. Quinn

RR Build and Design
21 Porter St.
Reinaldo Rasado

S.A.S. Trucking LLC
180 Warrenton St.
Sherlock Suban

Salazar Jewelry & Gifts
1090 Main St.
Pedro Salazar

Sao Mai Video & Gifts
285 Belmont Ave.
Hien M. Tran

Springfield Homeowners
14 Orange St.
Pascacio Reynoso

Springfield Mobil
1828 Boston Road
Sanjay P. Patel

T.S. Services
24 Leatherleaf Dr.
Sean L. Walter

The Hair Connection
1142 State St.
Nicole M. Sanders

Thee Realm
396 Page Blvd.
Juan R. Guillen

V.I.P. Cuts
445 Main St.
Hector Gonzalez

Watch Repair Professionals
1655 Boston Road
Jesus Navarro

Where There is a Need
27 Carver St.
Monica J. Caldwell

Your Buddy’s Painting Service
760 Alden St.
Thomas Waters

WESTFIELD

Cost Cutters
249 East Main St.
Regis Corporation

L.R. Pomeroy & Sons
491 Russellville Road
Seth W. Pomeroy

Lecrenski Bros Inc.
14 Delmont Ave.
Dana Lecrenski

TBG Property Management
1 Arch Road
Joseph M. Muto

VM Construction & Mill Work
43 Sabrina Brook Lane
Slav Mokan

WEST SPRINGFIELD

A-C Motor Express LLC
339 Bliss St.
John C. Nekitopoulos

David’s Bridal Inc.
935 Riverdale St.
David’s Bridal, Inc.

Delisioso Latin Restaurant
913 Main St.
Horaida Cardona

KapStone Kraft Paper
100 Palmer Ave.
KapStone Container Corporation

Market Ready Solutions
38 Neptune Ave.
New England Esta Services LLC

Polonez Parcel Service
143 Doty Circle
Jan A. Chrzan

Steve’s Piping & Heating
180 Farmer Brown Lane
Stephen Bousquet

Departments Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AMHERST

Homestead Community Farm Inc., 39 Autumn Lane, Amherst, MA 01002. Naomi Dratfield, same. Integrated and intergenerational farmstead where people can live, study, work, train, socialize and engage in skill-building activities.

CHICOPEE

Amex Global Corporation, 54 Grattad Dr., Chicopee, MA 01020. Gennadiy Botyan, same. Intermediary business services.

Forte Family Inc., 70 Exchanges St., Chicopee, MA 01013. Tania Forte Miss, 173 Summit Ave., Chicopee, MA 01020. Restaurant and lounge.

DEERFIELD

Amsterdam Software Corp., 200 Mill Village Road, Deerfield, MA 01342. Marinus Jan Vriend, same. Computer software engineering and consultation.

EASTHAMPTON

ESB Securities Corp., II 36 Main St., Easthampton, MA 01027. Willian Hogan, Jr. 35 Hillcrest Dr., Florence, MA 01062. Securities Corporation.

FEEDING HILLS

D-Transportation Corp., 1085 North St. Ext., Feeding Hills, MA 1030. Fedor Songorov, same.

DKC Ventures Inc., 55 Halladay Dr., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Richard McCaslin Jr., same. Property maintenance.

GREENFIELD

Capstone Inc., 278 Mohawk Trail, Greenfield, MA 01301. Joanne Delong MS, 70 Beechwood Dr., East Greenwich, RI 02818. Fitness club

INDIAN ORCHARD

Hashmi Sumaira Corp., 354 Main St., Indian Orchard, MA 01151. Syed Hashmi, 71 Chestnut St., Indian Orchard, MA 01151. Auto repair shop.

LUDLOW

Apex Dental Associates, P.C., 633 Canter St., Ludlow, MA 01056. Dara Darabi, 306 Ryan Road, Florence, MA 01062. Dental Practice.

GJR Group Inc., 19 Williams St., Ludlow, MA 01056. Gary Rodrigues, same. Internet Solutions consulting.

MONSON

Advanced Tree Equipment Inc., 14 Childs Road, Monson, MA 01057. William Allsop, same. Real estate and equipment holding company.

Gary Depace, CPA, P.C., 212 Main St., Monson, MA 01057. Gary Depace, 60 Bumstead Road, Monson, MA 01057. Accountant.

Halcyon Associates Inc., 17 Lakeside Dr., Monson, MA 01057. Carr Lane Quackenbush, same. Management consultation.

NORTHAMPTON

Chapel Jill Reality Inc., 31 Chapel St., Northampton, MA 01060. Lawerence Damon, 1367 Easthampton Road, Florence, MA 01062.

Committee to Preserve St. Mary of the Assumption Church Inc., 106 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060. Marie Mew, 194 Main St., Northampton, MA 01062. Organization developed to preserve and restore Assumption Church.

PITTSFIELD

Berkshire Home & Hospice Services Inc., 75 North St., Suite 210, Pittsfield, MA 01201. William Jones, Jr. 16 Charisma Dr., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Hospice and palliative care.

Berkshire Mini Warehouse II Inc., 371 Cloverdale St., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Francis Manning, 7498 Claypool St., Englewood, FL 34224. Self-storage facility.

Hospice Care of Eastern & Western Massachusetts, 75 North St., Suite 210, Pittsfield, MA 01201. William Jones, Jr., 16 Charisma Dr., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Hospice and palliative care.

SPRINGFIELD

Angeles Misioneros Blessmoments Photography Inc., 51 Church St., Springfield, MA 01105. Luis Garcia-Lorenzo, same. Photography services.

Bowdoin Street Defence Fund Inc., 86 Bowdoin St., Springfield, MA 01109. Stephen Gray, same.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

ANV Family Boutique, Inc, 750 Union St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Irina Samoylenmko, 95 Woodland Way, Russell, MA 01071. Consignment store.

BFP Associates Inc., 1233 Westfield St., West Springfield, MA 01090. Steven Bradway, same. Administration of retirement plans and benefits for businesses.

E & C Some Shop Inc., 793 Boston Road, Springfield, MA 01119. Hao Zheng, same. Retail sales.

WILBRAHAM

Fortivault Technologies Inc., 7 Southwood Road, Wilbraham, MA 01095. Tom Davis, same. Computer consulting services.

Company Notebook Departments

NEPA to Manage
Life Laboratories
SPRINGFIELD — The Sisters of Providence Health System has announced a collaboration with New England Pathology Associates (NEPA) to manage Life Laboratories. Dr. Scott Wolf, senior vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer at Mercy Medical Center, noted that the collaboration will make Life Laboratories the first and only physician-led and physician-managed clinical laboratory in the region. Dr. Lanu Stoddart will serve as the pathologist administrator, directing the operation and growth of Life Laboratories. A member of NEPA since November 2009, Stoddart has extensive experience in clinical pathology laboratory operations, serving in the past as medical director of S.E.D. Medical Laboratories in New Mexico and currently as chief of pathology at Harrington Memorial Hospital in Southbridge. Dr. Krystyna Sikorska will continue in her role as medical director of Life Laboratories. The innovative management relationship has already been recognized nationally, with NEPA invited to formally present its concept at the 2012 G2 Intelligence Pathology Institute Conference in Florida, according to Wolf. “For patients, the change at Life Laboratories will be transparent,” he said. “Likewise, daily operations of Life Laboratories will remain essentially unchanged. For physicians and their practices, however, direct access to physician managers will provide a unique feature and benefit.” Life Laboratories is a full-service medical diagnostic laboratory that conducts approximately 4 million tests per year for three hospitals, physician group practices, mental-health facilities, dozens of long-term care facilities, and hundreds of physicians.

Berkshire Hills Reports
Fourth-quarter Growth
PITTSFIELD — Berkshire Hills Bancorp Inc. recently reported fourth-quarter 2011 core earnings per share totaling $0.44, increasing by 57% compared to $0.28 in the fourth quarter of 2010. This increase resulted from ongoing organic growth together with the benefit of the acquisitions of Rome Bancorp and Legacy Bancorp, according to a statement by Berkshire President and CEO Michael Daly. Fourth-quarter GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) net income included merger-related expenses, together with income from discontinued operations. These non-core items together equated to a net charge of $0.04 per share and resulted in GAAP net income of $0.40 per share, compared to $0.26 per share in the fourth quarter of 2010. For the full year, core earnings per share increased by 53% to $1.56 in 2011, compared to $1.02 in 2010. GAAP net earnings per share totaled $0.98 for 2011 compared to $1.00 in 2010. “Our merger integrations are now completed, allowing us to focus on revenue enhancements going forward,” said Daly.

MMWEC Refunding
Saves Utilities $16.8M
LUDLOW — A refunding bond issue recently closed by the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Co. (MMWEC) will save $16.8 million for 28 state municipal utilities, strengthening their ability to secure stable and reliable power resources for the future, according to MMWEC CEO Ronald DeCurzio. In favorable market conditions, MMWEC issued $164.8 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds with a total interest cost of 1.2%. Proceeds from the bond issue and other available funds will be used to refund and retire approximately $214 million in higher-interest bonds issued by MMWEC in 2001. The refunding savings will be realized over the life of the bonds, which mature between 2012 and 2016. “This refunding will certainly give the municipal light departments greater flexibility to position their energy portfolios in pursuing physical assets for the longer term, from 2016 and beyond,” said DeCurzio. The 2012 MMWEC bonds are rated A+ by Fitch Ratings and have A ratings from Standard & Poor’s, all with a stable outlook, added DeCurzio. The underwriting team included Morgan Stanley, lead manager, and BMO Capital Markets. PFM Financial Management Inc. served as MMWEC’s financial advisor, with Nixon Peabody LLP acting as bond counsel. MMWEC is a nonprofit, public corporation and political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts that provides a variety of power-supply, financial, risk-management, and other services to the state’s consumer-owned municipal utilities.

Columbia Gas Announces Reduction in Winter Costs
WESTBOROUGH — Effective Feb. 1, the winter rates for natural gas will reduce a typical residential customer’s total heating bill over the next three months by nearly 11%, according to Steve Bryant, president of Columbia Gas of Massachusetts. The reduction is a result of lower natural-gas commodity costs. Natural gas is sold in a unit measurement called a ‘therm,’ equivalent to 100,000 British thermal units (BTU) of energy. The rate reduction of $0.1378 per therm would save a natural-gas heating customer $22 in February, if using 160 therms of gas. “Lower gas bills in the middle of the winter is great news for the many families who are struggling to make ends meet,” said Bryant. “Natural-gas prices have remained stable for the last few years, and today’s cost to customers is as low as nearly 10 years ago. That is a claim we are proud to announce to our customers.” Bryant added that help is available for customers struggling to cope with household finances and winter heating bills. For more information, call (800) 882-5454 or visit www.columbiagasma.com.

Couple Chooses New Career Path Together
NORTHAMPTON and WESTWOOD — The Honorable E. Chouteau Levine, a retired Massachusetts Probate and Family Court judge, and William Levine, a veteran divorce lawyer and mediator, recently launched Levine Dispute Resolution Center, LLC (LDRC). The new firm provides private and cost-effective dispute-resolution services such as mediation, arbitration, and related impartial professional services. The Levines resolve all manner of family law and probate matters, and will also address elder, small-business, and other kinds of disputes in their Greater Boston (Westwood) and Western Mass. (Northampton) offices. LDRC is described as a first-of-its-kind venture in that, while there are many mediators in the market, there is no other partnership operating as a team with the probate and family-law experience of the Levines, according to the couple. The Levines both believe strongly that most family disputes can and should be resolved by facilitated negotiation rather than by legal confrontation, and they are launching LDRC to provide a non-threatening way for parties in dispute to do so. For more information on their services, visit www.levinedisputeresolution.com.

Colony Hills Capital Closes on Alabama Property
WILBRAHAM — Colony Hills Capital (CHC) recently announced the closing of its $28 million purchase of a multifamily housing property in the growing Alabama suburb of Hoover. The garden-style apartment property, occupying more than 45 acres, is the first to be purchased by the privately held real-estate investment group since its formation in 2008, according to Glenn Hanson, principal director and founder of CHC. “It is a momentous occasion for us to report the successful closing on our first property as a significant acquisition,” he said. “Riverchase Landing is a wonderful community that is well-located, and it holds tremendous promise for our investors.” The Hoover property is a suburb outside Birmingham. Hanson noted that the property was built in three phases, consists of 468 units, and has approximately 740,000 square feet. Colony Hills Capital is a Massachusetts limited-liability company with an express investment focus on multi-family rental properties falling within specific demographic, socioeconomic, and real-estate markets that are cash-flow-positive on acquisition, generating outsized investor returns, according to Hanson.

ESB Announces
Fourth-quarter Results
EASTHAMPTON — William Hogan Jr., president and CEO of Easthampton Savings Bank, reported to the directors at the quarterly meeting that the bank experienced exceptional growth in assets, deposits, loans, and capital in the fourth quarter. The bank’s total assets have grown to almost $942 million. Bozena Dabek, senior vice president and CFO, further reported that the bank’s total assets increased almost $56 million over last year. “That’s an increase of 6%,” she noted. “Our capital ratio ended the year at 12.06%; we continue to be one of the best-capitalized banks in the area.” Denise Laizer, senior vice president and chief lending officer, noted that, over the past year, total loans increased 10% or almost $61 million, an increase of almost $13 million over the last quarter. Total loans now stand at $648 million. Thomas Brown, senior vice president of Retail Banking, reported on the bank’s unprecedented deposit growth, which was up more than $52 million for the year. That’s an increase of 7%, and total deposits now stand at almost $756 million.

