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Building Permits

The following building permits were issued during the months of August and September 2018.

AGAWAM

James Acerra, Clark Dore
707-709 Main St.
$1,600 — Wall sign for Voltage Vape Shop

Vista Holdings, LLC
281-301 Shoemaker Lane
$42,575 — Remove membrane to insulation, install insulation and new membrane, install new collar drain

Walnut Plaza, LLC
365-385 Walnut St. Ext.
$24,000 — Demolish wall, enclose two doorways, and open one doorway

AMHERST

Gillen Development Corp.
409 Main St.
$1,000 — Create a hair salon in former Chamber of Commerce space

Kellogg Ave., LLC
17 Kellogg Ave., Unit A
$84,000 — Fit-out of tenant space

Pauline Lannon, et al
1151 West St.
Renovate four offices

Paul Properties Amshrew
50 Meadow St.
$71,250 — Roofing

Survival Center Inc.
138 Sunderland Road
$12,500 — Install walk-in freezer with outdoor remote refrigeration system on concrete pad

CHICOPEE

Berkshire Retail-C, LLC
205 Exchange St.
$32,000 — Tenant fit-out of two adjoining spaces to make one unit

Yi Chen
450 Grattan St.
$2,000 — Remove section of wall and frame and sheetrock part of wall

Jeffrey Neece, Theresa Neece
70 Maple St.
$22,000 — Roofing

Mitchell Nowak, Helena Nowak
21 Old Chicopee St.
$7,350 — Install shingles over existing layer and new ridge vent

EASTHAMPTON

Calvary Baptist Church
411 Main St.
$9,500 — Remove and replace roof, siding, windows, and doors

Keystone Enterprises
122 Pleasant St.
$7,000 — Interior buildout of Suite 109

EAST LONGMEADOW

American Tower Corp.
30 Benton Dr.
$25,000 — Antennas

East Longmeadow Wellness Center
250 North Main St.
$28,500 — Commercial alterations

Springfield Spring Corp.
311 Shaker Road
$132,095 — Roofing

Tom Roc, LLC
191 Chestnut St.
$7,250 — Roofing

GREENFIELD

142 Mohawk Trail Greenfield, LLC
142 Mohawk Trail
Erect two signs above fuel pumps attached to canopy column

142 Mohawk Trail Greenfield, LLC
142 Mohawk Trail
Erect two wave signs

142 Mohawk Trail Greenfield, LLC
142 Mohawk Trail
Replace two faces on existing free-standing post

278-302 Main St., LLC
282 Main St.
$84,761 — Fit-out existing space for a bakery

American Tower Corp.
180 Country Club Road
$12,500 — Remove telecommunications equipment that is no longer in use

Franklin County Agricultural Society
85 Wisdom Way
$2,500 — Install vent hood over cooking area

Greenfield Co-operative Bank
277 Federal St.
Change out two signs attached to building and faces of two free-standing signs

Greenfield Co-operative Bank
62 Federal St.
Replace two illuminated signs attached to building

K & C Real, LLC
201 Main St.
$51,800 — Install 38-panel solar array on roof

Rosenberg Property, LLC
311 Wells St.
$183,756 — Subdivide existing interior spaces to create new offices and conference room

Town of Greenfield
31 Nash’s Mill Road
Replace sign at Green River Swimming and Recreation Area

Town of Greenfield
50 Miles St.
Erect two free-standing signs for the Energy Park

Town of Greenfield
Sanderson Street
Erect two free-standing signs for Beacon Field

HADLEY

Pioneer Valley Waldorf School
193 Bay Road
$52,600 — Build science lab stations

Joseph Sykier
110 East St.
$1,927.30 — Weatherization

Target Corp.
369 Russell St.
$2,500 — Change face on sign

W/S Hadley Properties, LLC
337 Russell St.
$1,150 — Set up for seasonal Spirit Halloween store

LONGMEADOW

Longmeadow Mall, LP
827 Williams St.
$2,000 — New sign for the Meeting House

Willie Ross School
32 Norway St.
$34,000 — Replace decking and add rails on two existing ramps and replace rear door

NORTHAMPTON

39 Main Street, LLC
33 Main St.
$2,500 — Illuminated wall sign for Lucky’s

City of Northampton
69 Maple St.
$1,250 — Build gear-storage room at Florence Fire Station

City of Northampton
80 Locust St.
$149,950 — Replace two gas-fired boilers with two new gas-fired boilers in Building A

Northampton Country Club
135 Main St.
$5,000 — Cleanup of burnt maintenance building

Trak Petroleum, LLC
54 Easthampton Road
Canopy sign

Wami, LLC
140 Main St.
$1,200 — Illuminated sign for AT&T, reface wall

Yokohama Ramen
88 Main St.
Illuminated sign

SPRINGFIELD

ADT, LLC
1964 Wilbraham Road
$17,600 — Install fire-monitoring alarm at Save-a-Lot

AJN Rentals, LLC
1464 State St.
$48,000 — Alter interior office space

Lazy Valley Winery Inc.
69 Parker St.
$13,500 — Change use from furniture store to microdistillery production sales

Bassam Yacteen, Hanan Yacteen
73 Liberty St.
$4,700 — Alter space for snack room and install exterior door at Omar Furniture

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Susan Belosic
101 Clayton Dr.
$11,567.44 — Aluminum modular ramp system

Mike Bertara
100 Westfield St.
$35,500 — Roofing

Yousef Chehade
21 Highland Ave.
$21,000 — Strip and replace shingles

Abdul Khider
14 Burke Ave.
$12,250 — Install sliders in existing framework

Union Street Corp.
1150 Union St.
$247,000 — Roofing

WILBRAHAM

Soccer City
2041 Boston Road
$1,000 — Add sprinkler head to hallway between Interskate 91 and the Print Shop

Court Dockets

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
Ailan Garcia, a minor, through his mother and next friend Idaileen Oyola v. Children’s House Learning Inc.
Allegation: Negligence; fall causing personal injury: $2,101.87
Filed: 6/13/18

HAMPDEN DISTRICT COURT
Perkins Paper, LLC v. Sweet Cupcakes Inc. and Yekaterina Pekar
Allegation: Money owed for goods sold and delivered: $6,422.47
Filed: 6/13/18

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
David Shartrand and Melissa Shartrand v. Pearson Systems Inc. and Universal Electric Co. Inc.
Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury on construction site: $817,393.49
Filed: 6/5/18

Kelly Fradet Lumber Inc. v. LM Heavy Civil Construction, LLC
Allegation: Breach of contract: $53,154.84
Filed: 6/12/18

Joseph T. Huckle v. Tree413 Inc.
Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury: $250,000
Filed: 6/19/18

Leanna Lewis, personal representative of the estate of Serena Lewis v. Eilean Attwood, M.D.; Danielle Granieri, D.O.; Asra Jawed, M.D.; and Heather Sankey, M.D.
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $25,000+
Filed: 6/20/18

Christine Antonuzzo, personal representative of the estate of John Antonuzzo v. John Romanelli, M.D. and Mouhanad Ayach, M.D.
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $1,015,000
Filed: 6/20/18

Marie Martin, personal representative of the estate of Celeste Lucille Davignon v. Sunshine Village Inc.
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $25,000+
Filed: 6/21/18

Khayyam Cruz and Juan Pizarro v. Smith & Wesson Corp. and Carrie Boyd
Allegation: Employment discrimination: $100,000+
Filed: 6/22/18

Humphrey Co. Inc. f/k/a Holden Humphrey v. Turn Key Lumber Inc.
Allegation: Money owed for goods sold and delivered: $83,358.90
Filed: 6/26/18

Patrick Smith v. Triple G Scaffold Services Corp. and NEI General Contracting Inc.
Allegation: Negligence; on-the-job fall causing personal injury: $287,449.18
Filed: 6/27/18

HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COURT
Thomas Suchodolski v. Randy Letourneau individually and d/b/a RKL Welding
Allegation: Negligence; dog bite causing personal injury: $4,580.20
Filed: 6/22/18

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Robin Bassell and Aaron Bassell v. Peter Pan Bus Lines Inc. and Joseph Anderson Jr.
Allegation: Negligence; bus drove into plaintiff’s home, causing personal injury and property damage: $184,000
Filed: 6/19/18

Chamber Corners

1BERKSHIRE

www.1berkshire.com
(413) 499-1600

• July 31: Entrepreneurial Meet-up, hosted by Shire Breu Hous, Dalton.

AMHERST AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700

• July 30: 15th Annual Golf Tournament, hosted by Orchards Golf Club, South Hadley. Schedule: 10:30 a.m.: registration, putting contest, and light lunch; noon: shotgun start, scramble format; 5 p.m.: social hour and cash bar; 6 p.m.: dinner and awards ceremony. Hole-in-one, longest-drive, and closest-to-pin contests. Cost: $150 per player, $600 for a foursome. To register, visit www.amherstarea.com/events/details/2018-golf-tournament-19060.

• Aug. 30: Candidate Debate, 7 p.m., hosted by Amherst Regional Middle School auditorium. A pre-primary debate for candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for state representative (Third Hampshire) and state senator (Hampshire, Franklin, Worcester).

GREATER CHICOPEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

• Aug. 16: European Café & Open House, 4:30-7 p.m., hosted by Chicopee Chamber of Commerce & Courtyard, 264 Exchange St., Chicopee. Come enjoy a taste of the European flavors of the local restaurants, all in a relaxed setting with the musical stylings of Sergio D’Orsini. Meet and greet the local artists and tour the Chamber of Commerce and engage with many small business owners, including MaryKay, Herbarium, Lemon Grass Fitness, and TrueHeart Wellness, to name a few. Presented in partnership with Westfield Bank. Cost: $25 for one attendee, $40 for two attendees (must be purchased at the same time). Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org/events or call (413) 594-2101.

WEST OF THE RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.ourwrc.com
(413) 426-3880

• July 25: West Meets West at the Ranch Networking Event, 5-7 p.m., hosted by the Ranch Golf Club in Southwick. Join us as we pair up with the Greater Westfield Chamber for an evening of games, fun, networking, and food. These events bring members and non-members together to network in a laid-back atmosphere. Cost: free for members, $10 for non-members. For more information about this event, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880, or register online at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

• Aug. 6: 15th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament, hosted by the Ranch Golf Club in Southwick. Schedule: 11:30 a.m.: registration; noon: lunch; 1 p.m.: shotgun start, scramble format. Putting contest, 15th hole air cannon, Carrabba’s Cuisine Hole, and more. Cost: $125 for golf and dinner. For more information and tickets to this event, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880 or [email protected], or register online at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

• Aug. 16: Free Membership Appreciation Luncheon, noon to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Carrabba’s Italian Grill, Riverdale Street, West Springfield. Lunch is on us! Members can register for this networking event and bring a non-member guest, and you both enjoy a free lunch. Seating is limited, so register at www.westoftheriverchamber.com before it’s too late. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880.

People on the Move

Local news hires, promotions, awards, and appointments

Daniel Bonelli

Daniel Bonelli

Comcast announced the appointment of Daniel Bonelli as vice president of Finance for the company’s Western New England Region, which includes more than 300 communities in Connecticut, Western Mass., New York, Vermont, and Western New Hampshire. In this role, Bonelli will oversee all financial operations, including finance and accounting, warehouse and materials, information technology, facilities, security, fleet management, and environmental health and safety. Bonelli began his career with Comcast in the Western New England Region in 2007 as a financial analyst. He quickly progressed to manager and then director before being promoted to senior director of Finance in 2014. In 2016, he relocated to the Philadelphia area, where he served as senior director of Finance for one of Comcast’s largest regions, overseeing a team of 60. Bonelli graduated with a bachelor’s degree in finance from Central Connecticut State University.

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Rania Kfuri

MaryLynn Murray

The Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts (WFWM) announced that Rania Kfuri and MaryLynn Murray have joined its Board of Directors. They will each serve a three-year term. Kfuri currently works as the Communications and Partnerships officer for the Solidago Foundation. Throughout her life experiences, she has worked to support educational opportunities and access to resources that improve the lives of women and girls. She has a professional background in international development, with a master’s degree in ethics, peace, and global affairs from American University in Washington D.C. Murray is vice president for Commercial Lines and Sales at the Insurance Center of New England. She holds an MBA with a concentration in human resources and has been employed in the insurance industry since 2002. She previously served on the board of the Agawam Small Business Assoc. and on the Women’s Fund marketing committee. In addition, new officers elected include Haydee Lamberty-Rodriguez as board president (formerly vice president), Leigh Rae as vice president (formerly board clerk), and Pia Kumar as clerk. Layla Taylor, immediate past board president, will remain on the board through June 2019.

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Valley Venture Mentors CEO Liz Roberts announced that she will be leaving her position as of July 13, at which time current chief operating officer Kristin Leutz will take the helm of the organization that has been dedicated to nurturing entrepreneurship in Western Mass. Roberts plans to depart after a period of growth for Valley Venture Mentors (VVM). During her tenure, she launched the Startup Accelerator program, in which entrepreneurs receive five months of training, mentoring, office space, and access to equity-free funding. Entrepreneurs who graduated from all VVM programs generated $51 million in revenue and fundraising during the past three years, and created 500 full-time and part-time jobs over the course of 2017. The Startup Accelerator program earned recognition as a model rural accelerator by the Obama administration. Prior to joining Valley Venture Mentors as COO in 2017, Leutz served as vice president for Philanthropic Services at the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, where she helped create programs such as Valley Gives. Leutz also aided entrepreneurs at VVM as a volunteer mentor for many years before joining the team. She has had a career in global philanthropy and business leadership spanning organizations like MassMutual and RefugePoint, a Cambridge- and Nairobi-based, globally recognized social-impact startup. She has led operations, fundraising, and marketing, and brings decades of experience to her role at VVM.

•••••

Patrick Love

Springfield College announced that Patrick Love will serve a two-year interim appointment as vice president for Student Affairs and program director of the Student Personnel Administration (SPA) program, effective Aug. 6.  The college will resume a national search for both positions in 2020. Love will serve as a member of the president’s leadership team in his role as VP for Student Affairs and will work closely with the leadership of the Division of Academic Affairs in his role as SPA program director. He brings to Springfield College a career in higher-education leadership and teaching, spanning managerial work in student affairs and academic affairs, and as a professor in Student Affairs. He is a lifelong educator who focuses on growth, development, and transformation.  He is also an experienced writer, author, speaker, coach, and trainer on leadership and management development.  He has consulted with or spoken at more than 40 colleges and universities, was a tenured professor at two research universities, and is nationally known for his innovative approaches to management as well as a commitment to student education and development.  He is active in both the American College Personnel Assoc. and the National Assoc. of Student Personnel Administrators. Most recently, Love was executive in residence at Bowling Green State University, serving as senior lecturer. Previously, he was vice president for Student Affairs at New York Institute of Technology, associate vice president for Student Affairs at Rutgers University, associate provost for Student Success at Pace University, co-director of the Higher Education Program at New York University, and director of the Master’s Higher Education Program at Kent State University.

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Hector Toledo

Jocelyn Walsh

Jacqueline O’Connell

Joseph Dallair

Greenfield Savings Bank (GSB) announced four team members for its new Hadley office: Hector Toledo, Jocelyn Walsh, Jacqueline O’Connell, and Joseph Dallair. Toledo has been named office manager of the new Hadley office. He joins Greenfield Savings Bank with 28 years of experience in banking. In his role as manager, he will concentrate on business development, in addition to managing the operations of the Hadley Office. Among his volunteer roles for numerous local nonprofit organizations, Toledo is a board member and chair of the finance committee of Baystate Health and a member of the board of the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts. He has previously chaired the board of Springfield Technical Community College and served as a board member of both the YMCA of Greater Springfield and the United Way of Pioneer Valley. Walsh has been promoted to the Hadley office as a super banker. GSB super bankers are customer-service professionals who can assist customers with a wide range of banking services, including account openings, online and mobile banking, as well as account transactions. Before joining the staff in Hadley, she worked for GSB at the Shelburne Falls office for more than two years. O’Connell has joined the staff of the Hadley office as a super banker. She has worked for GSB for more than three years at the Amherst office on University Drive. Dallair has joined the staff of the Hadley office as a teller. Prior to joining the team at Greenfield Savings Bank, he worked for three years in customer-service positions in other industries. He began working at GSB in 2017 as a teller in the Greenfield office.

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Kimberley Lee, a recognized leader in the nonprofit sector of the Western Mass. region, has joined the staff of MHA, a nonprofit provider of residential and support services to people impacted by mental illness, developmental disabilities, substance abuse, and homelessness. Lee is taking on the newly created role of vice president of Resource Development and Branding for MHA. Lee previously served in communications and development roles in several local nonprofit organizations, including CHD, Square One, the Basketball Hall of Fame, and the Community United Way. She has advanced these organizations and the people they serve with an active voice in the community and through vigorous advocacy achieved by constant policy influence at the local, community, and state level. A lifelong resident of Western Mass., Lee earned her bachelor’s degree in mass communication from Westfield State College.

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River Valley Counseling Center (RVCC) named Anna Dyrkacz to be its director of Finance. She was appointed to the position last month by Rosemarie Ansel, RVCC’s executive director. Dyrkacz has more than 17 years experience in the healthcare and human-services industry and came to River Valley Counseling Center from a leadership position at Pathlight. She has also held leadership positions at Southgate Retirement Community, Cooley Dickinson Hospital, and Kindred Healthcare of Springfield. She has a bachelor’s degree and MBA from Western New England University, majoring in finance.

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Jeremy Melton

Florence Bank promoted Jeremy Melton to the position of first vice president/Risk Management, Compliance and Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) officer. Melton joined Florence Bank in 2012. Prior to his recent promotion, he served as vice president/Risk Management, Compliance and CRA officer. Melton supports his community as the board chair and finance/audit committee member at Tapestry. He also serves as a board member for the Western Massachusetts Compliance Assoc.

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Mary Ann Coughlin, associate vice president for Academic Affairs at Springfield College, was recently awarded the John E. Stecklein Distinguished Member Award from the Assoc. for Institutional Research (AIR). The award recognizes an individual whose professional career has significantly advanced the field of institutional research through extraordinary scholarship, leadership, and service. Coughlin has a long-standing relationship with the AIR, including serving as a past president and as a trainer for national workshops sponsored by the association. In 2012, she was the recipient of the Assoc. for Institutional Research Outstanding Service Award, recognizing her professional leadership and exemplary service to AIR and for actively supporting and facilitating the goals and mission of the association. During her tenure at Springfield College, Coughlin has served in a variety of positions, including faculty member, president of the faculty senate, and her current administrative position in Academic Affairs. Coughlin worked as a professor of Research and Statistics at the college prior to moving into administration. In her current role, she supervises academic support services and provides leadership for program review, outcomes assessment, faculty development, student success initiatives, and institutional research.

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The Rotary Club of Springfield elected its new President, Susan Mastroianni, and board of directors at its recent meeting.Originally from the Bronx, N.Y., Mastroianni worked in Springfield for more than 26 years, first as media director for FitzGerald & Robbins Advertising and then as a partner and director of Media Services at FitzGerald & Mastroianni Advertising in Springfield, which closed in 2016. She has been a member of the Rotary Club of Springfield since May 2006. In addition to being president, she chairs the club’s publicity committee also serves as vice president of the board of directors for the Gray House in Springfield. She is a graduate of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., with a bachelor’s degree in communication arts.

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Every year, the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women asks every state legislator to nominate someone from their district as an “Unsung Heroine.” For state Rep. Aaron Vega, this year’s pick was Debbie Flynn-Gonzalez, program director at the Gándara Center’s Hope for Holyoke peer-recovery support center. Flynn-Gonzalez began her career in social work as a mental-health clinician performing outreach work in Holyoke 24 years ago before her personal background in recovery led her to work with the recovery community. She launched the first peer-recovery program for pregnant and parenting women in Holyoke and led that program for eight years. She has been program director for three years at Hope for Holyoke, which has 300 active members, with an average of 50 people accessing the center daily. Flynn-Gonzalez earned her bachelor’s degree in social work at UMass Amherst and her master’s degree in counseling and psychology from Cambridge College.

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The United Way of Pioneer Valley announced that Kathryn Dube is serving as interim president and CEO as the board of directors conducts a search for a new CEO. Dube is a former chairman and vice chairman of the board at United Way of Pioneer Valley and has served as chairman to a number of United Way of Pioneer Valley committees. Most recently she was employed as senior advisor for the United Way of Pioneer Valley since her retirement in December 2017 and was recognized as United Way Volunteer of the Year in 2014 and 2015. Prior to retirement, Dube was a senior vice president of Retail Banking and Wealth Management at TD Bank and Berkshire Bank.

•••••

KeyBank recently announced the addition of new retail leaders in markets across Connecticut and Massachusetts. Locally, Brandon Ojakian joined KeyBank with the title of vice president and area retail leader in the Northern Conn. and Western Mass. markets. Ojakian has 20 years of experience in the banking and finance industry. He joins KeyBank from Santander Bank, where he served as a district executive leading branch teams in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. Prior to Santander, he led several retail regions for Citizens Bank. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Albertus Magnus College.

Company Notebook

Bulkley Richardson Opens Office in Hadley

SPRINGFIELD — Due to expanding needs, Bulkley Richardson has moved from its Amherst location into a more spacious office at 380 Russell St. in Hadley. “This move supports the growing needs of our clients and offers a more centralized location in Hampshire County,” said Peter Barry, managing partner of the 35-attorney firm. Seunghee Cha, partner, will be located primarily in Hadley, where she has a comprehensive estate-planning and administration practice, including special-needs planning for individuals living with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Scott Foster, chair of the firm’s business and finance group, noted that “our client base continues to grow, especially as we expand our services to meet the evolving changes to legal needs. Among other areas, a Hampshire County office is relevant to the unique needs of startups, reality of cybersecurity threats, and emergence of cannabis facilities. Our clients range from large hospitals and medical practices to small brewery startups, and nationwide manufactures to local farmers and artists — and a whole lot in between. By having a local office, it just brings us closer to these clients.”

Thunderbirds Honored with Two Awards from AHL

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Thunderbirds were honored by the American Hockey League with four Team Business Service awards at a gala reception during the board of governors’ annual meeting at Hilton Head Island, S.C. As part of its Team Business Services program, the AHL honored one club from each conference for top revenue growth in four areas during this past season: overall ticket sales, season-ticket sales, group-ticket sales, and corporate sponsorship sales. For the 2017-18 season, the Thunderbirds took home two Awards of Excellence in the areas of season-ticket sales growth and corporate sponsorship sales growth. This marked the second consecutive season that Springfield captured these awards. These awards came just weeks after the Thunderbirds received numerous honors at the 2018 AHL Marketing Meeting presented by ExteNet Systems in Des Moines, Iowa. At that meeting,the Thunderbirds received the AHL award for Most Unique Community Relations Promotion. This past March, Thunderbirds player Eddie Wittchow approached team management with the idea of presenting loyal season ticket holder Katrina King with specialty glasses that would allow Katrina, a legally blind fan, to have the ability to see the action — through her own eyes — for the first time in her life. Springfield was also recognized for achieving a greater-than-15% increase in per-game full-season equivalents, a statistic that tracks the combined sales of all ticket packages. The Thunderbirds’ corporate sales team also was recognized for having a greater-than-15% growth in corporate cash sponsorships generated in the market. The organization also was honored for reaching the benchmark of a greater-than-15% growth in per-game group-ticket-sales revenue for a second straight season. On an individual level, Thunderbirds Senior Account Executive Matthew McRobbie beame the first Thunderbirds sales representative to be recognized as the Eastern Conference’s Top New Season Ticket Sales Executive.

PeoplesBank Announces Acquisition of First National Bank of Suffield

HOLYOKE — PeoplesBancorp, MHC, the parent company of PeoplesBank, both of Holyoke, and First Suffield Financial Inc., the parent company of the First National Bank of Suffield, both of Suffield, Conn., jointly announced that they have entered into a definitive merger agreement for PeoplesBancorp to acquire First Suffield Financial and PeoplesBank to acquire the First National Bank of Suffield. The parties anticipate the transaction will close in the fourth quarter of 2018 or the first quarter of 2019. Under the terms of the agreement, shareholders of First Suffield Financial Inc. will receive $12,001.85 in cash per share, representing a total transaction value of approximately $60 million. The merger consideration represents approximately 202% of the First National Bank of Suffield’s tangible book value at March 31, 2018. The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions, including the receipt of state and federal regulatory approvals and approval by the shareholders of First Suffield Financial Inc. In 2017, PeoplesBank donated almost $1 million to area nonprofits. Its employees devoted more than 15,000 hours to volunteer work over the past two years, and 48 of the bank’s officers serve on the boards of directors and committees of 115 nonprofit organizations in the area. Upon completion of the transaction, PeoplesBank will expand its community-development efforts in Suffield and the surrounding Connecticut communities. The combined organization will have approximately $2.8 billion in assets and $1.9 billion in deposits. Upon completion of the transaction, one current member of the board of directors of First Suffield Financial will be appointed to serve as a member of the board of trustees of PeoplesBancorp and the board of directors of PeoplesBank. Following completion of the merger, the current branches of the First National Bank of Suffield will remain open and will conduct business under the trade name First Suffield Bank, a Division of PeoplesBank.

Berkshire Community College to Receive $5.5M for Student Success Center

PITTSFIELD — Berkshire Community College (BCC) has been awarded $5.5 million for a major project that will transform the first floor of the Field Administration building into a One Stop Student Success Center, transforming the student experience by making the entire admissions and enrollment process easier. The project will renovate the first floor of the Field Administration building, which currently houses Enrollment Management, Advising, Career and Transfer services, Financial Aid and Student Accounts, and Admission and the college registrar. BCC is currently completing $34 million in campus projects for the renovation of Hawthorne and Melville halls, including a connector with upper and lower courtyards, paving of the parking lots and access roads, and installing a community turf field for football, soccer and lacrosse.

Valley Steel Stamp Expands with $1.9M MassDevelopment Bond

GREENFIELD — MassDevelopment has issued a $1.9 million bond for CJBW Stamp, LLC, the real-estate arm of Valley Steel Stamp, which will use bond proceeds to construct a 17,500-square-foot building in the Greenfield Industrial Park that the company will then lease. The new building will be next to an existing 27,500-square-foot building that Valley Steel Stamp also leases and has reached full capacity. When completed, the new building will accommodate additional equipment needed to fulfill customer orders. The project is expected to create nine jobs and support 13 construction jobs. GSB Securities Corp., an affiliate of Greenfield Savings Bank, purchased the bond. Valley Steel Stamp was founded in 1971 by William Capshaw as a two-man operation that produced custom-made steel-marking stamps. Over the years, William’s son, Steven, has expanded and diversified the company’s product line to now include general machining and tooling for customers in the aerospace, defense, and firearm industries. Valley Steel Stamp’s facility in Greenfield is a world headquarters for more than 50 highly skilled precision machinists serving over 300 companies in 10 countries. MassDevelopment previously issued bonds to support the purchase and expansion of this facility in 2008 and 2012.

Normandeau Technologies Attends NASRO Show

WEST SPRINGFIELD — Normandeau Technologies Inc. (NTI) attended the National Assoc. of School Resource Officers in Reno, Nevada in June. The annual, one-week NASRO conference brings together SROs from throughout the U.S. and international locations to meet, discuss the current state of school safety, and receive updates and training on the latest issues surrounding school-safety policy and procedures for school-based law-enforcement officers. NTI has undertaken a program to introduce the StaffAlerter Emergency Notification System (ENS) to school districts throughout the New England area. In association with this endeavor, Brett Normandeau, president and owner of NTI, is positioning the StaffAlerter with organizations associated with K-12 education, including NASRO. StaffAlerter is an ENS and cloud-based systems control. Any teacher or staff can press a button on a wi-fi personal access device and send a notification to thousands of people, lock doors, sound alarms, and page over loudspeakers. NASRO national leadership spent time with NTI to see and hear about StaffAlerter and were impressed and positive with their feedback, he added. NTI is looking to attend future SRO regional and national meetings as both exhibitor and presenter.

Bradley International Airport Receives A+ Revenue Bond Rating

WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. — The Connecticut Airport Authority (CAA) announced that the credit-rating agency S & P Global Ratings has raised Bradley International Airport’s rating on its general airport revenue refunding bonds from ‘A’ to ‘A+’ with a stable outlook. S & P Global Ratings assigns a credit rating for Bradley International Airport’s public debt obligations. Some of the factors taken into account during the rating process include the airport’s strong financial and risk-management practices, steadily improving liquidity, low and declining debt burden, strong origin and destination base, diverse service-area economy, airline diversity, and increasing number of enplanements and positive trends.

Briefcase

Advertising Club Selects 2018 Pynchon Medalists

SPRINGFIELD — The Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts’ trustees of the Order of William Pynchon announced their selection of four local residents as recipients of this year’s Pynchon medal. “Our choice of these four remarkable individuals represents a collective concern and dedication to the past, present, and future of our region,” said Mary Shea, chairman of the Pynchon trustees. Slated to receive the Advertising Club’s Pynchon Medal on Oct. 18 at the Log Cabin in Holyoke are: Craig Carr, one of the original incorporators of the Ronald McDonald House of Springfield; Sally Fuller, a tireless advocate for early childhood literacy; Robert McCarroll, a noted historic preservationist; and Ronald Weiss, who was instrumental in the creation of the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts. The Advertising Club confers the Order of William Pynchon and the Pynchon Medal upon citizens of Western Mass. who have rendered distinguished service to the community. Recipients are nominated each year by members of the community, and are chosen by unanimous decision of the Pynchon trustees, who are Ad Club’s current and five past presidents.

Employer Confidence Weakens During June

BOSTON — Confidence among Massachusetts employers weakened considerably during June as tariffs, rising raw-material costs, and approval of paid family and medical leave in the Bay State raised concerns about business growth. The Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) Business Confidence Index dropped 5.3 points to 61.3 last month, its lowest level since August 2017. Confidence remains well within the optimistic range, but the June decline left the BCI slightly below its level of a year ago. Though analysts say the volatility in business confidence during May and June may reflect some statistical anomalies, the comments provided by employers on the monthly AIM survey suggest that companies are becoming increasingly concerned about a perfect storm of issues on the federal and state levels. The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index all lost ground during June. The Massachusetts Index assessing business conditions within the Commonwealth fell 7.2 points to 62.8, leaving it 1.4 points lower than in June 2017. The U.S. Index ended the month at 60.0, down 9.3 points for the month but 2.6 points better than a year ago. The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, declined 2.6 points to 63.5. The Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, fell 7.5 points to 59.1. The Current Index gained 1.6 points during the year, while the Future Index lost 2.6 points. Employer views of their own companies also weakened. The Company Index declined 3.3 points to 61.2, down 1.2 points for 12 months. The Employment Index ended the month at 55.0, a 3.3-point decrease for the month and 3.1 points lower than a year ago. The Sales Index lost 2.9 points for the month and 0.2 points for the year. Manufacturing companies (62.5) were slightly more optimistic than non-manufacturers (60.2). Companies in the eastern part of Massachusetts (63.3) were more bullish than those in the west (58.7).

More Than $2 Million Announced for Collaborative Workspaces

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration and MassDevelopment announced $2,155,000 in funding for the third round of Collaborative Workspace Program grants, a MassDevelopment program that accelerates business formation, job creation, and entrepreneurial activity in communities by supporting infrastructure that fuels locally based innovation. Eligible organizations may apply for either seed grants to plan and study the feasibility of new collaborative workspaces, or fit-out grants to develop and expand existing workspaces. Through its first two rounds of grants, the Collaborative Workspace Program provided $3 million in funding to more than 50 organizations for the planning, development, and build-out of different types of collaborative workspaces. This new round includes $1.5 million from the Commonwealth’s capital budget and $655,000 from the Barr Foundation, the second installment of a three-year, $1,965,000 grant to the program to expand support for arts-related collaborative workspaces in the Commonwealth. Funding decisions are expected to be announced at the end of September.

MassDOT Announces $1.8M to Expand Industrial Rail and Freight

BOSTON — The state Department of Transportation recently awarded five grants totaling more than $1.8 million as part of the Industrial Rail Access Program (IRAP), which helps increase rail and freight access, economic opportunity, and job growth. IRAP is a competitive, state-funded, public/private partnership program that provides financial assistance to eligible applicants to invest in improvement projects in rail infrastructure access. State funding for these five projects will be matched by more than $2.4 million in private funds. Locally, $500,000 was awarded to the Western Recycling rail-spur project in Wilbraham. The project will allow an existing solid-waste-handling facility to load outbound waste into rail cars for shipment to out-of-state landfills. With the restoration of rail service to the site, the facility will start processing municipal waste, in addition to construction and demolition debris. The project includes the construction of one loading track and five storage tracks for a total of 6,000 feet of new track. With completion of the project, the facility will be served by more than 1,500 rail cars each year, eliminating 7,500 regional truck trips each year and supporting the creation of eight to 10 additional jobs at the facility. IRAP provides grants to railroads, rail shippers, and municipalities that identify a public benefit gained through improved rail transportation usage or economic growth that would be realized through improved access to rail assets. The other four grants went to projects in Littleton, Peabody, and Upton.