Departments People on the Move

Barbara Benoit has been appointed Director of Graduate Enrollment, Management and Services at Assumption College in Worcester. She is responsible for recruiting and screening prospective students for Assumption’s graduate programs in business, counseling psychology, rehabilitation counseling, school counseling, and special education.
•••••
JC Schnabl has been named the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Alumni Relations at UMass Amherst and Executive Director of the UMass Amherst Alumni Assoc.
•••••
Associated Industries of Massachusetts announced the following:
• Kristen Lepore has joined the organization as Vice President of Government Affairs. She will manage efforts in the areas of health care cost control and health insurance for employers; and
• Brad MacDougall has been promoted from Associate Vice President of Government Affairs to Vice President. He will assume responsibility for the agency’s work on taxation issues.
•••••
Edward Garbacik, Vice President of FSB Financial Group at Florence Savings Bank, has completed his CFP certification requirements that are required by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards. Individuals seeking certified financial planner certification are required to complete coursework and exams covering the seven major financial planning areas — general principles of financial planning, insurance planning and risk management, employee-benefits planning, investment planning, income-tax planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. CFP certificants must also agree to meet ongoing continuing-education requirements and uphold the CFP Board’s Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Rules of Conduct, and Financial Planning Practice Standards.
•••••
Greenfield Savings Bank announced the following:
• Christopher Caouette has been promoted to Vice President and Commercial Credit Officer; and
• Jean Dobias has been promoted to Assistant Vice President and Trust Officer.
•••••
Amanda Moyer has been named Director of Account Services at Market Mentors in West Springfield.
•••••
Joseph Knapik has joined the corporate office of Environmental Compliance Services in Agawam as Director of Training and Facilities Services. He will play a key role in developing the firm’s underground storage tank operator training program. He will also be spearheading additional product launches, primarily in the training field, and will develop and expand the firm’s suite of health and safety training course offerings. Additionally, he will direct the implementation of educational, informational, and service products for the regulated business community.
•••••
The law firm Bulkley Richardson announced the addition of four attorneys to the firm’s Litigation/Alternative Dispute Resolution Department. John P. Pucci, Andrew Levchuk and J. Lizette Richards will represent clients in all types of civil and criminal litigation, in responding to government investigations, and in conducting corporate internal investigations. They will practice from the firm’s Springfield and Boston offices. Jamie L. Kessler will handle financial services litigation from the firm’s Boston office.

John P. Pucci

John P. Pucci

• Pucci, a partner, of Northampton, is one of Massachusetts’ top civil and criminal trial lawyers, with particular experience in the areas of white-collar criminal defense and state and federal regulatory agency matters. He is the former chief of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Springfield, and has been a Fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers since 2002. In his career, Pucci has been named to The Best Lawyers in America, and Boston Magazine’s Massachusetts Super Lawyers and Top 100 Lawyers in Massachusetts. He was most recently a Partner at Fierst, Pucci & Kane in Northampton.
Andrew Levchuk

Andrew Levchuk

• Levchuk, Counsel, brings high-level national experience in corporate compliance and integrity as well as experience in data privacy and Internet security to Bulkley Richardson. He served as senior trial attorney in both the DOJ Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section and its Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section. In 2006-2007, he chaired the U.S. delegation to the G8 Subgroup on High-Tech Crime.  He has tried cases across the country and has argued 30 appellate cases in the U.S. Courts of Appeals. Most recently, he served as Deputy Chief of the Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section of the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. At Bulkley Richardson, he will handle complex civil and criminal litigation and responses to government investigations, as well as advise clients in matters of data security and corporate compliance.
J. Lizette Richards

J. Lizette Richards

• Richards, an Associate, joins the firm with significant civil and criminal litigation experience in areas such as mail and wire fraud, tax fraud, and healthcare fraud. In the past, she worked as a New Hampshire public defender, and, during the past seven years, she was an associate at Fierst, Pucci & Kane in Northampton.
Jamie L. Kessler

Jamie L. Kessler

• Kessler, an Associate, previously served for two years as a law clerk and paralegal at Bulkley Richardson.

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• Feb. 15: ERC Board of Directors’ Meeting, 8-9 a.m., the Gardens of Wilbraham, Community Room, 2 Lodge Lane, Wilbraham.

• Feb. 15: ACCGS Ambassadors Meeting, 4-5 p.m., EDC Conference Room, Springfield.

• Feb. 16: ACCGS Executive Committee Meeting, 12-1 p.m., TD Bank Conference Room, Chamber Offices.

• Feb. 16: Springfield Leadership Institute begins. For information, contact Lynn Johnson at [email protected]

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

• Feb. 15: Chicopee Chamber Salute Breakfast/Annual Meeting, 7:15-9 a.m., Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Cost: $19 for members, $26 for non-members preregistered.

• Feb. 22: Chicopee Chamber Business After Hours, 5-7 p.m., Hu Ke Lau, 705 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Joint networking event with the Massachusetts Latino Chamber of Commerce. Cost: $5 for members, $15 for non-members pre-registered. Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org, or call (413) 594-2101.

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463

• Feb. 24: Breakfast Series, 7:30-9 a.m., Chandler’s at Yankee Candle, Deerfield. Topic: “I Love My Job” — a panel of local speakers happy in their work. Sponsored by Yankee Candle Co. Cost: $12 for members, $15 for non-members.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

• Feb. 15: Chamber After Hours, 5-7 p.m., Mrs. Mitchell’s Kitchen, 514 Westfield Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by Holyoke Credit Union. Cost: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members. Make a reservation by calling the chamber at (413) 534-3376 or online at holycham.com.

• Feb. 17: Legislative Luncheon, 12-2 p.m., Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. Keynote speaker: Therese Murray. Cost: $36. Purchase tickets by calling the chamber at (413) 534-3376 or online at holycham.com.

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• Feb. 15: February WestNet, 5-7 p.m., Tekoa Country Club, 459 Russell Road, Westfield. Guest speaker: Rich Rubin, executive director of the American Red Cross Westfield Chapter. Cost: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members. Networking, cash bar, and free hors d’oeurvres. Call Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 to register.

Agenda Departments

Headache Relief Lecture
Feb. 15: Dr. Karin Johnson from Baystate Medical Center’s Neurodiagnostic & Sleep Center will present a free lecture titled “Headache Relief,” as part of Bay Path College’s Kaleidoscope series. Johnson will discuss the causes and theories about the physiology of migraines, as well as headache-treatment options, including trigger prevention, myofascial release, and abortive and preventative medications, at the Springfield JCC, 1160 Dickinson St., Springfield. Pre-registration is recommended by calling (413) 739-4715 or sending an e-mail to [email protected]

Human Service Forum Breakfast
Feb. 16: The Human Service Forum, which recently released a report showing the impact of human, social, and health service organizations on the region’s economy, will share the data at its monthly gathering from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at the Delaney House, 1 Country Club Road, Holyoke. Victor Woolridge, vice president at Cornerstone Real Estate Advisors, will give the keynote address. The program cost is $25 for HSF members and $35 for non-members. To register or for more information, visit www.humanserviceforum.org.

Holyoke Chamber Legislative Luncheon
Feb. 17: State Sen. Therese Murray, president of the Massachusetts Senate, will be the keynote speaker at Issues 2012, the annual legislative luncheon of the Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce. The 11:45 a.m. event is planned at the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House in Holyoke. State Sen. Michael Knapik will also present remarks, as well as Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse and state Rep. Michael Kane. Tickets are $36 per person and may be obtained at www.holyokechamber.com or by calling (413) 534-3376. Tables may be reserved for groups of eight or 10.

Historical Lecture at Wistariahurst Museum
Feb. 20: Alan Swedlund, professor emeritus of Anthropology at UMass Amherst, will lecture on his 30-year research into the history of mortality in the Connecticut Valley as part of the Wistariahurst Museum’s Historical Lecture Series. Swedlund’s program is planned at 6 p.m., and a $5 donation is suggested. Swedlund’s approach incorporates medical history with social history, and he uses documents from valley towns to identify epidemics and causes of death. Diaries, letters, newspapers, and other sources combine to tell the story from any given town. The lecture will be accompanied by historical images from the area. Swedlund’s most recent book is titled Shadows in the Valley: A Cultural History of Illness, Death and Loss in New England, 1840-1916. The Wistariahurst Museum is located at 238 Cabot St., Holyoke. For more information on the event, call (413) 322-5660 or visit www.wistariahurst.org.

Anthropologist Lecture
Feb. 22: Susan Darlington, a professor at Hampshire College, will discuss her latest book, The Ordination of a Tree: The Thai Buddhist Environmental Movement, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. Darlington has studied the work of Buddhist monks in Thailand who are engaged in rural development and environmental conservation. The science-based talks, at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, will also include insights into religion and social activism. The presentations are free and open to the public. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

ACCGS Outlook Luncheon
Feb. 27: Congressman Richard Neal and Michael Widmer, president of the Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, are featured speakers at the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield’s annual Outlook Luncheon. The event is planned from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the MassMutual Center in downtown Springfield. In addition to remarks by Neal and Widmer, Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno will outline the recently unveiled Rebuild Springfield Plan. For more information or to register, contact Cecile Larose at [email protected] or visit www.myonlinechamber.com.

Manufacturing Seminar
Feb. 29: Presentations by the Economic Development Council of Western Mass., MassDevelopment, Massachusetts Offices of International Trade and Investment, and Associated Industries of Massachusetts will highlight a seminar titled “Promoting Manufacturing in Massachusetts,” from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Springfield Country Club, 1375 Elm St., West Springfield. A networking reception is also planned. For more information or to register by Feb. 4, contact Gloria Fischer at [email protected]

Difference Makers
March 22: BusinessWest will stage its Fourth Annual Difference Makers Celebration at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. The program recognizes area individuals and organizations that are truly making a difference in this region. The winners will be announced in the Feb. 13 edition of BusinessWest. The awards ceremony will feature entertainment, butlered hors d’oeuvres, and introductions of the winners. Tickets are $55 per person, with tables of 10 available. For more information or to order tickets, call (413) 781-8600, e-mail [email protected]om, or visit www.businesswest.com.

Women’s Leadership Conference
March 23: Keynote speakers Sister Helen Prejean, Marjora Carter, and Ashley Judd will share personal stories, as well as insightful advice and perspectives, during Bay Path College’s annual Women’s Leadership Conference at the MassMutual Center in downtown Springfield. The theme for the 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. event is “Lead with Compassion.” Prejean is a member of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Medaille and an anti-death-penalty activist; Carter, an eco-entrepreneur, is president of the Majora Carter Group; and Judd is a film and stage actor and human-rights activist. For more information on the conference or to register, log onto www.baypathconference.com or call Briana Sitler, director of special programs, at (413) 565-1066.

Bestselling Author Lecture
March 28: Internationally acclaimed author Tom Perrotta will read from his upcoming novel, The Leftovers, at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. The talks are free and open to the public. Two of Perrotta’s books, Election and Little Children, have been made into movies, and five novels have been national bestsellers. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

Not Just Business as Usual
April 5: Former NBA player and businessman Ulysses “Junior” Bridgeman will be the guest speaker at the Springfield Technical Community College Foundation’s third annual Not Just Business as Usual event at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield. A cocktail and networking reception is planned from 5:30 to 7 p.m., followed by the dinner program from 7 to 9. Bridgeman spent most of his 12-year NBA career with the Milwaukee Bucks, but also played for the Los Angeles Lakers. He is the current franchise owner of more than 160 Wendy’s and 120 Chili’s restaurants. The event encourages local businesses to come together for an evening to network, learn from one another, and support student success. Funds from the event will provide students access to opportunities — through scholarships, technology, and career direction — to be successful future employees and citizens. “It’s a time to celebrate innovations, change, and our region’s success,” said STCC Foundation Interim Director Robert LePage. A variety of sponsorship opportunities are available, and individual tickets cost $175 each. For more information, contact LePage at (413) 755-4477 or e-mail [email protected]

Lecture by Author of Constitution Café
April 10: Author and philosopher Christopher Phillips’ latest book, Constitution Café, draws on the nation’s rebellious past to incite meaningful change today. He proposes that Americans revise the Constitution every so often, not just to reflect the changing times, but to revive and perpetuate the original revolutionary spirit. He will present a free lecture at 8 p.m. in the dining hall at Blake Student Commons on the Bay Path College campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow. The lecture is part of the annual Kaleidoscope series. For more information, call (413) 565-1000 or visit www.baypath.edu.

Slam Poet Lecture
April 13: Taylor Mali, a former high-school teacher who has emerged from the slam-poetry movement as one of its leaders, will discuss his performances at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. The talks are free and open to the public. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

40 Under Forty
June 21: BusinessWest will present its sixth class of regional rising stars at its annual 40 Under Forty gala at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. Nominations are currently being sought for the popular program, which recognizes young people in realms including business, education, health care, nonprofit management, and government service. Nominations, which are due Feb. 17, will be scored by a team of five judges. The 40 highest scorers will be feted at the June 21 gala, which will feature music, lavish food stations, and introductions of the winners. Tickets cost $60 per person, with tables of 10 available. Early registration is advised, as seating is limited. For more information, call (413) 781-8600, ext. 100, or visit www.businesswest.com.

Departments Incorporations
The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AMHERST

Polymer Standards Service-USA Inc., 160 Old Farm Road, Suite 1, Amherst, MA 01002. John McConville, same. Importing and selling chromotology products.

EAST OTIS

Well of Salvation Ministries Inc., 146 Ridge Ave., East Otis, MA 01029. James Wackerbarth, same. To drill water wells and provide safe and clean drinking water.

HOLYOKE

National Deaf Basketball Organization Inc., 7 Green Willow Dr., Holyoke, MA 01040. Donnie Schwebke, 9630 West Coldspring Road, Greenfield, WI 53228. Organization designed to provide eligible players an opportunity to develop their basketball skills and play basketball competitively.

Standen & Gallagher Insurance Agency Inc., 1763 Northampton St., Holyoke, MA 01040. Paul Gallagher, 1763 Northampton St., Holyoke, MA 01040. Insurance Agency.

LEE

Skyline Ridge Homeowners Association Inc., 10 Park Place, Lee, MA 01238. Sean McGlone, 49 Turtlecove Lane, Huntington, NY 11743. Managing the affairs of Skyline Ridge subdivision in the Town of Becket, MA.

LEEDS

Soldier On Development & Management Company Inc., 421 North Main St., Building 6, Leeds, MA 01053. Taylor Caswell, same. Development of housing for veterans, consultation and management of developments.

LONGMEADOW

Locivi Corp., 138 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA 01106. John Kole, same. Development and sales of mobile-orientated platforms.

MIDDLEFIELD

RWB Farms Inc., 92 Skyline Trail, Middlefield, MA 01243. Laurence Kenneth Shorter, same. To provide shelter and care for homeless and unwanted animals.

NORTHAMPTON

West Street Properties Inc., 82 Coles Meadow Road, Northampton, MA 01060. Patricia Giangregorio, same. Residential property rentals.

PALMER

Yanming Inc., 16 Cedar Hill St., Palmer, MA 01069. Michael Yan, same. Restaurant.

PITTSFIELD

Omvistech Inc., 20 Meadow Ridge Dr., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Srinivas Lingutla, same. Software products and services, online services, and information-technology products.

SPRINGFIELD

Maahi Petrolium Corp., 491 Allen St., Springfield, MA 01118. Rakeshkumar Vyas, 8 Bulhill Road, Pittsfield, MA 01201.

R.B.C. Foundation Inc., C/O Sabrena Brantley, 40 Delmore St., Springfield, MA 01109. James Jiles, 504 Fort Pleasant Ave., Springfield, MA 01108. Provides youth services and athletic opportunities to at risk youth in the Western Mass. area.