DPH Releases State Study Detailing Marijuana Use

BOSTON — A new, statewide study of marijuana use among Massachusetts residents found that about 21% of adults had used marijuana in the past 30 days, and the proportion of marijuana use was highest among 18- to 25-year-olds. The study, conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), was mandated by the Legislature as part of its revisions to the 2016 adult-use marijuana law. The purpose of the study was to investigate the patterns of use, methods of consumption, and general perceptions of marijuana; incidents of impaired driving and hospitalization related to marijuana use; and the economic and fiscal impacts for state and local governments. Among the study’s other highlights, smoking is the most common method of marijuana consumption, although more than 40% of marijuana users report using multiple methods of use. More than half of adults perceive marijuana to have slight or no risks and use marijuana for non-medical purposes. A survey of patients who use marijuana products for medical use suggests that the average person uses marijuana 24 days a month, with the majority using marijuana products for at least 21 out of the past 30 days. Among respondents that use marijuana, 34.3% reported driving under the influence. Overall, 7.2% of the adult population drove under the influence of marijuana in the past 30 days, and 11.3% of adults rode with a marijuana-using driver in the past 30 days. This is similar to estimates from a survey of medical marijuana patients that found approximately 10% of respondents drove under the influence in the past 30 days. The number of marijuana-related calls to the Regional Poison Control Center in Massachusetts has been increasing over time. The calls include incidents of unintentional exposures among children, with the majority of calls related to 10- to 19-year-old individuals, and/or exposure to dried marijuana flower. The proportion of calls increased after medical marijuana was available in the Commonwealth. Economic projections suggest that marijuana will increase Massachusetts state revenue by about $215.8 million in the first two years of retail sales. The increase will largely come from sales and excise taxes collected on retail purchases. Based on experiences from states with existing legalized adult use, sales-tax revenue is expected to be higher in the second year ($154.2 million), as compared to the first year ($61.6 million).

Google Announces $100,000 Sponsorship for FutureWorks

SPRINGFIELD — During its Grow with Google tour in Springfield, Google announced a sponsorship for FutureWorks Career Center totalling $100,000. The sponsorship will help FutureWorks deepen its available resources to prepare active job seekers with the digital skills necessary to obtain jobs and succeed in the workforce. FutureWorks will deploy Google’s Applied Digital Skills Curriculum its diverse group of youth and adult job seekers over the course of a year. Some of its staff will also be trained on Google for Jobs and teach active job seekers how to use the online platform to streamline their job search. Launched in October 2017, Grow with Google is the tech company’s new initiative to help create economic opportunities for Americans. The project is an extension of Google’s long-standing commitment to making information and technology accessible to everyone, and focuses on providing digital skills and learning opportunities to communities across the U.S.

Jugglers Convention Projects Economic Impact of More Than $1 Million

SPRINGFIELD — With 600 juggling enthusiasts from all over the world descending on Springfield last week for the 71st International Jugglers’ Assoc. (IJA) Annual Festival, the area’s hoteliers, restaurateurs, and retailers expected to see an impact in their cash registers. The six-day convention was projected to have an economic impact of $1,015,545, according to the Western Mass Sports Commission, a division of the Greater Springfield Convention & Visitors Bureau. “The organizers are expecting 600 attendees, and two of our largest downtown hotels have 1,100 room nights booked as a result,” said Mary Kay Wydra, president of the Greater Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau. “This represents a strong economic shot in the arm for these properties. And we anticipate upbeat business at area eateries and shops as well. It’s a fun, terrific event to have coming into Western Mass.”

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AGAWAM

Rayonia Inc., 132 Glendale Road, Agawam, MA 01001. Rajesh Rayonia, same. Restaurant.

DEERFIELD

RHI Enterprises Inc., 15 Jones Road, Deerfield, MA 01342. Thomas E. Sjodahl, same. Medical equipment sales and service.

GREAT BARRINgTON

Tall Tree Productions Inc., 11 Lake View Road, Great Barrington, MA 01230. Bruce Humes, same. Advertising, marketing and special event production

HADLEY

Spruce Hill Hospitality Inc., 239 Russell St., Hadley, MA 01035. Shardool S. Parmar, same. Operation of hotel.

HINSDALE

ST Inspired Inc., 124 Shore Drive, Hinsdale, MA 01235. Wayne Zaniboni, same. Online retail sales.

MONSON

Supporting Resilient Communities Inc., 29 Paradise Lake Road, Monson, MA 01057. Morgan E. O’Neill, same. Provides aid to the needy and stressed worldwide to relieve human suffering that maybe caused by natural or civil disasters and to relieve emergency hardships through the use of proven state-of-the-art technology.

NORTH ADAMS

The Center for Love and Hope, Sant Pou Lanmou Ak Lespwa Incorporated, 50 1/2 Williams St., North Adams, MA 01247. Caitlin Mcconnell, same. The purpose of this corporation is to inspire hope by meeting both tangible and spiritual needs of the communities we serve.

PITTSFIELD

Ridgeline Builders Inc., 243 Churchill St., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Aaron Rocha, same. General contracting and construction services.

SPRINGFIELD

Serres Inc., 1500 Main St., Suite 2700, Springfield, MA 01115. Mika Hagberg, same. Sales and marketing of medical devices.

STOCKBRIDGE

Sweet and Savoury On Main Inc., 31 Main St., Stockbridge, MA 01262. Livia M. Landry, 16720 Hollow Tree Lane, Wellington, FL 33470. Bake shop.

WESTFIELD

Sierra Bar and Grill Inc., 31 Hillcrest Circle., Westfield, MA 01085. Carmine Capua, same. Full service restaurant and bar.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of July 2018.

BELCHERTOWN

Karen’s Carpenter
441 State St.
Lee Lamoureux

Latour-Wilson Septic Service
9 Old Enfield Road
Brian Wilson

Liberty Blues Landscaping
75 South Liberty St.
Michael Ablicki, Cynthia Ablicki

Little Happy Pet
1042 Federal St.
Susan Wall

Norcom Mortgage
37 Main St.
Norwich Commercial Group

Poetry and Paint
40 South Main St.
Denise Fontaine-Pincince

Quabbin Valley Educational Consultants
6 Waterford Dr.
Frank Robbins, Marlene Morelli

Rannsaka
115 North Main St.
Ann Shelton

Westover Auto Salvage
147 Bay Road
Paul Bachand

CHICOPEE

Laplanet Arts
74 Ames Ave.
Micah Laplante

Maxx Vapors
1519 Memorial Dr.
James Scibelli

Plaza Liquors
591D Memorial Dr.
Yogesh Patel, Sonya Patel

Tipsy Paint Brush
110 Hampden St.
Wendy Stratton Markham

DEERFIELD

Free Ramblin’
123 North Hillside Road
Katherine Cavacco

Henry’s Professional Paving
9 Greenfield Road
Emmy Stanley

Wool-ology
242A Greenfield Road
Deborah Stratton

EASTHAMPTON

Hampton Inspections
9 Oakdale Place
Juan Suarez

HADLEY

Born Digital
84 Russell St.
Gabriel Smith

Crystal Gardens Umlimited
140 Mount Warner Road
Crystal Boucher

F45 Training Hampshire
207 Russell St.
Deane Enterprises, LLC

Home Depot
350 Russell St.
Home Depot USA

Maple Valley Creamery
102 Mill Valley Road
Bruce Jenks

Norm’s Auto Body
11 Railroad St.
Cody Belden

Soldega Carpentry
6 Phillips Place
James Soldega

Swan and Ember Arts
5A Cemetery Road
Julie Karlsson

Tutti Fruitti
367 Russell St.
Huot Ang

Wendy’s
376 Russell St.
Inspired by Opportunity, LLC

HOLYOKE

Air-Dell Inc.
209A South St.
George Airoldi

DMD Pizza, LLC
341 Appleton St.
Douglas Delisle

Masters Carpentry
28 O’Connor Ave.
Robert Masters

My Assistive Technology Resources & Services
214 Southampton Road
Michael Clark

Perfume World
50 Holyoke St.
Massab Hashmi

South Bridge Market
549 South Bridge St.
Angelo DeLeon

NORTHAMPTON

Chris Weaver Tile
5 Audubon Road
Christopher Weaver, Bryant Green

Creations by Candy, LLC
99B Market St.
Candy Lacey

Deb K Hypnosis
90 Conz St.
Debra Kizilcar

Dust Dancer
42 Fruit St.
Patricia Trant

Elm Tree Acupuncture
45 Main St.
Alexandra Andrew

Kaya Responsible Travel
17 New South St., #301
Global Educators Inc.

Lang-X
9½ Market St.
Melody Rivera

Matusko Fire Protection
972 Park Hill Road
David Matusko

MBS Solutions Inc.
901 King St., Unit 1
Matt Sternberger

Northampton Center for Health & Healing
241 King St., #228
Marcia Nickerson

VIP Nails Spa
104B Damon Road
Hoa Ly

SPRINGFIELD

Blink of an Eye
129 Ranney St.
Taneisha Gasque

Borinquen Bakery
464 Bridge St.
Dario Grullon

Bridget Street Mini Mart
468 Bridge St.
Davone Mullen

C1 Capital Inc.
6 Sparrow Dr.
Morgan Una

Crispy Wings-N-Fish
17A Rutland St.
Kim Domino

L S Towing
162 Gresham St.
Luis Santiago

Loja Construction
40 Parker St.
Leopoldo Loja-Zamora

Main Street Bodega Plus
176 Main St.
Miguel Franqui

Margarida’s
440 Tiffany St.
Margarida Aniceto

MBS Solutions Inc.
754 Sumner Ave.
Matt Stemberger

Para Mediators
1330 Main St., Suite 18
Rafael Fontanez

PCA Law
1391 Main St.
Peskin Courchesne

Pole in the Wall, LLC
95 Mill St.
Amanda MacFarland

Pregnant by Flor Diamante
24 Tracy St.
Magdalena Rodriguez

Smokey Clouds
1198 Parker St.
Clara Rodriguez

Soiree Mi
107 White St.
Soiree Mi

Surdoue Couture
1500 Main St.
Lisa Goodman

T and J Holdings
33 Genesee St.
Tynesha James

Taco Bell
464 Breckwood Blvd.
Ion Barbabanegra

Tong Tong Beauty Center
1293 Boston Road
Tong Wang

Top Notch Barbershop
932 Boston Road
Diosdenes Fonseca

Tyrone Tyson Jr.
36½ Oak St.
Tyront Tyson Jr.

WESTFIELD

A Slight Edge Salon
20 Elm St.
Awilda Colombani

CCI
221 Union St.
RPM Wood Finishes Group Inc.

Dollar General Store #18908
617 Southampton Road
DG Retail, LLC

Full Plate Strength & Conditioning
66 South Broad St.
Steven Czerniejewski

Garlic Green
1050 Russell Road
Richard Ponti-Smith

Northeast IT Systems Inc.
170 Lockhouse Road
Northeast IT Systems Inc.

One Stop Convenience
1056 North Road
S and N Corp.

Railroad Distribution Services
170 Lockhouse Road
John Levine

Railroad Distribution Services
100 Springdale Road
John Levine

Route 202 Antiques
869 North Road
Route 202 Antiques

Source
2 Russell Road
Renee Collier

Susan J. Austin
45 Meadow St.
Susan Austin

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Maximum Pawn Co.
1164 Memorial Ave.
Maximino Salvador

New England Caricature Co.
1717 Riverdale St.
Michael Lynch

Precision Auto Sales
2405 Westfield St.
James Stephenson

Preferred Auto
27 Heywood Ave.
Richard Larivee

Ricoh USA Inc.
One Interstate Dr.
Hildelisa Norat

Stitches and Ink
33 Appleridge Road
Christen Maxfield

TC Sales
1 St. Andrews Way
Timothy Crary

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Aiguosatile, Augustine O.
35 Larkspur St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Bassett, Craig, Matthew
63 Ridge Ave.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Bell, Courtney Gail
80 Damon Road, Unit 7-103
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/28/2018

Bruscoe, Jeffrey J.
108 West St.
West Hatfield, MA 01088
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/16/2018

Burns, Jeffrey S.
Burns, Kristin L.
a/k/a Sotiropoulos, Kristin L.
119 Raylo St.
Chicopee, MA 01013-3340
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/25/2018

Carroll, Catherine M.
204 Carol Ann St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/27/2018

Carvalho, Armindo M.
77 Primrose St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/21/2018

Cintron, Aisha Shakena
401 Springfield St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/27/2018

Clutz, Thomas William
Clutz, Jessica Falletti
77 Armstrong St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/28/2018

Conklin, George Robert
273 Nottingham Ct.
Becket, MA 01223
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/18/2018

Cooley, Annette M.
Warren-Cooley, Annette
93 Grochmal Ave., Lot 28
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Foya, Eugene
21 Barrington Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/28/2018

Gonzalez, Luis A.
31 Sprindale Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Haddad Farm
Haddad, Charles Y.
33 Silver St.
Great Barrington, MA 01230
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/27/2018

Hinkle, Jared M.
Brophy, Heather A.
12 Monska Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/20/2018

Jimenez, Amnris
Acevedo, Edwin N.
48 Adams St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/19/2018

Johnson, John J.
Tilli-Johnson, Denise M.
474 Glendale Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/18/2018

Johntson, Charles R.
Johntson, Gene S.
61 Caroline St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Laguerra Sierra, Miream A.
57 Olympia Dr. #202
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/27/2018

Larkin, Melissa J.
313 Egremont Road
Sheffield, MA 01257
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/25/2018

Magiera, Diane
68 C Theroux Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

McCoy, David E.
8 Pasadena St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/19/2018

Mitchell, Jeffrey B.
635 Valley Road
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/21/2018

Platanitis, George E.
Platanitis, Dawn S.
PO Box 818
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/25/2018

Puc, Joanne C.
83 Northwest Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Reed, Mark A.
23 Giffen Place
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Rios, Jose M.
515 Whitney Ave., Apt. 5A
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/28/2018

Ritter, Sean P.
Ritter, Iwona M.
74 Woodcliff Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/21/2018

Rodriguez, Wilmarie
a/k/a Salas, Wilmarie
935 St James Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Rondeau, David Lawrence
298 Stafford Road
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Santana, Severo
378 El Paso St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Smith, Matthew E.
Smith, JoAnn
53 Moss Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/19/2018

Smith, Susan E.
a/k/a Smith, Susan W.
26 Lawnwood Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Steinman, Jennifer L.
49 Putnam Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Taylor, Kayla M.
208 Reservoir Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Tryba, Roman F.
505 McKinstry Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Tucker, Lara S.
2058 Pleasant St.
Three Rivers, MA 01080
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/28/2018

Vincelette, Paul J.
Vincelette, Jennifer J.
584 Prospect St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/26/2018

Wentworth, Thomas Joseph
Wentworth, Danielle Lynn
20 Eagleville Road
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/29/2018

Whitney, Jennifer A.
28 Lorimer St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/28/2018

Picture This

A photo essay of recent business events in Western Massachusetts
Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

PWC New Members Gathering

The Professional Women’s Chamber of Western MA, an affiliate of the Springfield Regional Chamber, hosted its first annual new-member event on June 28 at Glendale Ridge Vineyard in Southampton. This event brought together professional women from all specialties and backgrounds to network and learn more about the benefits of becoming a member of the Professional Women’s Chamber. Attendees also had the opportunity to sample wines and learn more about the vineyard from host Mary Hamel, co-owner of the Vineyard.

From left: Kate Vishnyakov of Kate Gray Boutique, Jenny MacKay of the Gaudreau Group, and Madeline Landrau from MassMutual Financial Group


From left: Diane Cordeiro of Louis & Clark Drug, Gillian Palmer of Eastern States Exposition, Jeannie Filomeno of Marcotte Ford, Caron LaCour of Burkhart, Pizzanelli, P.C., Margaret Perry of Wilson’s Department Store, Kathleen Plante of BusinessWest, Landreau, and Rachel Duda of Louis & Clark Drug

Cutting the Ribbon

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, Paul Picknelly, president of Monarch Enterprises, and Jeff Lomma, member services director of the Springfield Regional Chamber of Commerce joined members of the United Bank team for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the bank’s new location at Monarch Place in downtown Springfield on June 28. Earlier this year, the bank moved its branch from 115 State St. into the first floor of One Monarch Place. June 28 marked the ceremonial opening of the new branch location.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, Paul Picknelly, president of Monarch Enterprises, and Jeff Lomma, member services director of the Springfield Regional Chamber of Commerce (left to right at center)

All-Star Unveilings

On June 28, the American Hockey League and the Springfield Thunderbirds announced that Lexus, a division of Toyota Motor Sales USA Inc. will serve as the title corporate partner for the 2019 Lexus AHL All-Star Classic presented by MGM Springfield, which will take place on Jan. 27-28, 2019 at the MassMutual Center. Balise Lexus of West Springfield was an integral part of the partnership for the AHL All-Star Classic, in addition to being a Springfield Thunderbirds corporate sponsor. “Balise is proud to partner with Lexus, the Springfield Thunderbirds, and the AHL in this endeavor to make the city we call home a destination, for both entertainment and community,” said Jeb Balise, owner and CEO of Balise Motor Sales, at the announcement. “As an integral part of the city of Springfield since 1919, we are committed to its continuing growth and revitalization.”

Officials from the team, the AHL, and Balise Lexus pose behind the official All-Star logos


Thunderbirds President Nathan Costa addresses the gathering

Pilgrimage Tour

Two students from Elms College spent a week in France last month, practicing their French, learning about French history and culture, and — perhaps most importantly — making personal connections with the legacy of the college’s founders, the Sisters of St. Joseph. The week of June 16-23, Jane Dugan of Southwick and Monica Karriem of West Hartford, Conn. joined a pilgrimage to Le Puy, France, led by the Assoc. of Colleges of Sisters of St. Joseph (ACSSJ), of which Elms College is one of nine members. The group was led by Sr. Kitty Hanley and Sr. Joan Lescinski, along with Martha Malinski, executive director of the ACSSJ, and campus ministry representatives from some of the colleges.

Jane Dugan of Southwick (at right) and Monica Karriem


Dugan (left) and Karriem pose beside the statue of Mother St. John Fontbonne at the Sisters of St. Joseph Heritage Rooms in Lyon, France.

Supporting Square One

For the second consecutive year, customers of Pride Stores and store management are showing support for Square One in a very big way. Pride recently staged a campaign where customers were encouraged to purchase a Square One ‘square’ for $1 at all Pride locations. Pride owner Bob Bolduc, one of BusinessWest’s Difference Makers for 2018, agreed to match all the donations, in support of the children and families served by Square One. On July 3, surrounded by Square One preschoolers, Bolduc, along with his team, presented a check for $13,000 to the agency at its location at 255 King St. in Springfield.

Pride employees play games with some of the children


From left, Joan Kagan, president and CEO of Square One; Marsha DelMonte and Kyara Wiggins of Pride Stores; and Kristine Allard, Square One


Bolduc meets with one of the young students.

Agenda

Financial-literacy Workshops

July 11 to Aug. 1: Springfield Partners for Community Action Inc. will host financial-literacy workshops starting Wednesday, July 11 and continuing every Wednesday through Aug. 1. Sessions run from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at 721 State St., Springfield, and are free and open to the public. Workshops are facilitated by the agency’s on-staff, nationally certified credit counselors. Series learning objectives include budgeting, credit, managing money, and debt. Participants completing the course will be presented with certificates of achievement, documenting an additional skill to enhance participants’ résumés or include in their personnel files on the job. Refreshments will be served, and raffle prizes will be offered. Call Springfield Partners at (413) 263-6500 to register.

‘Trauma-sensitive Schools’

July 11-13: The Education Division at Elms College will host a three-day conference in July to give educators tools for working with students who have been affected by trauma. The conference, titled “Trauma-sensitive Schools: Meeting the Needs of Traumatized Students and Their Teachers,” will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day on the Elms College campus. This comprehensive, trauma-informed conference is designed for pre-K-to-12 school administrators, teachers, counselors, school nurses, and paraprofessionals. District and school teams are strongly encouraged to attend. The summit will provide educators with the knowledge, understanding, and tools to create a successful trauma-informed learning environment, whether in a single classroom, a whole school, or an entire district. The cost for an individual to attend is $250; for district/school teams of three or more, the cost is $200 per person. The registration deadline is June 13. To register, e-mail [email protected]

Brightside Golf Classic

July 23: More than 200 golfers are expected to participate in the 38th Annual Brightside Golf Classic at Springfield Country Club in West Springfield. Two tee times are available. Registration and breakfast for the morning session will begin at 6:45 a.m. with a shotgun start at 7:30 a.m. Lunch and registration for the afternoon session will begin at 11:30 a.m. with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. The evening reception will be held immediately following the tournament from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Prices include green fees, golf cart, breakfast and/or lunch, a gift and swag bag, and reception featuring cocktails, food stations, auction, networking, and live entertainment. On-course food and beverages will be provided by event sponsors throughout the day. Golfers will also be eligible for a chance to win prizes and participate in raffles. The 2018 Golf Classic chairs are John Kendzierski, founder and director, Professional Dry Wall Construction Inc.; Matt Sosik, president and CEO, Easthampton Savings Bank; Hank Downey, vice president, commercial loan officer, Florence Savings Bank; and Dan Moriarty, senior vice president, chief financial officer, Monson Savings Bank. For more information on sponsorships, donations, and attending the event, contact Suzanne Boniface at (413) 748-9935 or [email protected] Information is also available at www.mercycares.com/brightside-golf-classic.

Future Tense Lecture

Sept. 20: The second installment of the BusinessWest lecture series Future Tense, titled “Change Considerations: An Examination of Lean Process, Market Disruption, and the Future of Your Business,” will take place on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Tech Foundry, 1391 Main St., ninth floor, Springfield. The lecture, open exclusively to CEOs and business owners, will be delivered by Mark Borsari, president of Sanderson MacLeod. The cost is a $25 donation to Tech Foundry. Event sponsors include Paragus IT, the Jamrog Group, and Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. With increasingly automated business processes, AI, and machine manufacturing, lean concepts are becoming more important than ever in terms of staying competitive.  Borsari will discuss change and innovation through lean concepts and focus on resulting cultural considerations. The presentation will also address already-active market disrupters that will affect business processes in various industries. Metered street parking is available near the venue, and there are several parking-garage options nearby as well. To register, visit businesswest.com/lecture-series.

Healthcare Heroes

Oct. 25: The second annual class of Healthcare Heroes will be honored at the Starting Gate at GreatHorse in Hampden. Healthcare Heroes, a recognition program involving the Western Mass. healthcare sector, was launched last spring by HCN and BusinessWest. The program was created to shed a bright light on the outstanding work being done across the broad spectrum of health and wellness services, and the institutions and people providing that care. Individuals and organizations were nominated in categories including ‘Lifetime Achievement,’ ‘Emerging Leader,’ ‘Patient/Resident/Client Care Provider,’ ‘Innovation in Health/Wellness,’ ‘Health/Wellness Administrator,’ and ‘Collaboration in Healthcare.’ They will be profiled in both magazines in September and feted at the Oct. 25 gala. Healthcare Heroes sponsors include American International College (presenting sponsor), National Grid (partner), Renew.Calm (supporting sponsor), and the Elms College MBA program (supporting sponsor).

Chamber Corners

1BERKSHIRE
www.1berkshire.com
(413) 499-1600

• July 18: 1Berkshire Chamber Nite, 5-7 p.m., hosted by NBT Bank on North Street.

• July 22: BYP Summer Social, 1:30-7:30 p.m. Begin with a catered lunch at Tanglewood with the Boston Young Professionals and end the evening with a cocktail reception at Berkshire Botanical Gardens.

• July 31: Entrepreneurial Meet-up, hosted by Shire Breu Hous, Dalton.

AMHERST AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700

• July 30: 15th Annual Golf Tournament, hosted by Orchards Golf Club, South Hadley. Schedule: 10:30 a.m.: registration, putting contest, and light lunch; noon: shotgun start, scramble format; 5 p.m.: social hour and cash bar; 6 p.m.: dinner and awards ceremony. Hole-in-one, longest-drive, and closest-to-pin contests. Cost: $150 per player, $600 for a foursome. To register, visit www.amherstarea.com/events/details/2018-golf-tournament-19060.

• Aug. 30: Candidate Debate, 7 p.m., hosted by Amherst Regional Middle School auditorium. A pre-primary debate for candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for state representative (Third Hampshire) and state senator (Hampshire, Franklin, Worcester).

GREATER CHICOPEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

Aug. 16: European Café & Open House, 4:30-7 p.m., hosted by Chicopee Chamber of Commerce & Courtyard, 264 Exchange St., Chicopee. Come enjoy a taste of the European flavors of the local restaurants, all in a relaxed setting with the musical stylings of Sergio D’Orsini. Meet and greet the local artists and tour the Chamber of Commerce and engage with many small business owners, including MaryKay, Herbarium, Lemon Grass Fitness, and TrueHeart Wellness, to name a few. Presented in partnership with Westfield Bank. Cost: $25 for one attendee, $40 for two attendees (must be purchased at the same time). Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org/events or call (413) 594-2101.

GREATER HOLYOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.holyokechamber.com
(413) 534-3376

• July 9: Grow with Google, hosted by MassMutual Center, Springfield. Grow with Google is an initiative to help small businesses, startups, job seekers, developers, and teachers improve the skills they need to prepare for a job, find a job, or grow their business. These free, live workshops include “Get Found on Google Search and Maps,” “E-mail, Spreadsheets, and Presentations,” “Reach Customers Online with Google,” “Get Started with Code,” “Using Data to Drive Growth,” and “Coding for Kids.” Join us for the whole day or a specific workshop. Greater Holyoke Chamber members receive first priority registration. To register, e-mail Jordan at [email protected]

GREATER NORTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

• July 11: July Arrive @ 5, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Northampton Country Club, 135 Main St., Leeds. Cost: $10 for members.

GREATER WESTFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• July 12: 41st Pancake Breakfast, 7-11 a.m., hosted by South Middle School, 30 West Silver St., Westfield. Rain or shine. Attractions include a bounce house, face painting, entertainment, a live broadcast from WSKB 89.5, and vendor tables. Sponsors to date include BusinessWest (pancake sponsor), Appalachian Press (placemat sponsor), Puffer Printing (ticket sponsor), and Dunkin’ Donuts (coffee sponsor). Cost: $6 for adults, $5 for seniors, $3 for kids under 10. For additional sponsorships or tickets, call the chamber at (413) 568-1618 or visit www.westfieldbiz.org.

SPRINGFIELD REGIONAL CHAMBER
www.springfieldregionalchamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• July 19: Golf Tournament, 11 a.m., hosted by Crestview Country Club, 281 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam. Cost: $600 per foursome, $150 per individual. Reservations may be made at www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, [email protected], or (413) 755-1310.

WEST OF THE RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.ourwrc.com
(413) 426-3880

• July 25: West Meets West at the Ranch Networking Event, 5-7 p.m., hosted by the Ranch Golf Club in Southwick. Join us as we pair up with the Greater Westfield Chamber for an evening of games, fun, networking, and food. These events bring members and non-members together to network in a laid-back atmosphere. Cost: free for members, $10 for non-members. For more information about this event, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880, or register online at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

• Aug. 6: 15th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament, hosted by the Ranch Golf Club in Southwick. Schedule: 11:30 a.m.: registration; noon: lunch; 1 p.m.: shotgun start, scramble format. Putting contest, 15th hole air cannon, Carrabba’s Cuisine Hole, and more. Cost: $125 for golf and dinner. For more information and tickets to this event, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880 or [email protected], or register online at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

• Aug. 16: Free Membership Appreciation Luncheon, noon to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Carrabba’s Italian Grill, Riverdale Street, West Springfield. Lunch is on us! Members can register for this networking event and bring a non-member guest, and you both enjoy a free lunch. Seating is limited, so register at www.westoftheriverchamber.com before it’s too late. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880.

People on the Move

Local news hires, promotions, awards, and appointments

Joanne Beauregard

Joanne Beauregard

The O’Connell Companies announced the promotion of Joanne Beauregard to financial vice president. Beauregard fills the position vacated by Martin Schoenemann, who retired this spring after 38 years at O’Connell’s. As financial VP, she is responsible for management of the financial, accounting, and tax matters of the company’s real estate, construction, property-management, and biosolids businesses. She moves to this position after 34 years of successive positions of increased responsibility and leadership, most recently as controller for O’Connell Development Group. She holds a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Hartford and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Western New England College. Beauregard is currently a board member of Providence Ministries Service Network and previously served as the chair of the board of the Sisters of Providence Health System. She also served as the treasurer of the Holyoke Children’s Museum. The O’Connell Companies is the parent company of O’Connell Development Group, New England Fertilizer Company, Appleton Corp., Western Builders, and Daniel O’Connell’s Sons.

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Jessica Dupont has been named the new president of the board of Dress for Success Western Massachusetts. Dupont, director of Risk Adjustment for Health New England, joined HNE in 2008 to help launch its Medicare Advantage plan. During her tenure there, she has held several roles within the organization and was promoted to her most recent position in February 2017. Dupont received a bachelor’a degree in sociology from Mount Holyoke College and an MBA with a concentration in healthcare leadership from Elms College in 2016. She is active in both the business and nonprofit communities in the area. In 2015, she began volunteering with Dress for Success Western Massachusetts and was later asked to become a member of the board of directors. In July 2017, she assumed the role of vice president of the board. That same year, she was profiled in BusinessWest’s 40 Under Forty, earning the highest score among the 150-plus nominees. Dupont is also chairperson of the local Catholic Campaign for Human Development advisory board, a member of the Elms College MBA executive advisory council, and a member of the board of directors for Square One.

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Lew Rudolph

Lew Rudolph

Rev. Marisa Egerstrom

Rev. Marisa Egerstrom

Jeannie Filomeno

Marvin Gonzalez

Providence Ministries for the Needy Inc. recently announced four new board members: Lew Rudolph, the Rev. Marisa Egerstrom, Jeannie Filomeno, and Marvin Gonzalez. Rudolph is currently the director of Government and Foundation Grants and Contracts for Trinity Health in Springfield. His past experience includes roles as program director and psychotherapist for ServiceNet Inc. in Northampton, and president and CEO of Hampshire Community United Way. Egerstrom is currently the priest-in-charge at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Holyoke. Her past experience includes serving as Christian education coordinator at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Boston, as a chaplain in hospital and street settings, and as a spiritual director for young adults. She is completing a Ph.D. in American studies at Harvard University. Filomeno currently serves as the Human Resource manager at her family-operated business, Marcotte Ford. With her family, she has dedicated years of support to Providence Ministries, including preparing and serving monthly at Kate’s Kitchen, organizing clothing, food, and school-supply drives distributed to the community through Margaret’s Pantry; and donating more than 100 holiday gifts and Easter baskets. Outside of working at Marcotte Ford, Jeannie serves on the board of the Professional Women’s Chamber. Gonzalez currently serves as an outreach specialist with Eliot Community Human Services. As part of his role, he performs daily street outreach in Holyoke and Chicopee. At Kate’s Kitchen, he not only greets guests and records vital daily census data, but also serves as an advisor and troubleshooter on topics including access and information related to housing, detox, mental health, and food support. He has dedicated more than 30 years to working in human services as an advocate for the most vulnerable.

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United Personnel announced the expansion of its Connecticut-based team. Nancy Scirocco Nesbitt has joined the company as its new vice president of Business Development for the Connecticut region, while Brandon Houston, United Personnel’s new director of Client Services, is leading the expansion of the firm’s Information Technology Division. Scirocco Nesbitt, most recently vice president for Government and Not-for-Profit Banking for Webster Bank, brings more than 20 years of management, client-support, and economic-development experience to her position with United. Past positions include vice president of at the Metro Hartford Alliance, adjunct professor at Central Connecticut State University, and contract administrator at Otis Elevator. She has an MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Connecticut. She serves on the Governor’s Task Force for Abused Children and is a former board member of Internhere.com and the Special Olympics of Connecticut. Houston has more than 10 years of human-resources experience, with a specialty in recruiting and placing software engineers, developers, architects, project managers, infrastructure, and security personnel. He most recently worked as a senior account manager for Prestige Staffing in Atlanta. Other prior positions include recruitment management roles at Latitude Inc. and Maxim Healthcare. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Tennessee and is involved with the Metro Hartford Alliance and HYPE.

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Local author and business owner Carleen Eve Fischer Hoffman is featured in the new book The Waiting Room: Invisible Voices of Lyme. The book is a compilation of 27 real-life stories released to help raise Lyme disease awareness, to encourage sufferers to keep fighting, and to help caregivers and doctors understand how to better support those with Lyme disease. Compiled by author Vickie Gould, the book outlines the struggles that sufferers go through on a daily basis, and aims to raise awareness and understanding of the disease. “It was difficult for me to write my story, and I was hesitant to release it for fear of what my family, friends, and colleagues would think — and, in fact, I had missed the deadline while contemplating my decision,” said Fischer Hoffmann, owner of the Clutter Doctor Inc. “But then I thought to myself, what if, by sharing my story, someone reading it got inspired to speak up and get help? Of course I would be happy with that.” The book is available for purchase on Amazon, and all profits will be donated to the Lyme documentary The Monster Inside Me.