Rana Supplies Inc., 337 East Columbus Ave., Springfield, MA 01105. Harbhajan Singh. 191 Elm St., East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Whole supplier for convenience stores.

S.A.E. Records Inc., 61 Keith St., Springfield, MA 01108. Denroy Morgan, same. Corporation is involved in all aspects of the music industry.

Seabrooks Inc., 47 Overlook Dr., Springfield, MA 01118. Christopher Seabrooks, same. Marketing services.

Shaili Love Inc., 500 Page Blvd., Springfield, MA 01104. Suresh Patel, 176 Rolling Green, Amherst, MA 01002. Convenience store.

St. Sauveur Associates Inc., 72 Sterling St., Springfield, MA 01107-1339. Michael James McMann, same. Manufacturers sales agency.

T3KDAD Inc., 692 Carew St., Springfield, MA 01104. Zachary Lamour, same. Software application development with sales.

The Corporation for Epiphany Development Corporation, 339 State St., Springfield, MA 01105. Timothy Baymon, 57 Thompson St.  Springfield, MA 01109. Establish ventures for other corporate entities.

Vann Group Resources Inc., 819 Worcester St., Springfield, MA 01151. Michael Vann, 149 Pitroff St., South Hadley, MA 01075. Employee staffing and management services.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Vision Source West Inc., 180 Westfield St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Brian Wadman, 100 Meadow Lane, Greenfield, MA 01301. Optical services.

WESTFIELD

Perfect Climate Inc., 649 Montgomery Road, Westfield, MA 01085. David Gourley, same. HVAC and mechanical systems.

Vellano Servistar Inc., 199 Servistar industrial Way, Unit One, Westfield, MA 01085. Joseph Vellano, 7 Hemlock St., Latham, NY 12110. Municipal water, sewer, and drainline supply house.

Opinion
A Victory on Many Levels

The recent announcement that Thing5 LLC will be creating a new call center in One Financial Plaza, thus bringing 500 new jobs to Springfield, is a positive story for the city and the region — on a number of levels.
Let’s start with the jobs. That’s priority No. 1 in the Greater Springfield area, and it has been for many years now. Some might look at this and say, ‘it’s only call-center jobs,’ or words to that effect, but these opportunities come on many levels, from entry positions to management slots, and, in many cases, they can be handled by those who do not possess a college education. The region needs those high-quality jobs (call them white-collar, if you like), but it also needs employment opportunities like these, especially in such large volume.
Beyond the employment factor, there are many other aspects to this story, all of them positive. First, this company started here, in the Technology Park at Springfield Technical Community College — which was created to spur this kind of tech-related enterprise — and thus provides solid evidence that we can incubate ventures and grow them into major employers.
Also, this company stayed here. Indeed, when it reached that proverbial next level, there were, quite obviously, opportunities to take Thing5 almost anywhere — because there isn’t a city or town in the Commonwealth or well beyond it that wouldn’t fight, and fight hard, for 500 jobs. But management chose to stay in the City of Homes, largely because of the lower cost of living, available workforce, access, quality of life, and affordable commercial real estate.
This shows that our various assets are tangible — and sellable.
But perhaps the biggest benefit will come in the form of greater momentum downtown. First, this move gives a substantial boost to the office tower known as One Financial Plaza, which has had several dark floors for many years, but has been staging something of a comeback recently.
Beyond that, though, the 500 new employees working downtown will provide a larger critical mass of people needed to spur additional investments, be they in support businesses, hospitality-related ventures such as restaurants and clubs, or badly needed retail.
And there is another component — the possibility that some of these employees may soon be working and living downtown, thanks to a program that will offer reduced lease rates to Thing5 employees at the nearby Morgan Square apartments, managed by the same company (Samuel D. Plotkin) that also manages One Financial Plaza. This additional residential piece could further stimulate investment in the central business district and be a key contributor to the kind of vibrancy that other Northeast cities have enjoyed.
As we said, there are many angles to this positive story for Springfield and its downtown. The headlines were all about the jobs coming to the city — and that’s an important aspect of this — but there are many other elements that bode well for the City of Homes.

Company Notebook Departments

Tighe & Bond Launches New Web Site
WESTFIELD — Tighe & Bond recently launched a new Web site aimed at making information on the engineering firm’s core services easier to find and more comprehensive, according to David Pinsky, president. “Part of being a progressive engineering firm that is client-focused means keeping up with technology and making it easier for our clients and others to readily find the information they seek on our Web site,” said Pinsky. He added that the firm wanted to “bring elements of our core business into greater focus and create a fresh design.” Beyond the firm’s traditional core business — civil engineering, water, wastewater, and environmental consulting — the Web site highlights newer areas of expertise. These areas include renewable energy, as well as the latest 3D modeling and GIS technologies. In addition, the Web site offers interactive features such as the ability to ask a question on each Web site page, review current projects that are out to bid, and request a host of technical papers authored by Tighe & Bond staff. The Web site also features a revitalized section on career opportunities and information on the company’s culture. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn are also integrated to keep followers up to date on the latest news. Lastly, the Web site spotlights the firm’s commitment to sustainability, documents the firm’s history, and provides a link to the online commemorative book, Engineering a Century of Progress: The Evolution of Tighe & Bond.

NUVO Bank Unveils No-Catch Checking
SPRINGFIELD — NUVO Bank & Trust Co. is now offering No-Catch Checking, a free account with no hidden requirements, according to M. Dale Janes, CEO. Customers may open a No-Catch Checking account with a deposit of $10; going forward, there is no minimum balance to maintain. Customers will have the benefits of no direct-deposit requirements, no monthly maintenance or activity charges, no service charges, no hidden fees, and no ATM fees. “We simply adjusted the requirements of our original two checking-account options,” said Janes. “We listened to what is going on regionally and nationally and heard consumers demanding simplicity in banking, with no games or hoops to jump through.”

Cooley Dickinson Named High-performing Hospital
NORTHAMPTON — Two independent rating organizations have verified that patients who choose Cooley Dickinson Hospital (CDH) for their health needs receive better quality and safer outcomes, even as the hospital has reduced the cost of care, according to Dr. Mark Novotny, chief medical officer. The hospital is among the 2011 Top Performing Hospitals in the Premier health care alliance’s national QUEST collaborative. In the delivery of evidence-based care, CDH ranked 10 percentage points above the top-performing hospitals’ score of 84%, and its cost per adjusted admission was $780 lower than that of other community hospitals in its size group. This is the first year CDH placed among the top-performing QUEST hospitals. “Being a QUEST member means redesigning the way we provide care so that patients receive reliable, safe, and efficient health care every time they visit Cooley Dickinson,” added Novotny. QUEST, the most comprehensive hospital collaborative (300 hospitals) in the nation, measures, compares, and scales solutions for the complex task of caring for patients. In related news, the Leapfrog Group reported that CDH ranked in the top 10% on overall value, a measure that takes into account the quality of care hospitals provide. This is the second consecutive year that CDH has ranked in Leapfrog’s top 10%. “Achieving high overall value is the key success factor for health systems,” said Novotny. “More than ever, employers and patients expect superb outcomes at low cost.” Among the Leapfrog database of 1,066 hospitals from 43 states, CDH earned roll-up scores of 81 on quality and 88 on resource use in Leapfrog’s 2011 Hospital Survey. The value score combines the quality and resource scores, with quality weighted most. The hospital’s 83 for value is 11 points above the 72 score needed to rank in the top 10%. Leapfrog’s quality score is based on a hospital’s performance on more than 20 national quality standards. The standards measured include care provided for common conditions such as pneumonia and normal deliveries of babies, intensive-care unit physician staffing levels, and performance on preventing conditions such as pressure ulcers and central-line-associated bloodstream infections.

Lord Jeffery Inn Reopens in Downtown Amherst
AMHERST — The transformation of the Lord Jeffery Inn is complete, according to the Amherst Inn Co., an affiliate of Amherst College and owner of the inn. The downtown property features 49 state-of-the-art guestrooms, including three king, three queen, and two double/double suites. The inn has added a 2,360-square-foot ballroom along with a tented garden area that can accommodate up to a 40’ x 80’ tent. The project also included upgrading the 46,000-square-foot building’s internal systems, adding 20 parking spaces, and creating a new restaurant. The renovation and expansion also included significant energy-efficiency improvements that make it one of the greenest inns in the Pioneer Valley, according to Amherst College President Biddy Martin. “The absence of the Lord Jeff over the past few years has shown how important the inn is to the vibrancy of the college and the community,” said Martin. “The Lord Jeff has long served as a beacon, welcoming visitors to the town of Amherst and to Amherst College. We are thrilled that the magnificently renovated inn and restaurant is open to guests once again.” Last June, the Mass. Historical Commission announced that it had voted and approved the expansion of the boundaries of the Amherst Central Historic Business District to allow for the inclusion of the Lord Jeffery Inn. The vote was the first step in recognizing the historical significance of the inn, which is now included on the National Historic Registry along with such notable community landmarks as the Emily Dickinson Homestead, the Evergreens, the Strong House, and the West Cemetery. “The new inn was given a fresh contemporary update representing the spirit of a new generation of modern comfort,” added Rob Winchester, president and COO of Waterford Hotel Group Inc., the inn’s management company. “This renovation addresses the evolving needs of today’s traveler, offering a more contemporary style and the latest technology. We are thrilled to reintroduce the Lord Jeffery Inn to the community as the premier destination for lodging, dining, corporate meetings, and social events.”

Holyoke Community College Going Smoke-free
HOLYOKE — Holyoke Community College will become an entirely smoke-free campus on Aug. 13, college President William Messner announced recently. On that day, smoking will no longer be permitted in any building or outdoor area on the 135-acre HCC campus. Smoking is now allowed only outdoors outside 20-foot buffer zones around entryways. “The decision to establish a smoke-free campus reflects HCC’s commitment to provide an accessible, safe, and healthy environment in which to learn and work,” Messner said in a message sent out today to the HCC community. “It is also a result of the efforts of HCC students and the staff members of the HCC Smoke-Free Committee, who urged us to join the hundreds of other colleges and universities that have already made smoke-free a reality.” The full text of Messner’s statement is available on the HCC Web site at www.hcc.edu/smokefree, along with resources and links for people who want to quit smoking. Counseling and nicotine patches are also being made available through HCC Health Services. “We understand that overcoming the addiction to tobacco is a great challenge,” Messner said. “For students and staff who wish to quit smoking or find ways to manage their cravings on campus, HCC will provide a variety of resources.” HCC will also be holding events throughout the spring semester to raise awareness about the new smoking policy and the health benefits of quitting. Testimonials from people who quit smoking will be going up soon in the main lobby of HCC’s Frost Building. “As with any change, it will take time to adjust,” Messner said. “During the transition to a smoke-free campus, all members of the HCC community must share the responsibility of self-enforcement and of creating an environment that is respectful and cooperative.”

United Bank Supports Several United Ways
WEST SPRINGFIELD — United Bank’s employees and its United Bank Foundation recently contributed a combined totaled of $97,643 in support of the United Ways of Pioneer Valley, Hampshire County, and Central Mass. United’s employee campaign totaled more than $58,000, surpassing last year’s level of giving, according to Richard Collins, president and CEO. In addition, the bank’s foundation contributed $39,000 to the three United Ways. “The participation of our employees is also a reflection of United Bank’s commitment to the communities where we live and work,” said Collins. “It’s particularly meaningful in today’s trying economic times. Our neighbors need our help; our employees stepped up to provide that help.”

First Niagara Donates
$50,000 to Mass Mentoring Partnership
BOSTON – Mass Mentoring Partnership (MMP), a Boston-based nonprofit that is an umbrella organization for youth mentoring statewide, recently announced that First Niagara Bank will donate $50,000 to support the organization’s mentoring efforts, with a focus on initiatives in Western Mass. During Mass Mentoring’s annual Youth Mentoring Forum at State Street, which was held recently at State Street Financial Center, MMP Chief Program Officer Marty Martinez thanked representatives from First Niagara for signing on as the Western Mass. sponsor of National Mentoring Month (January) and for its support of the annual Champions of Mentoring fund-raising event with the Boston Red Sox, which will be held June 7 at Fenway Park. “National Mentoring Month is a time when mentoring organizations across the country come together with a focus on raising awareness of the importance of mentors, acknowledging and appreciating current mentors, and positioning our organizations for future success,” said Martinez. “We’re thrilled to partner with First Niagara to promote National Mentoring Month and expand quality mentoring in Western Mass.” During January, First Niagara supported MMP’s efforts to promote the importance of mentoring through a multi-faceted marketing campaign with a focus on Western Mass. Throughout National Mentoring Month, MMP aims to help Massachusetts mentoring programs celebrate the everyday people who are making a difference for young people in their communities.

Departments People on the Move

Edward J. Garbacik

Edward J. Garbacik

Edward J. Garbacik, Vice President of FSB Financial Group at  Florence Savings Bank, has completed his CFP certification requirements from the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standard. Certification encompasses seven major financial planning areas — general principles of financial planning, insurance planning and risk management, employee-benefits planning, investment planning, income-tax planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. Individuals must also agree to meet ongoing continuing-education requirements and to uphold the CFP Board’s Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Rules of Conduct, and Financial Planning Practice Standards.
•••••
Tina M. Bennett has been named President of Conservation Services Group in Westborough. She runs the company’s day-to-day operations and oversees the executive committee. She also serves as an ex-officio member of the board of directors.
•••••
Cathy Jocelyn

Cathy Jocelyn

Cathy Jocelyn has been promoted to Assistant Vice President/Marketing Manager at Westfield Bank. In this new role, Jocelyn is responsible for day-to-day marketing, promotion, and public relations, along with coordinating community outreach and the Future Fund.
•••••
Michael B. Ginsberg has joined Accenture as a Partner in the life-insurance industry practice. He will work in Accenture’s Hartford office and serve several large insurance customers in Massachusetts and Connecticut in a client-account leadership role.
•••••
David J. Ericson, Physician Assistant, joined Cooley Dickinson Hospital’s Medical Staff and Pioneer Valley Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons. Ericson treats adults and children for a variety of ear, nose, and throat disorders, including allergy and sinus problems, hearing and balance disorders, and voice and swallowing problems.
•••••
Warren R. LaBerge has been promoted to Manager of Amherst Tire.
•••••
Robert Dellatorre has been named Senior Relationship Manager in the New England Middle Market Banking Group for First Niagara. Dellatorre will manage the bank’s relationships with middle-market companies located in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.
•••••
Tracey Burke has joined Park Square Realty in its Westfield office as a Sales Associate.
•••••
Janelle Holmboe was recently named Dean of Admissions at American International College in Springfield. Most recently, Holmboe served as Associate Director of Graduate Admissions in Forest Grove, Ore.
•••••
William Dowding has been named Director of Marketing at A.W. Hasting & Co. in Enfield. The firm is a distributor of Marvin Windows and Doors.
•••••
Atlantic Fasteners announced the following:
• Tony Orvis has joined its industrial fastener division; and
• Bruce Bonzey has been named Director of Quality.
•••••
InteliCoat has announced the following:
• Dave Burgos has joined the firm as inside Sales Representative. He is responsible for supporting and growing the firm’s digital-imaging business with key distributor partners.
• Candice Bakke has joined the firm as National Telesales Representative. She is tasked with raising brand awareness for the Magic, Magiclée, and Museo product lines, as well as increasing and improving customer contact and support.
•••••
Julie M. Quink

Julie M. Quink

Burkhart, Pizzanelli, P.C. announced that Julie M. Quink, CPA, has recently joined the firm. Her experience is in the accounting and auditing and forensic and fraud consulting areas of public accounting.  Her past experience includes 16 years with J.M. O’Brien and Co., P.C. in Springfield, and three years with KPMG Peat Marwick, LLP in Springfield prior to its office relocation. She received her bachelor’s degree in Accounting and Business Management from Elms College.  Her professional affiliations include membership in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Mass. Society of Certified Public Accountants, and the Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examiners.
•••••
Reliable Temps announced that Erin Corriveau has joined the firm as Marketing Manager. She will be responsible for overseeing daily marketing and public relations duties for the three Massachusetts Reliable temps locations: Agawam, Easthampton, and Greenfield.
•••••
Lynda Zukowski, manager of Radiology and Imaging at Baystate Franklin Medical Center, has received the credential of Certified Radiology Administrator (CRA) through the Radiology Administration Certification Commission.

Agenda Departments

Wine Tasting
Feb. 10: The Wistariahurst Museum in Holyoke will host its annual “I Love Wine Event” from 6 to 8 p.m., sponsored by Liquors 44 and Historic Holyoke at Wistariahurst. Wines will be available from distributors including Bay State Wines, MS Walker, Commonwealth, and United. Light refreshments will be provided. Advance tickets are $25 each or $40 per couple; door admission is $30 each or $50 per couple. Reservations are necessary. For more information, call the museum at (413) 322-5660. The museum is located at 238 Cabot St.

Historical Lecture
Feb. 20: Professor emeritus Alan Swedlund will lecture on his 30-year research on the history of mortality in the Connecticut Valley as part of the Wistariahurst Museum’s Historical Lecture Series. Swedlund’s program is planned at 6 p.m., and there is a $5 suggested donation. Swedlund’s approach incorporates medical history with social history, and he uses documents from valley towns to identify epidemics and causes of death. Diaries, letters, newspapers, and other sources combine to tell the story from any given town. The lecture will be accompanied by historical images from the area. Swedlund is professor emeritus of Anthropology at UMass Amherst. His most recent book is titled Shadows in the Valley: A Cultural History of Illness, Death and Loss in New England, 1840-1916. The Wistariahurst Museum is located at 238 Cabot St., Holyoke. For more information, call the museum at (413) 322-5660 or visit www.wistariahurst.org.

Anthropologist Lecture
Feb. 22: Susan Darlington, a professor at Hampshire College, will discuss her latest book, The Ordination of a Tree: The Thai Buddhist Environmental Movement, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. Darlington has studied the work of Buddhist monks in Thailand who are engaged in rural development and environmental conservation. The science-based talks, at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, will also include insights into religion and social activism. The presentations are free and open to the public. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

Author Lecture
March 28: Internationally acclaimed author Tom Perrotta will read from his upcoming novel, The Leftovers, at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. The talks are free and open to the public. Two of Perrotta’s books, Election and Little Children, have been made into movies, and five novels have been national bestsellers. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

Slam Poet Lecture
April 13: Taylor Mali, a former high-school teacher who has emerged from the slam-poetry movement as one of its leaders, will discuss his performances at 10:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. in Scibelli Hall Theater, as part of the Ovations series at Springfield Technical Community College. The talks are free and open to the public. For more information, call (413) 755-4233.

Difference Makers
March 22: BusinessWest will stage its fourth annual Difference Makers Celebration at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. The program recognizes area individuals and organizations that are truly making a difference in this region. The winners will be announced in the Feb. 13 edition of BusinessWest. The awards ceremony will feature entertainment, butlered hors d’oeuvres, and introductions of the winners. Tickets are $55 per person, with tables of 10 available. For more information or to order tickets, call (413) 781-8600, e-mail [email protected], or visit www.businesswest.com.

Outlook 2012
Feb. 22: The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield will stage its annual Outlook program at a new venue, the MassMutual Center in downtown Springfield. The event will feature co-keynote speakers: U.S. Rep. Richard Neal will provide the federal outlook, and Michael Widmer, president of the Mass. Taxpayers Foundation, will provide a state perspective. Tickets are $50 person, with tables of 10 available for $475. For more information, call (413) 755-1313, or visit www.myonlinechamber.com.

40 Under Forty
June 21: BusinessWest will present its sixth class of regional rising stars at its annual 40 Under Forty gala at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke. Nominations are currently being sought for the popular program, which recognizes young people in realms including business, education, health care, nonprofits, government, law, and many others. Nominations, due Feb. 17, will be scored by a team of five judges. The 40 highest scorers will be feted at the June 21 gala, which will feature music, lavish food stations, and introductions of the winners. Tickets are $60 per person, with tables of 10 available. Early registration is advised, as seating is limited. For more information, call (413) 781-8600, ext. 100, or visit www.businesswest.com.

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• Feb. 1: February [email protected], 7:15 a.m., Ludlow Country Club. Networking beginning at 7:15 a.m., breakfast buffet opens at 7:30 a.m., and program begins at 7:55 a.m. Cost: $20 for members, $30 for non-members. Seaso• tickets sponsor: Freedom Credit Union. Sig• sponsor: FastSigns. Coffee bar sponsor: YMCA of Greater Springfield. The chamber is still looking for sponsors for this breakfast.  Contact Cecile Larose at (413) 755-1313 or [email protected] for information.

• Feb. 7: Springfield Chamber of Commerce Executive Directors’ Meeting, 12-1:30 p.m., EDC Conference Room, Springfield.

• Feb. 8: Professional Women’s Chamber Critical Thinking @ Problem Solving Symposium, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Max’s Tavern, MassMutual Room, Springfield. Cost: $25 for members, $25 for non-members.

• Feb. 8: February After5, 5-7 p.m., Chez Josef. Joi• fellow chamber members for a• evening of networking, food, and a cash bar. Cost: $10 for members, $20 for non-members. Sponsorships are available. Contact Cecile Larose at (413) 755-1313 or [email protected] for more information.

• Feb. 10: ACCGS Legislative Steering Committee, 8-9 a.m., TD Bank Conference Center, Springfield.

• Feb. 15: ERC Board of Directors’ Meeting, 8-9 a.m., the Gardens of Wilbraham, Community Room, 2 Lodge Lane, Wilbraham.

• Feb. 15: ACCGS Ambassadors Meeting, 4-5 p.m., EDC Conference Room, Springfield.

• Feb. 16: ACCGS Executive Committee Meeting, 12-1 p.m., TD Bank Conference Room, Chamber Offices.

• Feb. 16: Springfield Leadership Institute begins. For information, contact Lyn• Johnso• at [email protected]

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700

• Feb. 2: Chamber After Five, 5-7 p.m., Lit Mezze Lounge and Nightclub. Cost: $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

• Feb. 8: Chamber Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., the Lord Jeffery Inn. Guest Speaker: Biddy Martin, president, Amherst College. Cost: $12 for members, $15 for non-members.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

• Feb. 15: Chicopee Chamber Salute Breakfast/Annual Meeting, 7:15-9 a.m., Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Cost: $19 for members, $26 for non-members preregistered.

• Feb. 22: Chicopee Chamber Business After Hours, 5-7 p.m., Hu Ke Lau, 705 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Joint networking event with the Massachusetts Latino Chamber of Commerce. Cost: $5 for members, $15 for non-members pre-registered. Sig• up online at www.chicopeechamber.org, or call (413) 594-2101.

Frankli• County Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463

• Feb. 24: Breakfast Series, 7:30-9 a.m., Chandler’s at Yankee Candle, Deerfield. Topic: “I Love My Job” — a panel of local speakers happy i• their work. Sponsored by Yankee Candle Co. Cost: $12 for members, $15 for non-members.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

• Feb. 15: Chamber After Hours, 5-7 p.m., Mrs. Mitchell’s Kitchen, 514 Westfield Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by Holyoke Credit Union. Cost: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members. Make a reservatio• by calling the chamber at (413) 534-3376 or online at holycham.com.

• Feb. 17: Legislative Luncheon, 12-2 p.m., Log Cabi• Banquet & Meeting House. Keynote speaker: Therese Murray. Cost: $36. Purchase tickets by calling the chamber at (413) 534-3376 or online at holycham.com.

Northampto• Area Young Professional Society
www.thenayp.com
(413) 584-1900

• Feb. 9: February NAYP Networking Event 5-8 p.m., the Clario• Hotel & Conference Center, One Atwood Dr., Northampton. For more information, visit www.thenayp.com.

West of the River Chamber of Commerce
www.ourwrc.com
(413) 426-3880

• Feb. 2: Nighttime Networking event, 5 p.m., BMW of West Springfield, 1712 Riverdale St. Cost: free for members, $10 for non-members. For more information, contact the WRC at (413) 426-3880 or e-mail [email protected]

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• Feb. 6: Mayor’s Coffee Hour, 8-9 a.m., Elm Street Diner, 266 Elm St., Westfield. Mayor Knapik welcomes you to hear about our the city and to bring any questions, concerns, or ideas. The event is free. Call Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 to register.

• Feb. 15: February WestNet, 5-7 p.m., Tekoa Country Club, 459 Russell Road, Westfield. Guest speaker: Rich Rubin, executive director of the America• Red Cross Westfield Chapter. Cost: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members. Networking, cash bar, and free hors d’oeurvres. Call Carrie Dearing at (413) 568-1618 to register.

Court Dockets Departments
The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
DHL Global Forwarding v. Diecast Connections Co. Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $5,251.11
Filed: 12/9/11

Viking SupplyNet v. Statewide Mechanical Contracting Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $5,059.04
Filed: 1/4/12

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
A.J.’s Pro Shop v. AMF Bowling Center Inc.
Allegation: Damages resulting from violation of lease agreement: $25,000+
Filed: 12/6/11

David A. Faita v. East Springfield Transportation Inc.
Allegation: Minority stockholder suit seeking equitable relief: $25,000+
Filed: 12/13/11

Iglesia Koinonia Inc. v. Primera Iglesia Cristiana Misionera, et al
Allegation: Fraudulent sale of property: $300,000
Filed: 12/16/11

Reynolds & Reynolds Co. v. Medeiros Williams Inc.
Allegation: Balance remaining on previous judgment: $32,140.88
Filed: 12/14/11

T.D. Bank, N.A. v. Advanced Corp. f/k/a Advanced Petroleum Installation Inc.
Allegation: Default on promissory notes: $159,080.89
Filed: 12/20/11

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
De Lage Landen Financial Services Inc. v. Value Discount Inc. and Abdul Chaudry
Allegation: Breach of lease agreements: $168,699.90
Filed: 12/5/11

Margaret Mercier and Marian Kennedy v. S.E. Sulenski Roofing and Siding Co. Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract, negligent misrepresentation, and failure to perform remodeling services: $408,789.54
Filed: 12/19/11

Mary Bartoli v. Rolling Green Apartments
Allegation: Negligence in property causing slip and fall: $143,891.45
Filed: 12/14/11

HOLYOKE DISTRICT COURT
James C. McCann, D.C. v. Travelers of MA
Allegation: Claim for unpaid PIP benefits: $1,352.50
Filed: 10/26/11

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
Waste Management New England Environmental Transport Inc. v. Northampton Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, LLV
Allegation: Breach of commercial service agreement and non-payment of waste-disposal services: $7,082.23
Filed: 12/2/11

PALMER DISTRICT COURT
Anna Maria Ribas-Dias and Joe Dias v. Adam Quenneville Roofing and Siding Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract and misrepresentation relating to the installation of a new roof: $7,000
Filed: 11/22/11

Lonnie Desmariais v. Curtis Factory Plus Inc.
Allegation: Negligence and breach of contract: $5,141.39
Filed: 12/7/11

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. v. Maillett Development
Allegation: Balance remaining on workers’ compensation insurance policy: $10,212.98
Filed: 12/12/11

Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. v. Peter Amorello Construction and Demolition Inc.
Allegation: Balance remaining on workers’ compensation insurance policy: $7,229.19
Filed: 12/12/11

R.S.M.S., LLC v. T.K.O. Insurance Agency Inc.
Allegation: Collection of remaining balance on commercial rent: $1,250
Filed: 12/16/11

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Mark Lund v. Reed’s Flooring and Mark Reed
Allegation: Breach of contract for shower installation and misrepresentation: $7,419.30
Filed: 11/14/11

Departments Picture This

Send photos with a caption and contact information to:  ‘Picture This’ c/o BusinessWest Magazine, 1441 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103 or to [email protected]

Cutting the Ribbon

PicThis 1 0112cAfter an extensive renovation project, the Lord Jeffery Inn in downtown Amherst reopened to the public on Jan. 9. Doing the honors at a ribbon-cutting ceremony are, from left: Robert Reeves, general manager of the inn; John Musante, Amherst town manager; state Rep. Ellen Story; Charles R. Longsworth, chair emeritus of the Amherst College Board of Trustees; Biddy Martin, president of Amherst College; Rob Winchester, president of the Waterford Hotel Group; and Peter Shea, treasurer of Amherst College and president of the Amherst Inn Co.

Third Thursday

YPS2
YPS1The Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield recently staged its monthly Third Thursday event at Nadim’s Mediterranean Grill in East Longmeadow. Top, Nick Gelfand, owner of NRG Real Estate Inc., with Christopher Rinaldi of Excel Technologies Inc. Bottom, board Member Ron Laprise, owner of Laprise Chiropractic, with Laura Judd.









Groundbreaking Development

DevAssocGroundbreakingBW-0112cGroundbreaking ceremonies were recently staged at the site of what will become known as the Northampton I-91 Professional Center, which will consist of two three-story Class-A office buildings designed for professional and medical tenants. The project is being spearheaded by Agawam-based Development Associates. From left are: David Masiello, owner of R.P. Masiello, general contractor, the builder chosen for the project; Travis Ward, operations manager for Development Associates; Suzanne Beck, executive director of the Northampton Area Chamber of Commerce; Eileen O’Leary Sullivan, co-owner of Northampton I-91 Professional Center; Ken Vincunas, general manager of Development Associates; J. Curtis Shumway, co-owner of the Northampton I-91 Professional Center; Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz; Brian Huntley, project manager for Tighe & Bond, the engineering firm consulting on the project; and Pat Levelle, CFO of CSO, a future tenant.