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Rick Sawicki of Sawicki Real Estate in Amherst was named the 2018 Realtor of the Year by the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley (RAPV). The announcement was made at the association’s annual awards dinner held on June 14 at the Log Cabin in Holyoke. Realtor of the Year is the highest honor given to a member of the association and is bestowed upon a single individual who demonstrated outstanding service and devotion to the 1,700-member organization during the past 17 months in the areas of association activity, community service, and business activity. A Realtor since 2005, Sawicki served as president of the association in
2017. He is currently the immediate past president and serves on the
building, executive, finance, government affairs, president’s award,
professional development, and strategic planning committees, as well as the
candidate endorsement work group. He has participated in the Massachusetts Assoc. of Realtors (MAR) annual Realtor Day on Beacon Hill and is a major investor in the Realtors Political Action Committee (RPAC). He has been featured on the “Real Estate Minute” segment of WWLP’s Mass Appeal program. Sawicki has given back to the community through activity with the Rotary Club of Amherst and the Turners Falls High School logo task force and is a member of the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce. He is actively involved in state initiatives and activities such as MAR professional standards training and Realtor party training, along with being a MAR RPAC trustee. He is also a member of the National Assoc. of Realtors (NAR) public policy coordinating committee.

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Kathleen Sawtelle, a clinical and lab instructor in the Surgical Technology program at Springfield Technical Community College (STCC), received the Clinical Educator of the Year Award during the Assoc. of Surgical Technologists 2018 conference in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., on May 31. She was at the conference as a delegate for the organization. The award recognizes one clinical educator who has gone above and beyond the call of duty for students. Sawtelle received a $500 award, a trophy, and recognition at the annual conference. A 1976 graduate of STCC’s Surgical Technology program, Sawtelle has worked in the field for 42 years. She has been coordinator of clinical education for the program at STCC for the past three years, and has taught at the college for 11 years. She has worked as a certified surgical technologist at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield for 28 years and on a per diem basis for 10 years. She previously received the designation of Fellow of the Assoc. of Surgical Technologists, which recognizes surgical technologists who have upheld the highest professional, ethical, and moral standards and traditions of the profession.

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Lamont Clemons, President of the Rotary Club of Springfield, recently presented Rotarians Jack Toner and Rick Lee with Rotary pins to acknowledge their donations to the Rotary Foundation. The Rotary Foundation supports clean-water projects, maternal and child health, education, and the promotion of peace throughout the world. Toner’s pin has one blue sapphire stone for his $2,000 to the foundation, and Lee’s has three sapphire stones for his $4,000 donation made over a period of time. “The global impact of the Rotary Foundation is extraordinary,” Toner said. “My small monthly gift pays itself forward over and over again. Each dollar given is multiplied through grants and various partnerships, mostly notably with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in Rotary’s effort to eradicate polio worldwide. I feel privileged to wear a different lapel pin each day to represent the various and diverse ongoing activities Rotary initiatives are involved with around the globe.” Lee also feels strongly about the Rotary and its foundation. “When I served as club president in 2014, I became acutely aware of the important work done worldwide through the Rotary Foundation,” he said. “I am convinced that supporting these efforts should be job one for any Rotarian. For me, Rotary’s unique blend of local fellowship and service, coupled with its global reach, makes the experience truly special.”

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Springfield College President Mary-Beth Cooper announced the appointment of Kathleen Martin of to the position of executive director of the Capital Campaign and Campus Strategy. The appointment marks Martin’s return to Springfield College, where she received both her doctorate in physical education with a specialization in sport psychology and her master’s degree in physical education (athletics administration concentration). She also began her teaching career at Springfield College. Martin will be responsible for coordinating the overall strategic direction of the college’s capital campaign, strategic plan, and campus master plan. Through the development of strong collaborative relationships with the office of the president, the college’s senior leadership team, and key stakeholders, she will serve as the primary lead, strategist, and coordinator of strategic initiatives. Most recently, Martin served as vice provost and chief educational compliance officer and Title IX coordinator at Bay Path University. She also held the positions of director of Institutional Research and Special Projects, and assistant provost for Academic Affairs.

•••••

The Center for Human Development (CHD) has named Ben Craft its vice president of Community Engagement.In the newly restructured position, Craft has been charged with deepening the nonprofit human services agency’s relationships in the communities it serves in Massachusetts and Connecticut. In the role, he will oversee strategic communications, marketing, and development, as well as community, government, and provider relations.Craft brings a strong background in communications, engagement, and advocacy to CHD, coupled with almost 10 years of experience in healthcare and public policy, at a critical point in CHD’s growth and development. “We are excited to have Ben join us at a time when CHD is not only expanding our network of human services into more communities, but also at a time when we are playing a critical and growing role in the new model of care management, and connecting people with complex needs to more preventive and supportive services,” said Jim Goodwin, president and CEO of CHD. Craft, who grew up in East Longmeadow, started his career in New York at the Wall Street Journal and worked at the United Nations as a communications officer before returning home to Western Mass. in 2008 to work for Baystate Health, most recently as senior director of Government and Public Affairs. He is a 1996 graduate of UMass Amherst.

Company Notebook

Florence Bank Breaks Ground on New Springfield Branch

SPRINGFIELD — Florence Bank broke ground recently on its second Hampden County branch, at 1444 Allen St. in Springfield, and leaders said the full-service location will open later this year. “We’re coming to Springfield,” John Heaps Jr., Florence Bank’s president and CEO, told a crowd of roughly 50 people who gathered for the celebratory event. “Our focus is on our customers and on helping to reinvigorate the community.” Last September, Florence Bank opened its first branch in Hampden County at 1010 Union St. in West Springfield. The Springfield branch marks the second of an anticipated four branches in the region. Like the West Springfield banking center, Heaps said, the Allen Street branch will have an open floor plan with a full-service teller pod and innovative technology for quick cash handling. The location will also feature a drive-up ATM with SMART technology for easy depositing and a comfortable waiting area inside with a coffee bar and free internet. Florence Bank has nearly 3,800 customers living in Hampden County, including 700 business customers.

People’s United Financial to Acquire First Connecticut Bancorp

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. — People’s United Financial, Inc., the holding company for People’s United Bank N.A., announced an agreement to acquire First Connecticut Bancorp Inc., the holding company for Farmington Bank, in a 100% stock transaction valued at approximately $544 million. Completion of the transaction is subject to customary closing conditions, including receipt of regulatory approvals and the approval of First Connecticut Bancorp shareholders. Established in 1851, Farmington Bank is a community bank with 28 branches throughout Central Conn. and Western Mass. With $3.1 billion in assets, the bank has built a strong balance sheet by focusing on commercial and retail banking. “People’s United Bank is a premier brand with a rich, 176-year history in the state of Connecticut,” said John Patrick, chairman, president, and CEO of Farmington Bank. “Our customers will benefit from their broader array of products, enhanced access to technology and digital capabilities, as well as the bank’s seven-day-a-week Stop & Shop branch locations.” The transaction is expected to close during the fourth quarter of 2018. Under the terms of the agreement, which has been approved by both companies’ boards of directors, First Connecticut Bancorp shareholders will receive 1.725 shares of People’s United Financial stock for each First Connecticut Bancorp share. The transaction is valued at $32.33 per First Connecticut Bancorp share.

State’s First Solar Cooperative to Be Built in Wendell

WENDELL — Northeast Solar, in cooperation with the Wendell Energy Committee, is offering residents of Wendell and surrounding communities the opportunity to become owners of the state’s first solar cooperative. The co-op will be owned by community members who become member-owners of the site by purchasing part of the community solar array. Owners will receive all of the solar benefits generated at the site, located at 97 Wendell Depot Road. Solar panels are typically mounted on rooftops, but close to 60% of residential buildings are not suitable sites for solar due to shading or roof condition. The solar cooperative will allow any resident to purchase solar power for their homes by buying into the centralized array.  Owners in this system will receive a lower purchase price than standard residential installations. The Wendell Solar Cooperative will return more than $1.3 million back into the local economy over the life of the array. The site is expected to take between six and eight weeks to build. The co-op will accept 50 members, but Northeast Solar is planning more solar cooperatives in other communities to allow more residents the chance to go solar.

Greenfield Cooperative Bank Announces 2018 Performance

GREENFIELD — Michael Tucker, president and CEO of Greenfield Cooperative Bank and its parent company, Greenfield Bancorp, MHC, announced the operating results of the bank’s latest fiscal year as reported at the 113th annual meeting of the bank on June 19. Tucker reported that FY 2018, which ended March 31, was successful, with and the assets of the bank growing by $24.9 million (up 4.3%) over the prior year. In addition, GCB originated more than $124 million in loans of all types, and saw an increase of $28.4 million in deposits over the past year. Total equity grew to $67.4 million. The pre-tax operating income for Greenfield Cooperative Bank was up to $5,078,000 for the year ended March 31, 2018, and the net income after taxes was $2,773,000. The bank also paid its fair share of federal and Massachusetts income taxes ($1.5 million) and local property taxes (more than $129,000) in the cities and towns where it has offices. As a result of these earnings and the fact that Greenfield Cooperative Bank targets its charitable and civic giving at 5% of the prior year’s pre-tax operating income, the bank and its employees were able to contribute more than $200,000 to more than 200 charities, community groups, school events, youth teams, and cultural events throughout Hampshire and Franklin counties during the past fiscal year.

HCC, Holyoke Schools Receive Grant for Early College Program

HOLYOKE — Holyoke Community College (HCC) and Holyoke public schools have been awarded a $131,600 state grant to establish a new program to help high-school students get an early start on their college educations. The program was one of only five such partnerships — and the only one outside the Greater Boston area — to receive an official  “Early College” designation from the state. The Early College Program will enable participating Holyoke students to earn a minimum of 12 college credits before they graduate from high school. Beginning in their sophomore years, students enrolled in the program will complete college courses in fields of study that align with academic majors at HCC and transfer pathways to four-year colleges and universities in Massachusetts. There is no cost to participating students. Like other dual-enrollment classes, the Early College courses will be taught by HCC faculty at Holyoke High School or on the HCC campus. The program is designed for 100 students each academic year, beginning in the sophomore year. At full capacity, in fall 2020, up to 300 students in grades 10-12 will be part of the program. Sophomore students will take their first college courses at Holyoke High School. In their junior and senior years, they will take courses on the main HCC campus on Homestead Avenue. According to studies, dual-enrollment courses and early-college programs boost college-completion rates for low-income students, minorities, and first-generation college students.

Colony Care at Home Donates $500 to Rotary Club’s Cambodia Project

SPRINGFIELD — Alan Popp, president of Colony Care at Home, a home-care agency in Springfield serving Western Mass. and North Central Conn., recently presented Dr. MaryAnne Herron of the Rotary Club of Springfield a check for $500. The donation was to kick off a fundraiser for the Springfield Rotary Club’s participation in an international water project for the Lvea Em District in Cambodia. “The villagers presently use the very polluted river water that surrounds their six small communities,” Herron said. “The Springfield Rotary Club has a goal to raise $600,000 to build a generator for 10,000 families who have no clean water to drink. We are applying for grants to Rotary International but need to raise some of the funds ourselves. This check is very much appreciated and a great start to our cause.” Added Popp, also a Springfield Rotarian, “I have always been especially drawn to the international service aspect of Rotary and have a particularly high regard for MaryAnne’s passion, energy, and personal sacrifice on behalf of villagers in Cambodia. As a Vietnam veteran, I also appreciate having this opportunity to give something back to Southeast Asia.”

Community Bank N.A. Donates $2,500 to MSBDCN

SPRINGFIELD — Community Bank N.A. recently presented the Western Regional Office of the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center Network (MSBDCN) with a $2,500 donation to support the organization’s various programs for 2019. MSBDCN’s Western Regional Office provides free and confidential one-to-one business advice to prospective and existing small businesses in Western Mass. The office provides a variety of services to startups and existing businesses in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties. Areas of assistance include business-plan development, preventure feasibility, conventional and non-conventional financing, cash-flow analysis, organizational and personnel issues, and marketing. In its last fiscal year, MSBDCN conducted 36 events and workshops, which were attended by more than 300 participants. Throughout the first six months of this year, MSBDCN has met with 261 small-business clients seeking to start and grow their businesses and helped secure close to $2 million in funds for those clients.

Berkshire Bank Named 2018 Halo Award Winner

BOSTON — Berkshire Bank announced it was awarded the 2018 Gold Halo Award for its XTEAM corporate volunteer program. The award recognizes the top corporate social-responsibility efforts in North America across multiple categories, including education, cause marketing, and employee engagement. Berkshire received the award in the Employee Engagement (Group Volunteering) category, which recognizes initiatives that meaningfully and measurably engage its employees in a cause-focused initiative to achieve both a social and a business impact. Berkshire’s Xtraordinary Day of Service, held in June 2017, mobilized 92% of its workforce across the country and impacted more than 400,000 individuals. In 2017, the XTEAM logged 306 projects benefiting 203 organizations and contributed 40,000 hours of service. This corporate employee-volunteer program boasts a 100% employee-participation rate, earning it the highest recognition in the Employee Engagement category.

Briefcase

News of interest about the region’s business community

ValleyBike Launches Regional Bike-share Program

NORTHAMPTON — ValleyBike launched with a celebration and parade on June 28 at in Pulaski Park. ValleyBike is the first bike-share program in the Pioneer Valley and the first pedal-assist bike-share program in New England. The program allows members to pay for bikes by the trip, or join as a member for unlimited 45-minute rides by the day, month, or year. Partners include the communities of Amherst, Holyoke, Northampton, South Hadley, and Springfield, as well as UMass Amherst and the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC). ValleyBike was initiated by Amherst, Northampton, and the PVPC, and then quickly joined by Springfield, Holyoke, and South Hadley. The planning effort was led by the PVPC, which found the funding for planning. Leadership of the effort switched to Northampton for the implementation phase of the project. Residents may sign up at www.valleybike.org, with special founding membership opportunities for a limited time. “ValleyBike is yet another exciting example of how our region, and its cities and towns, are working collaboratively and proactively to shape a smart and sustainable future for us all,” said PVPC Executive Director Tim Brennan. “ValleyBike not only introduces a new type of shared mobility, but offers a creative and sensible way to improve our air and our health while capturing the benefits of modern-day pedal power.” ValleyBike has contracted with Bewegen Technologies and Corps Logistics to build and operate the system, and is funded by state and federal grants, Bewegen investments, community investments in station pads, user fees, and program sponsors.

State Awards $1,080,000 to Increase Access to Healthy, Local Food

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration awarded $1,080,000 to a joint partnership between the Local Enterprise Assistance Fund and Franklin County Community Development Corporation to create a sustainable program that creates quality jobs and increases food access for low-income residents throughout the state. The funding is awarded under the Massachusetts Food Trust Program (MFTP), a program launched by the Baker-Polito administration in 2017, which seeks to establish a financing infrastructure that increases access to healthy, affordable food options and to improve economic opportunities for nutritionally underserved communities statewide. The MFTP, funded through the administration’s FY 2018 Capital Investment Plan, provides funding through grants to community development financial institutions and community development corporations. This statewide program is designed to meet the financing needs to fresh food retailers and distributors that plan to operate in underserved communities where costs and credit needs cannot be filled solely by conventional financing institutions. With the funding, grantees may provide grants, loans, and technical assistance to support entities that have shown a meaningful commitment to sell fresh, affordable, and local products, with a preference for food grown, caught, or harvested in Massachusetts. Projects that are eligible for funding through the awarded financial institutions include the development, renovation, and expansion of supermarkets; commercial community kitchens; and commercial greenhouses.

Job Picture Continues to Improve in Massachusetts

BOSTON — Local unemployment rates decreased in 13 labor-market areas, increased in six areas, and remained the same in five labor-market areas in the state during the month of May, the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development reported. Compared to May 2017, the rates dropped in 23 labor-market areas and increased in one area. Fourteen of the 15 areas for which job estimates are published recorded a seasonal job gain in May. The largest gains occurred in the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Barnstable, Worcester, Framingham, and Haverhill-Newburyport-Amesbury areas. The Brockton-Bridgewater-Easton area lost jobs over the month. From May 2017 to May 2018, all 15 areas added jobs, with the largest percentage gains in the Lynn-Saugus-Marblehead, Haverhill-Newburyport-Amesbury, Lawrence-Methuen-Salem, Lowell-Billerica-Chelmsford, and Worcester areas. In order to compare the statewide rate to local unemployment rates, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the statewide-unadjusted unemployment rate for May was 3.3%. Last week, the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development reported the statewide seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in the month of May remained at 3.5% for the eighth consecutive month. The statewide seasonally adjusted jobs estimate showed a 6,200-job gain in May, and an over-the-year gain of 56,100 jobs.

 

Pioneer Valley Communities, PVPC Acting on Climate Change

SPRINGFIELD — Nine new Pioneer Valley municipalities recently joined six already working on Municipal Vulnerability Program (MVP) certification, bringing the total to 15 communities seeking greater resiliency in the face of climate change. That represents 35% of the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission’s (PVPC) member municipalities — home to approximately 410,000 people, or more than 66% of the region’s population. In 2017, six pioneering municipalities applied for and secured MVP planning grants, and four of these six have now successfully secured action grants in the highly competitive first round of funding. Of these, Belchertown will assess stream crossings and culverts, Holyoke is learning from Hurricane Maria survivors how to adapt and care for vulnerable residents affected by extreme weather, Northampton is reducing storm damage by designing with nature, and Pelham aims to improve small-town resilience. Together, these 15 municipalities have secured $1,186,512 in state funding to plan for ($348,000) and adapt to ($838,512) the changing climate. The funding allows the PVPC to engage with local officials and community stakeholders, while leveraging its unique technical capabilities. Any of the 43 cities and towns of Hampden and Hampshire counties not currently engaged in MVP work, but interested, should contact PVPC Senior Planning Emily Slotnick at (413) 781-6045 or [email protected]

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AGAWAM

MKDP Inc., 418 Meadow St., A6, Agawam, MA 01001. Paul D. Musselwhite, same. Restaurant.

Pastaio Via Corta Inc., 25 Alhambra Circle South, Agawam, MA 01001. Danielle M. Glantz, same. Production and sale of food.

AMHERST

PB & A Solutions Inc., 55 Hulst Road, Amherst, MA 01002. Paul G. Bobrowski, same. Software development and other related services

EAST LONGMEADOW

Morrissey Ventures Inc., 141 Porter Road, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Paul Morrissey, same. Pet boarding and grooming.

GREENFIELD

Om Country Farm Inc., 49 Main St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Falguni Patel, 5 Patriot Ridge Lane, Wilbraham, MA 01095. Convenience.

INDIAN ORCHARD

Orchard Laser Hair Removal & Aesthetics Inc., 835 Worcester St., Suite, B, Indian Orchard, MA 01151. Aesthetic laser treatment center.

NORTHFIELD

Pioneer Valley Poetry Productions Inc., 181 School St., Northfield, MA 01360. Edward Foster, same. Product and promote public poetry readings.

PALMER

New Tang’s Inc., 1581 North Main St., Palmer, MA 01069. Chang Qi Wu, 433 51st St., Brooklyn, NY 11220. Take-out restaurant.

SPRINGFIELD

Pinnacle Express Inc., 143 Main St., Springfield, MA 01105. Kennth M. Rodriguez, same. Transportation.

Quantum Electric Inc., 29 Pelham St., Springfield, MA 01109. Christopher Martinez, same. Constructional, electrical.

WESTFIELD

New China Star Inc., 36 Southwick Road, Westfield, MA 01085. Yun Zheng, same. Take-out restaurant.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of June 2018.

BELCHERTOWN

Belchertown Soccer Club
2 Sabin St.
Clifford Holt II

C.O. Lawncare
40 Daniel Shays Highway
Ann Shelton

Community Options Inc.
442 State St.
Ann Shelton

Family Ties
584 North Liberty St.
Mark Fitzherbert

Frank’s Lawnmower Service
181 Jabish St.
Frank Towne

Galaxy Automotive
50 Turkey Hill Road
Ali Soleimani, Wendy Soleimani

Hubbard Home Improvement
121 North Main St.
Thomas Hubbard

Inner Peace Farm
275 Jackson St.
Sara Weil

CHICOPEE

AK Corp.
45 Forest St.
Marie-Airelle Kemembin

Residential & Commercial Design
704 Granby Road
John Kosakowski

Sarah S. Vadi
208 Exchange St.
Sarah Shanty Vadi

Where the Vinyl Things Are
141 Nonotuck Ave.
Nina Leclerc

DEERFIELD

High Performance Marketing
75 Sugarloaf St.
Daniel White

Jerry’s Place
55A North Main St.
Jared Dagrosa

Polar Focus Inc.
20 Industrial Dr. East
Michael Akrep

EASTHAMPTON

Grey Street Photography
173 Main St., Apt. R
Danielle Vengrove

Tall Dog Electronics
48 Parsons St., Unit 6
Daniel Gilbert

HADLEY

Alligator Brook Farms
42 Lawrence Place
James Gnatek

Ananda Yoga
41 Russell St.
Justine Budhram

Arts School
8 Goffe St.
Weir Arts

Edible Arrangements
41 Russell St.
Louise Beauchenirn

Embodied Chiropractic
226-D Russell St.
Brenna Werme

Fort River Farm
102 Mill Valley
Gordon Smith

Knotted Wood
79 River Dr.
Kellsie Rees

Lucy & Sue Pioneer Valley Photo
233 Bay Road
Susan Pawlishen

Pipczynski Farm
22 East St.
Dennis Pipczynski

Studio Subjective
5B Cemetery Road
Emily Gallik

HOLYOKE

Amazing Discount
369 High St.
Abdul Sattar Chaudhry

AOK Improvements
120 Front St.
AOK Bottle & Can Inc.

Bliny Crepes Tea House Inc.
50 Holyoke St.
Arturas Rivinskas

Home Health Solutions
1593 Northampton St.
Nova Leap Health MA II Inc.

Pickles Pub & Pizzeria
910 Hampden St.
Rene Dulude, Jodi Dulude

Salon Jade
234 Lyman St.
Jasmine Reyes

LONGMEADOW

Claddagh School of Irish Dance
37 Wimbleton Drive
Home Office

EPF Consulting
247 Crestview Circle
IT Consulting

NORTHAMPTON

Bird’s Store
94 Maple St.
Gaurang Patel

Companion Software
71 Olander Dr.
Lawrence Daniele

Crafted Birth
149 Barrett St.
Mollie Hartford-Chamberland

Deals by Little Man
35 Ellington Road
Katherine Carey

Holistic & Rehab Center
107 Moser St.
Sunny Chernly

Holy Cow Online Marketing
71 Olander Dr.
Lawrence Daniele

Jeffrey Bott Contracting
32 Pine St.
Jeffrey Bott

Northampton Jewelers Inc.
104 Main St.
Cuauhtli Hernandez

Rolling Clouds Soapery
140 Pine St.
Rebecca Fritz

Room 6
140 Pine St.
Wendie Willey

SPRINGFIELD

Andrew Farrar Painting
852 Belmont Ave.
Andrew Farrar

Andy and Jassi Inc.
711 Boston Road
Ravinder Arora

Barranco Construction
43 Melha Ave.
Santos Barranco

Beauty Queen Salon
874 State St.
Janira Del Luna

Blair Boys Painting
43 Belvidere St.
Dennis Blair

Crown Weather Services
152 Lake Dr.
Robert William

Dewey Street
34 Front St.
Cindy Nickerson

Fine Arts Heritage
54 Thornfell St.
Erin Lamica

FedEx Office #176
1 MGM Way
FedEx Corp.

Good Neighbor Fence Co.
80 Elijah St.
Elijah Street, LLC

Metrocare of Springfield
125 Liberty St., #404
Alex Eydinov

NEMC, LLC
720 Berkshire Ave.
Mohammed Burhan

New York Nail Salon
1368 Allen St.
Trung Nguyen

Olmeda Home Improvement
26 Ledyard St.
Orlando Olmeda

Pamela J. Chesbro Consulting
41 Eleanor Road
Pamela Chesbro

Renay’s Personal Chef Service
193 Northampton Ave.
Renay Stampp

RJ’s Handyman Service
100 Loretta St.
James Avery

Robbin D. Jones
21 Deveau St.
Robbin Jones

Roll In Roll Out Tire Service
359-361 Taylor St.
Ngoni Noble Makoni

School of the Noble Warrior
57 School St.
Ahmad Sharif

The Spirit Shoppe
1132 St. James Ave.
Pankajkumar Patel

Taylor Rentals
34 North Chatham St.
Velma Taylor

WESTFIELD

Blueriver Recycling
58 Sherwood Ave.
Gene Davis

Erwin Electrical Services
53 Westwood Dr.
Michael Erwin

Gambe ENT
43 Fairfield Ave.
Robert Gambe

Jojo’s Rustic Remnants
182 Falley Dr.
Joanne Bigelow

Major Home Improvements
19 Hunters Slope
Vasilie Kukharchuk

Pro Green Power Washing
73B Moseley Ave.
Nathan Provost

Property Management Service
Merritt Andrews
14 Spring St.

Ray of Hope International Church
15 Summer St.
Parlad Gurung

The Scrub Peddler
10 Fawn Lane
Ellen Tatro Majka

TNT Pressure Washing
9 Zephyr Dr.
Terrence Pulley

Unified PPC
49 Church St.
Maksim Yurovsky

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Aveanna Healthcare
78 Capital Dr.
Epic Health Services

Bobcat of Greater Springfield
181 Wayside Ave.
Bobcat of Greater Springfield

Comfort Inn and Suites
106 Capital Dr.
Nataver Inc.

Conca Sport and Fitness
170 Elm St.
Stephen Conca

Denny’s Auto Export
1044 Piper Road
James Denny

Elm Family Dentistry
1284 Elm St.
Cole Archambault, Gary Archambault

Forfa Home Repair
85 Day St.
William Forfa

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were re5onfirm all information with the court.

Barboza, Heidi A.
3 Fletcher St., Apt. D
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/06/18

Bauer, Raymond
229 West St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/15/18

Blakely, Jason M.
54 Beverly Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Boudreau, David J.
18 Maple St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Boudreau, Marilyn J.
234 South St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Bridges, James A.
26 Spruce St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Burgos, Eduardo R.
34 Ontario St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/05/18

Burke, Paula Anne
a/k/a Burke-Montalvo, Paula A.
40 Lawler St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Burnett, Joshua Daniel
Burnett, Kelly Marie
181 Harugari St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/14/18

Cognac, Lori A.
58 Allison Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/06/18

Colon Robles, Carmen M.
411 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/14/18

Cox, David Martin
70 Birch St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/14/18

Cust Express
Cust, Jerry L.
36 Westerly Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Daigneault, Kathleen M.
151 Gardens Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/12/18

Denette, Edward C.
116 John St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/13/18

Duford, Jason A.
Duford, Christy L.
112 Balfour Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Flores, Jasmine A.
19 Hastings St., Apt. 2L
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

Gaj, Paul Francis
60 Oaklawn Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 05/31/18

Gamache, Tammy L.
157 Palmer St.
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/05/18

Gardner, Shirley L.
a/k/a Spencer, Shirley L.
47 Palmyra St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/13/18

Gelinas, Brett A.
75 Fairway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Gillis, Brian Stuart
128 Russell St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/04/18

Gorn, Scott Zelig
457 Springfield St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/05/18

Guiel, Daniel R.
Guiel, Cheryl A.
2027 Westfield St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/12/18

Kelly, Carol L.
28 Duffy Lane
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/04/18

Landry, Linda A.
260 Fountain St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

LeClaire, Kenneth J.
LeClaire, Robin D.
50 Campbell Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Lissandri, Lillian P.
21 Gay Ter.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Lorow, Gregg A.
Lorow, Lynda S.
146 Edwards Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/01/18

Lovler, David A.
11 Fairfield Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/05/18

Morey, Amy R.
22 Laurel St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

MSM Transport, LLC
73 Oregon Road
Ashland, MA 01721
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

Mullarkey, Gregory A.
11 Fowler Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/07/18

Narreau, Paul
Narreau, Patricia A.
2023 East St.
Three Rivers, MA 01080
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

North, Kevin Allen
227 North Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/14/18

Ojeda, Jessica
a/k/a Ojeda-Tarrats, Jessica
38 Dorothy Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

O’Malley, Maureen V.
16 Union St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/04/18

Owens, Kissa T.
a/k/a Owens-Davis, Kissa T.
53 Palmer Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Payless Auto Sales
Doyle, Wayne
Doyle, Kelly
a/k/a Brothers, Kelly
215 Ware St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

Pushee, Craig Eugene
13 Leo Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/12/18

Renaud, Kelly Rita
23 Coolidge Ave.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/05/18

Renaud, Kelly Rita
23 Coolidge Ave.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/15/18

Rodriguez, Evelyn
290 Dorset St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/07/18

Rozki, Bethany J.
110 Wayne St.
West Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/10/18

Ruel, Paul A.
37 Ridgeway Circle
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Spencer, Elizabeth A
75 Main St., Apt. 2
Northfield, MA 01360
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Sustache, Ruth D.
16-18 Beacon Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/05/18

Territo, Jennifer M.
38 Gerrard Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/11/18

Torres, Denise
a/k/a Rivera, Denise
51 Quincy St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/07/18

Turgeon, Germain J.
Turgeon, Laurette M.
20 Everett St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Welcome, Kurt Joseph
10 Depot St.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/08/18

Wiater, John M.
200 Stafford Road
Wales, MA 01081
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/07/18

Zborowski, Douglas J.
Zborowski, Renee O.
a/k/a Stetson, Renee O.
49A Crown St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/13/18

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

1629 Conway Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Cynthia J. Cheever
Seller: Jacqueline T. Marsh
Date: 06/05/18

BUCKLAND

1 Conway Road
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $218,000
Buyer: Clint R. Kelley
Seller: Dena M. Briggs
Date: 06/14/18

COLRAIN

15 High St.
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Migdalys Burgos-Diaz
Seller: Douglas A. Weber
Date: 06/07/18

CONWAY

411 South Shirkshire Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $134,000
Buyer: Patrick Lynch
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 06/11/18

DEERFIELD

12 Captain Lathrop Dr.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Barbara Kubacki
Seller: Barbara Kubacki RET
Date: 06/05/18

341 Pine Nook Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Philip Greer
Seller: David Ilsley
Date: 06/11/18

GREENFIELD

898 Bernardston Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $322,000
Buyer: Frederick G. Nassiff
Seller: R. J. Mulford
Date: 06/15/18

68 Cleveland St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $197,500
Buyer: Michael F. Dindoffer
Seller: Dana M. Fulton
Date: 06/08/18

259 Federal St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: James W. Renaud
Seller: Raven Ridge LLC
Date: 06/08/18

70 Fort Square
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Edmond L. Leclerc
Seller: Jennifer A. Mielinski
Date: 06/08/18

39 Grove St.
Greenfield, MA 01376
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Paul W. Allis
Seller: Daniel M. Majewski
Date: 06/15/18

16 Hall Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Andrew Downey Myles
Seller: Joshua D. Parker
Date: 06/15/18

128 Mountain Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $433,500
Buyer: Curtice R. Griffin
Seller: Alistair N. Shurman
Date: 06/08/18

47 Silvio O. Conte Dr.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $640,000
Buyer: DS PBCR LLC
Seller: Howard Mathison
Date: 06/06/18

28 Wunsch Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Austin E. Moreno
Seller: Andrew M. Cloutier
Date: 06/15/18

HAWLEY

12 Pudding Hollow Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Bryan W. Clark
Seller: Kenneth A. Bertsch
Date: 06/07/18

LEVERETT

10 Lead Mine Road
Leverett, MA 01054
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Michael A. Wissemann
Seller: Langley RT
Date: 06/07/18

101 Long Hill Road
Leverett, MA 01054
Amount: $338,000
Buyer: Anya Jacobs
Seller: Sharon E. Howard
Date: 06/14/18

LEYDEN

27 Eden Trail
Leyden, MA 01337
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Richard Pendleton
Seller: Wayne L. Fisher
Date: 06/08/18

MONTAGUE

14 Gunn Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $308,000
Buyer: Tanya M. Parker
Seller: Henry Komosa
Date: 06/15/18

ORANGE

35 Ball St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Katherine S. Bates
Seller: David A. Page
Date: 06/05/18

24 Briggs St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: Lisa R. Merrill
Seller: Arthur Dumont
Date: 06/11/18

67 Mayo Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: 88 Lambert Ave NT
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 06/11/18

3 Meadow Lane
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jacob Fedelski
Seller: Ryan J. Lilley
Date: 06/08/18

Moore Ave. #6E
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: George A. Hunt
Seller: Orange Economic Development
Date: 06/08/18

118 Tully Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Mickey Gonzalez
Seller: Reginald C. Haughton
Date: 06/07/18

SHELBURNE

125 Reynolds Road
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: John F. Manning
Seller: Michael D. Parry
Date: 06/15/18

55 Shelburne Center Road
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Jeffrey B. Barden
Seller: Biscuit Hill Farm LLC
Date: 06/04/18

SHUTESBURY

379 Leverett Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Thomas R. Zeller
Seller: Kevin McGarigal
Date: 06/08/18

WENDELL

41 Bear Mountain Road
Wendell, MA 01379
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Rachel Stevens
Seller: John T. Koehler
Date: 06/11/18