Bankruptcies Departments
The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Archer, Cynthia L.
88 Columbus Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Armold, Melissa
121 Joseph Dr.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

Barrett, Patricia A.
97 Rear Homer Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

Beauregard, Cheryl Ann
55 Belanger St.
Three Rivers, MA 01080
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Bedard, Lise M.
72 Humphrey Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Bird, Sarah A.
407 Brookfield Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Briggs, Laura G.
13 Walpole Road
Haydenville, MA 01039-9751
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Broskey, Jason L.
9 Plimpton St.
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/29/11

Bryant, Raymond F.
Bryant, Carol A.
25 Lincoln St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/22/11

Budlong, Carrie A.
4 Opal St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/19/11

Campbell, William P.
Campbell, Lisa M.
150 Fairview Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Carr, Cheryl
34 Adams St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/27/11

Chic Spaces Interior Design
Obahi, Hassan
Obahi, Lida
172 High Meadow Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Chittenden, Lindsay Jean
189 East Road
Adams, MA 01220
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/22/11

Christian, Robert H.
1310 South Main St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Clark, Patricia E.
781 So. West St.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/21/11

Collado, Aguedo
136 Prospect St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Cruz, Tito
Cruz, Patricia C.
16 Banner St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/27/11

Dendievel, Ronald P.
Dendievel, Virginia M.
71 Benedict Ter.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Designs by Nicole
Bowers, Nicole R.
a/k/a Barstow, Nicole R.
a/k/a Nicole R. Bowers
120 Hayden St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Desmond, David William
215 Windsor St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/21/11

DeSousa, Janine D.
81 Cummings Road
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/21/11

Dessources, Marie K.
616 Armory St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/21/11

Dunsmoor, James W.
426 Wilbraham Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Fare With Flair, LLC
DiSalvo, Ronald J.
46 Lynebrook Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/22/11

Fueston, James T.
Fueston, Lisa J.
19 Voltage Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Fuller, Sherri Lee
a/k/a Stevens, Sherri Lee
a/k/a Munster, Sherri Lee
15 Sawmill Plain Road
South Deerfield, MA 01373
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/29/11

Hastings, Mark J.
7 Bradlind Ave.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

Huffman, Marilyn Ann
51 Village Hill Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

Jabry, Cynthia M.
158 Corey Colonial
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/21/11

Johnson, Maureen Lisa
63 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/27/11

Johnson, Raymond A.
Johnson, Anna C.
585 Sheridan St., Apt. 42
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Johnson-Studstill, Theresa D.
17 Los Angeles St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/20/11

LaBranche, Amy Leigh
a/k/a Dubiel, Amy Leigh
P.O Box 199
Russell, MA 01071
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/21/11

LaVoie, Carol A.
8 Castle Ave.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

LeClair, Suzanne Florence
4496 High St.
Palmer, MA 01069-1500
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/27/11

Lemarier, Mark S.
Lemarier, Jennifer P.
a/k/a Lukert, Jennifer P.
457 Old Dana Road
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Lord, Bill
a/k/a Lord, William G.
134 Silver St.
Granville, MA 01034-9532
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Lussier, Melinda Anne
55 North Main St. #45
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

Malachowski, Christine A.
50 Colony Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Marotte, Justine
a/k/a Finn, Justine
1569 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/20/11

McNamara, Mary J.
PO Box 546
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/27/11

Melendez-Oakley, Milagrito
a/k/a Marrero, Milagro
85 Marsden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/22/11

Morton, Susan
27 King St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Murphy, Timothy J.
PO Box 821
East Longmeadow, MA 01028-0821
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 12/29/11

Murray, Patricia A.
30 Lachine St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/19/11

Olofson, Norma Jean
45 Mayfair St.
Lynn, MA 01904
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Perry, Anthony L.
Perry, Karen A.
64 Treetop Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Plucker, Donald R.
Plucker, Donnamarie
26 Berkshire Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/27/11

Potvin, Patricia A.
58 Felix St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/28/11

Rothery, John Robinson
257 Redlands St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Rounds, Kevin G.
P.O. Box 75
Greenfield, MA 01302
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Salazar, Joel N.
Velazquez-Rodriguez, Maria Santos
187 William St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/29/11

Santiago, Jose A.
108 Shawmut St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/20/11

Scharmann, Catherine A.
153 South Longyard Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/16/11

Senez, Michael L.
Senez, Sharon E.
43 Vincent Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/21/11

Simmons, John F.
Simmons, Jennifer P.
a/k/a Thomas, Jennifer
51 Shaw Park Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Soler, Jeanette
56 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/22/11

Stone, Melinda Sue
148 Russell St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/29/11

Suse, James Francis
Suse, Theresa Marie
PO Box 188
Brimfield, MA 01010
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/29/11

Sylvester, David A.
Sylvester, Brenda M.
39 Mattawa Circle
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Taft, Richard R.
PO Box 1371
Warren, MA 01083
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Todd Boynton Roofing
Boynton, Todd Joseph
83 Silver St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/22/11

Vargas, Iris C.
a/k/a Rivera, Iris C.
192 Lucerne Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/19/11

Whitfield, Kristine B.
439 Warren Wright Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/23/11

Willis, Joseph Theodore
200 Lambert Ter. #46
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/20/11

Wing, Carol T.
146 School St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 12/30/11

Opinion
Workforce Training Is Good Business

There are 13 million unemployed Americans and approximately 3 million job openings in the U.S. today. According to the Mass. Department of Workforce Development, this 4:1 ratio of unemployed people to unfilled jobs is mirrored in our state as well. Despite high unemployment, a 2011 report found that more than half of business leaders, and 67% of small-business leaders, face a challenge recruiting employees with the right education and training. In Massachusetts, these unfilled jobs in the health care, education, and manufacturing sectors pay between $40,000 and $60,000 per year.
How can this be?
Primarily, it’s the result of a skills mismatch brought on by technological change, structural economic shifts, and decades of underinvestment in the types of basic skills and occupational training that are essential for a thriving economy. We need an education system that focuses not on a college degree, but on preparation for the jobs of today and tomorrow as identified by employers, not politicians and economic forecasters. And with the rapid evolution of technology, we need programs that continually train and retrain adults.
Middle-skill jobs across the country pay well and contribute similarly through income-tax revenues paid by employees and reduced unemployment payments. Many of these jobs involve specialized training on highly complex manufacturing machinery or in hospitals and labs. Regions can achieve economies of scale by partnering with vocational schools and community colleges to do this training on shared equipment with shared curricula.
Western Mass. faces a chronic shortage of skilled machinists in our high-technology, precision-manufacturing industry. This month alone, three companies in Hampden County are looking to hire more than 40 machinists at salaries that average $60,000. Without these workers, companies face unwelcome choices such as subcontracting the work to outside shops or expanding in other states with more skilled machinists.
We’ve had success in Western Mass. by developing public-private partnerships to support this type of skills training, but employers can’t do it alone. The partnership between employers in the Western Mass. Chapter of the National Tooling and Machining Assoc., the Regional Employment Board of Hampden County (REB), the state, and area school systems and community colleges has leveraged resources and created or retained good-paying jobs for over 1,000 Western Mass. residents.
Precision machinists, nurses, elevator mechanics, and EMTs require a foundation of advanced math, metrology, physiology, biology, etc. that employers cannot be expected to provide. Skills training by professional educators combined with on-the-job internships should be part of our public education system. And if properly aligned with available jobs by hiring employers, this will strengthen our economy by putting people back to work.
Congress should examine the business case for skills training:  the above-mentioned 3 million job openings, if filled, could generate over $9 billion in annual taxable income (assuming a low average salary of $30,000 per year). With a federal tax rate of 15%, this would provide more than $1.3 billion in annual payroll taxes as well as state tax revenues and reduced unemployment benefits. With estimated training costs of $2,500 per person, the government would recover its investment in less than a year.
Federal funding for workforce-training programs declined by almost 20% (adjusted for inflation) between 2002 and 2012, with a 29% decrease in funding for Workforce Investment Act programs for adults, dislocated (laid-off) workers, and youth.
Instead of improving the system to help workers enter or return to the labor market and match employers with skilled workers, Congress has proposed eliminating it or consolidating it to the point of elimination. Cuts to federally funded workforce training would hurt Massachusetts’ small-business owners, stifle job creation, and slow economic growth.
Our elected representatives, including Sen. Brown and Sen. Kerry, need to stop their colleagues from acting in direct opposition to the economic interests of Massachusetts and the needs of our state’s workers and employers.
These programs, when properly structured and administered, pay for themselves. The Western Mass. model developed by the local Machining and Tooling Assoc. and the REB can provide the case study for success. v

Larry Maier is president of Peerless Precision Inc. in Westfield and co-president of the National Tool and Machining Assoc. of Western Mass.; [email protected]

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the month of January 2012.

AMHERST

35 South Cycle Studio
35 South Pleasant St.
Lindsay Abbate

Crepe Diem
26 Emily Lane
Maya Stein

USA Constructing
133 South East St.
Mariana Falcon

CHICOPEE

Abram’s Masonry
22 Marcelle St.
Dayna L. Whitten

Dragonfly Properties
41 Reedstone Ave.
Donna M. Fanos

The Fisar Monica Shop
45 Fairview Ave.
James Dascanio

Vital’s Auto Service Inc.
451 Granby Road
Vital M. Fonseca

GREENFIELD

Dillon Chevrolet Inc.
54 Main St.
Thomas Dillon

In Stitches
259 Federal St.
Kathleen McIntyre-Bernier

Life’s a Pooch
25 Laurel St.
Jeremiah N. McLenithan

Neal Music Studio
16 West St.
Raymond Neal

The Masiello Group Commercial Associates
529 Bernardston Road
James J. Fleming

Timeless Beauty Salon
42 Chapman St.
Tina Hickey

W.H. Hutchinson Services
28 White Birch Ave.
Heath Hutchinson

HADLEY

Carr’s Ciderhouse
295 River Dr.
Jonathan Carr

Donut Man
142 Russell St.
Tony Santos

International Food Market
206 Russell St.
Hai Cheng

HOLYOKE

Cyberhook Design
55 Laura Lane
Franklin W. Dorman

Fast Eddies Citgo
679 Main St.
Iyad Jamal

K.W. Property Management
97 Locust St.
Kenrick Williams

Stop & Go
399 Hillside Ave.
Irfan Kashif

LUDLOW

Element Salon & Day Spa
21 Harding Ave.
Dan Montgomery

Flavr Flames Kitchen LLC
247 Cady St.
Paul Mock

Lavoie Family Chiropractic
733 Chapin St.
Christopher Lavoie

Western Mass Educational Advocacy Services
116 Sewall St.
Karen Mowry

PALMER

Eric’s Repair & Radiator
1281 South Main St.
Eric Gilbert

Mark Gilberts Auto Repair
24 Orchard St.
Mark Gilbert

Office Care of New England
55 Beacon Dr.
Kathleen Dyer

Pepe’s Tree Service
4231 High St.
Lucas Hebert

Top Notch Contractors
21 Wilbraham St.
Russell Orcutt Jr.

SPRINGFIELD

A & R Trucking Services
33 Cadwell Dr.
A & R Logistics Inc.

A.M.P. Solutions
125 Main St.
Courtney C. Brown

Baystate Employee Assistance
50 Maple St.
Mark R. Tolosky

Bermudez Remodeling
26 Allen St.
Juan L. Bermudez

Big City Builders
42 Arbutus St.
Steven J. Brantley

Chacon’s Trucking
35 Moore St.
Roberto Chacon Jr.

Chris Franklyn Agyei
188 Russell St.
Chris Agyei

Creative Cakes by Colleen
95 Patricia Cir.
Colleen F. Nadeau

Destinee’s Mini Market
2881 Main St.
Florita Ayala

E-V Automotive Repair
11 Front St.
Vance O. Dion

Eric-N-Son’s Trucking LLC
52 Pearl St.
Eric B. Denson

Executive Real Estate
535 Main St.
Amy Rio

Gina P. Allen Typing Services
120 Westminster St.
Gina P. Allen

Gordo World Barber Shop
856 Main St.
Juan A. Rondon

Hanna’s Diner & Deli Shop
184-186 Main St.
Hanna Kucharczyk

Hbookz Distribution Company
12 Mattoon St.
Ibn-Husein Muhammad

Keith’s Carpentry
726 Bradley Road
Keith Fournier

WESTFIELD

Adam & Company Landscape and Design
43 Deer Path Lane
Adam Midura

Adams Power Services Inc.
55A Westfield Industrial Park Road
David Tremblay

Chinto’s Pizza & Restaurant
868 Southampton Road
Jacinto Blanco-Munoz

Clean Sweep
69 Michael Dr.
Debra A. Post

Saari Philanthropy
20 Frederick St.
Faizer Iddrissu

Town Coupons
11 Shadow Lane
Roy Federer

World Peace Beads and Glass Emporium
4 School St.
Suzanne Tracy

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Cruise Center
1285 Riverdale St.
Gorecki Enterprises Corporation

Diamond Gold Connection
389 Park St.
GX Corporation

Friendly Hair Salon
553 Union St.
Tatyana Gitsman

Liquori’s Pizza Inc.
659 Westfield St.
Antonio Liquori

The Crop Shop
338 Westfield St.
Nancy R. Jamrog

Valley Instrument Service
84 Sagamore Road
Ronald Lee Jr.

Briefcase Departments

Friendly Is Closing 37 More Restaurants
WILBRAHAM — Friendly Ice Cream Corp. closed another 37 stores recently, including 10 in the Bay State, before emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The chain, based in Wilbraham, has closed about 40% of its locations in Massachusetts and 20% overall (about 100 restaurants in total) since filing for bankruptcy protection last October. Locally, stores in Springfield, Holyoke, and Great Barrington shut their doors. The most recent closings will result in nearly 800 people losing their jobs, the company said. A spokesperson for Friendly said the company restructured leases for some sites, but could not reach agreements with landlords for 37 restaurants and decided to shut them down at the close of business on Jan. 8.