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

115 Anthony St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Alicia C. St.Laurent
Seller: Mary-Ellen Hulse
Date: 06/04/18

27 Belvidere Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $200,900
Buyer: Kathleen S. Sobczyk
Seller: John Cooley
Date: 06/08/18

44 Colonial Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Dobek
Seller: Patrick H. Cullen
Date: 06/11/18

234 Corey St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $228,550
Buyer: New England Developers
Seller: US Bank
Date: 06/14/18

28 Garden St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Kelly Holve
Seller: David A. Dorman
Date: 06/05/18

70 Independence Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $339,000
Buyer: Lawrence A. Mayo
Seller: Matthew W. Bulmer
Date: 06/14/18

232 North Westfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Katelyn Iacolo
Seller: Norman J. Iacolo
Date: 06/08/18

58 Oak Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $206,250
Buyer: Thomas J. Graveline
Seller: James T. Graveline
Date: 06/04/18

34 Peros Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Stephen Liptak
Seller: June L. Savoy
Date: 06/11/18

52 Peros Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Joshua M. Dufrane
Seller: Viktor Moshkovskiy
Date: 06/08/18

31 Pineview Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: J. M. Leclerc-McLaughlin
Seller: Brett J. McLaughlin
Date: 06/05/18

76 Pineview Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Ashley M. Moore
Seller: David L. Aldrich
Date: 06/12/18

167 Poplar St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Jason Mann
Seller: Mary F. Whalen
Date: 06/15/18

53 Silver St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Patrick H. Cullen
Seller: Emerald City Rentals LLC
Date: 06/11/18

71 Stony Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $142,058
Buyer: HSBC Bank
Seller: William J. Muzzy
Date: 06/13/18

76 Pineview Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Ashley M. Moore
Seller: David L. Aldrich
Date: 06/12/18

167 Poplar St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Jason Mann
Seller: Mary F. Whalen
Date: 06/15/18

53 Silver St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Patrick H. Cullen
Seller: Emerald City Rentals LLC
Date: 06/11/18

71 Stony Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $142,058
Buyer: HSBC Bank
Seller: William J. Muzzy
Date: 06/13/18

BLANDFORD

30-R Birch Hill Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Ryan F. Jarest
Seller: Edwin E. Howe
Date: 06/15/18

Stannard Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Springfield City Water
Seller: Arlow H. Case
Date: 06/11/18

30-R Birch Hill Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Ryan F. Jarest
Seller: Edwin E. Howe
Date: 06/15/18

Stannard Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Springfield City Water
Seller: Arlow H. Case
Date: 06/11/18

BRIMFIELD

67 Champeaux Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $446,000
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Mike W. Crosby
Date: 06/08/18

CHICOPEE

40 Auburn St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $169,500
Buyer: Victor M. Santiago-Rivera
Seller: Glotin, Leone A., (Estate)
Date: 06/15/18

115 Blanchwood Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Ramona M. Romero
Seller: Christina J. Cordero
Date: 06/11/18

388 Broadway St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $392,500
Buyer: Hurricane Properties LLC
Seller: North Harlow 2 LLC
Date: 06/15/18

635 Burnett Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Robert F. Barnes
Seller: Jones FT
Date: 06/08/18

378 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Dmitriy Salagornik
Seller: Sergey Tokarev
Date: 06/05/18

400 East Main St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Al Lafleur Inc.
Seller: Kenneth A. Gevry
Date: 06/13/18

600 East Main St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Elizabeth J. Cayo
Seller: Ronald A. Libby
Date: 06/15/18

146 Edgewood Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Steven P. Gilzinger
Seller: Joseph M. Thomas
Date: 06/08/18

195 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Jessica Nhong
Seller: Jadwiga D. Nhong
Date: 06/15/18

92 Harding St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Lisa M. Reniewicz
Seller: Adam P. Tanguay
Date: 06/06/18

117 Labelle Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: Sobhi M. Saleh
Seller: Kazimierz Chmielewski
Date: 06/14/18

43 Laskowski St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Melissa M. Lizardi
Seller: Daniel J. Roberge
Date: 06/13/18

76 Neill Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Paulo M. Fragoso
Seller: Michael J. Fine
Date: 06/08/18

17 Pearl St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $248,000
Buyer: Joseph T. Lemire
Seller: Elaine M. Dutton
Date: 06/15/18

421 Prospect St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Barbara Dickinson
Seller: Jeffrey Vanoudenhove
Date: 06/11/18

25 Tenney St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jose A. Fines
Seller: Robert F. Barnes
Date: 06/08/18

40 Western Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Bachir M. Saleh
Seller: Elizabeth Dabrowski
Date: 06/15/18

24 Willwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $145,953
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: John Martino
Date: 06/04/18

EAST LONGMEADOW

147 Canterbury Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $730,500
Buyer: Min Zhao
Seller: Mitchell J. Westlund
Date: 06/15/18

134 Country Club Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $900,000
Buyer: Peter Cote
Seller: Timothy P. Daggett
Date: 06/15/18

Deer Park Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: Charles G. Arment
Seller: Westmass Area Development Corp.
Date: 06/14/18

126 Gates Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $185,500
Buyer: Jonathan Schroeder
Seller: William E. Preye
Date: 06/04/18

26 Hampden Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $252,500
Buyer: Ronald F. Ennaco
Seller: Allyn K. Peterson
Date: 06/07/18

38 Hillside Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $234,900
Buyer: Kyle C. Mitchell
Seller: David N. Abad
Date: 06/14/18

12 Indiana St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: M. N. Logan-Cangialosi
Seller: Hastings, Cedric W., (Estate)
Date: 06/11/18

15 Peachtree Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $555,000
Buyer: Ormond B. Hamilton
Seller: Jeffery H. Hastings
Date: 06/05/18

80 Porter Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Casey Laushway
Seller: Todd M. Kowalczyk
Date: 06/04/18

55 Rockingham Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $589,000
Buyer: Christopher Mudge
Seller: Patrick T. Mailloux
Date: 06/15/18

834 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $264,000
Buyer: Jessica Nash
Seller: Joseph P. Deangelo
Date: 06/15/18

250 Westwood Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Gina M. Roy
Seller: Samar Reine
Date: 06/07/18

HAMPDEN

13 Sessions Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Taran A. Savoie
Seller: Joseph Delessio
Date: 06/15/18

HOLLAND

18 Knollwood Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $126,000
Buyer: David A. Roche
Seller: Barbara Travisano
Date: 06/07/18

21 Lakeridge Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Karen J. Calkins
Seller: Arnold Paul
Date: 06/13/18

51 Old County Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Davide M. Ferrari
Seller: Jude Germaine-Skowyra
Date: 06/15/18

1 Old East Brimfield Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Jennifer J. Sullivan
Seller: Jean M. Sullivan
Date: 06/11/18

18 Stafford Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $214,900
Buyer: Jesse Vaillancourt
Seller: Jose L. Ramos
Date: 06/12/18

HOLYOKE

82 Chapin St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: Luis Rodriguez
Seller: Miguel A. Cruz
Date: 06/11/18

11 Cypress Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Anthony E. Giannetti
Seller: James M. Hart
Date: 06/13/18

141 Dupuis Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Brian E. Besko
Seller: Andrew M. Barsalou
Date: 06/04/18

345-363 Dwight St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Assets Investment Co. LLC
Seller: Princeton Commercial Holding
Date: 06/05/18

51 Francis Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $157,700
Buyer: Jeffrey D. Nutting
Seller: Donna E. Dickinson
Date: 06/13/18

1033-R Hampden St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Beatriz I. Rivera
Seller: Bowen, Shirley J., (Estate)
Date: 06/13/18

63 Hillview Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $189,839
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Erica R. Leahy
Date: 06/12/18

20 Labrie Lane
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $389,000
Buyer: Leeann Pasquini
Seller: Eduardo B. Carballo
Date: 06/12/18

21 Morgan St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Jennifer Gutterman
Seller: Hedge Hog Industries Corp.
Date: 06/11/18

1140 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Ruth H. Pinon
Seller: James M. Neiswanger
Date: 06/04/18

126-128 Pearl St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Alexandra H. Fazzi
Seller: John Makowski
Date: 06/15/18

133 Pleasant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Andrzej J. Warminski
Seller: Linda C. Laderach
Date: 06/15/18

28 Stanford St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Patrick T. Kandianis
Seller: Katherine Q. Hebert
Date: 06/15/18

30 Vadnais St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Fabienne D. Boisson
Seller: Jennifer L. Cooper
Date: 06/08/18

292-294 West Franklin St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: James Stillwaggon
Seller: Richard A. Herman
Date: 06/14/18

LONGMEADOW

37 Captain Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $226,800
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Diane L. Josephson
Date: 06/14/18

246 Colony Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $675,000
Buyer: Yiming Ching
Seller: James R. Cook
Date: 06/04/18

26 Edgewood Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $278,000
Buyer: Ryan M. Coseo
Seller: Jesus Escobar
Date: 06/08/18

177 Hopkins Place
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $316,900
Buyer: Michael Diclemente
Seller: John D. Bowman
Date: 06/06/18

10 Magnolia Circle
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $628,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Sheehan
Seller: Elaine Fleisher
Date: 06/13/18

15 Magnolia Circle
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $580,000
Buyer: Andreas Vaupel
Seller: Natalie K. Rafferty
Date: 06/04/18

183 Meadowbrook Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Carol L. Abizaid
Seller: Mary Scully
Date: 06/04/18

142 Meadowlark Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Jeremy E. Master
Seller: Anil V. Inamdar
Date: 06/04/18

49 Quinnehtuk Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $427,000
Buyer: Shawn A. Caron
Seller: Richard S. Fox
Date: 06/15/18

36 Willett Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $481,000
Buyer: Matthew Brais
Seller: James F. Biron
Date: 06/14/18

186 Williams St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $277,000
Buyer: David P. Buscemi
Seller: Elizabeth Perodeau
Date: 06/08/18

963 Williams St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $488,000
Buyer: Alexander C. Santaniello
Seller: Vincent B. Santaniello
Date: 06/11/18

LUDLOW

30 Brookfield St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Raul R. Coelho
Seller: Anne M. Correia
Date: 06/12/18

54 Bruni Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Jeffrey Butcher
Seller: Hervieux, Mary C., (Estate)
Date: 06/08/18

47 Coolidge Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $235,500
Buyer: Isabel G. Martins
Seller: Elaine Lemieux
Date: 06/13/18

33 Crescent Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $186,250
Buyer: Nicole L. Belisle-Garza
Seller: Domitilia A. Rodrigues
Date: 06/12/18

174 Erin Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $284,000
Buyer: Steven M. Oliveira
Seller: Ann M. Belden
Date: 06/15/18

78 Georgetown Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Patrick A. Roy
Seller: Diane L. Witowski
Date: 06/11/18

135-137 Howard St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Manuel C. Salgado
Seller: Idalina C. Rodrigues
Date: 06/14/18

115-117 Minechoag Heights
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Jorge J. Fonseca
Seller: Jose F. Mateus
Date: 06/14/18

11 Nash Hill Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $332,000
Buyer: Brent E. Fisher
Seller: Deann Szczepanek-Bingham
Date: 06/08/18

183 Prospect St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Nathan J. Pereira
Seller: Donald G. Clement
Date: 06/07/18

183 Reynolds St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $148,500
Buyer: Eric A. Rucki
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 06/15/18

137 Stevens St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Grace M. Dias
Seller: Vincent F. Stanek
Date: 06/05/18

681 West St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $397,000
Buyer: Chris L. Cotto
Seller: Ronald P. Methe
Date: 06/15/18

135 Whitney St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Kyle W. Neil-Vosburgh
Seller: Kyle J. Gauthier
Date: 06/15/18

MONSON

41 Thompson St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $128,200
Buyer: TM Properties Inc.
Seller: TM Properties Inc.
Date: 06/05/18

MONTGOMERY

47 Pitcher St.
Montgomery, MA 01085
Amount: $613,000
Buyer: Steven D. Pierce
Seller: Roberta Barron
Date: 06/14/18

PALMER

10 Brown St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Stephanie S. Russo
Seller: Gordon M. Merkel
Date: 06/04/18

1057 Central St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $212,400
Buyer: Carol Campagna
Seller: Donald J. Potter
Date: 06/15/18

39 Converse St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Michael C. Champagne
Seller: Irene M. Johnson
Date: 06/15/18

4037 Hill St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $252,500
Buyer: Dianne L. Lefebvre
Seller: Steven P. Lemay
Date: 06/08/18

80 Squier St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $236,195
Buyer: Wesley R. Deshano
Seller: Raymond Labonte
Date: 06/08/18

2 Thompson Dr.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $231,900
Buyer: Kevin Larocque
Seller: Jane E. Sutphin
Date: 06/15/18

SOUTHWICK

12 Bugbee Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Larue FT
Seller: Anderson, Elwood H., (Estate)
Date: 06/04/18

9 Junction Station Road #9
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Mary F. Whalen
Seller: 20 Depot Square LLC
Date: 06/15/18

24 Lauren Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $540,000
Buyer: Matthew W. Bulmer
Seller: Kelly J. Francoeur
Date: 06/14/18

11 North Pond Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: Daryl M. Philo
Seller: Chang H. Choi
Date: 06/15/18

7 Overlook Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Cynthia N. Metcalf
Seller: Pinnacle Estates at the Ranch
Date: 06/15/18

45 Pineywood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Yuliya Sivolobova
Seller: Wilmington Savings
Date: 06/05/18

11 Pondview Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: Thomas C. Feyre
Seller: Rodney H. Payette
Date: 06/13/18

SPRINGFIELD

48 Agnes St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $148,900
Buyer: Darcy L. Borecki
Seller: Brian A. Bisson
Date: 06/14/18

137-139 Allen St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Charlie Melo-Perez
Seller: Gabriel E. Sanchez
Date: 06/05/18

891-893 Armory St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $128,740
Buyer: JP Morgan Chase Bank
Seller: Domitila Silva-Cruz
Date: 06/07/18

36 Arthur St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $194,000
Buyer: Juan D. Almonte
Seller: Miriam I. Caldwell
Date: 06/15/18

107 Arthur St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $200,500
Buyer: Evelyne I. Malavi
Seller: Erik J. Lacasse
Date: 06/11/18

228 Atwater Road
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Robert F. Shea
Seller: Keough, John J. Jr, (Estate)
Date: 06/08/18

64 Audubon St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $199,000
Buyer: Daren Kline
Seller: Grosz RT
Date: 06/04/18

17 Balfour Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $131,500
Buyer: Scott T. Page
Seller: Andrew A. Ngure
Date: 06/15/18

465 Berkshire Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $124,586
Buyer: PNC Bank
Seller: Susann G. Schwarz
Date: 06/04/18

185 Birchland Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Mattie L. Barklow
Seller: Robert J. Shonak
Date: 06/08/18

175 Bowles Park
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $223,829
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Anthony Appleyard
Date: 06/06/18

37 Bray St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Yolanda Torres
Seller: Mary Peters
Date: 06/12/18

35 Bruce St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Kathryn Graves
Seller: Kevin T. Stevenson
Date: 06/08/18

50 Cambridge St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Orlando Berdecia
Seller: VIP Homes & Associates LLC
Date: 06/06/18

52 Carnavon Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Jeanny B. Chalas
Seller: Titus B. Barklow
Date: 06/08/18

26-28 Claremont St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Zuleikys Y. Escoto
Seller: Lachenauer LLC
Date: 06/08/18

374 Commonwealth Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $136,900
Buyer: Krista Santiago
Seller: Mildred Goldsmith
Date: 06/15/18

58 Crawford Circle
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Ashley C. Crutchfield
Seller: Della Ripa Real Estate
Date: 06/14/18

41 Dartmouth St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Fatima M. Abdelmagid
Seller: Yasir Osman
Date: 06/06/18

84 Denver St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Kimberly A. Deuso
Seller: Juan A. Lozada
Date: 06/12/18

201 Durant St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Seneca R. Spruill
Seller: Joshua O’Neil
Date: 06/11/18

74 East Drumlin Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Jenna Girouard
Seller: Leonard Volfson
Date: 06/15/18

101 Eleanor Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $133,000
Buyer: Joyce A. Crafts
Seller: Maria Georges
Date: 06/07/18

29 Fairway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $162,500
Buyer: Garfield D. March
Seller: Shellie M. Donner
Date: 06/15/18

55 Fenway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $204,000
Buyer: Mohammed N. Meteab
Seller: Country Development Corp.
Date: 06/14/18

264 Fountain St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $117,500
Buyer: William Raleigh
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 06/08/18

228 Gifford St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: NSP Residential LLC
Seller: PNC Bank
Date: 06/08/18

171 Gilbert Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $116,400
Buyer: Daniel Cabido
Seller: James W. Fiore
Date: 06/05/18

46 Grattan St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Hellson N. Almodovar
Seller: Anibal Cotto-Laboy
Date: 06/08/18

6 Greentree Circle
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $206,000
Buyer: Shane M. Fricke
Seller: Charmaine Luvera
Date: 06/15/18

23 Greentree Circle
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Hyacinthe Ufiteyezu
Seller: Domenic S. Folco
Date: 06/08/18

98 Hall St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Jose L. Fontan
Seller: Lachenauer LLC
Date: 06/15/18

77 Huron St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Lareau
Seller: Kenneth L. Fitzgibbon
Date: 06/11/18

55 Ionia St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $147,100
Buyer: Johanny M. Tejeda
Seller: Indra Harris
Date: 06/04/18

43 Jefferson Ave.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $142,000
Buyer: Homayra Rivera-Lozada
Seller: Imadeddine A. Awkal
Date: 06/05/18

179 King St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $138,500
Buyer: Kevin R. Benoit
Seller: Marie Tavernier
Date: 06/15/18

34 Lancaster St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Justin J. Turner
Seller: George E. Legere
Date: 06/04/18

65 Leatherleaf Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: 4D RT
Seller: Janice M. Moses
Date: 06/12/18

73 Leete St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $117,400
Buyer: Jose E. Serrano
Seller: Vanessa Rodriguez
Date: 06/12/18

150 Louis Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Dylan J. Sheehan
Seller: Joanne N. Gilley
Date: 06/13/18

45 Lumae St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Michele L. Paige
Seller: Laura A. Normand
Date: 06/15/18

445 Main St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: 445 LLC
Seller: RSMS LLC
Date: 06/11/18

46 Marquette St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Lydia E. Caban
Seller: Joseph Pantuosco
Date: 06/14/18

53 Martha St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Solimar Rivera
Seller: Somontia S. Smith
Date: 06/05/18

110 Mary Coburn Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Robert J. Perkins
Seller: Nancy G. Kennedy
Date: 06/07/18

90 Mayher St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $164,900
Buyer: Chad J. Tillinghast
Seller: Cheryl M. Cassidy
Date: 06/15/18

41 McKnight St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Jitxia M. Diaz
Seller: Good Homes LLC
Date: 06/13/18

109 Mildred Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Miriam L. Caldwell
Seller: Sandra L. Sternal-Chafer
Date: 06/15/18

34-36 Moulton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $128,625
Buyer: Junior Properties LLC
Seller: HSBC Bank
Date: 06/15/18

49 Norman St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Jacqueline Diaz
Seller: James Lee
Date: 06/15/18

24 North Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Rick M. Pio
Seller: Brian Krawiec
Date: 06/04/18

80 Northampton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Ramon A. Rodriguez
Date: 06/11/18

60 Old Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $205,500
Buyer: Kelly A. Partridge
Seller: Daniel P. Lukasik
Date: 06/07/18

154 Packard Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Venice M. Phillips
Seller: Gary M. Gaudette
Date: 06/08/18

406-408 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Albert B. Cuevas
Seller: FHLM
Date: 06/12/18

850 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $188,000
Buyer: Bank New York Mellon
Seller: David O. Nicholson
Date: 06/05/18

14 Parkwood St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $179,900
Buyer: Felix Arez
Seller: Albert Garnier
Date: 06/08/18

872 Plumtree Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Matthew Simon
Seller: Freddie Redondo
Date: 06/05/18

133 Powell Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Gamalier Colon
Seller: Randy L. Knoll
Date: 06/08/18

23 Rosedale Ave.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Michael Winn
Seller: Frank V. Winn
Date: 06/15/18

1160 Saint James Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Sabrina L. Cooley
Seller: Saw Construction LLC
Date: 06/15/18

68 South Branch Pkwy.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: DPW RET
Seller: William L. Collins
Date: 06/15/18

119 South Branch Pkwy.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $160,514
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Veronica C. Gooden
Date: 06/06/18

36 South Shore Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Jeffrey C. Meon
Seller: Mary E. Metzger
Date: 06/12/18

183 Stapleton Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $153,000
Buyer: Amybeth Danehey
Seller: AJN Rentals LLC
Date: 06/15/18

34-36 Sterling St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Jacey M. Rondeau
Seller: Nolava LLC
Date: 06/07/18

27 Stocker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Charlene Cuevas
Seller: Jessica Ferreira
Date: 06/12/18

102 Tinkham Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: A. Martinez-Velazquez
Seller: Anthony M. Feliton
Date: 06/14/18

22 Virginia St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Yolanda I. Cabrera
Seller: Global Homes Properties
Date: 06/08/18

374-382 Walnut St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Joshua Reid
Seller: Mitchell Taylor
Date: 06/12/18

24 Webber St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Ai N. Lin
Seller: Carol R. Collins
Date: 06/07/18

191 West Allen Ridge Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $156,100
Buyer: Catharine Norman-Pauze
Seller: Alice Eustathion
Date: 06/14/18

750 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $164,820
Buyer: Midfirst Bank
Seller: Mai Nguyen
Date: 06/06/18

226 Winton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $174,226
Buyer: Christopher J. Footit
Seller: Alan A. Pellerin
Date: 06/15/18

15 Woodridge Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Anthony Recchia
Seller: Timothy M. McGowan
Date: 06/08/18

29 Woodrow St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $129,700
Buyer: Irmarilis Santiago
Seller: Diego Garcia
Date: 06/14/18

WALES

18 Ainsworth Hill Road
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Jarrett Tanner-Sumwalt
Seller: Theodore J. Casey
Date: 06/12/18

22 Monson Road
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $268,000
Buyer: Eric Pedersen
Seller: Timothy J. Watson
Date: 06/13/18

WEST SPRINGFIELD

163 Albert St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Amanda E. Kocot
Seller: Gray, Birgitta E., (Estate)
Date: 06/15/18

31 Bonnie Brae Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $297,000
Buyer: Arnold C. Farley
Seller: Jeanne A. Gagne
Date: 06/05/18

47 Bradford Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $5,000,000
Buyer: DAK Judge LLC
Seller: Home-Like Apartments Inc.
Date: 06/15/18

35 Burke Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: John P. Rancin
Seller: Lilliya Kulyak
Date: 06/14/18

86 Connecticut Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Brian S. Zapor
Seller: Brahman Holdings LLC
Date: 06/08/18

62 Craig Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $5,000,000
Buyer: Dak Judge LLC
Seller: Home-Like Apartments Inc.
Date: 06/15/18

102 Greystone Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Ryan Bartlett
Seller: James F. Bailey
Date: 06/04/18

123 Greystone Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Migdalia Bernal
Seller: Catherine J. Napolitan
Date: 06/04/18

45 High St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Atif Khan
Seller: Vladimir Kot
Date: 06/07/18

6 Lyman St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Aspen Properties Investments
Seller: Ryan Harrington
Date: 06/07/18

79 Robinson Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $283,500
Buyer: Joseph P. Saimeri
Seller: William Brown
Date: 06/05/18

11 Sheridan Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $232,500
Buyer: David J. Malloy
Seller: Nolan P. Ryan
Date: 06/06/18

68 Sprague St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $155,900
Buyer: That W. Tun
Seller: Robin A. Austin
Date: 06/04/18

249 Woodmont St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $227,500
Buyer: Michael S. Tenczar
Seller: Sabrina Capaccio
Date: 06/08/18

WESTFIELD

56 Barrister Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Scott A. Cervonayco
Seller: Paul P. Petell
Date: 06/15/18

50 Dartmouth St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Nicholas J. Blais
Seller: Brahman Holdings LLC
Date: 06/15/18

307 Falley Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Anthony J. Bilotta
Seller: Judith G. Mason
Date: 06/04/18

33 Hawks Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Vuthy Chhum
Seller: Eric D. Meyers
Date: 06/08/18

102 Lindbergh Blvd.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Kara E. Smith
Date: 06/07/18

163 Main St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $158,546
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Pamela J. Kappel
Date: 06/11/18

138 Meadow St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $117,500
Buyer: C&K Blue Sky Properties
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 06/05/18

45 Miller St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $179,900
Buyer: Joann Laplante
Seller: John E. Wood
Date: 06/08/18

78 Orange St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Maya Shankar
Seller: Sara E. Gilbert
Date: 06/08/18

20 School St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $204,500
Buyer: Western Mass Property Developers
Seller: Eagle Properties Development Inc.
Date: 06/15/18

347 Shaker Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Krystal Olko
Seller: Lapierre, Liann, (Estate)
Date: 06/06/18

10 Sherman St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $116,500
Buyer: Richard Ringer
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 06/15/18

55 South Meadow Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $263,500
Buyer: Elizabeth A. Emmett
Seller: Robert B. Morrill
Date: 06/14/18

25 Spruce St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Zachary Florek
Seller: Robert W. Bernardara
Date: 06/08/18

57 Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Patrick M. Greaney
Seller: Jeffrey R. Mitchell
Date: 06/13/18

WILBRAHAM

2343 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Tadpole Development Corp.
Seller: Bellasophia LLC
Date: 06/15/18

43 Decorie Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $337,000
Buyer: Jeffrey M. Picariello
Seller: Rene D. Garza
Date: 06/12/18

14 Devonshire Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $213,600
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Richard K. Lawrence
Date: 06/07/18

44 East Longmeadow Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Association Properties Group
Seller: Steven E. Kloss
Date: 06/08/18

9 Longfellow Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $176,320
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Lorraine Scott
Date: 06/12/18

4 Maynard Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: NRZ REO 10 LLC
Seller: Richard S. Kinsey
Date: 06/05/18

7 Ronald Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Nicole M. Fusco
Seller: Custom Homes Development Group
Date: 06/08/18

38 Sunnyside Ter.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $318,000
Buyer: Daniel Soto-Tovar
Seller: Judy L. Cezeaux
Date: 06/07/18

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

42 Applewood Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Adam Tanguay
Seller: David L. Slovin
Date: 06/06/18

50 Aubinwood Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $347,500
Buyer: Rochelle Green
Seller: Kent FT
Date: 06/12/18

1335 Bay Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Ian M. Fisher
Seller: Agustin Lao
Date: 06/14/18

19 Dickinson St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Dickinson Street LLC
Seller: Crossman, Marjorie R., (Estate)
Date: 06/04/18

419 Henry St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $699,000
Buyer: Darcy A. Zbinovec
Seller: Benjamin R. Preston
Date: 06/11/18

211 Iduna Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $675,800
Buyer: Zhijian Qiao
Seller: Robert L. Sullivan
Date: 06/11/18

15 Jason Court
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Tingyi Liu
Seller: Kam Kit Wong 2007 TR
Date: 06/07/18

28 Kestrel Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Symeon Gerasimids
Seller: William B. Driscoll
Date: 06/15/18

125 Lindenridge Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $819,000
Buyer: Ryan Crawford
Seller: Bercume Construction LLC
Date: 06/11/18

87 Logtown Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Min Cheng
Seller: Rex E. Wallace
Date: 06/11/18

641 Main St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Paul M. Dibenedetto
Seller: Kathleen H. Maiolatesi TR
Date: 06/06/18

401 Old Farm Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: William J. Leonard
Seller: Tsering Dolma
Date: 06/15/18

1380 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Dolkar Gyaltsen
Seller: Robert W. McAllister
Date: 06/15/18

108 Wildflower Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $509,200
Buyer: Patrick Chin-Hong
Seller: Schultz-Pietromonaco FT
Date: 06/04/18

BELCHERTOWN

227 Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Charles A. Blandford
Seller: Eric C. Paige
Date: 06/15/18

671 Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Gabriel Ting
Seller: Megan S. Scoon
Date: 06/08/18

30 Canal Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Bryan W. Eldridge
Seller: William F. Daly
Date: 06/11/18

23 Chadbourne Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Steven I. Hodgen
Seller: Jeffrey D. Hodgen
Date: 06/14/18

305 Federal St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $234,597
Buyer: Florence Bank
Seller: Michalski, Jennifer M., (Estate)
Date: 06/13/18

12 Magnolia Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $412,900
Buyer: Richard W. Rege
Seller: J. N. Duquette & Son Construction
Date: 06/15/18

177 Michael Sears Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $344,900
Buyer: Andrew M. Barsalou
Seller: William R. Thomas
Date: 06/04/18

25 South Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Michael J. Fine
Seller: Gary G. Decoteau
Date: 06/08/18

107 South Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Christopher J. Plewa
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 06/11/18

305 Sabin St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Michael T. Adams
Seller: Thomas J. Pelissier
Date: 06/08/18

153 Stebbins St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Dean M. Kolodji
Seller: Stephen M. O’Brien
Date: 06/14/18

CHESTERFIELD

141 Ireland St.
Chesterfield, MA 01084
Amount: $204,000
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Edward Stempniewicz
Date: 06/11/18

EASTHAMPTON

21-23 Exeter St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $312,000
Buyer: Bethany O’Neil
Seller: Lindsay R. Barron
Date: 06/15/18

7 Laurel Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: George A. Paradee
Seller: Lisa L. Cappello
Date: 06/07/18

8 Louise Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $258,375
Buyer: 8 Louise Avenue LLC
Seller: Elizabeth Stiles-Neumann
Date: 06/15/18

127 Main St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $622,500
Buyer: Viktoriia Harrison
Seller: Diane M. Kwolek
Date: 06/11/18

29 Morin Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Angeline M. Brault
Seller: Patrick E. O’Neil
Date: 06/15/18

50 Pomeroy St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $396,000
Buyer: Deborah B. Harris
Seller: Mark S. Dupuis
Date: 06/04/18

33 Torrey St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $272,600
Buyer: Barbra L. Eaton
Seller: Cheryle S. Lawrence
Date: 06/08/18

35 Torrey St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Mark G. Mastroianni
Seller: Edward A. Salners
Date: 06/05/18

GRANBY

174 Batchelor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: Robert S. Seibert
Seller: David J. Barthelette
Date: 06/08/18

Carver St. #4
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Roberge
Seller: Kotowicz Custom Homes LLC
Date: 06/11/18

4 Carver St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Thomas O’Brien
Seller: Matthew T. Biron
Date: 06/07/18

89 Morgan St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: James M. Hart
Seller: Richard P. Mathieu
Date: 06/14/18

16 Taylor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Patricia J. Amidon
Seller: Patricia L. Gordon
Date: 06/15/18

HADLEY

14 Crystal Lane
Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $762,500
Buyer: Nadeem Sheikh
Seller: Bercume Construction LLC
Date: 06/07/18

12 East Commons Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $459,500
Buyer: John J. Pipczynski
Seller: East Street Commons LLC
Date: 06/06/18

73 North Maple St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Dorn L. Carranza
Seller: Carl Selavka
Date: 06/08/18

158 Rocky Hill Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $292,000
Buyer: Nader S. Akoury
Seller: Camella World-Peace
Date: 06/04/18

303 Russell St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: 303 Russell Street LLC
Seller: 1836 Development Ent. LLC
Date: 06/06/18

42 West St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: 42 West Street Realty LLC
Seller: Jacqueline M. Zuzgo
Date: 06/15/18

HATFIELD

13 Chestnut St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Cindy A. Barcomb
Seller: Mark D. Kamins
Date: 06/04/18

78 Chestnut St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Robert J. Powers
Seller: Edward L. Malinowski
Date: 06/14/18

8 School St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $237,000
Buyer: Katherine S. Knapp
Seller: FNMA
Date: 06/08/18

HUNTINGTON

68 County Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $352,000
Buyer: Sarah J. Pringle
Seller: Casey J. Mitchell
Date: 06/14/18

15 Mountain View
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $146,500
Buyer: Norwich Properties LLC
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 06/08/18

171 Worthington Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Joshua S. Parsons
Seller: Timothy D. Doherty
Date: 06/04/18

MIDDLEFIELD

57 East River Road
Middlefield, MA 01243
Amount: $302,000
Buyer: Alfonso J. Longobardi
Seller: Judith E. White
Date: 06/08/18

NORTHAMPTON

88 Autumn Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Josiah Friedberg
Seller: Steven Friedberg
Date: 06/05/18

218 Elm St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Stephen R. Watson
Seller: Kenneth C. Hellman
Date: 06/15/18

36 Forbes Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $445,115
Buyer: Matthew Czaplinski
Seller: Nancy W. Keyes
Date: 06/15/18

8 Garfield Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Mary J. Sondrini
Seller: Mary C. Skinner
Date: 06/15/18

29 Munroe St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $660,000
Buyer: Martha T. McCluskey
Seller: Erich Husemoller
Date: 06/11/18

190 North Elm St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $419,900
Buyer: Jaycelle M. Pequet
Seller: Lindsay R. Barron
Date: 06/11/18

61 Ridgewood Ter.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Elizabeth A. Myers
Seller: Kim Y. Dionne
Date: 06/04/18

944 Ryan Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Joyce Duso
Seller: Christopher R. Aller
Date: 06/05/18

113 Sandy Hill Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Bridget C. Pinsonneault
Seller: Kelly A. Rose
Date: 06/08/18

14 Straw Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $336,000
Buyer: Laura E. Carlton
Seller: Jo-Anna Ross
Date: 06/11/18

22 Swan St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $337,000
Buyer: James N. Lobley
Seller: Julia A. Johnson
Date: 06/07/18

625 Westhampton Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $366,000
Buyer: Rachel S. Simpson
Seller: Thomas B. Malsbury
Date: 06/11/18

PLAINFIELD

73 South Union St.
Plainfield, MA 01070
Amount: $388,000
Buyer: Jerry H. Little
Seller: Patricia G. Morrill
Date: 06/12/18

West St.
Plainfield, MA 01070
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Massachusetts Audubon Society
Seller: Mary A. O’Brien LT
Date: 06/15/18

SOUTH HADLEY

26 Lamb St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Kevin Haczynski
Seller: SDJ Realty LLC
Date: 06/15/18

98 Morgan St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: David Barthelette
Seller: Marcela Bustamante
Date: 06/08/18

231 Mosier St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $312,000
Buyer: Bozena Welborne
Seller: Jake R. Blais
Date: 06/15/18

7 Roundelay Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $259,900
Buyer: Sarah K. Nystrom
Seller: Elizabeth A. Innocent
Date: 06/08/18

31 South St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: RB Homes LLC
Seller: Alison M. Lapierre
Date: 06/11/18

10 Spring St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Nicholas A. Friscia
Seller: 4 Seasons Property Maintenance
Date: 06/14/18

SOUTHAMPTON

133 Middle Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Lori D. Reynolds
Date: 06/13/18

24 Mountain View Circle
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: John Kennedy-Twyford
Seller: Ryan Hollister
Date: 06/15/18

WARE

50 Bacon Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Nathaniel A. Prince
Seller: Stewart M. Scoles
Date: 06/15/18

6 Gwen Circle
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $228,800
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Steven G. Kiel
Date: 06/13/18

14 Lee Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Warren M. Coughlin
Seller: Louis J. Supczak
Date: 06/08/18

19 Maple Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $138,900
Buyer: Gary W. Aiken
Seller: Ahmad N. Almoula
Date: 06/06/18

181 Monson Turnpike Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $147,500
Buyer: Megan K. Scott
Seller: Wilmington Savings
Date: 06/05/18

4 Moriarty Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Maximino Gonzalez
Seller: Joseph A. Companion
Date: 06/07/18

66 Pleasant St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Kelsi Lopes
Seller: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Date: 06/14/18

WILLIAMSBURG

5 Kingsley Ave.
Williamsburg, MA 01060
Amount: $314,000
Buyer: Chelynn Tetreault
Seller: Sara A. Sullivan LT
Date: 06/05/18

1 Myrtle St.
Williamsburg, MA 01039
Amount: $248,000
Buyer: Elizabeth C. Mathews
Seller: Allan L. Kidston
Date: 06/15/18

WORTHINGTON

265 Ridge Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: James A. Ryan
Seller: Joan M. Mendieta
Date: 06/04/18

Building Permits

The following building permits were issued during the months of May and June 2018.

AGAWAM

ICNE Group Realty, LLC
1070 Suffield St.
$81,500 — Modify wall locations, renovate two rooms, and new finishes in six rooms

Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield
823-835 Main St.
$16,500 — Roofing

AMHERST

Amherst College
Mead Art Building
$15,000 — Move existing door in restroom

Amherst College
Webster Hall
$40,000 — Paint, replace carpet, and lighting fixtures in classroom

Gleason Johndrow Rentals, LLC
10 University Dr.
$8,000 — Remove wall in kitchen of the Hangar, install new steel door for trash removal

PVP Holdings, LLC
30 Boltwood Walk
$65,000 — Remodel interior finishes, new bar construction

CHICOPEE

James Costigan Sr., Janice Costigan
32-34 Roosevelt Ave.
$17,500 — Remove and rebuild front-porch floor

Crown Atlantic Co., LLC
514 Montgomery St.
$30,000 — Verizon Wireless to remove antennas and replace with new antennas and ancillary equipment

Rene Fagnant
728 Grattan St.
$10,925 — Frame and sheetrock interior, replace doors

EASTHAMPTON

Autumn Properties, LLC
221 Northampton St.
$69,000 — Install ductwork for two HVAC units and refrigerant piping for Cumberland Farms

CH Realty VII CG Mact Bird, LLC
124 Northampton St.
$98,000 — Build addition to rear of car wash

Williston Northampton School
40-50 Park St.
$114,000 — Roofing

NORTHAMPTON

City of Northampton
125 Locust St.
$28,152 — Remove and replace garage door for DPW

Malvern Panalytical
22 Industrial Dr.
$1,000 — Replace window

Nonotuck Mill, LLC
296 Nonotuck St.
$3,000 — Add three partitions
Northampton Golf
135 Main St.
$2,500 — Non-illuminated monument sign

Smith College
102 Lower College Lane
$16,000 — Upgrade interior finishes in Ainsworth Gym, including ceiling, paint, flooring, and lockers

Suher Properties, LLC
76 Pleasant St.
$15,000 — Remove ceiling and wall partitions

SPRINGFIELD

143 Main Street Realty Corp.
125 Main St.
$60,000 — Install 12 roof-mounted panel antennas, microwave dish, and one GPS antenna

3640 Main Street, LLP
3640 Main St.
Alter medical office tenant space for New England Retinal Consultants

Blue Tarp Redevelopment, LLC
12 MGM Way
$343,328.80 — Tenant fit-out for Starbucks at MGM Springfield

Industry Avenue Holdings, LLC
66 Industry Ave.
$54,800 — Alter warehouse and office space for Refco Manufacturing

MassMutual
1295 State St.
$260,000 — Alter existing women’s restroom

Springfield Boys Club
481 Carew St.
$405,795 — Install roof-mounted solar panels

Springfield College
263 Alden St.
$30,390 — Interior demolition for future buildout of Dunkin’ Donuts in Springfield College Campus Union

Springfield College
263 Alden St.
$15,000 — Alter office space

Springfield Redevelopment Authority
55 Frank B. Murray St.
$200,000 — Alter space for community space and office areas on second floor of Union Station

Trident Alloys Inc.
181 Abbe Ave.
$481,500 — Add rooftop solar panels to commercial building

WEST SPRINGFIELD

CH Realty VII CG Mact Bird, LLC
1130 Riverdale St.
$15,000 — Exterior modifications, new entry arcade

Costco Wholesale
119 Daggett Dr.
$234,239 — Remodel restrooms

Coyote Realty
117 Park Ave.
$17,800 — Fire-protection system

Garrett Distefano
431 Gooseberry Road
$10,000 — Porch roof, pour concrete slab under porch, install new doors

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

520 Main St.
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: April P. West
Seller: Ethan K. Vandermark
Date: 05/23/18

193 Norton Hill Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Carolyn B. Johnson
Seller: Pamela J. Poissant
Date: 05/22/18

CHARLEMONT

327 West Hawley Road
Charlemont, MA 01339
Amount: $146,500
Buyer: Joseph H. Gougeon
Seller: Jeffery Carantit
Date: 05/31/18

COLRAIN

181 Call Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Luke M. Johnson
Seller: Oona Morrow
Date: 06/01/18

499 Jacksonville Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $115,200
Buyer: PNC Bank NA
Seller: Jillian M. Lively
Date: 06/01/18

DEERFIELD

216 Conway Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Jennifer C. Green
Seller: Julie A. Sencabaugh
Date: 05/30/18

630 Greenfield Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Christopher Manning
Seller: Pamela T. Hodgkins
Date: 06/01/18

107 Plain Road West
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Karen K. Murphy
Seller: Cheryl A. Bohonowicz
Date: 06/01/18

393 River Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $281,000
Buyer: Leonard Haskin
Seller: Andrew A. Adams
Date: 06/01/18

ERVING

32 Forest St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Jeffrey W. Lanoue
Seller: Shirley J. Holmes
Date: 05/25/18

24 Prospect St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jeremy D. Klepadlo
Seller: Mary Gapinski
Date: 06/01/18

GREENFIELD

49 Birch St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: James S. Pettengill
Seller: Leif C. Riddington
Date: 05/30/18

101 Colrain St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $124,000
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Mae A. Hale
Date: 05/22/18

346 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Sarah L. Meikle
Seller: Bryan G. Hobbs
Date: 05/31/18

776 Country Club Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Adam J. Williams
Seller: James A. Cullen
Date: 05/30/18

181 Elm St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $161,000
Buyer: Dominic S. Lively
Seller: Stefanie A. Williams
Date: 05/30/18

20 Hancock Lane
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Darren J. Stover
Seller: Robert Mattson
Date: 05/23/18

66 Orchard St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Spencer Sherman
Seller: Louis D. Manica
Date: 05/31/18

18 Shattuck St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Jason Higgins
Seller: Gerard R. Ethier
Date: 06/01/18

151 Smead Hill Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: Moonlight Rose Inc.
Seller: Michael A. Waskewicz
Date: 05/30/18

302 Wells St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $144,900
Buyer: David P. Cardaropoli
Seller: George R. Marchacos
Date: 05/24/18

LEVERETT

Putney Road
Leverett, MA 01054
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: Janine Roberts
Seller: Gregory L. Woodard
Date: 05/24/18

MONTAGUE

4 K St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Vladimir Gargun
Seller: Bich-Thuy T. Reed
Date: 06/01/18

432 Millers Falls Road
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: James Perkins
Seller: Aaron D. Budine
Date: 05/21/18

14 Morris Ave.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Jacob S. Dlugosz
Seller: Christian S. Couture
Date: 05/30/18

108-R South Prospect St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $211,500
Buyer: Jonathan T. Rawls
Seller: Leon R. Laster
Date: 05/25/18

9 Turnpike Road
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Bryan G. Hobbs
Seller: Scott A. Johnson
Date: 05/31/18

37 Unity St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Trevor A. Leblanc
Seller: Terry F. Pease
Date: 05/30/18

23 X St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $137,000
Buyer: Brian J. Bowden-Smith
Seller: Scott D. Tompkins
Date: 05/25/18

ORANGE

202 Daniel Shays Hwy.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: Courtney J. Graves
Seller: Randall L. Croto
Date: 05/30/18

76 Mechanic St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Stephen Petrovich
Seller: Sean T. Bardsley
Date: 06/01/18

78 Shelter St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Brody M. Cullen
Seller: Andrew Meuse
Date: 05/24/18

58 Stone Valley Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $211,230
Buyer: Catherine M. McCarthy
Seller: April Melanson
Date: 05/25/18

280 Walnut Hill Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Jessalyn L. Zaykoski
Seller: Peter A. Gerry
Date: 05/31/18

175 West Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $174,900
Buyer: Daniel J. Quinn
Seller: Lisa M. Cameron
Date: 05/30/18

72 West Orange Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Scott P. Medeiros
Seller: David M. Sakowicz
Date: 06/01/18

226 West River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $163,500
Buyer: Jean M. Kandrotas
Seller: Russell C. Jardine
Date: 05/31/18

SUNDERLAND

124 North Silver Lane
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $300,550
Buyer: Steven R. Unkles
Seller: Sean G. McCallen
Date: 05/24/18

61 Plumtree Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Nigel Brissett
Seller: Gordon Kramer
Date: 05/22/18

56 South Plain Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $300,900
Buyer: Eric M. Toia
Seller: Linda Brown Wilcox RET
Date: 05/22/18

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

319 Barry St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $164,481
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Richard W. Shays
Date: 05/29/18

69 Brookline Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Aaron J. Samuelsen
Seller: Ramona M. Cavallini
Date: 05/25/18

26 Colonial Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Peter E. Rizzo
Seller: Danielle Petrangelo
Date: 05/25/18

20 Family Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $320,500
Buyer: Craig A. Goodrow
Seller: James W. Horne
Date: 05/31/18

54 Glendale Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $293,000
Buyer: Samuel G. Johnson
Seller: Micki Choi
Date: 05/31/18

30 Halladay Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Shaun L. Cummings
Seller: Steven P. Merhar
Date: 06/01/18

190 Mill St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $190,159
Buyer: Bayview Loan Servicing
Seller: Roger H. Leroux
Date: 05/29/18

61 Parker St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $228,200
Buyer: Andrew Lopez
Seller: Diane M. Goodrow
Date: 05/31/18

28 Ramah Circle North
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: G&K Properties LLC
Seller: Daniel H. Burnett
Date: 05/31/18

89 River Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Joanna Stone
Seller: Don Donahue
Date: 05/31/18

11 Silver St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Alyssa D. Goss
Seller: Anthony Grassetti
Date: 06/01/18

460 Southwick St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $363,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Koons
Seller: Terriann Morin
Date: 05/25/18

24 Sunset Terrace
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $194,000
Buyer: Zachary K. Dulka
Seller: Erin C. Hurley-King
Date: 05/29/18

16 Sycamore Terrace
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Zachary J. Bussiere
Seller: Valeriy Kuznetsov
Date: 05/25/18

24 Sylvan Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Joseph Maldonado
Seller: Fay, Samuel P., (Estate)
Date: 05/31/18

59 Western Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Diane G. Pomeroy
Seller: Kayla M. Cummings
Date: 06/01/18

2 Westview Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $341,500
Buyer: Derek Kresiak
Seller: FHLM
Date: 06/01/18

47 Willow Brook Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: ATR Realty LLC
Seller: Gregory S. Moran
Date: 05/25/18

BLANDFORD

82 Curtis Hall Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Adam Gonska
Seller: Gregory R. Sykier
Date: 05/31/18

BRIMFIELD

49 Haynes Hill Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $545,000
Buyer: Kevin O’Malley
Seller: Eric J. Emanuel
Date: 05/24/18

51 Knollwood Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Michael J. Neely
Seller: FNMA
Date: 05/21/18

260 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Stephen Taricano
Seller: Bayview Loan Servicing
Date: 05/30/18

CHESTER

259 Route 20
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $227,500
Buyer: Antonio J. Boucher
Seller: Thomas E. Beeman
Date: 06/01/18

CHICOPEE

17 Artisan St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Houssam M. Abdul-Baki
Seller: Pennymac Loan Services
Date: 05/25/18

160 Asselin St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: William T. Purchase
Seller: Ghislaine M. Ricardi
Date: 05/25/18

154 Blanan Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $198,900
Buyer: Lilliam I. Colon
Seller: Nilton D. Rosa
Date: 05/31/18

20 Bonner St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $179,000
Buyer: Przemyslaw Szura
Seller: JPNTT Real Estate LLC
Date: 05/30/18

170 Crestwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Lewis J. Taylor
Seller: John W. Taylor
Date: 06/01/18

19 East Street Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Sarnelli
Seller: Lise Patry
Date: 05/29/18

57 Dayton St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: Kaitlin Buckley
Seller: Derick J. Samson
Date: 05/25/18

53 Edgewood Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Krzysztof Gorczak
Seller: Alan Jahsman
Date: 05/21/18

58 Edward St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Holyoke Management LLC
Seller: Robert C. Leduc
Date: 05/23/18

21 Harrison Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Stanley A. Pierce
Seller: Christopher C. Steele
Date: 05/30/18

59 Hawthorn St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Marc A. Mailhott
Seller: Paul Mailhott
Date: 05/31/18

14 Hillcrest St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Jake W. Flaucher
Seller: George Hollister
Date: 05/25/18

26 Jeanette Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $220,500
Buyer: Terry Eaddy
Seller: Kimberly A. Anderson
Date: 05/31/18

111 Lachine St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Angela R. Zucco
Seller: Mulak, Steven J., (Estate)
Date: 05/30/18

135 Lukasik St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: James M. Wozniak
Seller: Dorothy P. Hilton
Date: 05/31/18

65 Main St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Jahjan LLC
Seller: Koziol LLC
Date: 06/01/18

11 McCarthy Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $171,100
Buyer: Craig A. Duffy
Seller: Robert D. Butler
Date: 05/25/18

1765 Memorial Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $194,000
Buyer: Julia Guerrero
Seller: Scott C. Darcy
Date: 05/29/18

36 Oakwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Robert D. Baldwin
Seller: Laing, Janet A., (Estate)
Date: 05/21/18

429 Oldfield Road
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: David J. Zagula
Seller: Rhonda Marchetti
Date: 05/30/18

20 Park St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Open Sesame Real Estate
Seller: DB Properties LLC
Date: 05/25/18

23 Royalton St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Victor Surreira
Seller: Donna M. Cerez
Date: 06/01/18

31 Saratoga Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: Jodi O’Malley
Seller: Jason A. Szumski
Date: 05/29/18

6 Sesame Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Haleigh R. Scott
Seller: Jeffrey P. Scott
Date: 05/25/18

1040 Sheridan St.
Chicopee, MA 01022
Amount: $4,200,000
Buyer: A3 Sheridan LLC
Seller: We 1040 Sheridan LLC
Date: 05/23/18

17 Sullivan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Jordan J. Deshais
Seller: Michael P. Lafleur
Date: 05/31/18

128 Sunnymeade Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $187,900
Buyer: Ruthie M. Therrien
Seller: Rick Denoncourt Carpentry
Date: 05/30/18

18 West St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Open Sesame Real Estate
Seller: DB Properties LLC
Date: 05/25/18

205 Wildermere St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: Angel Rodriguez-Inserni
Seller: Kevin J. Fonseca
Date: 05/31/18

EAST LONGMEADOW

30 Allen St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Antonella Raschilla
Seller: Francesco Raschilla
Date: 05/21/18

102 Braeburn Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $135,800
Buyer: 88 Casino Terrace LLC
Seller: Richard A. Beron
Date: 05/25/18

23 Day Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Cariel Wilkinson
Seller: Dennis M. Ducharme
Date: 05/21/18

15 Harmon Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Emiliana Rivas
Seller: Kenneth S. Malone
Date: 05/25/18

17 Hillside Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Charles Kalomeris
Seller: Annker Jr LLC
Date: 05/25/18

68 Holland Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Heather Spera
Seller: Katie M. Lane
Date: 05/25/18

14 Lasalle St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Jonathan Guinipero
Seller: Sidney M. Preman
Date: 05/31/18

3 Robin St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $188,900
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: William E. Hurlburt
Date: 06/01/18

242 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Michael Ziyadeh
Seller: Jeremy J. Seymour
Date: 05/30/18

347 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Brandy A. Hartz
Seller: Anthony V. Trovato
Date: 05/25/18

80 Somersville Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $278,000
Buyer: Nicholas P. Rosati
Seller: Laurie J. Rosati
Date: 05/23/18

41 Taylor St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Demetrios Sotiropoulos
Seller: Sarah C. Sterlacci
Date: 05/31/18

33 Villanova St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01108
Amount: $259,900
Buyer: Chinh D. Pham
Seller: Leng Jiang
Date: 05/29/18

GRANVILLE

88 Crest Lane
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Bella Akinyr-Windoloski
Date: 05/21/18

HAMPDEN

17 Baldwin Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Steven A. Whelihan
Seller: Christopher P. Lizotte
Date: 05/22/18

53 Meadow Brook Lane
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Abigail R. Perreault
Seller: Brian C. Hourihan
Date: 05/31/18

48 Old Coach Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Maura Stack
Seller: Scott P. Bacon
Date: 05/30/18

51 Scantic Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $214,400
Buyer: Bruce M. Hubbard
Seller: Gordon J. Willcutt
Date: 05/31/18

346 Somers Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $329,000
Buyer: Thomas Cardano
Seller: Wayne D. Augusto
Date: 05/23/18

335 Wilbraham Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Matthew E. Lambert
Seller: Brenda Lee-Lambert
Date: 05/30/18

HOLLAND

6 Roberts Park Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Bennett Wightman
Seller: Ulrike Brisson
Date: 05/25/18

HOLYOKE

275 Apremont Hwy.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $142,500
Buyer: Eugene J. Borowski
Seller: Paul E. Bluemer
Date: 05/29/18

190 Essex St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $136,700
Buyer: Reni Baez
Seller: Sunlight Properties LLC
Date: 05/30/18

29 Fenton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Louis T. Grueling
Seller: Angel M. Cruz
Date: 05/31/18

19 Greenwood Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Brett A. Scott
Seller: Sara Jones
Date: 06/01/18

40 Lenox Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Brianne N. Deflumeri
Seller: Jennifer Cook
Date: 05/30/18

252 Pine St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Audrianna Rigney
Seller: Ignacio Rivera
Date: 05/31/18

11 Richard Eger Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Rita Miller
Seller: Peter Breton
Date: 05/31/18

248-250 South St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: Jose A. Robles-Lopez
Seller: Edward D. Piedra
Date: 05/22/18

397 South Elm St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Jaime J. Montanez
Seller: Erick Vazquez
Date: 05/30/18

156 Suffolk St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $118,400
Buyer: David Taber
Seller: Daphne Board
Date: 06/01/18

21 Taylor St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Marissa M. Montemagni
Seller: William S. Gruszkos
Date: 05/30/18

73 Walnut St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: Albert E. Paone
Seller: Rose Property Management
Date: 05/23/18

238 West Franklin St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: David M. Lally
Seller: Daniel B. Lally
Date: 05/30/18

24 West Glen St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Patrick W. Nietupski
Seller: Michael K. Fern
Date: 05/25/18

LONGMEADOW

65 Arlington Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Bay Path University
Seller: Kessler, Dolores L., (Estate)
Date: 06/01/18

34 Ellington St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $382,450
Buyer: Clayton C. Schettler
Seller: Gerald M. Green
Date: 05/29/18

46 Erskine Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Mark D. Sullivan
Date: 06/01/18

20 Green Willow Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Francis J. Smith
Seller: Betty H. Herman
Date: 05/31/18

191 Greenacre Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Jennifer M. Carroll
Seller: Ralph V. Budington RET
Date: 05/22/18

223 Kenmore Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $326,500
Buyer: Tara J. Laviana
Seller: Keith S. Maynard
Date: 05/31/18

664 Longmeadow St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $295,800
Buyer: Khushboo Gupta
Seller: William B. Miller
Date: 05/30/18

980 Longmeadow St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: David Chapdelaine
Seller: John J. Rapalus
Date: 05/21/18

232 Longview Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Michael S. Richmond
Seller: Carla J. Szczepanek
Date: 05/25/18

119 Maple Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: David A. Dupuis
Seller: Kylee C. Granfield
Date: 06/01/18

637 Maple Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $313,000
Buyer: Thanh V. Nguyen
Seller: Denis O. Petrov
Date: 05/30/18

8 Mohawk Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $402,500
Buyer: Edward Steiger
Seller: Linda D. Glenn
Date: 05/21/18

47 Oakwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $260,500
Buyer: Thomas P. Meara
Seller: Stephen A. Morowsky
Date: 05/31/18

5 Pinelawn Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Julian R. Ortiz
Seller: Ruben Cruz
Date: 05/31/18

185 Redfern Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $312,500
Buyer: Ruslan F. Babayev
Seller: Ronda G. Parish
Date: 05/23/18

97 Wimbleton Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: James G. Card
Seller: Seunghee Kim
Date: 06/01/18

550 Wolf Swamp Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $462,150
Buyer: Jason M. Rosewell
Seller: David J. Devivo
Date: 05/24/18

LUDLOW

Autumn Ridge Road #42
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $134,900
Buyer: Isidoro R. Ganhao
Seller: Whitetail Wreks LLC
Date: 05/31/18

Harvest Dr. #26
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $139,500
Buyer: Timothy W. Whitney
Seller: Whitetail Wreks LLC
Date: 06/01/18

32 Lawton St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $249,000
Buyer: Francesca B. Cust
Seller: Billie P. Wilson
Date: 05/31/18

Lyon St. #9
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Derek D. Vigneault
Seller: Grabowski, Antoni F., (Estate)
Date: 05/30/18

25-27 Maple St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: Alan T. Kelliher
Seller: Dmitriy Papeko
Date: 06/01/18

275 Miller St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Kelly Butler
Seller: Cheryl A. Bouyea
Date: 05/30/18

280 Moody St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $850,000
Buyer: MFB Realty LLC
Seller: MNL Management LLC
Date: 05/31/18

91-93 Motyka St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Daniel Dos-Santos
Seller: Jose F. Mateus
Date: 05/31/18

469 Munsing St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Richard J. Chenier
Seller: Raymond G. Chenier
Date: 05/23/18

143 Nash Hill Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Danny P. Rebelo
Seller: Benjamin N. Michalski
Date: 05/29/18

48 Pine Glen Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $505,000
Buyer: Jeffrey N. Leandro
Seller: Raymond F. Catuogno
Date: 05/31/18

39 Salli Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $284,900
Buyer: Jason A. Szumski
Seller: Ronnie R. Lamontagne
Date: 05/29/18

MONSON

2 Crest Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $221,500
Buyer: Jacob Watkins
Seller: Louise C. Fleck
Date: 05/30/18

15 Heritage Lane
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Anthony M. Trojanowski
Seller: Audrey D. Carabetta
Date: 05/25/18

110 Thayer Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: William C. Moynihan
Seller: H. & L. Tassinari Builders Inc.
Date: 05/29/18

5 Valley View Hts.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $231,000
Buyer: Joshua E. Flieder
Seller: Joanne Soukup
Date: 05/25/18

PALMER

20 Arnold St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: NRZ REO VO Corp.
Seller: Heather A. North
Date: 05/30/18

1036 Central St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $157,363
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Ruth A. Manning
Date: 05/30/18

25 North St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Sarah Gould
Seller: Michael R. Stallings
Date: 05/31/18

18 Paul St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Troy Santerre
Seller: Bruce N. Cabrini
Date: 05/23/18

2025 Pine St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: James Jaron
Seller: Sophie Chudy RET
Date: 05/30/18

4014 School St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $264,000
Buyer: Central MA Properties LLC
Seller: Tracy M. Hibbard
Date: 05/29/18

50 South High St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Eric Gulbrandson
Seller: Richard H. Walder
Date: 05/31/18

3026 South Main St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Joseph Malloy
Seller: Warren M. Coughlin
Date: 05/25/18

46 Smith St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Jason W. Bessette
Seller: Kristin L. Converse
Date: 05/24/18

48 Walnut St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $148,700
Buyer: Joseph D. Morin
Seller: Joanne L. Haley
Date: 05/31/18

37 Ware St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $142,000
Buyer: Jean A. Moran
Seller: Jason W. Bessette
Date: 05/24/18

RUSSELL

275 Dickinson Hill Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $283,750
Buyer: Bryan A. Canterbury
Seller: Daniel M. Krupa
Date: 05/22/18

303 South Quarter Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $199,501
Buyer: Dan W. Gordner
Seller: US Bank
Date: 06/01/18

SOUTHWICK

365 College Hwy.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: RE Inspired LLC
Seller: Edward C. Hildreth
Date: 05/21/18

43 Fernwood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Peter A. Trimboli
Seller: Lawrence P. Boisjolie
Date: 05/25/18

199 Hillside Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: John F. Decaro
Seller: Kathleen S. Sobczyk
Date: 05/24/18

36 North Lake Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $167,900
Buyer: Stefanie Davignon
Seller: Steven R. Ferrari
Date: 05/21/18

87 Powder Mill Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $187,500
Buyer: Lucas M. Cimmino
Seller: Todd M. Crevier
Date: 05/31/18

16 Sheep Pasture Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Paul H. Whalley
Seller: Kevin C. Saunders
Date: 05/22/18

86 South Longyard Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Lynch
Seller: Barrett S. Lynch
Date: 05/21/18

SPRINGFIELD

228 Acrebrook Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $184,900
Buyer: Larry J. Cole
Seller: Ivette Diaz
Date: 05/31/18

28-30 Ainsworth St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $181,000
Buyer: Anthony Molina
Seller: Elaine B. Scalia
Date: 05/25/18

135 Aldrew Terrace
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Folly Brook Associates
Seller: Patricia P. Ross
Date: 05/22/18

65-67 Ardmore St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $227,500
Buyer: Jonathan J. Lepper
Seller: Michael J. Keane
Date: 06/01/18

642 Belmont Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Danai S. Macridi
Seller: Belmont Rentals LLC
Date: 05/29/18

452-472 Bridge St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Apremont Properties LLC
Seller: John R. Spano
Date: 05/30/18

486-496 Bridge St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Apremont Properties LLC
Seller: John R. Spano
Date: 05/30/18

209 Bristol St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Pgaye Thompson-Lawrence
Seller: Sandro Gonzalez
Date: 05/31/18

48 California Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $156,000
Buyer: Ernie Toussaint
Seller: James A. Ryan
Date: 06/01/18

64 Canterbury Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $127,835
Buyer: Benjamin J. Krolicki
Seller: Patricia Courtney-Croken
Date: 05/24/18

74 Carew Terrace
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $156,000
Buyer: Johanna Guzman
Seller: Elizabeth A. Heacock
Date: 05/24/18

1594 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: Vanessa Torres
Seller: Anna M. Acevedo
Date: 06/01/18

154 Carnavon Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Lien Baker
Seller: Robert W. Walker
Date: 05/25/18

56-58 Chester St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: An H. Duong
Seller: Full Service Real Estate
Date: 05/21/18

141-147 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01103
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Apremont Properties LLC
Seller: John R. Spano
Date: 05/30/18

130 Connecticut Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $145,200
Buyer: Robert J. Dupuis
Seller: FNMA
Date: 05/21/18

355 Cooley St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Jeitza N. Sanabria-Guzman
Seller: Jomarie Ramirez
Date: 05/25/18

66 Curve St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $119,701
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Daniel Methot
Date: 05/29/18

146 Davis St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Efrain Rivera
Seller: Jeannette R. Crawford
Date: 05/31/18

178 Davis St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $116,500
Buyer: Emilee Brunelle
Seller: Hector Sanchez
Date: 05/29/18

30 Daytona St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Sumayya M. Ghalaini
Seller: Rosetta Piecuch
Date: 05/21/18

24 Derryfield Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $284,900
Buyer: Aleksey Deykin
Seller: Adam M. Tarquini
Date: 05/23/18

630-632 Dickinson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $115,600
Buyer: 196-198 Bowdoin St. Realty
Seller: Western Mass Realty LLC
Date: 05/25/18

109 Dimmick St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Salvador Zayas
Seller: Rox-Dot Rehab LLC
Date: 05/21/18

81 Dorset St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Bevin C. Morrissey
Seller: Adam J. Seegars
Date: 05/24/18

25 Driftwood Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Juan E. Quiles
Seller: Aguasvivas Realty LLC
Date: 05/31/18

47 East Drumlin Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Ann M. Basile
Seller: Jeffrey D. Nashville
Date: 05/22/18

208 Ellendale Circle
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Jane E. O’Neil
Seller: Jeffrey M. Picariello
Date: 05/31/18

88 Fair Oak Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $124,800
Buyer: Anthony Bourget
Seller: Lakeview Loan Servicing
Date: 05/25/18

40 Farnsworth St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Matthew Mosher
Seller: Daniel R. Torres
Date: 05/23/18

70 Firglade Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Neil G. Greene
Seller: William C. Bowie
Date: 05/23/18

37 Flint St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: Jose A. Mojica
Seller: Brahman Holdings LLC
Date: 05/24/18

24 Forbes Circle
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $204,000
Buyer: Orlando Marrero
Seller: Sharon A. Goodman
Date: 05/29/18

82 Garfield St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Mohammed Taqi
Seller: Orlando Delgado
Date: 05/22/18

392 Gifford St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Omar Silva-Charbonier
Seller: Gregory Judge
Date: 05/31/18

37 Glen Albyn St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $170,250
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Ann M. Jackson
Date: 05/30/18

82 Hampshire St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Jennifer Andrews
Seller: Luis F. Santos
Date: 05/22/18

199 Harkness Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Norma I. DeLaCruz
Seller: James Niedbala
Date: 05/22/18

43 Hollywood St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: Muhammad Taqi
Seller: Ambrose I. Mwea
Date: 05/22/18

171 Jasper St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Carmen M. Ortiz
Seller: Chris Wiernasz
Date: 05/24/18

80 Jeanne Marie St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Angela V. King
Seller: US Bank
Date: 05/25/18

34 Jonquil Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Carlos A. Torres-Gonzalez
Seller: Emiliana Rivas
Date: 05/25/18

47 Kazbeck St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $203,500
Buyer: Detric Watkins
Seller: Robert D. Sleeper
Date: 06/01/18

72 Kenway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Yanaira L. Valentin
Seller: Anna M. Perez
Date: 05/30/18

102-104 Kenyon St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: 196-198 Bowdoin Realty
Seller: Geneva H. Moore
Date: 05/30/18

917-919 Liberty St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Carlos E. Restrepo
Seller: Casiano R. Lozada
Date: 05/25/18

16 Louis Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Kimberly M. Hill
Seller: Michael Barbarisi
Date: 06/01/18

57 Middlebrook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Hubert R. Scott
Seller: FNMA
Date: 05/25/18

62 Midway St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Jose M. Bermudez
Seller: Zachary Cortis
Date: 05/21/18

75 Montrose St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Liem Pham
Seller: JLC Realty Group LLC
Date: 06/01/18

11 Murray Hill Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $168,900
Buyer: Roque M. Perez-Gomez
Seller: James S. Gordon
Date: 05/23/18

306 Naismith St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Elsa Arias
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 05/30/18

814 Newbury St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Joshua D. Rosario-Matos
Seller: Luis E. Correa
Date: 05/30/18