HCC To Acquire
Grynn & Barrett Studio
HOLYOKE — State Sen. Michael Knapik (R-Westfield) and state Rep. Michael Kane (D-Holyoke) recently announced that legislation authorizing Holyoke Community College (HCC) to borrow $7 million from the Mass. Development Finance Agency for the acquisition and renovation of Grynn & Barrett Studios has passed both branches of the legislature and is headed to Gov. Deval Patrick for his approbation. The bill, which was filed last January, will allow HCC to create a state-of-the-art educational facility for the associate’s degree in Nursing and the Practical Nursing and Radiologic Technology programs at the site currently occupied by the Grynn and Barrett Photography Studios. The building is located across from the college’s secondary access road on Homestead Avenue. These funds will provide an additional 22,000 square feet for specialized and general instruction, and will allow the college to repurpose space on campus freed up by the relocation of these programs. In 2008, the Mass. Division of Capital Asset Management (DCAM) commissioned a space-reallocation study, which concluded that HCC was tightly packed, and the current campus would not allow for projected increases in enrollment. The college has pledged to continue to work with DCAM to develop strategies to address space issues in the future. “This legislation will allow Holyoke Community College to prepare more students for careers in nursing and health care to meet the growing demand for qualified workers,” said Knapik. “This will not only be a boost for the college but for the Pioneer Valley as whole, as many of the students and former students live and work within our communities.” A major component of the new facility will be the HCC SIMuCENTER. This program will introduce simulation into the nursing curriculum, providing students the opportunity to learn clinical decision-making skills, refine technical skills, gain competency in recognizing and preventing common medical errors, and practice a wide variety of commonly occurring clinical events and situations. The SIMuCENTER program will also provide a unique opportunity for the creation of partnerships with other community-college nursing programs and local health care providers to further educate current employees. The college will enter into a 30-year financing plan with the Mass. Development Finance Agency, with the loan to be paid off through student fees. The college will implement a three-tier surcharge, including a $150-per-semester surcharge for Registered Nursing, Practical Nursing, and Radiological Technician students; a $100-per-semester surcharge for Pre-Nursing, Pre-Health, and Foundations of Health students; and a $1-per-credit charge for all students. Currently, HCC is the second-least-expensive community college in Massachusetts at $4,050 per year. The average for all Massachusetts community colleges is $4,545 per year. Patrick is expected to sign the bill into law.

Nominations Sought for Woman of the Year
SPRINGFIELD — The Professional Women’s Chamber, a division of the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield, is seeking nominations for its 2012 Woman of the Year Award. The award has been presented annually since 1954 to a woman in Western Mass. who exemplifies outstanding leadership, professional accomplishment, and service to the community. The nominee’s achievements can be representative of a lifetime’s work or for more recent successes. Any woman is eligible for nomination, and a chamber affiliation is not required. For more information and a nomination form, visit www.professionalwomenschamber.com or e-mail committee chair Nancy Mirkin at [email protected] Nomination documents are due by Feb. 10.

Construction-industry
Unemployment Jumps
to 16% in December
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Despite the addition of 17,000 jobs in December, the nation’s construction-industry unemployment rate jumped to 16% last month, a sharp increase from 13.1% in November, but down from 20.7% at the same time last year, according to the Jan. 6 jobs report by the U.S. Labor Department. For all of 2011, the construction industry added 46,000 jobs (0.8%), representing the best industry performance since January 2007. The average annual construction unemployment rate in 2011 was 16.4%, down from 20.6% in 2010 and 19% in 2009. Non-residential building construction employment stood at 662,200 jobs in December, down by 3,000 jobs compared to November, but up 3,000 jobs (0.5%) compared to the same time one year ago. Residential-building construction employment stood at 567,000 jobs in December, up by 3,000 jobs from the previous month and up 4,000 jobs (0.6%) from the same time last year. Non-residential specialty trade contractors added 20,000 jobs in December and have added 12,000 jobs, or 0.6%, during the past 12 months. In contrast, residential specialty trade contractor employment decreased by 3,000 jobs for the month, but is up by 16,000 jobs (1.1%) from December 2010. Heavy and civil engineering construction employment remained unchanged for the month and has added 11,000 jobs (1.4%) during the course of 2011. Across all industries, the nation added 200,000 jobs as the private sector expanded by 212,000 jobs and the public sector shrank by 12,000 jobs. Year over year, the nation has added 1,640,000 jobs (1.3%). The nation’s unemployment rate fell to 8.5% in December, down from a revised 8.7% level in November and down from 9.4% in December 2010.

Company Notebook Departments

TommyCar Corp. Adds Northampton Volkswagen
NORTHAMPTON — Carla Cosenzi and Thomas Cosenzi are continuing the legacy of their father, Thomas Cosenzi, by adding Northampton Volkswagen to the family-owned company, TommyCar Corp. The dealership, which will add approximately 25 to 30 new jobs in the Northampton area, is located at 48 Damon Road. “We want to strengthen the Volkswagen brand in the Pioneer Valley,” said Carla Cosenzi, president. “It is the leading company in diesel-engine technology, and the cars are an excellent value for the money. We believe we are exactly the right company to build excitement for this line of great cars.” Northampton Volkswagen will offer all models in Volkswagen’s line, including the Jetta, Passat, CC, Tiguan, Touareg, Golf, GTI, Golf R, Jetta SportWagen, Routan, Eos, and Beetle. The dealership will include a service department that offers full service, parts, and repairs for all Volkswagen models.

United Bank Foundation Awards $62,400
WEST SPRINGFIELD — Ten not-for-profit organizations recently received grants from the United Bank Foundation totaling $62,400 that serve individuals and families in the Springfield area and Worcester. The grants included $34,000 to United Way of Pioneer Valley, $2,000 to the Hampshire Community United Way, and $2,500 to United Way of Central Massachusetts. In addition, $6,900 was awarded to the Boys and Girls Club of West Springfield to replace game-room equipment destroyed by water damage as a result of the June 1 tornado. Also, Junior Achievement of Western Mass. received $5,000 from the foundation to support financial-literacy, work-readiness, and entrepreneurial programs for youths in kindergarten through grade 12, while Western New England University was granted $4,000 to purchase equipment for its School of Pharmacy. A $1,000 grant to ServiceNet in Northampton will provide program support for the Fit Together wellness center, which meets the needs of individuals with developmental and emotional challenges. The Worcester Education Collaborative received a $3,000 grant to help ensure that all Worcester public-school students have equal access to excellence in education, and a $3,000 award to the Worcester Youth Center will support the Leap to College program for urban youth. Dress for Success Worcester, which provides business attire for disadvantaged women seeking employment, was awarded $1,000 for operating funds. The foundation’s four primary funding areas of interest are education, health and human services, youth development, and cultural programs. Foundation guidelines can be found by logging onto www.bankatunited.com.

Firm Achieves LEED Gold Certification
SPRINGFIELD — Dietz & Co. Architects Inc. has received Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Homes Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council for the recently completed units at the YWCA’s Campus of Hope. The new units provide housing that serves to transition women from domestic-violence shelters to longer-term living facilities. The 32,000-square-foot project is made up of 20 apartments and eight congregate housing units within its walls. The project was part of the larger Campus of Hope initiative that was started more than 10 years ago for which Dietz & Co. was the master planner. The firm also designed the first phase of the campus, a 60,000-square-foot building that includes administrative offices, meeting and classroom space, as well as an on-site shelter. The YWCA project was originally designed to achieve the LEED for Homes Silver certification level, but exceeded that level by achieving Gold certification. Several factors that supported the Gold certification include super-insulated walls and airtight construction, efficient mechanical systems that include roof-mounted photovoltaic panels for electricity, sustainable site design, and the use of green construction materials. A healthy indoor environment, pollution reduction, and lower utility and maintenance costs are also key elements of the certification. The efficient building is expected to reduce water and energy consumption by 20% to 30% over typical code-compliant construction. NL Construction was the general contractor for the project, and the units were supported by the LEED for Homes Provider, CET. The LEED Green Building Rating System is a voluntary, consensus-based national standard for developing high-performance, sustainable buildings.

Amherst Media Offers Animation Workshops
AMHERST — Amherst Media, an Apple-authorized training center, recently added a Winter Break Animation Workshop to its course offerings. Professional illustrator Gregory Miller, who has worked at Cartoon Network, is the instructor for the four-day course. Also, a Final Cut Pro X class will be offered Jan. 16-18 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. In addition, a host of training sessions are available for cameras and field equipment, editing, studio use, and numerous software applications, including Final Cut Pro and Photoshop. For more information on all of the available programs, visit www.amherstmedia.org.

Nicolai Law Group Named to U.S. News Ranking
SPRINGFIELD — For the fifth year in a row, Paul Nicolai has been named one of the “Best Lawyers in America” in commercial litigation. His firm, Nicolai Law Group, P.C., also ranked among the “Best Law Firms” by U.S. News & World Report in Springfield’s Tier 1 for Commercial Litigation and Tier 2 for Arbitration, and for Litigation-Eminent Domain and Condemnation. More than 3 million confidential evaluations by 39,000 of the country’s leading attorneys help formulate the lists for the “Best Lawyers in America.” Now in its 18th edition, the reference work is considered a definitive guide to legal excellence in North America, according to Nicolai. The U.S. News ranking took the evaluation process a step further, asking thousands of clients as well as legal peers for feedback on those law firms with “Best Lawyers” on their staff. The publication’s rigorous evaluation process also included information submitted by more than 10,000 U.S. law firms. The guide, in its second year, is intended to help refer lawyers and clients to appropriate sources of legal advice for their needs. The Nicolai Law Group represents businesses and their owners in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Hampshire, and Washington, D.C.

Departments Picture This

Send photos with a caption and contact information to: ‘Picture This’
c/o BusinessWest Magazine, 1441 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103 or to [email protected]

Future Returns

The Mass. Bankers Assoc. Charitable Foundation recently presented Cooley Dickinson Hospital with a check for $5,000 to support the hospital’s Building Our Future campaign. Pictured, from left, are Craig Melin, president and CEO of CDH; Ken Bordewieck, senior vice president of Easthampton Savings Bank; Joanne Finck, CDH Building Our Future campaign chairperson; William Stapleton, president of Northampton Cooperative Bank; and Dan Forte, president and CEO of the Mass. Bankers Assoc. Charitable Foundation.

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

FRANKLIN SUPERIOR COURT
Jason Brooks v. Charter Oak Fire Insurance Co.
Allegation: Failure to amounts due under insurance contract: $66,000
Filed: 11/8/11

GREENFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Capital One Bank v. Ace Cab Two
Allegation: Non-payment for goods charged on credit account: $7,513.49
Filed: 11/10/11

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
James Afflitto v. Shuttle X Transportation, LLC
Allegation: Breach of employment contract: $25,000+
Filed: 11/10/11

Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. v. Brian Michalyzk Excavation & Trucking
Allegation: Non-payment of workers’ compensation policy: $83,233.58
Filed: 11/21/11

New Penn Motor Express v. Insulation Machine Corp.
Allegation: Non-payment of shipping services: $94,090.41
Filed: 11/29/11

Plastic Resource Inc. v. Igor Poltavets, Bergen Industries Inc. and James P. McKay
Allegation: Breach of contract and conversion of equipment: $133,810.50
Filed: 12/6/11

Richard and Doreen Weisner v. Bertera Chrysler Jeep Inc.
Allegation: Misrepresentation and deceit in the sale of a vehicle: $25,000
Filed: 11/21/11

PALMER DISTRICT COURT
Stephen Plifka v. Liberty Mutual Insurance Co.
Allegation: Claim for non-payment of benefits: $5,000
Filed: 11/30/11

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
ABC Supply Co. Inc. v. Nick’s Affordable Home Improvement Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract: $8,605.88
Filed: 11/21/11

Alphasite v. Dunbar Community Center Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract and non-payment of services: $7,267.50
Filed: 12/9/11

Christopher R. Brunell v. Jump & Bounce Inc. and Brenda G. Chouinard
Allegation: Breach of contract and failure to pay on promissory note: $20,000
Filed: 11/22/11

United Rentals Inc. v. Defelice Corp.
Allegation: Non-payment of materials, equipment, and services on a construction project: $23,826.52
Filed: 12/6/11

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Airflyte Inc. v. Waltzing Matilda, LLC
Allegation: Remaining balance due for FAA inspection and repairs to a Cessna aircraft: $70,934.19
Filed: 12/9/11

Ford Motor Credit Co., LLC v. Eg Partners, LLC
Allegation: Non-payment on retail installment sales agreement: $2,943.79
Filed: 11/9/11

Opinion
Work in Progress: Glacial Improvement on Jobs

The December jobs numbers are good news — sort of — for the economy and the Obama re-election campaign. The economy added 200,000 new jobs, and the duration of unemployment is down slightly. Wages and hours worked are up, too. We can anticipate continuing progress between now and November.
But the bad news is that, though the trend is in the right direction, the progress is glacial. As Heidi Sherholz of the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) reports, the deficit of jobs needed to keep up with the normal growth of working-age population is still upwards of 10 million. Even at December’s modestly improved rate of net job creation, it will take until 2019 for the U.S. to recover its pre-recession rate of unemployment.
Moreover, as EPI points out, if we factor in workers who have dropped out of the labor force by looking at the ratio of employment to population (which is still down almost five percentage points since the beginning of 2007), the adjusted unemployment rate would be 9.5%.
The other problem is wages. As the New York Times keeps reporting in its fine “Working for Less” series, some jobs are coming back, but the wages are down by as much as half. And as long as that is the case, the measured unemployment rate can drop, but people still feel as if their own personal economy is in a deep recession. Between June 2009 — when the recession officially ended — and June 2011, inflation-adjusted median household income fell 6.7%, to $49,909, according to a study by two former Census Bureau officials.
This trend has only begun to reverse. Worker productivity is actually increasing at a rapid rate, but nearly all of these gains have been captured by corporate profits rather than worker wages.
As long as household income is down, there is not enough purchasing power to drive a recovery strong enough to generate enough good jobs at good wages. At the bottom of this problem are deep structural trends compounded by the financial collapse. They include a chronic trade deficit, the weakness of labor unions, and economic deregulation that gave corporations the power to batter down wages.
Since the financial crash, these longer-term trends have been compounded by the deflationary drag of the housing collapse and misplaced austerity fever. While the private sector is belatedly adding jobs, a public sector that should be leaning against the winds is still cutting net jobs.
So while the December jobs report is cautiously hopeful news both politically and economically, the administration, should President Obama win a second term, will have to do a great deal more to restore an economy of good jobs at good wages.

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of the American Prospect.

Chamber Corners Departments

Amherst Area
Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700
  
• Jan. 25: Amherst Area Chamber After 5, 5-7 p.m. Cost: $5 for members; $10 for non-members. The new chamber Web site will debut.

Franklin County
Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463
 
• Jan. 17: Business After Hours, 5-7 p.m. at the Farm Table at Kringle Candle, Bernardston. Tickets: $5 for members, $8 for non-members.
 
• Jan. 27: Breakfast Series, 7:30-9 a.m. at the Greenfield Corporate Center. Program TBA. Co-sponsored by F/H Career Center. Tickets: $12 for members, $15 for non-members.

Greater Easthampton
Chamber of Commerce
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

• Jan. 26: Chamber Annual Meeting & Awards Dinner, 5 p.m. at Southampton Country Club. Annual awards presentation for business, business person, and nonprofit members of the year. Also, a review of a successful, 2011, and a celebration of member milestones. Cost: $30 per person, inclusive. For more information, visit [email protected]

Greater Holyoke
Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376
 
• Jan. 18: Chamber After Hours, 5-7 p.m., at Mrs. Mitchell’s Kitchen, 514 Westfield Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by Holyoke Credit Union. Cost: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members.
  
Professional Women’s Chamber
www.professionalwomenschamber.com
(413) 755-1310
 
• Jan. 18: Professional Women’s Chamber Business Expo, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Max’s Tavern at the Basketball Hall of Fame. Accepting reservations for the 14th Annual Tabletop Expo. Last year’s successful expo was a sellout. Sign up today to showcase your company’s products and services or to attend the event. Display price includes a draped table and lunch for one. General admission tickets include specialty sandwiches, fruit, chips, and dessert. For more information, contact Lynn Johnson at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]

Greater Westfield
Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• Jan. 18: WestNet networking event, 5-7 p.m., at Tucker’s Restaurant, 625 College Highway, Southwick. Opportunity to meet other local businesses and chamber members. Cash bar and free hors’doeuvres. Tickets: $10 for chamber members, $15 for non-members. Your first WestNet is always free.

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com

• Jan. 19: YPS Third Thursday, 5-7 p.m., Nadim’s, East Longmeadow. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Enhance your social and business networking skills. For more information, visit www.springfieldyps.com

Opinion
Thing5 Move Downtown Spurs Momentum in Springfield

The recent announcement that Thing5 LLC will be creating a new call center in One Financial Plaza, thus bringing 500 new jobs to Springfield, is a positive story for the city and the region — on a number of levels.
Let’s start with the jobs. That’s priority No. 1 in the Greater Springfield area, and it has been for many years now. Some might look at this and say, ‘it’s only call-center jobs,’ or words to that effect, but these opportunities come on many levels, from entry positions to management slots, and, in many cases, they can be handled by those who do not possess a college education. The region needs those high-quality jobs (call them white-collar, if you like), but it also needs employment opportunities like these, especially in such large volume.
Beyond the employment factor, there are many other aspects to this story, all of them positive. First, this company started here, in the Technology Park at Springfield Technical Community College — which was created to spur this kind of tech-related enterprise — and thus provides solid evidence that we can incubate ventures and grow them into major employers.
Also, this company stayed here. Indeed, when it reached that proverbial next level, there were, quite obviously, opportunities to take Thing5 almost anywhere — because there isn’t a city or town in the Commonwealth or well beyond it that wouldn’t fight, and fight hard, for 500 jobs. But management chose to stay in the City of Homes, largely because of the lower cost of living, available workforce, access, quality of life, and affordable commercial real estate.
This shows that our various assets are tangible — and sellable.
But perhaps the biggest benefit will come in the form of greater momentum downtown. First, this move gives a substantial boost to the office tower known as One Financial Plaza, which has had several dark floors for many years, but has been staging something of a comeback recently.
Beyond that, though, the 500 new employees working downtown will provide a larger critical mass of people needed to spur additional investments, be they in support businesses, hospitality-related ventures such as restaurants and clubs, or badly needed retail.
And there is another component — the possibility that some of these employees may soon be working and living downtown, thanks to a program that will offer reduced lease rates to Thing5 employees at the nearby Morgan Square apartments, managed by the same company (Samuel D. Plotkin) that also manages One Financial Plaza. This additional residential piece could further stimulate investment in the central business district and be a key contributor to the kind of vibrancy that other Northeast cities have enjoyed.
As we said, there are many angles to this positive story for Springfield and its downtown. The headlines were all about the jobs coming to the city — and that’s an important aspect of this — but there are many other elements that bode well for the City of Homes.

Bankruptcies Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Alvarez, Ivette
a/k/a Rivera, Ivette
300 East Main St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Barnes, Dale E.
Barnes, Melissa M.
9 Belanger Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Battles, Jennifer Nicole
a/k/a Grannells, Jennifer N.
51 Southview Terrace
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Benitez, Yoni F.
Liberato, Jenny
712 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/11

Boyer, Jason Allyn
Boyer, Kerrianne
a/k/a Wolske, Kerrianne
310 Birch Hill Road
Russell, MA 01071
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Bump, Carl E.
Neale-Bump, Doris B.
36 Joy St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/28/11

Burr, Shirley Anne
82 Darling St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Cameron, Lucretia D.
1259 Plum Tree Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/21/11

Cherry, Ronald
Cherry, Patricia
19 Ford St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/30/11

Christianson, Leona F.
28 Little Alum Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/21/11

Columbia, Percy R.
a/k/a Columbia, Richard P.
205 West Granville Road
Granville, MA 01034
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Connors, Patricia
26 Fullerton St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/21/11

Cote, Patrick M.
34 Rockview St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/28/11

Cruz, Tamara M.
62 Warner St., Apt. 4L
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Davidson, David G.
P.O. Box 854
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Dickson, Diana S.
16 Beyer Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/17/11

Dubish, Edward S.
Dubish, Jennifer A.
77 Lombard St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/28/11

Fleagle, Jr., Robert D.
Fleagle, Christina J.
21 Raymond Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/28/11

Guertin Day Care
Guertin, Roger David
Guertin, Shirley Marie
495 Burts Pit Road
Florence, MA 01062
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/17/11

Harnden, Brian S.
263 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Harrop, Ronald L.
79 West St.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Keefe, Joseph W.
30 Westwood Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Kolek, Kimberly A
a/k/a Gauthier, Kimberly A.
33 Dale Court
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/17/11

Kozlowski, Michael
24 Farquhar Road
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/20/11

Labarre, Brooke A.
a/k/a Miltimore, Brooke A.
360 Westfield Road
Russell, MA 01071
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/28/11

LaBonte, Deborah J.
451 Hapgood St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/11

Lacasse, Lincoln A.
Lacasse, Kimberly A.
a/k/a Gray, Kimberly A.
191 Packard Road
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/30/11

Lami, Dannielle M.
P.O.Box 1785
Westfield, MA 01086
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/26/11

Lander, John J.
Lander, Jamie E.
128 Gale Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Laprade, Pierre F.
Laprade, Catherine A.
P.O. Box 564
West Warren, MA 01092
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Leahy, Stephanie J.
35 Jeanne Marie Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/17/11

Loizeaux, Clyde R.
125 Pondview Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Lynes, Leonard A.
Lynes, Halina J.
647 Britton St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Mahony, Clark T.
Mahony, Candace Docimo
119 Old Pleasant St.
Lee, MA 01238
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/30/11

McCabe, Donald V.
McCabe, Mary F.
5 Wood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Melanson, Edward R.
51 Village Hill Road, #14
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/26/11

Messer, Cami J.
197 Pasco Road
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/11

Murdock, Gloria D.
204 Denver St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/21/11

Nana’s Day Care
Ventura, Thomas F.
Ventura, Geraldine F.
Third Ave.
P.O. Box 73
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/23/11

Norway, Donna B.
61 Leslie St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/26/11

Omartian, Virginia N.
286 Bridge St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/21/11

Pantojas, Cruz N.
16 Manilla Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Picard, Jessie M.
288 Allen Park Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Pierce, Lorene L.
a/k/a Massey, Lorene L.
a/k/a Small, Lorene L.
164 Plain Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/23/11

Praise and Glory Church
339 State St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 11
Filing Date: 11/22/11

Pratt, Kenneth R.
43 Orchard St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Rathbun, Richard R.
24 Apremont St.
Adams, MA 01220
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Recoulle, Karen M.
296 Granville Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Roy, James R.
Roy, Paula A.
43 Spruce Circle
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Sanchez-Vega, Epifanio
127 Elijah St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Schaffrick, John A.
Schaffrick, Brenda V.
15 Walnut St.
Adams, MA 01220
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/26/11

Shea, Joseph E.
1 Springfield St., Apt. 207
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/21/11

Shufelt, Douglas G.
P.O. Box 813
Great Barrington, MA 01230
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Simpson, Bradley
35 Barlett Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Stabach, Paige E.
24 North St.
Three Rivers, MA 01080
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Staton, Tommy Eugene
Staton, Debbie Ann
a/k/a Russell, Debbie A.
8 Banbury St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/29/11

Stewart, Nadia V.
a/k/a Jarrett, Nadia V.
111 Fargo St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/16/11

Sylvester, Kathy H.
630 Chicopee St., # 513
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Talbot, Rene F.
52 Meadow St. Apt 2
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/11

Torres, Alisa
16 Cornwall St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/23/11

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the month of December 2011.

AMHERST

Amherst Family Chiropractic
228 Triangle St.
Lee Kane

Amherst Healing Light Acupuncture
479 West St.
Elaine Walsh

Bold Folds
2 Dwight Circle
Alex Gillat

Visual Concepts 123
170 East Hadley Road
Yvonne Mendez

CHICOPEE

AJ’s Gaming
425 East St.
Luigi M. Montefusco

Cool Limos
658 Fuller Road
John Garcia

Diana Sobieras Photography
140 Hendrick St.
Diana Sobieras

MCS
17 Mellen St.
Daniel S. O’Connor

Wackerbarth Deliveries
57 Carter Dr.
Matthew Wackerbarth

GREENFIELD

ABC Cab
305 Federal St.
James Shippee

Blissful Nails
42 Chapman St.
Angela D. Dobie

Buttonfoot
111 Davis St.
Cyrstal Kelleher

Family Dollar Stores of Massachusetts
10 Colrain Road
Joyce K. Thaggard

Goodwin, Shine, and Associates
20 Federal St.
Alfred B. Goodwin

Sweet Banana Berry
87 Hayward St.
Raymond Trombly

Thai Blue Ginger
298 Main St.
Kanok Ninsri

HADLEY

Ascent Audiology
104 Russell St.
Northland Hearing Inc.

Calendar Club
367 Russell St.
SRV LLC

Loonar Tattoo
206 Russell St.
Albert Valenta

HOLYOKE

Dock’s Classics
31 Jackson St.
James D. Perry

Dunkin Donuts
225 Whiting Farms Road
Derek Salema

Pretty Nails & Tan
2257B Northampton St.
Ngocgiao Dinh

LUDLOW

CJ Refrigeration
25 Parker Lane
Claudio Laneiro

Esteenz Skin Care LLC
733 Chapin St.
Carol Santini

Felt Well Woolies
33 Cady St.
Amy Brown

Mainely Drafts
1361 Lyon St.
Keith Ouellette

PALMER

Bechard Farms
149 St. John St.
Donald Bechard

Bumpers and More
21 William St.
William Tetrault

Labonte & Son
241 Wilbraham St.
Gary Labonte Sr.

Roadfox
136 Gates St.
Andrew Fox

Rondeau Entertainment
1300 Ware St.
Richard C. Rondeau

SPRINGFIELD

Majestic Barber Shop
444 Chestnut St.
Misael Colon

Maxim Seamless Gutters
21 Cluster Circle
Maksim Barabolkin

Mexico Express Packaging
2756 Main St.
Ady N. Rosario

New England Home Improvement
463 Page Blvd.
Anthony Becker

O.D. Trucking
34 King St.
Oscar Davila

Puerto Rican Master Barber
602 Page Blvd.
John W. Stevens

R & R Cleaning
21 Valley Road
Diana Mercedes

S.A.S. Trucking LLC
180 Warrenton St.
Sherlock Suban

Snow and Ice
88 Butternut St.
Deobrah A. O’Brien

Springfield Mobil
1828 Boston Road
Sanjay P. Patel

T.S. Services
24 Leatherleaf Dr.
Sean L. Walter

Thalia Nails Creation
27 Lyman St.
Yahaira Rodriguez

Thee Realm
396 Page Blvd.
Juan R. Guillen

Touch of NYC Hair Studio
167 White St.
Sophia C. Evans

Valhalla Ventures
805 White St.
John R. Henle

Zuny’s Family Daycare
367 St. James Ave.
Maria Pedemonte

WESTFIELD

Barry’s Painting
348 Elm St.
Kurt Barry

Central Transit
93 Sackett Road
Joseph Caputo

Cosmic Holdings LLC
302 East Main St.
Alan Flint

Igor’s Construction & Remodeling
134 Little River Road
Igor Kravchuk

New England EDM Service
22 Mainline Dr.
Theodore W. Macutkiewicz

Terry’s Barber Shop
48 Elm St.
John Symmons

WEST SPRINGFIELD

AAA Xtreme Paintball
683 Westfield St.
Edward J. O’Malley

Cellular Sales of Massachusetts
175 Memorial Ave.
Julie Dean

Fabulous Finds
209 Elm St.
The Home Staging Company LLC

Quick Stop Oil
75 Union St.
David J. Vickers

Storrowton Tavern
1305 Memorial Ave.
Vintage Inc. Corporation

Briefcase Departments

MassMutual Invests in BMC’s Future
SPRINGFIELD — Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. (MassMutual) recently made a $3 million contribution to Baystate Medical Center’s capital campaign to support construction of its new facility. “At MassMutual, we recognize the importance of good health and well-being, as well as the benefits of leading a healthy lifestyle,” said Roger Crandall, chairman, president, and CEO of MassMutual. “So it’s only fitting that MassMutual does its share to contribute to this project, as our employees, agents, policyholders, and the community at large in this region will directly benefit from the outstanding care this great facility will provide.” In recognition of MassMutual’s commitment to Baystate Medical Center, Mark Tolosky, president and CEO of Baystate Health, announced the naming of its first phase of the building project; it will be known as the MassMutual Wing. “We are so grateful that MassMutual shares our vision of good health for the community and has so generously provided this support, which significantly helps us to replace an aging infrastructure and continue to meet the health care needs of the people of Western Mass. right here in Springfield,” said Tolosky. The first phase is on schedule and on budget for opening in March 2012. The MassMutual Wing will house the Davis Family Heart and Vascular Center, which includes six surgical/endovascular suites to accommodate advanced, lifesaving cardiovascular procedures, and 32 cardiovascular critical care rooms that will support state-of-the-art medicine and at the same time provide ample room for the comforting presence of patients’ family members and friends. The $296 million project has made a significant economic impact on the region, with job growth for the construction industry benefiting from the addition of approximately 300 new jobs on site since breaking ground in 2009. Approximately 70% of the work on the project has been completed by local and regional businesses. In addition, Baystate expects to add more than 200 permanent clinical and medical positions.