315 Newhouse St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Alexa J. Diaz
Seller: Christine J. Forgotch
Date: 05/29/18

100-102 Odion St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $207,900
Buyer: Suwanee Moon
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 05/24/18

233 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Ali Elzinji
Seller: Duc H. Truong
Date: 06/01/18

37 Palmer Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Antonia Ramos
Seller: Anthony Grassetti
Date: 05/31/18

688 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Daniel Cotter
Seller: Angelica Rodriguez
Date: 06/01/18

378 Parkerview St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $176,000
Buyer: Jason L. Arnold
Seller: Miguel A. Colon
Date: 05/31/18

66 Pasco Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Alfonso R. Fernandez
Seller: Home Equity Assets Realty
Date: 05/22/18

68 Pembroke Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $149,500
Buyer: Erika Serrano
Seller: Luz N. Garcia
Date: 05/21/18

42-44 Phoenix St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Elmer R. Diaz-Verduo
Seller: Anthony S. Marangoudakis
Date: 05/30/18

15 Pine Acre Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $229,950
Buyer: Sandro Gonzalez
Seller: Thomas S. Halgas
Date: 05/31/18

52 Pinecrest Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Connors
Seller: Justin A. Biccum
Date: 05/25/18

61 Plumtree Circle
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $129,900
Buyer: Tyrone M. Williams
Seller: Colin M. Arnold
Date: 05/23/18

72 Prospect St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Kelvin Lopez
Seller: Ahmed M. Aljashaam
Date: 05/29/18

30 Rachael St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Katie Meleleu
Seller: Frances Castor
Date: 06/01/18

5 Randall Place
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $189,900
Buyer: Jose Ortiz
Seller: Madison Property Investors
Date: 05/31/18

149 Rocus St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: NFSAJ LLC
Seller: Kenneth Bousquet
Date: 06/01/18

155 Rocus St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: NFSAJ LLC
Seller: Kenneth Bousquet
Date: 06/01/18

183 Roosevelt Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $118,710
Buyer: 183 Roosevelt Avenue RT
Seller: NSP Residential LLC
Date: 05/22/18

718 Roosevelt Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Edward Clemons
Seller: Nadine S. Michel
Date: 05/21/18

193 Roy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Lynn A. Thompson
Seller: Judith Harpin
Date: 05/25/18

367 Saint James Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $162,900
Buyer: Janie Diaz
Seller: Justo Martinez
Date: 05/31/18

160 Shady Brook Lane
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $171,900
Buyer: Heather M. Leone
Seller: Joseph Swift
Date: 05/24/18

142 Shefford St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Evelyn Liriano
Seller: Aguasvivas Realty LLC
Date: 05/31/18

45 Slumber Lane
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Sean P. Garvey
Seller: Vincent N. Santaniello
Date: 05/29/18

173 Stapleton Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Ashley A. St.Amour
Seller: Anthony Rodrigues
Date: 05/25/18

10 Surrey Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Anthony Ott
Seller: Anthony Bourget
Date: 05/21/18

75 Surrey Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Bekele E. Oyomo
Seller: Dionne Real Estate LLC
Date: 05/24/18

118 Tamarack Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $233,000
Buyer: Sidney M. Preman
Seller: Michele Pepe
Date: 06/01/18

15 Texel Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $196,000
Buyer: Christopher P. Lizotte
Seller: Craig C. Moore
Date: 05/22/18

25 Tiffany St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Yesenia Toribio
Seller: Kevin M. Camara
Date: 06/01/18

581 Tinkham Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Madeleine Cadorette
Seller: James W. Fiore
Date: 06/01/18

4 Tumbleweed Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Quinton Rogers
Seller: Phillip Prouty
Date: 05/22/18

72 Victoria St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $139,110
Buyer: Nora W. Kamara
Seller: Dina Grossi
Date: 05/25/18

89 Wallace St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Jonathan Pumarejo
Seller: Nu-Way Homes Inc.
Date: 05/29/18

105 Welland Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $164,495
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Jose Soto
Date: 05/29/18

70-72 West Alvord St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Ivan Carrasquillo
Seller: Ronald J. Sarnelli
Date: 06/01/18

73 West Crystal Brook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Ryan J. Murphy
Seller: Siraco, John M. Jr, (Estate)
Date: 05/30/18

705-707 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Geovanni Montesino
Seller: Ray E. Gilman
Date: 05/23/18

730-732 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Victor M. Ortiz
Date: 05/31/18

1349 Worcester St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Victor I. Rivera-Santiago
Seller: Aleksandr Chuduk
Date: 05/25/18

178 Wrentham Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $153,340
Buyer: Citizens Bank
Seller: Adan A. Rivera
Date: 05/24/18

45 Wrona St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $183,900
Buyer: Patricia C. Rivera
Seller: Patricia A. Cennerazzo
Date: 05/29/18

WEST SPRINGFIELD

89 Baldwin St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $219,250
Buyer: Derdy LLC
Seller: Zak Smith
Date: 05/24/18

188 Falmouth Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $283,750
Buyer: Ashley Antoine
Seller: Laguercia, Frederick P., (Estate)
Date: 05/21/18

41 Lancaster Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $169,500
Buyer: Joseph D. Gagnon
Seller: Cynthia A. Sullivan
Date: 05/30/18

55 Lyman St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: Konstantinos Tsavidis
Seller: Zhi Tan
Date: 05/22/18

119 North Blvd.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $182,555
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Franky M. Sanchez
Date: 05/25/18

57 Oak St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Jeremy W. Bourke
Seller: Ashley McGurn
Date: 05/21/18

12-14 Sprague St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Krishna L. Kharel
Seller: Kuta, Joanna, (Estate)
Date: 06/01/18

91 Woodmont St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $226,900
Buyer: Purna B. Tamang
Seller: Bobin Gurung
Date: 05/25/18

WESTFIELD

10 Bush St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Stephanie Smith
Seller: Scott N. Madrid
Date: 05/31/18

133 Colony Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Kristylyn B. Jackewich
Seller: Noreen E. Jachym
Date: 05/21/18

41 Dartmouth St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Nathan R. Porter
Seller: David J. Lewis
Date: 05/31/18

10 Day Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $242,950
Buyer: Mechanic Man LLC
Seller: Joseph G. Flahive
Date: 05/31/18

110 Elm St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Camia LLC
Seller: Cloverleaf Realty Group
Date: 06/01/18

105 Franklin St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Ilya A. Katykhin
Seller: Allan Young
Date: 05/31/18

28 Hancock St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $222,500
Buyer: Kristina L. Leighty
Seller: Tracy Mountain
Date: 06/01/18

77 Heggie Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Amy K. Scarpa
Seller: Union Crossing Realty LLC
Date: 05/25/18

25 High St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $182,500
Buyer: Jacob V. Lane
Seller: Irene L. Buckowski
Date: 05/22/18

22 Hillary Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $429,900
Buyer: Travis Rogers
Seller: Maria S. Valliere
Date: 05/21/18

20 Hopkins Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: John J. Sapelli
Seller: David G. Brill
Date: 05/24/18

105 Long Pond Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $358,100
Buyer: David Garstka Builders
Seller: Hampton Ponds Realty LLC
Date: 06/01/18

16 Meadow St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Hector O. Miranda
Seller: Hector L. Miranda
Date: 05/31/18

625 Montgomery Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Thomas S. Albano
Seller: Ryan N. Wheeler
Date: 05/22/18

89 Montgomery St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $149,900
Buyer: Justin C. Wild
Seller: Dolat, Doris L., (Estate)
Date: 05/22/18

40 Murray Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $194,900
Buyer: Scott A. Miles
Seller: Bryan A. Canterbury
Date: 05/22/18

11 Noble Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $146,002
Buyer: Cedar Investment Group
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 06/01/18

287 Notre Dame St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $193,000
Buyer: Nathaniel P. Munson
Seller: Robert P. Southworth
Date: 05/25/18

17 Parker Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $167,900
Buyer: Marc A. St.Pierre
Seller: Christopher Gibbs
Date: 05/31/18

34 Pine St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Vyacheslav Katko
Seller: Eric D. Meyers
Date: 05/25/18

136 Pontoosic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Aleksandr S. Shtyba
Seller: FHLM
Date: 05/31/18

151 Rachael Terrace
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: James A. Cook
Seller: Calvin C. Fletcher
Date: 05/30/18

16 Ridgecrest Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $256,600
Buyer: Andrey Gokhgalter
Seller: FHLM
Date: 06/01/18

165 Russell Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Christine A. Towle
Seller: Francis D. Towle
Date: 05/31/18

150 Sackett Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Vitali Ievdoshenko
Seller: Erin L. Morin
Date: 05/25/18

298 Sackett Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $304,000
Buyer: Lawrence P. Boisjolie
Seller: Nicole Leja
Date: 05/25/18

22 Saint James Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Nathan C. Ryan
Seller: James J. Palumbo
Date: 05/31/18

5 Sherman St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Morizio Brothers Mgmt. LLC
Seller: Randy Arkoette
Date: 05/30/18

7 Springdale St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $137,000
Buyer: Angela S. Bolduc
Seller: Laura Vaniderstine
Date: 06/01/18

20 Stephanie Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $279,900
Buyer: Multi-Cultural Community Services
Seller: Christopher Wiggs
Date: 05/31/18

9 Union Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $142,500
Buyer: CIG 4 LLC
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 05/25/18

51 Yeoman Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Randy Arkoette
Seller: Diamond Investment Group
Date: 05/30/18

WILBRAHAM

6 Brooklawn Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: Lorraine M. Adamz
Seller: AEM Property Investment
Date: 05/30/18

15 Circle Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $252,500
Buyer: Nuno M. Marques
Seller: High Ridge Real Estate
Date: 06/01/18

312 Glendale Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $168,000
Buyer: Mario Tascon
Seller: USA VA
Date: 05/31/18

611 Glendale Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Town Of Wilbraham
Seller: Silo Farm Associates LLC
Date: 06/01/18

42 Oakland St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Ashley D. Kunz
Seller: Geary, Daniel M., (Estate)
Date: 05/30/18

4 Springfield St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $162,500
Buyer: Nancy Jodoin
Seller: Thomas J. Martin
Date: 05/29/18

707 Stony Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: James M. Davis
Seller: Holly L. Attridge
Date: 05/30/18

985 Tinkham Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $231,900
Buyer: David E. Nicoll
Seller: Nancy C. Cullinan
Date: 05/24/18

5 Wellfleet Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $275,900
Buyer: Ann M. Belden
Seller: Virsna K. Mompho
Date: 05/24/18

53 Weston St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Cassandra A. Dias
Seller: Linda E. Bourcier
Date: 06/01/18

3 Willow Brook Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $432,400
Buyer: Jeremy J. Seymour
Seller: AC Homebuilding LLC
Date: 05/30/18

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

3 Bayberry Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $547,888
Buyer: Raymond J. Rennard
Seller: David E. Hayes
Date: 05/22/18

552 Flat Hills Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Turcotte
Seller: William W. Kramer
Date: 05/25/18

29 Harris St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $386,500
Buyer: Jeffrey J. Clark
Seller: Thomas M. Scriver
Date: 05/22/18

65 High St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $640,000
Buyer: Faye J. Crosby RET 2005
Seller: Margaret M. Bouvier
Date: 05/31/18

43 Jeffrey Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jonathan M. Sivel
Seller: Matthew W. Dufresne
Date: 06/01/18

659 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Margaret Kroeplin
Seller: Kathryn E. Marciano
Date: 05/24/18

598 South Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Amherst Rental Properties
Seller: Gedmin, Ann M., (Estate)
Date: 05/30/18

75 Sunset Ave.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $540,000
Buyer: Jackson T. Katz
Seller: Jacquelyn H. Wolf RET
Date: 06/01/18

5 Teaberry Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $445,400
Buyer: Peter Beltramo
Seller: Alisa J. Braverman
Date: 05/31/18

BELCHERTOWN

40 Aldrich St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Joshua A. Ryan
Seller: Terry Avery
Date: 06/01/18

33 Brandywine Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Steven A. Fernandes
Seller: Donna Sims-Boisvert
Date: 05/24/18

780 Franklin St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $199,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Perusse
Seller: Lynn Crowfoot
Date: 05/24/18

9 Meadow Pond Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $332,500
Buyer: Nilton D. Rosa
Seller: Dawn M. Demerchant
Date: 05/31/18

243 Michael Sears Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Brad Richardson
Seller: Theodore Nicholson
Date: 05/30/18

321 North Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Daina Davenport
Seller: Whitcomb, Harlan, (Estate)
Date: 05/24/18

41 Old Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Marc S. Paquet
Seller: Daniel Aube
Date: 06/01/18

16 Old Sawmill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Joseph E. Conroy
Seller: Patricia B. Light
Date: 05/24/18

18 South Main St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $316,000
Buyer: Thomas J. Pelissier
Seller: Joseph M. Jones
Date: 05/31/18

59 Spring Hill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Jon A. Zulkiewicz
Seller: Mark Zulkiewicz
Date: 05/29/18

330 Springfield Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $465,500
Buyer: Peter J. Billman-Golemme
Seller: Mary E. Fioravanti
Date: 05/31/18

CHESTERFIELD

4 Willicutt Road
Chesterfield, MA 01012
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Norman E. Boutwell
Date: 06/01/18

EASTHAMPTON

15 Arthur St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Phillip G. Hurteau
Seller: Robert T. Lamothe
Date: 06/01/18

16 Bayberry Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $419,000
Buyer: James D. Molitoris
Seller: Patrick S. Connor
Date: 05/29/18

1-3 Cherry St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $290,200
Buyer: Kevin Netto
Seller: Shauneen M. Page
Date: 05/24/18

6 Chestnut St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Shirley L. Vankainen
Seller: Joseph J. Dushane
Date: 05/31/18

442 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $246,000
Buyer: Jonathan M. Schmidt
Seller: Bresnahan, Joan C., (Estate)
Date: 05/31/18

41 Florence Road
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Michael K. Fern
Seller: Edward B. Fallon
Date: 05/30/18

3 Fugere Court
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Revampit LLC
Seller: Esther Vekakis
Date: 06/01/18

60 Highland Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: David R. Boyle
Seller: Lamoureux, Elizabeth H., (Estate)
Date: 05/31/18

67 Highland Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Michael Klein
Seller: Kevin C. Netto
Date: 05/21/18

26 Kingsberry Way
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Cory A. Staples
Seller: David G. Tse
Date: 05/31/18

325 Main St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Hayley M. Singleton
Seller: Watson FT
Date: 05/31/18

27 Mayher St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $154,500
Buyer: Mary C. Bordewieck
Seller: Deanna L. Moore
Date: 05/31/18

12 McKinley Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $343,500
Buyer: Amy E. Richane
Seller: Bradford W. Osgood
Date: 05/30/18

5 Monska Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Sarah E. Eisenberg
Seller: Elizabeth B. Staples
Date: 05/31/18

9 Pomeroy Place
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Michael O. Budnick
Seller: Susan E. Bancale
Date: 06/01/18

53 Pomeroy St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $276,000
Buyer: Jan C. Sullivan
Seller: Timothy P. Marquis
Date: 06/01/18

34 Water Lane
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: F&G LLC
Seller: O’Donnell, John J., (Estate)
Date: 06/01/18

GRANBY

112 Cold Hill Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $180,750
Buyer: Christopher J. Enyart
Seller: Macmonegle, Joan M., (Estate)
Date: 05/21/18

19 Deerbrook Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Anthony D. Lauzon
Seller: Ronald E. Smigiel
Date: 05/21/18

29 Forge Pond Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Matthew C. Smith
Seller: Patricia E. Brochu
Date: 05/25/18

100 West St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $142,000
Buyer: Stephen C. Smith
Seller: David Cyr
Date: 05/29/18

HADLEY

278 Bay Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $403,000
Buyer: Andrew K. Lapre
Seller: Sarah-Marie Belcastro
Date: 05/21/18

3 Laurel Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Eliza Dagostino
Seller: John J. Pipczynski
Date: 05/30/18

18 Newton Lane
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Lauren C. Ostberg
Seller: Adylson Rodrigues
Date: 06/01/18

20 River Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $387,500
Buyer: Michael Colwell-Lafleur
Seller: Charles J. Szafir
Date: 05/30/18

105 Roosevelt St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $424,671
Buyer: Stacy Simin
Seller: James L. Cuomo
Date: 05/31/18

HATFIELD

24 Depot Road
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $525,000
Buyer: Darryl Williams
Seller: Sanford A&E G. Belden RET
Date: 05/31/18

144 Pantry Road
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: Megan Wendolowski
Seller: William J. Kennedy
Date: 05/25/18

72 West St.
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $190,625
Buyer: Adam J. Barker
Seller: Joseph S. Barker
Date: 05/21/18

HUNTINGTON

41 Allen Coit Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $287,000
Buyer: Melissa A. Tse
Seller: Andrew M. Dunn
Date: 05/31/18

MIDDLEFIELD

24 Alderman Road
Middlefield, MA 01243
Amount: $190,500
Buyer: Adam J. Simonowicz
Seller: Cody P. Paschal
Date: 05/31/18

NORTHAMPTON

219 Audubon Road
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $389,000
Buyer: Mark M. Pompian
Seller: Susan E. Etzel
Date: 05/30/18

4 Barrett Place
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $715,000
Buyer: Lawrence P. King
Seller: Georgia Barwick
Date: 05/30/18

591 Coles Meadow Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $765,000
Buyer: Elise Starr
Seller: Barbara B. Reitt
Date: 05/31/18

468 Elm St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Peter Thomas-Melly
Seller: Keith D. Rodgers
Date: 05/29/18

41 Holyoke St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: William G. Sherr
Seller: 41 Holyoke Street RT
Date: 05/29/18

19 Lexington Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $262,500
Buyer: Sarah T. Harvey
Seller: Nu-Way Homes Inc.
Date: 05/21/18

21 Terrace Lane
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $264,000
Buyer: Devon St. Martin
Seller: Joseph Usaforest
Date: 05/31/18

63 Ward Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $635,000
Buyer: Pranay M. Parikh
Seller: Melinda E. Blau
Date: 05/31/18

123 Westhampton Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Brian F. Donnelly
Seller: Nicholas J. Kelley
Date: 05/24/18

851 Westhampton Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Mandana Marsh-Szkotak
Seller: Kristofer P. Demasi
Date: 05/23/18

SOUTH HADLEY

34 Harvard St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Danalyn Bahosh
Seller: Steven A. Fernandes
Date: 05/24/18

110 Lincoln Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $251,000
Buyer: Joshua J. Savoie
Seller: Rita C. Chrobak
Date: 05/30/18

156 Lyman St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Rebekah M. Wilder
Seller: David C. Leiman
Date: 05/30/18

10 Oak Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Brian T. Dooley
Seller: Christopher Worthington
Date: 05/30/18

79 River Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $143,850
Buyer: Gilroy Property Renewal
Seller: US Bank
Date: 05/25/18

24 Washington Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $137,500
Buyer: Holly K. Stolarski
Seller: Thomas M. Stolarski
Date: 05/24/18

4 Wellington Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Arthur W. Pontbriant
Seller: Leo A. Deschenes
Date: 05/25/18

SOUTHAMPTON

80 Crooked Ledge Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $469,000
Buyer: Denise L. Dupelle
Seller: Jonathan H. Marsh
Date: 05/21/18

95 Moose Brook Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Viktor N. Gorobinskiy
Seller: Frary IRT
Date: 05/25/18

79 Strong Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Malaina M. Hollister
Seller: Gregory J. Kwolek
Date: 05/25/18

4 Wallace Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Karen B. Brunette
Seller: Gail A. Trudell
Date: 05/30/18

5 Woodmar Lane
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Lindsay R. Barron
Seller: G&F Custom Built Homes
Date: 05/25/18

WARE

1 Briar Circle
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Carl R. Waal
Seller: J. Harder Construction LLC
Date: 05/24/18

144 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Theodore C. Nicholson
Seller: Bothwell, Claire R., (Estate)
Date: 05/21/18

48 Old Belchertown Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $164,000
Buyer: Tammy L. Salsbury
Seller: Christopher M. Malcuit
Date: 06/01/18


6 Pleasant St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $263,456
Buyer: USA HUD
Seller: Flagstar Bank FSB
Date: 05/25/18

37 Warebrook Village
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $123,850
Buyer: Bryce D. Haley
Seller: Assist Realty Group LLC
Date: 05/25/18

15 Webb Court
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $117,836
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Phillip V. Harper
Date: 05/29/18

WILLIAMSBURG

37 Goshen Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Vanessa E. Coates-Cooney
Seller: Megan E. Pelis
Date: 05/29/18

10 Judd Lane
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Kyle J. Schwartz
Seller: Barbara W. Carr
Date: 05/25/18

Sections Sports & Leisure

Refreshing the Data

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) has released a new official statement regarding energy drinks, published in the college’s clinical review journal, Current Sports Medicine Reports. “Energy Drinks: A Contemporary Issues Paper” provides guidance and warnings regarding these beverages because of the dangers they present to at-risk populations, primarily children who are the most vulnerable and the target of marketing efforts.

“Energy drinks are extremely popular, and concerns about their consumption are coming from every sector of society, which is why we’ve published these recommendations,” said Dr. John Higgins. “Our review of the available science showed that excessive levels of caffeine found in energy drinks can have adverse effects on cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, renal, and endocrine systems, as well as psychiatric symptoms. More needs to be done to protect children and adolescents, as well as adults with cardiovascular or other medical conditions.”

Energy drinks are highly caffeinated beverages that often contain myriad vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and herbal mixtures. As a global authority for sports medicine, exercise science, and the promotion of participant safety, the ACSM is focused on facilitating high performance while protecting those who compete in athletics or engage in other forms of physical activity. By publishing the new recommendations, the ACSM is helping consumers to understand the risks associated with rapid and excessive consumption of energy drinks.

“When used safely and with moderation, energy drinks may have some short-term, performance-enhancing effects. However, users are generally unaware of the many potential adverse reactions that could have long-term effects, some of which are quite serious,” said Higgins. We highly encourage consumers, parents, physicians, athletic trainers, personal trainers, and coaches to follow these recommendations.”

Children and adolescents appear to be at particularly high risk of complications from energy drinks due to their small body size, being relatively caffeine-naive, and potentially heavy and frequent consumption patterns, as well as the amounts of caffeine. The message that these beverages are not intended for children needs to be reinforced and widely disseminated, Higgins said.

At the same time, he added, marketing should not appeal to vulnerable populations. Currently, manufacturers of energy drinks advertise on websites, social media, and television channels that are highly appealing to both children and adolescents. Target marketing to sporting and other events involving children and adolescents should not be permitted.

Regardless of health and fitness level, and until such time that proper safety and efficacy data are available, the ACSM recommends that energy drinks should be avoided before, during, or after strenuous activities. Some of the deaths allegedly due to energy drinks have occurred when a person consumed them before and/or after performing strenuous activities.

Clearly, Higgins notes, investment in awareness and educational resources highlighting the potential adverse effects and safe use of energy drinks is required. Significant efforts should be made to educate consumers regarding the clear and present differences between soda, coffee, sports drinks, and energy drinks. Energy-drink education also should be a priority in school-based curricula related to nutrition, health, and wellness.

The ACSM is calling for a research agenda to prioritize key questions about the acute and chronic effects of energy-drink use. At a minimum, standard safety and efficacy studies should be performed and submitted to the FDA by manufacturers. Well-designed and controlled research is required to examine the increasing frequency of adverse events being reported by emergency departments.

In addition, the organization notes, healthcare providers must talk to their patients about energy-drink use and report adverse events to watchdog agencies like poison-control centers, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the FDA. A national registry should be set up to specifically track energy-drink side effects with mandated reporting requirements.

Among other specific recommendations, the ACSM argues that energy drinks should not be consumed by children or adolescents; should not be consumed by other vulnerable populations, including pregnant or breastfeeding women, caffeine-naive or sensitive individuals, or individuals with cardiovascular or medical conditions; should not be used for sports hydration; should not be mixed with alcohol; and should bear a label such as “high source of caffeine” or “do not mix with alcohol.”

Departments People on the Move
Moira Maguire

Moira Maguire

Holyoke Community College recently welcomed Moira Maguire as its new dean of Social Sciences. Maguire most recently served as dean of Liberal Arts at Schenectady County Community College in New York. Before that, she spent 12 years as a professor of history at the University of Arkansas in Little Rock, where she was a tenured faculty member and served as a department chair and course coordinator. She holds a Ph.D. in history from American University, a master’s degree in history from Northeastern University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science and history from George Washington University. As a teacher and scholar specializing in 20th-century Irish history, Maguire spent more than 10 years at the University of Ireland Maynooth, where her research on infanticide and the Irish government’s care of unwed mothers and their children led to many articles and a book, Cherished Equally? Precarious Childhood in Independent Ireland. She has also worked as a consultant for the BBC on documentaries related to her research. As dean of Social Science, she will oversee six academic departments: Education, Criminal Justice, Human Services, Critical Cultural Studies (Economics, Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Women’s Studies), Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology.

•••••

Sonya Stephens, the acting president of Mount Holyoke College, has been named the college’s 19th president, effective July 1. The Mount Holyoke College board of trustees announced its decision to appoint Stephens on April 23 after an extensive presidential selection process that began in January. A formal inauguration will be held in September. The decision was unanimous. Stephens was made acting president in July 2016. During her tenure, she has overseen the implementation of the Plan for Mount Holyoke 2021 and been focused on ensuring the college’s long-term financial stability. Other key efforts include the creation of the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Initiative, which led to the annual BOOM! (Building on Our Momentum) learning conference and to the hiring of the college’s first chief diversity officer. Stephens led the development of the college’s comprehensive self-study for re-accreditation by the New England Assoc. of Schools and Colleges, and launched the Community Center construction and the opening of the Dining Commons. She is also overseeing the college’s commitment to reach carbon neutrality by its bicentennial in 2037.

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Elissa Langevin

Elissa Langevin

Lee McCarthy

Lee McCarthy

Shelley Daughdrill

Shelley Daughdrill

Lori Jarrett

Lori Jarrett

Celia Alvarado

Celia Alvarado

Alicia Pare

Alicia Pare

Florence Bank has promoted three employees to oversee the management of branches within their designated regions. Elissa Langevin has been named vice president and area manager for the bank’s main office in Florence, Lee McCarthy will serve as vice president and area manager for the King Street office in Northampton, Shelley Daughdrill and will hold the role of vice president and area manager for the Belchertown branch. Langevin is a 10-year employee of Florence Bank. Formerly, she was vice president and branch manager of the main office in Florence. During her tenure at the bank, Langevin has been the recipient of Florence Bank’s Community Service Award, which provides recognition to employees who are actively involved in community organizations. She serves as the current treasurer of the Belchertown Day School and has served as a board member for Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts. She has also served as board member and president of the East of the River Five Town Chamber of Commerce. McCarthy is a 15-year employee of Florence Bank. Formerly, she was vice president and branch manager of the King Street office. During her tenure at the bank, McCarthy has served as consumer lending officer and branch manager. She is a volunteer for the United Way of Hampshire County and serves on its Community Allocation Committee. In 2015, she was recognized by the United Way as an honoree for the Community Champion Award, presented to a community member who has made a significant contribution to the organization’s mission of creating positive and lasting change in Hampshire County. Daughdrill is a 12-year employee of Florence Bank. Formerly, she served as vice president and branch manager of the Amherst and Belchertown offices. She has been the recipient of the bank’s President’s Award and Community Service Award. She is a board member, attendance chair, and auction committee member for the Amherst Rotary Club, and she also serves on the development committee for the Amherst Survival Center. Meanwhile, Florence Bank has also hired three new employees to serve in various positions. Lori Jarrett will serve as assistant controller in the Finance Department in the main office in Florence, Celia Alvarado was named portfolio officer/commercial loan origination, and Alicia Pare was named to the position of cash management relationship officer. Jarrett holds a master’s degree in accounting from Western New England University. She volunteers for area nonprofits, including Riverside Industries, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampshire County, and Safe Passage, and she runs in the Apple-a-Day 5K, which benefits the elementary schools of Easthampton. Alvarado joined Florence Bank in February with nearly 10 years of banking experience. She currently studies at the New England College of Business, where she’s working on a bachelor’s degree in accounting and finance. She volunteers for Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts and has served on its board in the past. Pare earned a bachelor’s degree in business management from Assumption College in Worcester. In 2014, she received Florence Bank’s prestigious President’s Club Award, an annual tradition that recognizes outstanding performance, customer service, and overall contribution to Florence Bank.

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Mark Fuller, current dean and Thomas O’Brien Endowed Chair at Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst, has been appointed the new vice chancellor for Development and Alumni Relations by UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy. Fuller will succeed Michael Leto, who announced his upcoming retirement last fall. As the university’s chief advancement officer, Fuller will serve on the chancellor’s leadership team and be responsible for short- and long-term plans to improve private support as well as cultivate strong relationships with UMass alumni and supporters. UMass Amherst, the Commonwealth’s flagship campus, has more than 200,000 living alumni. Fuller has led UMass’s Isenberg School of Management since 2009. Under Fuller’s leadership, Isenberg has generated a four-fold increase in annual gift performance since 2010; received a $10 million endowment to create the Berthiaume Center for Entrepreneurship; increased student giving ten-fold; secured private support for the new, $62 million Business Innovation Wing; and created 12 new endowed faculty positions. Prior to coming to UMass Amherst, Fuller was a professor and chair of the Department of Information Systems and holder of the Philip L. Kays Distinguished Professorship in Management Information Systems at Washington State University. He received his master’s degree in management and his Ph.D. in management information systems from the University of Arizona’s Eller College of Management. His research focuses on virtual teamwork, technology-supported learning, and trust and efficacy in technology-mediated environments. Prior to Washington State, Fuller was an associate professor at the Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University.

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Maureen “Maura” Guzik

Maureen “Maura” Guzik

Casey Cusson

Casey Cusson

Erin Tautznik

Erin Tautznik

Janet Rosenkranz

Janet Rosenkranz

Michael Tucker, president and CEO of Greenfield Cooperative Bank, announced one new hire as well as three promotions. Maureen “Maura” Guzik joined Greenfield Cooperative Bank as vice president, Commercial Loans. She will be responsible for developing new commercial business in Hampshire County with the Northampton Cooperative division of the bank. She will be based in the bank’s Triangle Street branch in Amherst. She has more than 34 years of commercial banking experience. Guzik is a board member of the Northwestern District Attorney’s Children Advocacy Center and chairperson of the Belchertown Council on Aging. She is also active with the Amherst Area and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce. She earned her bachelor’s degree from St. Anselm’s College and her MBA from American International College. Casey Cusson has been promoted to assistant vice president and branch manager of the bank’s Shelburne Falls location. He has more than 15 years of management experience and joined Greenfield Cooperative Bank in June 2017. He is a board member on the Shelburne Falls Area Business Assoc. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business from UMass Amherst and will attend the New England School of Banking at Babson College beginning in May. Erin Tautznik was promoted to branch officer. With more than 13 years of banking experience, she is responsible for managing the bank’s 67 King St., Northampton office. She joined Northampton Cooperative Bank in 2004 and has attended Holyoke Community College and numerous banking seminars and courses. She is also a volunteer with the JFK Middle School’s after-school program. Janet Rosenkranz, credit officer, has additionally been named the Credit Department manager, and is now responsible for the bank’s Credit Department staff and coordinating its activities. She joined the bank in 2016 and has more than 18 years of experience in banking. She is a volunteer with the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts. She received her bachelor’s degree at UMass Amherst and will attend the National School of Banking at the Wharton School beginning in June.

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Brian Kapitulik has accepted the position of dean of Business, Information Technology, Professional Studies, and Social Sciences at Greenfield Community College (GCC). “After a thorough search, we were excited to offer the position of dean to Brian,” said Catherine Seaver, chief Academic Affairs officer. Kapitulik has 18 years of professional experience in the Massachusetts public higher-education system and, in particular, during the last decade, in community college. Before his current role, he was chair of the Department of Social Sciences and professor of Sociology at GCC. He has also taught at UMass Amherst and Quinsigamond Community College. During this time, he evaluated and developed curriculum, assessed and reviewed programs, created new courses, and hired and mentored new faculty, all while teaching students, publishing papers, organizing professional-development workshops in his field, and serving the college in a number of leadership capacities ranging from search committees to faculty mentor for online pedagogy.

•••••

The Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts’ newly launched arts initiative, ValleyCreates, announced the appointment of five community advisors to support the initiative’s core mission to address underserved communities’ access to arts and culture funding and resources. Gina Beavers, Arts and Culture editor for the Valley Advocate, will serve as a liaison to arts and culture organizations in Hampshire and Hampden counties. Vanessa Pabón-Hernandez, director of Community Engagement and Education for WGBY, will serve as the initiative’s liaison to arts organizations in Hampden County. Matthew Glassman, co-artistic director ensemble of Double Edge Theater in Ashfield, will serve as a liaison to rural arts and culture organizations with a focus on Franklin County. Rosemary Tracy Woods, executive director and chief curator of the nonprofit Art for the Soul Gallery in Springfield, will serve as the ValleyCreates events curator. Finally, Kent Alexander will serve as the initiative’s diversity, equity, and inclusion facilitator. He brings with him years of experience conducting anti-racism and social-justice-focused workshops for various local organizations. Each community advisor will contribute up to eight hours per month for one year and will receive a stipend. ValleyCreates is supported by the Barr Foundation, through the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts’ participation in the Creative Commonwealth Initiative.

•••••

Jeanne Hardy, associate professor of Chemistry, whose research focuses on a key protein linked to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, is being recognized with the inaugural Mahoney Life Sciences Prize at UMass Amherst. A panel of expert judges from the life-sciences sector observed that the “biomedical implications are significant” and “this could turn out to be one of ‘the’ pivotal studies in the effort to combat Alzheimer’s.” Hardy will receive the prize and present her research with life-sciences experts and UMass officials and scientists at a breakfast ceremony on Tuesday, June 19 at the UMass Club in Boston. Established by UMass Amherst alumni Richard, Robert, and William Mahoney, the $10,000 prize is intended to recognize scientists from the university’s College of Natural Sciences whose work significantly advances connections between research and industry. The prize will be awarded annually to one faculty member who is the principal author of a peer-reviewed paper about original research. Eligible papers can be on any topic in the life sciences that focuses on new research with translatable applications to industry and society. Hardy’s research paper, “Multiple Proteolytic Events in Caspase-6 Self-activation Impacts Conformations of Discrete Structural Regions,” was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in September 2017.

•••••

Baystate Franklin Medical Center announced that two interim leaders have accepted permanent positions at the community hospital. Ron Bryant has been named president, Baystate Franklin Medical Center/Northern Region, in addition to his continued role as president, Baystate Noble Hospital. Deb Provost has been named chief nursing officer and chief administrative officer, Baystate Franklin Medical Center/Northern Region, in addition to her continued role as chief regulatory officer, Baystate Health. Both have been serving in these roles in an interim capacity. Since Bryant’s interim appointment in January, he has held many open forums focusing on employee engagement and the need for a strong collaborative culture, advancing system integration and re-emphasizing the health system’s mission from a patient and employee perspective. Provost has been serving in the interim role of vice president of Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer at Baystate Franklin since November. Since her appointment, she has worked collaboratively with Baystate Franklin Medical Center’s leaders and team members to help ensure safe, high-quality care to the residents of Franklin County. Provost has been with Baystate Health for 41 years and has served as vice president, Surgery and Anesthesia and as interim chief nursing officer at Baystate Medical Center.

Features

The Trickle-down Effect

Rebeca Merigian, here with her son, Andrew Takorian

Rebeca Merigian, here with her son, Andrew Takorian, expects Park Cleaners’ contract with MGM to perhaps double the company’s current volume of business.

Rebeca Merigian says the slip was found, and promptly given to her, many years ago by a long-time customer, a description she quickly categorized as an obvious understatement.

Indeed, the date at the top is 1940, and thus this item, now displayed under glass, is a time capsule as much as it is a pick-up slip for a two-piece suit.

Start with the phone number at the top; there are just five digits because that’s all that were needed back then (ask your mother; actually, make that your grandmother). The name of the company was Park Cleaners & Dyers Inc. (the ‘& Dyers’ was dropped a long time ago because those services were discontinued). The address is Kensington Avenue in Springfield (the company moved to Allen Street in 1955). Even the slogan is different; back then it was ‘Dry cleaning as it should be done.’ Now, it’s ‘Family-owned and operated since 1935. We appreciate your business.’

Yes, much has changed since Edward Takorian, an Armenian who somehow escaped the genocide of 1915 and came to this country soon thereafter, went into business for himself.

There have been many ups and downs, said Merigian, Takorian’s great-granddaughter, who started working in the business on Saturdays when she was 9 and bought it from her mother three years ago. She noted that the company was started at the height of the Great Depression and has endured many other downturns over the next eight decades, and also the early death of her father. Not so long ago, there were more than 20 people working here; now there are four, including Merigian’s son and nephew.

But that number will be rising soon, thanks to what would have to be one of the biggest developments since that suit was picked up a year before the U.S. entered World War II — a contract with MGM Springfield, the $960 million resort casino that will open in about four months.

Park Cleaners has been awarded a contract to clean the uniforms for all 3,000 employees at the casino, and for the dry-cleaning of hotel guests and the MGM Springfield management team as well. Merigian couldn’t put a dollar figure on the contract, but she could certainly put it into perspective.

“I’m hoping that this will double our business,” she told BusinessWest, adding that the contract could give her the means to perhaps double the current workforce and pay the kind of benefits that are currently beyond the company’s reach. “My goal from this is to be able to provide health insurance for my employees who have been with through a lot of the challenges; I want to give back to them and provide more benefits and incentives so we can grow.”

Several other area businesses now have contracts with MGM or are in the process of finalizing one. Most will not be as life-changing as the one received by Park Cleaners, but they are all significant in some way.

Nick Noblit

Nick Noblit says the contract with MGM gives Yankee Mattress a new top line for its deep list of clients.

Take Agawam-based Yankee Mattress, for example. The company was originally asked to supply mattresses for all the rooms in MGM’s Springfield hotel, an order that Nick Noblit, the company’s general manager, admitted was too big to handle at this time. But the company will make California kings for the larger, high-roller suites, an assignment that will give the company additional business and some hopefully effective marketing material.

Meanwhile, Holyoke-based Kittredge Equipment Co. has secured one of the bigger contracts — this one to provide kitchen appliances and supplies to the many businesses that will do business at the casino.

There have been other contracts signed, and there will be many more agreements inked in the weeks to come as the countdown to the grand opening continues, said Courtney Wenleder, vice president and chief financial officer for MGM Springfield. She told BusinessWest that, as part of its host-community agreement, the company is required to apportion a percentage of its receivables to local companies.

But the company is striving to do more than just meet that obligation, she said, adding that MGM is looking to take the company’s philosophy regarding diversity and apply it to its vendor list. And this translates into extending opportunities to women (Kittredge is also woman-owned), minorities, and small businesses in general.

“MGM has a commitment to diversity and partnering with local vendors,” she explained. “It’s all about building the community together; there’s a symbiotic relationship — if the community does well, we do well, and vice versa.”

For this issue, BusinessWest looks at how the trickle-down effect from MGM Springfield, which began with local contractors taking part in the construction of the complex, is gathering momentum in the form of contracts to supply everything from knives and forks to marketing services. And while doing that, we’ll also shine a spotlight on some intriguing local businesses that have, by and large, flown under the radar.

The Rest of the Story

Wenleder told BusinessWest that many factors go into MGM’s decisions about which vendors to do business with and what might give a certain enterprise an edge over whatever competition emerges.

They range from quality of service and customer satisfaction, obviously, to whether, as noted, the business is minority- or women-owned. But there are some intangibles, and sometimes a little luck, that comes into play.

To get that point across, she relayed the story about how MGM Springfield now rents several apartments downtown, and they’re used, among other things, to house company executives visiting Springfield for extended stays.

Kittredge Equipment Co. owner Wendy Webber, left, with sales representative Amanda Desautels

Kittredge Equipment Co. owner Wendy Webber, left, with sales representative Amanda Desautels. The company will supply MGM Springfield with everything from appliances to glassware.

MGM CEO William Hornbuckle is one of these executives, and on one of his stays, he slept so soundly and comfortably that he took note of the label on his mattress (Yankee), later commented to those at MGM Springfield’s headquarters about his experience, and essentially initiated steps that would eventually lead to the company getting a contract.

“Bill commented about what a great night’s sleep he had on that mattress, and that pretty much secured their position,” Wenleder recalled with a laugh, adding that it wasn’t all that simple, but that bit of serendipity certainly got the ball rolling.

And the mattress contract serves as a good example of how MGM is trying to do business locally when it can and when it’s appropriate, said MGM Springfield General Manager Alex Dixon.

He noted, as Wenleder did, that there are times when MGM will simply add the Springfield casino to some existing contracts it has in place to provide certain products and services to the company’s existing properties.

Playing cards and dice would be good examples of this, he said, adding that MGM already has manufacturers providing those products. And, for the most part, there is no local company that makes such items.

But even with those products, there may be some opportunities for local businesses, he went on, noting, for example, that most playing cards are destroyed soon after they’re used, and MGM Springfield will use a local company to handle that work.

“We want to recognize what’s available in the local market and then tailor our supply chain to match what is happening in the local community,” he said while describing the company’s broad mindset when it comes to vendors.

Overall, MGM has a process in place when it comes to vendors, said Dixon, adding that the company actively solicits information from companies interested in doing business with it. The owners and managers of such ventures are invited to attend outreach events (they’re posted on the MGM Springfield website, for example), and through such events, companies become part of a database the company refers to when it needs specific products or services.

“Whenever there’s a business need, we want to find out if there are vendors, preferably local, who can help us to fulfill those needs — that’s step one,” he explained. “But informally, being members of the community, you really develop relationships.

“It’s no longer ‘hey there’s this great local brewer,’” he went on, while explaining how these relationships are created. “Now it’s ‘that’s Ray Berry from White Lion; maybe there’s an opportunity there.’”

In other words, familiarity breeds opportunity, and examples abound of how companies ranging from local caterers and computer hardware providers have come onto MGM Springfield’s radar screen — and are now doing business with the company.

The contract with Yankee Mattress is a good example of this phenomenon at work, said Dixon, confirming that the company was first presented with a proposal to furnish every room in its hotel now taking shape on Main Street.

But Noblet said such a large order would have necessitated additional hiring and other steps the company wasn’t ready to take.

But the contract to supply mattresses for the larger suites is a welcome addition and positive development for the Agawam-based company, which has been gaining traction in recent years as word-of-mouth referrals about its products proliferate.

This is another family business, started by Nick’s father, Joe, who is still active in the venture. The elder Noblit worked for a major mattress manufacturer for several years before deciding he could make a better product, and at a lower price, himself. And he did.

Yankee was launched in 1999, and it has grown and evolved other the years, said Noblit, adding that it started with a storefront and adjacent assembly area in Agawam, and now has four stores in the region.

Those outlets carry a host of lines with those huge tags that are supposedly illegal to rip off, including the top-of-line Black Collection, with models including the York, Fairhaven, Merrimac, and Nantucket.

There is a strong residential component to the customer base, obviously, said Noblit, but also many commercial clients as well, including several area B&Bs, hotels, and inns, as well as some healthcare providers, a few private schools, and a host of area fire departments.

“We custom-build those to be stronger than average — because there are some big firefighters out there and it’s important for them to have something durable,” he explained, adding that word of mouth has been the best marketing tool when it comes to adding new lines to the customer list on the company’s website.

If one were to peruse that list, the name now at the very top is MGM Resorts International, an indication of how important this contract is, not size-wise, but from a marketing and branding standpoint.

“Most hotels have a contract with a major manufacturer, and across the board, they do business with this manufacturer, and they make all of their beds,” he explained. “So for MGM to consider someone outside these big manufacturers that are nationwide, that’s significant.”

Buying Power

But if MGM Springfield found Yankee Mattress thanks to Bill Horbuckle’s good night’s sleep, most of the other vendors have had to find the casino giant.

And ‘find’ means going through a process of introducing one’s company to MGM Springfield through one of a number of vendor meet-and-greets, for lack of a better term, that the company has staged, including one at last fall’s Western Mass. Business and Innovation Expo, staged by BusinessWest.

Courtney Wenleder

Courtney Wenleder says there’s a symbiotic relationship between MGM and local vendors; when they do well, the casino operator does well, and vice versa.

Through these outreach sessions, MGM is making it much easier for companies to find it, said Wenleder, adding that MGM Springfield has a three-person purchasing team (a manager and two assistants), and one of their primary responsibilities is to go out into the community and find local vendors.

“Even though we’ve been doing a lot of communication with people when it comes to local purchasing requirements, some people aren’t hearing that message,” she explained. “We have people on the ground physically reaching out to these vendors.”

Merigian said she started attending such outreach sessions not long after MGM was granted the Western Mass. license in 2014, recognizing the casino as a rare business opportunity.

“I had my sights on it from the beginning,” she told BusinessWest. You never know how it’s going to work out with companies renting their own uniforms or owning them, but either way, I knew I would like to be part of it.”

So much so that she took steps to become a certified woman-owned business, understanding from those very first meetings that MGM had a strong interest in doing business with businesses led by women and minorities.

There would be more meetings to come over the next few years, she went on, adding that these sessions were beneficial on many levels.

“It really gets you tuned into your business,” she said, using that phrase to indicate everything from capabilities to long-term goals to what it will take to reach them. “It was an educational experience on many levels.”

The volume of work is large — most all of the 3,000 employees will wear some kind of uniform, and this contract covers all that and more — and thus MGM will likely be the largest customer in Park’s long history, said Merigian, although Park did have a contract with MassMutual for a quarter-century and still has one with the Defense Department (Westover Air Reserve Base).

“We don’t have specific numbers, but know it will be high volume,” she said of the business to start coming her way in a matter of weeks as employees are added to the payroll in waves. “But we’re ready for it, and we can feel the excitement.”

Indeed, after her father’s death, the company had to withdraw from the MassMutual contract, and it downsized considerably, said Merigian, adding quickly, however, that “we’re ready to go; we’re ready to get back to work.”

At Kittredge, meanwhile, the MGM contract is another important step forward for that company, said Amanda Desautels, an outside sales representative now working with MGM to outfit the restaurants that will be doing business at the casino.

“This is a significant contract for us,” she said, noting that Kittredge will be supplying MGM with everything from appliances to bar equipment; glassware to silverware, and adding it to a client list that includes UMass Amherst, the Max restaurant group, and Mount Holyoke College, among many others.

The company, rapidly approaching its centennial (it was launched in 1921), started as a supplier of typewriters and cash registers and has evolved into a $50 million equipment and supply giant that now employs more than 70 people locally.

At its warehouse and retail facility in the Agawam Regional Industrial Park, one can find everything from industrial refrigerators, freezers, and stoves to dishes and glassware to individual carving knives. Desautels joked that the company provides everything that goes on the table, around it (furniture), and even under it. “If you have a wobbly table, we have table levelers.”

It also has certification as a woman-owned business (Wendy Webber succeeds her late husband, Neil, as owner and operator), a designation that has opened many doors for the company and no doubt played a role in securing the contract with MGM.

“Being a woman-owned business has created many opportunities for Kittredge, and MGM is obviously one of those,” said Desautels, noting that the addition of MGM to the client roster is significant in many respects. “It’s exciting to be doing business with a company like MGM that shares the same values we do, such as diversity and the importance of their employees.”

Pressing Engagement

As she posed for a few photos for BusinessWest, Merigian gathered her son, Andrew Takorian, and insisted that he be part of the picture.

Figuratively speaking, he has been for some time now, working at this establishment — like his mother, grandfather, and great-grandfather before him — while still in grade school.

He represents the fifth generation to carry a business card that says ‘Park Cleaners’ — or Park Cleaners & Dyers, as the case may be. The company has gone through a lot of change and evolution after the past eight and half decades, and many important developments.

Perhaps none were as big as the contract inked with MGM Springfield, which comes at a critical time and represents a huge opportunity for growth and security.

It’s just one example of the trickle-down effect that is now underway, and already changing the local business landscape in profound ways.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Company Notebook Departments

CHI Insurance Opens Downtown Springfield Office

SPRINGFIELD — CHI Insurance Agency Inc. announced the opening of an additional office location in downtown Springfield. The office, located at 1684 Main St., is the former Joseph Chernaik Insurance Agency. The Springfield location is the fourth CHI office, with other locations in Holyoke, Westfield, and South Hadley. Auto insurance will continue to be offered, and additional insurance products have been added and are available out of 1684 Main St. In addition to new staff and updated systems, customers now have the opportunity to purchase coverages for home, business, life, and specialty lines. All locations are bilingual and offer complete insurance products. CHI services clients throughout the Pioneer Valley with all of their insurance needs, and represents most major insurance carriers.

Griffin Staffing Network Announces Expansion, Rebrand to ManeHire

EAST LONGMEADOW — Griffin Staffing Network, a certified woman- and minority-owned business, has undergone a company rebrand to ManeHire and unveiled its new logo, tagline — “connecting great companies with great talent” — and website, manehire.com, to support its expansion from a local boutique staffing agency to a full-service regional staffing agency serving the Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and Washington, D.C. markets. Since 2013, Griffin Staffing Network has served a wide-range of local and regional clients operating in industries such as healthcare, financial services, insurance, manufacturing, and nonprofit, filling roles from entry-level to C-suite and everything in between.

PeoplesBank Issues 2018 Corporate Green Report

HOLYOKE — PeoplesBank issued its 2018 annual Corporate Green Report in recognition of Earth Day 2018. During the past year, the Sustainable Business Network (SBN) of Massachusetts named PeoplesBank a winner of the Sustainable Business of the Year award. For the fourth year in a row, voters throughout Hampshire County named PeoplesBank the Best Local Green Business in the 2017 Daily Hampshire Gazette Readers’ Choice poll. The bank also continued a multi-year commitment of more than $65,000 in funding for green initiatives in Western Mass, and is a longtime leader in sustainable-energy financing. The bank boasts three LEED-certified branches in Northampton, West Springfield, and Springfield; and it has installed electric-vehicle charging stations at its Northampton, West Springfield, and Holyoke offices.

L&A Fine Men’s Shop Cuts Ribbon in Springfield

SPRINGFIELD — L&A Fine Men’s Shop, located at 159 State St., Springfield, hosted a ribbon cutting and open house April 19. Audrin Desardouin and Lillian Ortiz, husband-and-wife co-owners, opened the store in December and have been investing in inventory and undergoing training to become an official minority-owned business. Desardouin came to the U.S. from Haiti when he was 21 years old. A U.S. citizen, he has lived in New England for the past 30-plus years. Ortiz, who was born in Connecticut, is Puerto Rican. She works at Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester as vice president of Enrollment and Student Engagement and Community Connections. Desardouin owned a men’s clothing store in Norwich, Conn. for 15 years. The new shop is open Monday through Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Pioneer Valley Credit Union Awards Four Scholarships

SPRINGFIELD — Pioneer Valley Credit Union announced the recipients of its 2018 college scholarship program. Each year, PVCU selects four students to receive a $1,000 scholarship to help with college expenses; over the years, it has awarded $70,000 in all. The scholarships are named in honor of board of directors members who have dedicated their time and service to Pioneer Valley Credit Union and to the credit-union movement. Miya Walto of Smith Academy received the Maurice O’Shea Scholarship, John Fiester of Monson High School received the Richard Borden Memorial Scholarship, Janiya Dixon of Longmeadow High School received the Ignatius Collura Scholarship, and Fiona Cioch of Westfield High School received the Ted Klekotka Memorial Scholarship.

United Financial Bancorp Announces Q1 Earnings

HARTFORD — United Financial Bancorp Inc., the holding company for United Bank, announced results for the quarter ended March 31, 2018. The company reported net income of $15.8 million, or $0.31 per diluted share, for the quarter ended March 31, 2018, compared to net income for the linked quarter of $9.5 million, or $0.19 per diluted share. The company reported net income of $13.7 million, or $0.27 per diluted share, for the quarter ended March 31, 2017. Assets totaled $7.07 billion at March 31, 2018 and decreased $45.5 million, or 0.6%, from $7.11 billion at December 31, 2017. At March 31, 2018, total loans were $5.38 billion, representing an increase of $42.3 million, or 0.8%, from the linked quarter.

JA of Western Mass. Wins Grant from Wells Fargo

SPRINGFIELD — Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts announced it was awarded a $7,500 grant from Wells Fargo. Funding from Wells Fargo will support the Pathways to 21st Century Skills Project to provide students with the tools to develop the 21st-century skills needed to become autonomous employees. The project’s goals are to improve students’ knowledge of financial literacy in order for them to make sound financial judgments in the future, increase students’ entrepreneurial skills, increase students’ critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, and increase awareness of career and post-secondary education and career opportunities in Western Mass.

Fuss & O’Neill Opens Downtown Springfield Office

SPRINGFIELD — Engineering firm Fuss & O’Neill, which has locations throughout New England, recently held an open house at its new downtown Springfield office, 1550 Main St. The company’s move from its West Springfield office to downtown Springfield officially happened in January. “We are thrilled to be here in Springfield,” said Eric Bernardin, vice president at Fuss & O’Neill. “As an engineering firm, our job is to help create an environment that promotes and provides the groundwork for economic opportunity, civic involvement, and arts and entertainment. We are excited to be part of helping Springfield grow, and we look forward to the future.” The office space is owned by MassDevelopment, the public finance and economic-development authority of Massachussetts.

Smith Brothers Insurance Acquires Bailey Agencies

EASTHAMPTON — Smith Brothers Insurance, LLC has purchased the assets of Bailey Agencies Insurance of Groton, Conn. Owned and operated by the Scott family since 1980, Bailey has been a long-term fixture on the Connecticut shoreline. Bailey Agencies Insurance has moved to the Smith Brothers office in Niantic, Conn., at 377 Main St. With headquarters in Glastonbury, Conn., Smith Brothers has offices throughout Connecticut as well as Massachusetts — including a branch in Easthampton — and New Jersey. John Scott IV, former Bailey Agencies Insurance principal, will continue his role as commercial-lines producer and, along with two other insurance professionals, will work from Smith Brothers’ Niantic office.

Berkshire Bank Honored for Social Responsibility

PITTSFIELD — Berkshire Bank announced that it received the 2017 Communitas Award for Leadership in Community Service & Corporate Social Responsibility. The Communitas Awards, administered by the Assoc. of Marketing and Communication Professionals, recognize businesses that give of themselves and their resources to their communities. The award recognized Berkshire Bank’s comprehensive corporate social-responsibility activities, including volunteer, philanthropy, and sustainability efforts, as well as responsiveness to community needs through products, services, and engagement activities. Annually, Berkshire Bank and the Berkshire Bank Foundation provide more than $2 million in financial contributions as well as scholarships to high-school seniors. In addition to financial support, the XTEAM, the bank’s employee volunteer program, provides employees with paid time off to volunteer during regular business hours.

Florence Bank Presents Customers’ Choice Grants

FLORENCE — Florence Bank recently presented $100,000 in awards ranging from $500 to $5,000 to 57 area nonprofits through its 16th annual Customers’ Choice Community Grants Program during an event at the Garden House at Look Memorial Park. The funds will support libraries, schools, police, fire departments, hospitals, hospices, and other organizations that benefit people of all ages, as well as animals and the environment. The bank reached the $1.05 million mark in terms of grants made over nearly two decades to 144 community nonprofits. The Customers’ Choice Community Grants Program is an annual offering founded in 2002, through which Florence Bank customers are invited to vote for their favorite local nonprofit in hopes it will receive a share of grant funding.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Holyoke Community College recently welcomed Moira Maguire as its new dean of Social Sciences.

Maguire most recently served as dean of Liberal Arts at Schenectady County Community College in New York. Before that, she spent 12 years as a professor of history at the University of Arkansas in Little Rock, where she was a tenured faculty member and served as a department chair and course coordinator.

She holds a Ph.D. in history from American University, a master’s degree in history from Northeastern University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science and history from George Washington University.

As a teacher and scholar specializing in 20th-century Irish history, Maguire spent more than 10 years at the University of Ireland Maynooth, where her research on infanticide and the Irish government’s care of unwed mothers and their children led to many articles and a book, Cherished Equally? Precarious Childhood in Independent Ireland. She has also worked as a consultant for the BBC on documentaries related to her research.

As dean of Social Science, she will oversee six academic departments: Education, Criminal Justice, Human Services, Critical Cultural Studies (Economics, Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Women’s Studies), Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology.

“The combination of her scholarly work, teaching, and administrative experience will no doubt be an asset to the Social Sciences division and the college,” said Monica Perez, HCC vice president of Academic Affairs.

Daily News

FLORENCE — Florence Bank recently presented $100,000 in awards ranging from $500 to $5,000 to 57 area nonprofits through its 16th annual Customers’ Choice Community Grants Program during an event at the Garden House at Look Memorial Park. The funds will support libraries, schools, police, fire departments, hospitals and hospices, and other organizations that benefit people of all ages, as well as animals and the environment.

Noting that the bank reached the $1.05 million mark in terms of grants made over nearly two decades to 144 community nonprofits, President and CEO John Heaps Jr. offered a toast to roughly 150 volunteers and staff members from the organizations who gathered for the celebration last month.

“We started 16 years ago with an idea to ask our customers to vote for a worthy organization to receive funds,” Heaps said. “Here’s to the $1 million mark.”

Heaps noted that the bank is most grateful to the 57 organizations and the work they do to strengthen the community. “You make our communities special with your contributions every day. Here’s to you.”

The Customers’ Choice Community Grants Program is an annual offering founded in 2002, through which Florence Bank customers are invited to vote for their favorite local nonprofit in hopes it will receive a share of grant funding. In its early years, awards of $50,000, and later, $75,000, were offered each year by the bank; in more recent years, $100,000 has been disbursed each spring.

To qualify for a community grant, organizations must receive at least 50 votes. Marketing Director Monica Curhan said at the event that this year each vote is worth about $15 to the organizations. She also said that, for the first time this year, eight organizations that received between 40 and 49 votes were invited to attend the event to vie for one bonus $500 award. Leaders from three of the eight were present — Easthampton Dollars for Scholars, Smith Vocational and Agricultural High School PTO and the Family Business Center of Pioneer Valley Inc.

In 2017, before the Dec. 31 deadline, 10,111 votes were cast through Customers’ Choice.

The Customers’ Choice Community Grants program is a year-long initiative. Customers’ of the bank can vote via paper ballots until Dec. 31 at each bank branch location or online at www.florencebank.com/vote.

Nonprofits are encouraged to create campaigns to motivate their constituents, those who are Florence Bank customers, to vote. To request materials to help with a campaign, e-mail [email protected] and request a Customers’ Choice kit.

Daily News

CHICOPEE — In honor of Autism Awareness Month in April, Gina Kos, executive director of Sunshine Village, announced the organization is partnering with community organizations on several special events focused on inclusivity, acceptance, and celebrating unique abilities. As a local provider of day programs and employment services, the organization regularly seeks partnerships to promote goodwill and give back to the community by volunteering and offering educational opportunities.

On April 2, Sunshine Village programs visited the offices of Chicopee Mayor Richard Kos, and Chicopee Treasurer Marie Laflamme, and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, along with the Chicopee Fire Department, Chicopee Police Department, and Springfield Fire Department, to deliver handmade crafts, treats, and artwork celebrating Autism Awareness Month. Visits are also planned for fire and police departments in other towns served by the organization to raise awareness and to thank first responders for their dedication to the community.

Representatives from Sunshine Village will also be at several fairs during the month, and will also partner with Chicopee Public Library for interactive events. For more information and registration, visit www.chicopeepubliclibrary.org.

Departments Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 

Celebrate Springfield

DevelopSpringfield hosted its seventh annual Celebrate Springfield Dinner on March 21 at the MassMutual Center. Nick Fyntrilakis, DevelopSpringfield’s chairman, shared a presentation on highlights of DevelopSpringfield’s first 10 years. Proceeds will support DevelopSpringfield’s redevelopment initiatives, projects, and programs.

From left, Liz O’Gilvie of the Springfield Food Policy Council; Jay Ash, Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development; and Laura Masulis of MassDevelopment

From left, Liz O’Gilvie of the Springfield Food Policy Council; Jay Ash, Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development; and Laura Masulis of MassDevelopment

From left, Bob Bolduc, founder of Pride Stores, and Joan Kagan, president and CEO of Square One, received the Partners in Progress Award

From left, Bob Bolduc, founder of Pride Stores, and Joan Kagan, president and CEO of Square One, received the Partners in Progress Award, while Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno (represented by Sarno’s Chief of Staff Denise Jordan) received the first-ever Cornerstone Award. The awards recognized the honorees for their efforts to create a strong community and their commitment to economic development and revitalization in Springfield.

Will of the People

Florence Bank recently presented $100,000 in awards ranging from $500 to $5,000 to 57 area nonprofits through its 16th annual Customers’ Choice Community Grants Program during an event at the Garden House at Look Memorial Park. The funds will support libraries, schools, police, fire departments, hospitals and hospices, and other organizations that benefit people of all ages, as well as animals and the environment. The bank reached the $1.05 million mark in terms of grants made over nearly two decades to 144 community nonprofits. (Photos by Evan Fogarty)

Niki Lankowski and Michael Skillicorn of Grow Food Northampton celebrate the receipt of their Customers’ Choice Community Grant.

Niki Lankowski and Michael Skillicorn of Grow Food Northampton celebrate the receipt of their Customers’ Choice Community Grant.

Florence Bank President and CEO John Heaps Jr., right, shakes hands with Carmine DiCenso, executive director of Dakin Humane Society, the top program recipient with a $5,000 award.

Florence Bank President and CEO John Heaps Jr., right, shakes hands with Carmine DiCenso, executive director of Dakin Humane Society, the top program recipient with a $5,000 award.

Modern Office Sections

Playing by the Rules

John Gannon

John Gannon says putting a policy in writing isn’t enough — an employer then needs to follow it — but it’s a first step in showing a company takes workplace law and ethics seriously.

Most companies, especially larger ones, have employee handbooks that detail everything from vacation time to reasons for termination. Yet, too many are content to draft a handbook and shelve it for years, never reviewing it for changes in the regulatory landscape or confusing or contradictory language. In the ever-changing world of employment law, those are mistakes that can prove costly in more ways than one.

An employee handbook isn’t a contract, nor is it a legally binding document. But in a legal proceeding, it helps to have one.

Take, for instance, the case of an employee suing a company for allowing a culture of sexual harassment — a particularly timely example.

“In court, the first thing the judge will ask is to see the company’s policy,” said John Gannon, partner with Skoler, Abbott & Presser. “If your response is ‘we don’t have one,’ that suggests the employer doesn’t care about harassment and discrimination in the workplace. And that’s really getting off on the wrong foot in the event you’re sued for harassment or discrimination.”

The #MeToo revolution has certainly sent HR departments scrambling to make sure their policies on that issue are up-to-date, clear, and enforced. But if they’re smart, said the attorneys BusinessWest spoke with, they’re also regularly reviewing all sorts of policies that govern workplace rules and expectations — from disciplinary procedures to time off — and, hopefully, including them in an employee handbook.

“Every company that has employees should have a handbook,” said Daniel Carr, an associate with Royal, P.C. in Northampton. “But we use the term ‘handbook’ loosely; there’s no requirement that they have to be bound in a single document. It could mean whatever collection of policies you have, as long as it’s applied to all employees.”

Even if the employee signs a statement that he has read and understands the handbook, that doesn’t create contractual rights, Carr explained, noting that Massachusetts is, after all, an at-will state when it comes to hiring and firing, and an employee can be terminated for any reason that is not explicitly illegal, such as discrimination.

“I can’t tell you how many cases we’ve seen where the employee claims his termination was a violation of his contract. When asked, ‘what contract?’ they argue the employee handbook is a contract. It’s not.”

Gannon agreed. “One of the nice thigns about a handbook is that you can reaffirm the principle that everyone is an at-will employee,” he explained. “That’s why it’s really important, if you’re going to have a handbook, it should make it clear this is not a binding contract, your employment is at-will, and we can change the terms of the handbook and your employment relationship at any time with or without notice.”

So, if it’s not a contract, what is a handbook, and why should employers have one — and take it seriously?

“A handbook is a collection of policies, an ever-living document that can be changed at any time by an employer with or without notice,” said Mary Kennedy, partner with Bulkley Richardson in Springfield. “The purpose of a handbook is to give information to employees about expectations at work.”

Employers use the policies in an employee handbook as a sort of roadmap to both the treatment of employees and, conversely, expectations for their behavior. They protect themselves from lawsuits, such as harassment claims, wrongful termination claims, and discrimination claims. Employee handbooks generally contain a code of conduct for employees that sets guidelines around appropriate behavior for the individual workplace.

Mary Kennedy says the first goal of a handbook is to lay out clear expectations for workplace behavior.

Mary Kennedy says the first goal of a handbook is to lay out clear expectations for workplace behavior.

Under Massachusetts law, for companies with at least six employees, part of that collection of expectations must be policies reflecting the state’s own guidelines governing sexual harassment, accommodations for pregnant workers, sick leave, and other issues — many of which have changed recently.

Other contents should typically include policies governing discipline, rules of behavior, when and how to take time off, sick-time guidelines, how much vacation and personal time employees get, when they are paid, and what health benefits are available and how to access them.

The contents of any handbook vary from industry to industry, Gannon noted. For instance, the time an employee clocks in may be more important on the manufacturing floor than in an office setting, while safety guidelines for construction workers will be different than those for accountants.

“It’s an inexact science, and obviously no handbook is foolproof, and you can’t account for every possible contingency,” Carr said. “There may be at times you have to deviate from it. Certainly, you don’t want to be hemming yourself in to something you can live up to. As an employer in an at-will state, you have the right to set the policies. The handbook is more about setting expectations than setting hard and fast rules.”

Law and Order

The benefits of having a handbook fall into two buckets, Gannon said: The legal obligations governed by state and federal employment law, and basic HR practices that aren’t necessarily required by the law.

For the latter, written policies must make it clear to the employee what the employer’s expectations are.

“If you do need to discipline an employee, if you need to write them up or suspend them, you never want an employee to turn around and say, ‘wait a minute, I didn’t know I was going to get written up if I was absent more than three times in a month.’ Or, ‘I didn’t know it was a violation of your company policy to raise my voice at a meeting’ — whatever the case may be. A handbook sets expectations.”