Kennedy Named Chief Development Officer
SPRINGFIELD — Lifelong city resident Kevin Kennedy was recently tapped by Mayor Domenic Sarno to serve as the city’s new chief development officer. Kennedy will manage a consolidated Community Development Department created in 2008 under Springfield’s Finance Control Board. He also will oversee the city’s Housing, Neighborhood, Economic Development, Code Enforcement, and Planning departments, as well as staffing of the redevelopment and industrial-development financing authorities. Sarno described Kennedy in a statement as “exceptionally well-suited for the job of chief development officer.” Sarno added that Kennedy is a “seasoned professional who possesses the knowledge and experience to navigate the economic-development waters on the federal, state, and local levels as well as with the private sector.” Kennedy has served as the chief economic-development assistant to U.S. Rep. Richard E. Neal since 1989. “Kevin Kennedy’s departure is a bittersweet occasion for me,” said Neal in a statement. “While I am sad he is leaving my congressional office, the city of Springfield will once again be the beneficiary of his considerable talents.” Neal cited Kennedy’s work on the State Street Corridor Initiative, the construction of the U.S. Courthouse, the new state data center, and the creation of the Neal Municipal Operations Center as areas where he has demonstrated effective leadership. In related news, Sarno announced that Christopher Moskal of Springfield, who has served as interim chief development officer, now will serve as director of the Springfield Redevelopment Authority. Moskal previously served as executive director of the Springfield Parking Authority. Sarno noted that the two appointments underscore his commitment to supporting the city’s planning and development functions to ensure they are optimally configured for maximum effectiveness. “The city’s ongoing investment in economic development will pay substantial dividends in terms of increasing development activity, stimulating job creation, and expanding our municipal tax base,” said Sarno. Both appointments are effective immediately. Kennedy will earn an annual salary of $125,000, and Moskal will receive an annual salary of $97,950.

Common Capital
Unveils New Focus
HOLYOKE — The Western Mass. Enterprise Fund has expanded its mission, changed its name, and put more capital on the table for local community-development projects, according to executive director Chris Sikes. In a recent announcement at Open Square, Sikes presented the company’s new name, Common Capital, and revealed a new logo, along with the company’s newly expanded role in the region. “It is clear to us that there is ample capital available to fund major change in Western Mass.,” said Sikes. “The challenge is not to access the money, but to help the region absorb that capital and leverage it for the common good.” Common Capital’s new focus, according to Sikes, includes extending lending well beyond small-business microloans, significantly increasing the company’s capital base, and enlarging business-advisory services. To help guide investments, Common Capital has initiated a discovery process to document specific needs within local business and community-development networks. Sikes noted that the process will include a “listening tour” with potential collaborative partners throughout the region to reconfirm community needs and resources. “We have capital and are well-positioned to attract much more,” he said, adding, “our goal is to find new and better ways to put it to use creating jobs, stimulating community development, and improving the quality of life in Western Mass.”

Women’s Fund to Award $150,000 in Grants
EASTHAMPTON — Applications are now available from the Women’s Fund of Western Mass., which will award $150,000 in grants in 2012 to organizations or programs serving women and girls in the four counties of Western Mass. Grants will range up to $15,000. “We look for projects that truly address the root causes, that influence long-term social change for women and girls, particularly around education, economic development, and safety,” said Julie Kumble, director of grants and programs. “Our three grant categories make it easier for organizations to decide where they might best fit in — operating support, project support, and capacity-building grants.” Before applying for a grant, Kumble recommends that applicants listen to a webinar that describes the application process. For more information on the webinar or for an application, visit www.womensfund.net. Since 1998, the Women’s Fund has awarded $1.7 million in grants.

Company Notebook Departments

Hampden Bank Donates $150,000 to Develop Springfield
SPRINGFIELD — The Hampden Bank Charitable Foundation recently granted $150,000 to support the plans and objectives of DevelopSpringfield. “We not only see this as an opportunity to help build a better, more vibrant community, but, as a corporate citizen and a purpose-driven organization headquartered in Springfield since 1852, we also consider this is a major responsibility,” said Thomas Burton, president and CEO of the bank. “We are proud to be part of this significant effort to move Springfield forward.” DevelopSpringfield is a private Massachusetts nonprofit 501(c)(3) formed in 2008 to advance development and redevelopment of commercial real-estate projects, stimulate and support economic growth, and expedite the revitalization process within the City of Springfield. In recent months, Mayor Domenic Sarno requested that DevelopSpringfield, in partnership with the Springfield Redevelopment Authority, expand its role to lead the city’s multi-year planning and redevelopment activities for areas impacted by the tornado of June 1. “Throughout the years, and regardless of the challenges facing our community, we have always been able to count on Hampden Bank to support important community needs in Springfield,” said Nicholas Fyntrilakis of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., and chair of DevelopSpringfield’s 14-member board. “Supporting DevelopSpringfield is the latest example of their commitment to our community.”

United Bank Named Top SBA Lender to Women
WEST SPRINGFIELD — United Bank was recently named the state’s #1 Lender to Women in fiscal 2011 by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). United Bank approved the highest percentage of total loans to women of all participating SBA lenders. Joanne Sheedy, RCA portfolio manager, accepted the award on behalf of United Bank at a recent meeting of SBA participating lenders in Boston. Robert Nelson, Massachusetts district director, applauded lenders for supporting SBA loan programs, which he called a “tremendous benefit to our businesses and economic recovery in Massachusetts.”

WMECo Completes Largest Solar Facility in Region
SPRINGFIELD — Western Massachusetts Electric Co. (WMECo) celebrated the completion of its second large-scale solar-energy facility on Dec. 21 in the Indian Orchard section of the city. The facility features 8,200 solar panels and produces 2.3 megawatts (MW) of electricity. WMECo representatives joined local and state officials in celebrating the transformation of the former foundry site into a clean, renewable energy facility. The Indian Orchard facility joins WMECo’s Silver Lake Solar facility in Pittsfield as one of the largest in the Northeast region, and is the largest in New England. The project brought nearly $12 million of new construction to the region and will contribute $400,000 of annual property tax revenue to the City of Homes. Springfield is one of the two Gateway Communities in WMECo’s service territory, and is home to approximately 65,000 WMECo customers. The Commonwealth has a goal to install 250 MW of solar generation by 2017. Under the landmark Green Communities Act, each Massachusetts electric utility may own up to 50 MW of solar, subject to approval by the Department of Public Utilities.

Bay Path Receives
$25,000 Award
LONGMEADOW — Bay Path College recently received a $25,000 scholarship award from the Petit Family Foundation during its first Evening Honoring Women in Science event at the Connecticut Science Center. The award will be used to provide financial support for students who are pursuing careers in the sciences. Bay Path currently offers undergraduate majors in biology, biotechnology, and forensic science, and will be introducing programs in biochemistry and neuroscience in the fall of 2012. The Petit Family Foundation honors the memories of Jennifer Hawke-Petit, Hayley Elizabeth Petit, and Michaela Rose Petit by continuing the kindness, idealism, and activism that defined their lives. The foundation’s funds are given to foster the education of young people, especially women in the sciences, to improve the lives of those affected by chronic illnesses, and to support efforts to protect and help those affected by violence. “On behalf of the college, I wish to express my profound gratitude to the Petit Family Foundation,” said Bay Path President Carol Leary. “With this scholarship award, our students will have the opportunity to study and excel in the sciences, pursuing meaningful and rewarding careers.”

CHD Elder Care Program Receives $10,000
SPRINGFIELD — The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) recently awarded the Center for Human Development’s Hawthorn Elder Care program a $10,000 grant to fund performances of Talking with Dolores, a one-act play that takes a serious look at depression and suicide among the elderly. The award is part of NEA’s Challenge America Fast Track program, which supports extending the arts to underserved audiences. The funding targets elder Latino audiences in Massachusetts and Connecticut. CHD is one of 162 organizations nationwide to receive this award. “We’re thrilled about the grant award because we will be able to reach more people with an important message,” said Jim Callahan, vice president of CHD Hawthorn Elder Care, in a statement. “The play tackles serious issues, but it does so in a very creative way. More than anything, it’s an effective way to get the community at large to talk about issues that are often times uncomfortable to discuss.” The NEA grant also enables Hawthorn to fund Hablando con Dolores, a Spanish-language production of the play.

Big Y Adds 38th Pharmacy
GUILFORD, CT — Big Y Foods Inc. recently opened its 38th pharmacy in a World Class Market in Guilford. Paul Dimmock, R.Ph., is the pharmacy manager, assisted by Robert Frye, R.Ph., and Jane Gray, R.Ph. Big Y pharmacies also conduct special wellness events throughout the year, including flu shots and cholesterol, osteoporosis, and blood-pressure screenings.

Departments People on the Move

Florence Savings Bank announced the following:

Erin L. Couture

Erin L. Couture

• Erin L. Couture has been elected Vice President, Commercial Lending Officer of the Commercial Lending Department; and
Nancy D. Mirkin

Nancy D. Mirkin

• Nancy D. Mirkin has been elected Vice President, Commercial Lending Officer of the Commercial Lending Department.
•••••
Attorney John G. Bagley, Partner at Morrison Mahoney in Springfield, has been admitted to the American College of Trial Lawyers. He is the first person in the 63-year history of the firm to be inducted into the American College of Trial Lawyers. Bagley’s practice focuses on medical, dental, and legal malpractice; professional liability; product liability; commercial litigation; construction liability; employment litigation; and general negligence.
•••••
Karina L. Schrengohst, Esq. has been elected to serve as a member of the Board of Directors of Community Enterprises Inc. She is an Associate at Royal LLP, a management-side labor- and employment-law firm.
•••••
TD Bank announced the following:
• Gregg P. Desmarais has been appointed Store Manager at the TD Bank branch at 60 Main St., Westfield. He is responsible for new-business development, consumer and business lending, managing personnel, and overseeing the day-to-day operations; and
Derrick P. Feuerstein

Derrick P. Feuerstein

• Derrick P. Feuerstein has been named Store Manager of the TD Bank Hadley store, 140 Russell St. An Assistant Vice President, he is responsible for new-business development, managing personnel, consumer and business lending, and overseeing daily operations.
•••••
Six-Point Creative Works in Springfield announced the following:
• Meghan Lynch has been appointed President and Chief Executive Officer. In her new role, she is responsible for business and client development, and continues to manage day-to-day agency operations; and
• Marsha Montori will serve as Chief Strategist for client accounts.
•••••
Bacon Wilson, P.C. of Springfield announced that eight attorneys have been distinguished as New England “SuperLawyers,” and six of its attorneys have been distinguished as “Rising Stars” in the November issue of Boston magazine:
Paul R. Salvage

Paul R. Salvage

• Attorney Paul R. Salvage is the Co-chairman of the Insolvency Department. His practice deals with creditors, individuals, and companies facing financial difficulties. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Gary L. Fialky

Gary L. Fialky

• Attorney Gary L. Fialky is Chairman of the Corporate Department. His practice is concentrated in business and banking law, with an emphasis on business formations, mergers, and acquisitions. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Michael B. Katz

Michael B. Katz

• Attorney Michael B. Katz is Co-chairman of the Bankruptcy Department. His practice is concentrated in business and insolvency law. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Paul H. Rothschild

Paul H. Rothschild

• Attorney Paul H. Rothschild is Chairman of the Litigation Department. His practice is concentrated in general litigation, as well as personal injury, product liability, medical malpractice, and employer/employee disputes. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Hyman G. Darling

Hyman G. Darling

• Attorney Hyman G. Darling is Chairman of the Estate Planning and Elder Law departments. His areas of expertise include all areas of estate planning, probate, and elder law. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Michael J. Coyne

Michael J. Coyne

• Attorney Michael J. Coyne is a member of the Litigation Department with experience in commercial litigation, motor-vehicle franchising, banking litigation, lender-liability defense, franchise-litigation defense, municipal-law litigation, and government-contracts litigation. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Francis R. Mirkin

Francis R. Mirkin

• Attorney Francis R. Mirkin specializes in commercial and residential real estate and general business matters, as well as commercial-loan documentation. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Stephen B. Monsein

Stephen B. Monsein

• Attorney Stephen B. Monsein is a member of the Domestic Relations and Litigation departments. His work is concentrated on divorce cases, but he also handles personal-injury cases and does OUI defense work. He was named a SuperLawyer;
Gina M. Barry

Gina M. Barry

• Attorney Gina M. Barry is a member of the Estate Planning/Elder Law Department whose practice includes estate-planning issues as well as pet estate planning. Additional areas of focus include guardianship, conservatorship, planning for long-term care, and residential real estate. She was named a Rising Star;
Justin H. Dion

Justin H. Dion

• Attorney Justin H. Dion focuses on insolvency, business, and financial matters. In addition to handling Chapter 7, 11, and 13 bankruptcies, he also does financial planning, conducts foreclosures, and handles collection matters for lenders, as well as practicing nonprofit and real estate law. He was named a Rising Star;
Adam J. Basch

Adam J. Basch

• Attorney Adam J. Basch is a member of the Litigation Department whose areas of practice include construction litigation, personal injury, general litigation, and commercial litigation. He was named a Rising Star;
Todd C. Ratner

Todd C. Ratner

• Attorney Todd C. Ratner is a member of the Estate Planning/Elder Law Department whose practice includes estate-planning issues. Additional areas of practice include commercial and residential real estate together with general business and corporate law. He was named a Rising Star;
Benjamin M. Coyle

Benjamin M. Coyle

• Attorney Benjamin M. Coyle is a member of the Business and Corporate, Estate Planning and Elder, Litigation, and Municipal departments. He was named a Rising Star; and
Kevin V. Maltby

Kevin V. Maltby

• Attorney Kevin V. Maltby concentrates his practice on litigation and employment law. He was named a Rising Star.
•••••
The YMCA of Greater Springfield announced five new board members. They are:
• Ray Berry;
• Jules Gaudreau;
• Brendon Hutchins;
• John Koomson; and
• Sarah A. Williams.
The addition of these new members brings the total number of board members to 26.
•••••
Freedom Credit Union announced the following:
• Amy E. Fyden has been appointed Branch Officer of the Easthampton branch; and
• Beverly Walz has been appointed Branch Officer of the Sixteen Acres branch in Springfield.
As branch officers, both women oversee the financial and lending operations of their branch, develop new business opportunities with individuals and businesses, and promote financial literacy at area schools.
•••••
SABIC in the Americas, based in Pittsfield, announced the following:
• Innovative Plastics Executive Vice Presi-dent Charlie Crew will retire on Jan. 1; and
• Keith J. Smith, formerly of DuPont, will succeed Crew. Smith joined the company in December to plan for the transition.
SABIC acquired GE Plastics in 2007 and integrated it into its diverse portfolio as the Innovative Plastics strategic business unit.

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