It also provides guidelines to managers so they can treat employees fairly and consistently, he added. If the policy is clear, it can be applied to everyone across the board. If not, one supervisor may write someone up for a violation, while another supervisor doesn’t. That leads to inconsistency and, sometimes, hot water in court.

“Inconsistent application of your rules can lead to a lot of legal problems if the employee challenges the reason for his or her reason for separation from employment,” Gannon said, adding that the actual enforcement of the rules is more important than what a handbook says, “but if you don’t have, at minimum, a written policy, you have a big risk of inconsistent enforcement of your work rules.”

Kennedy said having clear policies in the handbook is the first step when defending a claim of wrongful termination in court.

“If you have a no-show policy where, after three violations, the employee is terminated, and it’s in writing and the employee was told it applies to all employees, and the employer can show it was uniformly applied to all employees, then the employer has a better shot at defending itself.

“For example, if a bank teller continually makes mistakes on the line and keeps coming up short, that’s certainly not beneficial for the employer,” she explained, so a written policy outlining the consequences of coming up short multiple times would be reasonable. “Whereas, if the bank said, ‘we don’t like people with red hair,’ well, that’s different.”

Supervisors and managers, Gannon said, typically appreciate a hard-and-fast policy because it’s something they can fall back on. He recalls one client whose employee showed up to work intoxicated, and at first, his supervisor didn’t know what to do. “Fortunately, they had a policy that made it clear, if you detect someone is under the influence, this is what you should do. It helped the supervisor navigate what his options were. Without that, they’re left wondering what to do.”

Communicating the policy to employees is just as important, Kennedy said, whether it’s a physical document passed out, with the employee signing an acknowledgement of receipt, or an electronic document distributed through the company intranet, or, for a larger business, explaining new policies in a meeting and making a list of who attended. “You certainly want to give it out when onboarding people, and then when there are any changes in policy.”

Even progressive discipline can be altered if the employer can prove the action is reasonable, Carr said — again, going back to the at-will concept. “If the handbook says a first violation is a verbal warning, the second is a written warning, third is probation, and fourth is termination, you have the right to revise that if someone commits a terminable offense the first time out.”

Trouble Spots

With all the protections a handbook may provide, Gannon said, some pitfalls do exist. One is trying to put everything in a handbook.

“The more words you have in the handbook, the less likely an employee is going to read it all,” he noted. “Sometimes I’ll see one that’s 120 pages long. I’m not sure any handbook needs to be that long.”

A smarter option, he said, is to include a short, two-paragraph summary of each policy, directing the employers to ask a particular person, maybe someone in human resources, if they need a more detailed explanation.

“Another mistake is not getting it reviewed enough,” he added. “It’s great to have a handbook — most employers do — but sometimes they get stale. You don’t want to have a policy that’s outdated, or you don’t want a handbook that misstates the law, because there are often changes in the law.”

For example, on April 1, Massachusetts employers will be required to have a policy that adheres to the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. “You need to review your handbook — it doesn’t necessarily have to be annually, but I would say every two or three years — just to make sure you’re not missing anything and there haven’t been changes in the law that would require rewording a policy.”

In a union shop, Kennedy said, employers want to make sure the handbook gels with the collective bargaining agreement, but even in a non-union shop, certain written policies may run into conflict with rulings from the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few years ago, several companies made news by terminating workers for complaining about their job on social media — and took their cases to court, where they won.

“Social media has become the equivalent of the so-called water cooler,” Carr said, noting that the NLRB has long protected the rights of employees to discuss the terms and conditions of their employment, even in a public forum. However, the composition of the board has changed under President Trump and may be less willing to side with employees in all such matters.

“A few years ago, handbook provisions that restricted employees’ right to discuss terms and conditions of employment were considered overbroad — that was all the rage for awhile,” Gannon said. “New administration has scaled some of that back. With all the ebbs and flows in the world of employment law, you need to make sure the handbook stays up to date with those changes.”

Kennedy agreed. “Employment law changes on a regular basis, so handbook policies should be reviewed on a regular basis, to make sure they contain up-to-date language.”

Still, amid all the talk of violations and firings, Gannon said, the greatest value of a handbook is in its power to prevent some of those incidents in the first place.

“If an employee knows what can potentially lead to discipline, I think the employee is less likely to engage in that behavior,” he told BusinessWest. “That’s one of the really nice things about a handbook — it sets out what your expectations are. The goal of discipline is not to create a path that justifies termination. The goal of discipline is to correct behavior so that somebody can stay with the company for a long time and be a valued contributor to the group.”

To that end, he continued, “if you do need to discipline, it’s easier to explain why when you can point to handbook and say, ‘look, this is company policy, and you violated it. Sorry, but I have to write you up.’”

Turn the Page

That said, a handbook also helps with a company’s defense is they are sued, Gannon noted.

“If an employee claims they were fired because of a protected characteristic, it’s the employer’s burden to demonstrate to a judge or jury that, no, this is the real reason this person was fired. It’s nice to be able to point to a policy in a handbook that makes it clear this is why the employer took a particular action, that it wasn’t an arbitrary decision one supervisor just came up with. The company considered this particular issue, went to the extent of drafting a handbook putting this policy in place and having the employee sign off on it, and there’s an expectation the policy is going to be followed.”

Carr, who told BusinessWest he has drafted or reviewed “many, many handbooks,” emphasized, however, that a good policy holds up in court only if the employer actually enforces that policy uniformly and consistently.

“Otherwise, it’s just empty rhetoric. Sexual harassment is a perfect example, and a timely one,” he said.

Elaborating, he said virtually every company has an anti-sexual-harassment policy, and one of the tenets of sexual-harassment law is the question of whether an employer knew about, or should have known about, the alleged violations. “If the employee can show the employer was not diligent about enforcing their own policies, it creates the impression they dropped the ball and should have known.”

It’s a lesson many companies continue to learn the hard way.

Simply put, Kennedy said, “what’s bad about having a handbook is if you don’t follow it.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Modern Office Sections

Getting Ahead at Work

By Susan Bellows

You went to college and did well. You got an entry-level job and moved up in the company. Yet, for some reason, your advancement has plateaued.
You’re not getting the respect, recognition, and rewards your hard work deserves. What are you doing wrong, and what can you do to turn the situation around?

Let’s Start with the Don’ts

• Don’t complain, gossip, or blame others. All of these behaviors devalue you.

• Don’t make up an answer if you don’t know it. Instead, say something like, “let me get back to you with the most accurate information.” This will avoid jeopardizing your long-term credibility.

• Don’t bring your personal problems to the office.

• Don’t be afraid to ask for more details on a project you’ve been assigned. The president of a bank once said to me, “I worry if they don’t come back and ask questions.”

• Don’t try to hide mistakes. Own up to them and learn from them. You’ll earn more respect from others when you take ownership.

• Don’t be a know-it-all. A little humility goes a long way in building rapport with your colleagues.

Now for the Do’s:

• Behave positively and professionally both inside and outside the company. This includes the Christmas party, networking events, and posting on social media. You’re always being evaluated. Inappropriate pictures or statements made on social media can and will be used against you.

• Have a can-do attitude. Be proactive about saying ‘yes’ to new opportunities and challenges. Your willingness to step up will make you more valuable to the company and enhance your reputation as a team player.

• Build mutually beneficial relationships with vendors, colleagues, department heads, and your boss. Some of the best job referrals come from vendors. An adversarial relationship with a department head could easily sabotage your ability to get your job done.

• Be proactive about your career development. Invest in things like additional training and technology. These actions will increase your value as an employee. They will also make you a more marketable candidate for jobs inside and outside your company.

• Continue learning once you get a job. Go to other departments that involve the work you do, such as marketing if you’re in sales, and ask questions that’ll help you understand their challenges. Read about your industry. Join outside professional groups to learn more about your field and to build a network of peers.

• Learn communication skills to build rapport with others. Dale Carnegie’s classic book How to Win Friends & Influence People is a good place to start. Anything you can do to understand yourself and others will be valuable at work and in your personal life.

• Listen attentively and take notes, if appropriate, when gathering information. Ask for clarification if needed. Nobody wants to spend time explaining something and then realize the listener was just nodding, but not retaining the details.

• Offer fact-based solutions, not just your opinion, when making suggestions for improvements in a process.

• Contribute constructively at meetings and listen to what others have to say. It’s important to understand the perspective of others. The only way this is possible is to be receptive and listen.

• Avoid challenging, questioning, and criticizing how things are done when you’re new. Later, learn to say these things in a way that doesn’t alienate others. Try using softening statements, such as “could I ask you something that might be sensitive?” or “you probably already know this, but…”

• Volunteer for high-visibility projects when you believe you’ll be able to contribute. Doing this exposes you to the attention of upper management, who may later offer you a position that leverages the talents they observe you demonstrate.

• Be aware of what you say and how you say it. Your tone of voice can enhance or destroy the message you want to deliver. Avoid asking a question starting with “why.” Folks get defensive when they hear this word. It’s preferable to say something like, “Tell me more about…” in a soft, non-confrontational tone of voice.

• Be prepared for inevitable change. This includes changes in ownership of the company, the economy, business competitors, co-workers, and your boss. Plan for change and be ready for it.

This is lot to think about. But being strategic about getting ahead is a little like starting a new job. It’s hard at the beginning, and then it becomes second nature. In the long run, it’s well worth the effort.

Susan Bellows is a business consultant specializing in empowering middle-management women to attain the recognition, respect, and rewards they deserve; (413) 566-3934; [email protected]

Briefcase Departments

Tighe & Bond Publishes 2017 Water and Sewer Rate Survey Results

WESTFIELD — Tighe & Bond published the results of its most recent Massachusetts Water and Sewer Rate Survey. Since 1997, Tighe & Bond has gathered and published Massachusetts water and sewer user rate data that municipal government and private water suppliers can use as a benchmarking tool for comparing their rates against other suppliers in the state. The survey, conducted across the state during 2017, includes typical annual homeowner water and sewer costs for most systems throughout Massachusetts. It also provides information regarding rate structures and billing cycles. This can be particularly useful information when suppliers are considering adjustments to their current rates or rate structures. Tighe & Bond is now teaming with the Environmental Finance Center at the University of North Carolina School of Government to present the results of the firm’s rate study using a free, online rates dashboard developed, hosted and maintained by the center. This gives users more flexibility in examining the survey data. Users can adjust the assumed annual usage the comparison is based on, review conservation and affordability metrics, as well as compare annual bills. They can also compare rates by utility size, river basin, geographic area, and median household income. The 2017 water survey indicates that annual water costs in in Massachusetts range from a low of $123 to a high of $2,025. The 2017 average is $595, and the median is $568. Sixty-five percent of survey respondents have increased their rates since the 2014 survey. The 2017 sewer survey indicates that annual sewer costs in in Massachusetts range from a low of $229 to a high of $2,316. The 2017 average is $862, and the median is $838. Three-quarters of survey respondents have increased their rates since the 2014 survey. Anyone can access the online rates dashboard, or request a copy of these survey results, by visiting www.tighebond.com/category/rate-surveys.

Opioid-related Overdose Deaths Fell by More Than 8% in 2017

BOSTON — Opioid-related overdose deaths in Massachusetts declined in 2017 by an estimated 8.3% compared to 2016. This is the first time in several years there has been a year-over-year decline, according to the quarterly report released by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. This is the third consecutive quarterly report where the number of estimated and confirmed opioid-related deaths declined. The total number of estimated and confirmed opioid-related overdose deaths in 2017 was 1,977, which is 178 fewer deaths than the 2,155 estimated and confirmed deaths in 2016, or an 8.3% decrease. In previous years, the year-over-year comparisons showed increases in opioid-related overdose deaths; the estimated opioid-related overdose death rate in 2016 increased by 22% from 2015, there was a 30% increase in 2015 from the prior year, and in 2014, there was a 39% increase from 2013.

Bradley Airport to Introduce Non-stop Service to St. Louis

WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. — The Connecticut Airport Authority (CAA) announced the debut of new daily, non-stop service between Bradley International Airport and St. Louis Lambert International Airport on Southwest Airlines. The service will commence on Aug. 7, utilizing a Boeing 737, with an average of 143 seats. The daily departure from Bradley International Airport is scheduled for 11:10 a.m. (Eastern Time), with an arrival at St. Louis Lambert International Airport at 12:45 p.m. (Central Time). The inbound flight is scheduled to leave St. Louis at 4:25 p.m. (Central) and arrive at Bradley at 7:50 p.m. (Eastern). This route will be Southwest’s 10th non-stop destination out of Bradley International Airport. The airline currently offers non-stop service from Bradley to Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Ft. Lauderdale, Ft. Myers, Las Vegas, Orlando, Tampa, and West Palm Beach. The airline first started flying out of Bradley in 1999.

State Announces Grants to Restore Rivers, Boost Climate Readiness

BOSTON — The state recently announced $97,397 in state grant funds for priority projects in the city of Northampton and the towns of Duxbury, Middleton, and West Boylston to remove dams, aid in the restoration of rivers to their natural state, and increase climate readiness. Benefits of river restoration include increased habitat for fish and wildlife, flood management, landscape development, and an increase in recreational opportunities and access. The grant funds are administered by the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration (DER). Locally, work will include the Upper Roberts Meadow Brook restoration and the Upper Roberts Meadow Brook dam removal in Northampton, to be funded with a $25,000 state grant. The brook is a cold-water stream with a resident trout population. Removal of the 30-foot-high dam will provide numerous environmental benefits, including conversion of the dam impoundment back to a free-flowing reach, reconnection of approximately nine miles of upstream habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms, and repair of ecological processes that support a healthy stream system, including the movement of sediment and organic matter. This grant will support the city in completing the permitting phase, conducting the bid phase, and beginning the project implementation phase. Priority projects are evaluated by DER on their ecological benefit, cost, size, practicality, feasibility, contribution to climate readiness, opportunity for public education and recreation, available program resources, and partner support.

New Energy-efficiency Program Offers Opportunities and Rebates

BOSTON — A new pilot program funded by the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) is making incentives for energy-efficiency upgrades in residential buildings with one to four units available to Massachusetts residents, including those serviced by municipal lighting companies. DOER, established to develop and implement policies and programs to further the energy-related goals of the Commonwealth, has created the Home Energy Market Value Performance (MVP) pilot program to test innovations to residential energy-efficiency program delivery. This program is designed to be custom-built around a home’s individual needs instead of a prescriptive, one-size-fits-all process, relying on the participating contractors’ expertise in building science and advanced modeling software used during the energy audit. The incentives and rebates available for energy-efficiency upgrades are based on the reduction of annual energy consumption of the home. The initial audit will model the current annual energy usage, and the energy specialists will create a plan to reduce that usage. Together with the energy specialists, homeowners can make decisions about what measures to install or upgrade based on their homes’ particular needs and the projected incentive paid by the program. A site visit will be conducted after the upgrades have been completed to confirm their installation and approve the customer’s rebate package. The MVP pilot will run until November 2019 or until all funding is spent, which is estimated to cover 600 projects statewide. Massachusetts residences up to a four-unit building that meet health and safety standards are eligible for participation, including condominiums and rentals with written agreement from the landlord. Currently, homes that heat with Berkshire Gas or that are on a reduced rate code or heating assistance are not eligible for the program. The pilot consists of just eight participating contractors across the state. Locally, the Energy Store, an Easthampton-based Building Performance Institute Goldstar Contractor, was chosen as a participating contractor. Inquiries about the DOER MVP pilot can be directed to the Energy Store at [email protected]

Advertising Club Accepting Scholarship Applications

SPRINGFIELD — The Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts scholarship committee announced that scholarship applications are now available online at adclubwm.org. Applications will also be available through guidance departments at high schools in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties, or by contacting the Ad Club at (413) 736-2582. In 2018, one $1,000 scholarship will be awarded. Western Mass. seniors who plan to attend an accredited college or technical school to study advertising, communications, marketing, or graphics arts and will be attending in September 2018 are encouraged to apply. The scholarship must be applied against tuition and fees at the school. Candidates will be judged on academic performance; extracurricular activities; community service and/or work experience; a demonstrated interest in advertising, communications, marketing, or graphic design; personal recommendations; and a letter of introduction outlining future plans. Completed scholarship applications and all support materials must be submitted to the Ad Club and postmarked by Friday, March 30. Scholarship decisions are made by the scholarship committee of the Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts, and are considered final. The scholarship will be awarded at the Ad Club’s Creative Awards show in May.

HCC Foundation Offers More Than $200,000 in College Scholarships

HOLYOKE — More than $200,000 in scholarships is available for new, current, and transferring Holyoke Community College (HCC) students for the 2018-19 academic year. Students must be currently enrolled at HCC or have been accepted for the upcoming academic year to be eligible for scholarships, which are awarded through the HCC Foundation. Last year, for the 2017-18 academic year, the HCC Foundation awarded scholarships to more than 200 students. For more information or to fill out the online application, visit www.hcc.edu/scholarships. The application deadline is Wednesday, March 21. For more information, call the HCC Foundation scholarship office at (413) 552-2182 or visit the Institutional Advancement office in Donahue 170 on the HCC campus, 303 Homestead Ave., Holyoke.

Employment Sections

Sidebar

Courtney Wenleder says she can see a number of parallels between the MGM Springfield development and the work to rebuild in Biloxi, Miss. after Hurricane Katrina.

Courtney Wenleder says she can see a number of parallels between the MGM Springfield development and the work to rebuild in Biloxi, Miss. after Hurricane Katrina.

Courtney Wenleder was working in Las Vegas, as financial controller for the Bellagio Hotel and Casino, in the summer of 2005 when she was asked to step in and assist another property in the MGM portfolio, the Beau Rivage Hotel and Casino in Biloxi, Miss.

She happened to be back in Vegas for some meetings when Hurricane Katrina slammed into the region several weeks after her arrival, but she’ll never forget the flight back to the area five days later on one of the company’s corporate jets that received special clearance to fly into the devastated area.

“Flying over Biloxi, you could see the blue tarps everywhere,” she said, adding that the casino complex itself was closed for exactly a year and had to rebuild just as the region around it did.

“The community saw us as a kind of beacon of hope,” she recalled. “We committed to rebuild right away; people lost their homes and their jobs, and we played a big role in the recovery.”

Wenleder related that story as she started to explain what brought her to Springfield late last summer and, more specifically, to the role of vice president and chief financial officer for MGM Springfield.

While Hurricane Katrina was an exponentially larger natural disaster than the tornado that carved a path through Springfield almost seven years ago now, Wenleder can see a number of parallels between the two calamities and the two regions, especially when it comes to the role a casino complex can play in a devastated region.

And also in how rewarding it can be to be a part of such efforts.

“That experience in Biloxi was more than a job, more than just being a CFO in a casino,” she told BusinessWest. “It was helping the community, giving them hope, rebuilding, working as a team.

“The team that we had down there was incredible,” she went on. “When you go through something like that, you bond instantly; there’s no time for niceties, and ‘let’s just develop this relationship’; you become connected quickly.”

While different from the experience in Biloxi in many ways — the disaster is years in the rear-view mirror, not days — Wenleder says she can find many parallels to her current role with another team, the one that will open the $950 million MGM Springfield in roughly six months.

That’s why, when Mike Mathis, president and COO of MGM Springfield, first approached Wenleder, then the VP of Finance and CFO at the New York New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, about coming to the City of Homes three years ago, she almost immediately started giving it some serious thought.

There were several reasons why she eventually said ‘yes.’ There was that opportunity to be part of another community comeback story, if you will, but also a desire to get back to the East Coast (she was born and raised in Virginia), and the chance to open a new facility.

“Springfield was a pretty easy sell,” she explained. “I was looking for change — I had been at New York New York for nine years and wanted a new challenge — and the opportunity to have a job that meant more than building a property and running the financials.”

Although those are, obviously, big parts of her job description, as we’ll see.

For this issue and its focus on employment, BusinessWest talked at length with Wenleder about her role at top level of the leadership team at MGM Springfield, and also about why, as she said, this particular job involves much more than running financials.

On-the-money Analysis

Wenleder, one of the first members of the executive team hired last year (see story, page 15), said those letters CFO usually come complete with a lengthy and varied job description.

That’s especially true in the casino industry, where operations such as MGM Springfield have a number of components, myriad expenses, and (eventually, in the case of MGM Springfield) several revenue streams.

But at the end of the day, the job here, as it does everywhere, comes down to making sure the expense side doesn’t exceed the revenue side. (Although, when it comes to the Springfield casino, we’re going to need that word ‘eventually’ again because, at the moment, there are no revenues).

There’s no end to the expenses, though, said Wenleder, who said she’s trying to manage them the best she can.

“It’s quite stressful when you only have one side of the ledger,” she said with a laugh. “Managing the budget is difficult, especially when things come up that you didn’t anticipate, and there are plenty of those.”

One of the most pressing items on Wenleder’s to-do list is putting her own team together. For several months she was a one-person show, but over the past several weeks there have been a number of additions to the finance team.

But most of the hiring is still to come, obviously, she said, adding that, by the time MGM Springfield is ready to open, that finance team will number between 150 and 200 people.

They will be spread out across a number of departments, she noted, including purchasing; warehouse and receiving; inventory control; financial planning and analysis; those working in ‘the cage,’ meaning those handling money; the ‘counts team,’ individuals who pull money out of the slot machines and table games; casino finance (a compliance role); and a small accounting team. (Payroll, accounts receivable, and other functions are handled out of corporate offices in Las Vegas.)

It’s a big job, with big numbers, such as a projected $90 million in annual payroll alone for the Springfield facility, said Wenleder, adding that she does not yet have a budget or updated revenue projections for either the short year ahead (2018) or the first full year of operation to follow.

But she’s working on it — just as she’s working on a whole host of other aspects of the casino operation.

Such as staffing. That is the focus of much of the activity at 95 State St., and the goal is to come up with the right numbers across each of the various departments. Talks are ongoing as to just how many will be needed within each department, she said, adding that the goal, quite obviously, is not to overstaff or understaff. “There’s a balance there, and it’s important to get the right numbers.”

Other day-to-day work includes everything from financial analysis on potential partners, such as retail tenants, the movie theaters, and bowling alley, to setting of internal control drafting procedures related to the minimum standards set by the Gaming Commission.

While handling all that, Wenleder is thinking about that ‘beacon of hope’ aspect to this casino operation, the element that links it many ways to Biloxi, those blue tarps she saw while flying overhead, and the rewarding work of helping a community bounce back from adversity.

“That’s the element to this I really enjoy — engaging the community, helping people find jobs and improve their lives, training them on new skills, and, hopefully, bringing more vibrancy to the area, because other businesses will come because we’re here. There is that ripple effect.”

Watching the Bottom Line

She’s seen that ripple effect first-hand, in Biloxi and in Las Vegas, of course.

And she’s quite confident that there will be one here as well, and being one of the key drivers of that ripple effect is just part of what made Springfield the easy sell she described.

There won’t be anything easy about getting the doors open come September, but Wenleder is, by all accounts (that’s an industry phrase) well on top of things, thanks to a wealth of experience with these balancing acts.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Health Care Sections

Secure Connections

The Baby Boom generation isn’t just marching into retirement — they’re positively surging into their senior years, with some 10,000 Americans reaching age 65 each day.

Yet, despite the fact that senior-living communities have become increasingly modernized, specialized, and resident-focused, nearly 90% of seniors want to stay in their own homes as they age, according to the American Assoc. of Retired Persons.

And technology is helping them do just that — everything from home-monitoring devices to GPS trackers (for loved ones with dementia); from medication reminders to automatic stove turn-offs, and more . All of it is intended to lend both security to seniors living alone and peace of mind to their loved ones.

Older Americans welcome the trend — according to the AARP survey, even if they begin to need day-to-day assistance or ongoing healthcare during retirement, 82% would still prefer to stay in their own homes. Yet, the stereotype often lingers of seniors being technophobes averse to change.

“Many Boomers disagree with that statement, finding it insulting or pessimistic or both,” writes Laurie Orlov, principal analyst for Aging in Place Technology Watch, a market-research organization that provides analysis and guidance about technologies and services that enable seniors to remain longer in their home of choice. “They will repeat plaintively that Baby Boomers are very different than their parents’ generation. They are comfortable with technology. See how many have smartphones — they text, use Facebook and YouTube. Many book travel online, read Trip-Advisor reviews, and even call for car pickups with an app.”

So why not embrace technology meant to improve quality of life and — just as important — independence? Especially, Orlov noted, when there are so many options, from a simple door sensor or a sophisticated whole-home automation and security system.

In the case of the former, simple technology can have profound results. “If an older adult is alone at home, enters a room, and does not return past the sensor, an alert is sent to a family member or other predefined organization, thus enabling an attempt to contact the older adult, and, if no answer, to dispatch help.”

Rachel Walker, an assistant professor in the UMass Amherst College of Nursing, has focused much of her research on addressing health disparities and the care of older adults with cancer and other serious illnesses. She’s also on the faculty for the Center for Personalized Health Monitoring (CPHM), one of three centers that make up the Institute for Applied Life Sciences at UMass Amherst, one that aims to accelerate the development and commercialization of low-cost, wearable, wireless sensor systems for personalized healthcare and biometric monitoring — but always with a focus on the human side of care.

“Oftentimes in the national news, there’s a lot of focus on the technologies — things like wearable sensors and home health monitors,” she explained. “A lot of clinicians and practitioners like myself work with individuals out in the community who experience these health challenges as they age, and there aren’t too many places that merge those two ends of the spectrum.”

Through the Wires

One reason technology isn’t an end-all, Walker said, is because, while 90% of older adults prefer to stay in place, it’s a bigger challenge in the more rural areas of Western Mass., where people may not have access to broadband and high-speed wireless service.

“That’s a sticky wicket. We’re embracing technology more and more, in this digital arena where people also expect to access their health record [electronically]; all these things are on the horizon, but we have whole communities in this region that have yet to get high-speed access.

“The team I work with, we would like to develop solutions that put control back in the hands of actual individuals and their caregivers,” she went on, adding that they’re using grant funds to develop a home-assessment tool that’s compatible with people’s smartphones. “Most users, even in places without high-speed wireless, have access to smartphones.”

Susan Keel, an aging-in-place specialist, recently told HGTV that a robust whole-home security system can be installed for the same cost as one month in an assisted-living facility. “With a system like this, you can remotely log in on a smartphone or the Internet, and, via the devices connected to the system, monitor your loved one’s activities.”

On a smaller scale, Orlov said personal emergency-response systems — wearable devices that can be used to alert outsiders of a health emergency or fall — is currently a $3 billion market that has evolved only slightly from its origins. But one important advance has been their use outside the home.

“The ‘I’ve fallen’ message is still inspiring families and seniors to acquire one. But 30% of the market’s sales are for mobile devices. This makes sense in this time of substantial life expectancy at age 65, when 46% of women aged 75+ live alone,” she notes. “Mobility demands mobile devices, which in turn boost confidence to be out and about. Consider walking the dog — since one-third of the 65+ population has one.”

The Center for Personalized Health Monitoring consolidates expertise from polymer science and engineering, computer science, kinesiology, and neuroscience as well as from other departments and collaborators, such as the UMass Medical School and industry, to develop solutions that consider the whole person, not just technology, Walker told BusinessWest.

For example, “we’re trying to better understand what specific exercises older adults can do to improve their lower-extremity balance and strength, so they don’t have as much risk for falls,” she explained.

At the same time, however, “we’re working on home sensor networks to determine how people are using the space, so we can optimize their environment. We’ve also focused on some of the data-security problems, to make sure information is kept secure from hackers.”

In short, Walker said, there’s plenty of room for technology to help people understand their environment and manage chronic conditions and symptoms, such as fatigue and sleep impairments that, if not addressed over time, can wear the body down and lead to other types of disability. “We try to avoid that so people can stay in their homes as long as possible as they continue to age.”

Human Touch

As amazing as it is, technology doesn’t have all the answers, writes elder-care specialist Michelle Seitzer at Care.com.

“It should never be used to supplement actual caregiving — only enhance it. Certain situations may require a caregiver’s assistance or physical presence (be it a family member, neighbor, or a senior-care aide) for a few hours a week, overnight, or most of the day.

“There may also come a time when it’s just not safe for your loved one to stay home — no matter how many webcams you install,” she continues. “If a senior doesn’t answer the phone, seems withdrawn, falls frequently, misses medications, or wanders off regularly, you may need to look beyond technology. Think about options like hiring a home-care aide or finding senior housing. Figure out what works best for your loved one and the situation, and be open to changes along the way.”

Walker said her team at UMass focuses on concepts of dignity, capability, and healthcare equity in the senior years, and not on technology for its own sake.

“Any time we start a new project, we ask if there is really a need for this technology or new device. Are we building something people really need? Secondly, how will it fit into the life of the person it’s designed for? Also, who’s been left out? A lot of technology is built for the upper middle class, and that’s certainly a need, but we need to make sure what we’re building doesn’t systematically exclude certain individuals like rural residents, with no high-speed wireless access.”

Then there are unintended consequences. “Are we making someone reliant on a device, so if something breaks on the device, they’re left without a safety net to get their needs met?”

It’s an important question to keep in mind as the worlds of elder care and technology continue to cross-fertilize in new, intriguing ways.

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Departments People on the Move
Eric Polep

Eric Polep

J. Polep Distribution Services announced the promotion of Eric Polep to president and CEO, reporting to Chairman of the Board Jeffrey Polep. “Eric has proven time and again he understands how to grow with the industry and as the business dictates. He represents J. Polep with pride, and his everyday goal is to make sure each customer and vendor sees the outcome of long-term success, which is the foundation to our business,” said Jeffrey Polep, also Eric’s father. J. Polep Distribution Service is the fifth-largest convenience wholesaler in the U.S., exceeding $1.5 billion in sales. The locally owned and operated business posted a 30.1% increase in overall sales, rising from ninth place to fifth place in the 2017 CSNEWS Top Wholesalers report. Eric will continue to work closely with Jeffrey and all of the company’s support staff to ensure effective execution of strategies and operational services. “I am very excited for this opportunity that lies ahead of me and look forward to the continuing growth of the business,” Eric said. “Upon graduating college, I knew I wanted to go right into the family business and absorb everything I could from my father. Working beside him has always been a dream of mine, and it’s an honor to be named president of J. Polep Distribution Services by him and our board.”

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Christopher Scott

Christopher Scott

Michael Pike

Michael Pike

PeoplesBank announced appointments of two key associates. Christopher Scott was appointed assistant vice president, portfolio manager, while Michael Pike was appointed Hadley branch manager. Scott has more than six years of banking experience. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration, with a concentration in corporate finance, from the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst. He is also a graduate of the Springfield Leadership Institute. Pike has more than 12 years of banking and financial-services experience. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business management from Notre Dame College.

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Dr. Neil Kudler, former chief medical information officer for Baystate Health, has joined Holyoke-based healthcare consultancy VertitechIT as chief medical officer. “IT consultants focused primarily on bits and bytes are doing their clients a disservice,” said Kudler, who has held other senior executive and strategist positions at Baystate Health, one of New England’s largest healthcare systems. “As CMO of VertitechIT, I’m in a position to bridge that all-important technology gap between clinicians and the IT departments that must support them.” VertitechIT is among the fastest-growing healthcare IT consultancies in the country, focused on helping senior IT leaders to strategically and tactically transform the role of IT in the hospital setting. “Any consultant worth their fee can design and implement a new cloud strategy or infrastructure platform,” said VertitechIT CEO Michael Feld. “Dr. Kudler gives us immense credibility on the clinical side of the house, providing guidance on things like diversified health-system operations, population health, and data analytics.” Before joining VertitechIT, Kudler served as senior healthcare innovation strategist for TechSpring Technology Innovation Center, and as chief operating officer for Baycare Health Partners. He is a graduate of Colgate University and received his master’s degree from Harvard Divinity School. He received his doctor of medicine degree from New York University and trained in internal medicine at UC San Francisco.

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Jonathan Howell

Jonathan Howell

Springfield College named Jonathan Howell as its new director of Human Resources, effective March 5. He brings more than 18 years of experience in human resources, with the last 15 years working in higher education. As the college’s lead human-resources officer, Howell will be responsible for providing strategic leadership and direction surrounding all human-resources initiatives and priorities for Springfield College. Howell comes to Springfield College from Mitchell College in New London, Conn., where he served as vice president for Human Resources starting in 2015. Prior to his most recent position, Howell also served as director of Human Resources at Mitchell College from 2012 to 2015. Prior to his time there, Howell was employed for eight years at the University of Illinois in multiple human-resources positions. Howell received his bachelor’s degree in business management from Augustana College and will complete a master’s program in human resources from Ft. Hays State University this spring.

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Carol Anne McGowan

Carol Anne McGowan

The UMass Donahue Institute, an outreach and economic-development arm of the UMass President’s Office, promoted Carol Anne McGowan to associate director. In this position, McGowan works closely with the executive director to develop and implement management strategies, systems, and practices across the Donahue Institute. She is also directly responsible for overseeing all fiscal and human-resource functions. Previously, she served as the institute’s director of Administration and Finance. She first joined the institute in 2000 as a member of the Financial Management, Education and Training (FMET) team. She spent more than 10 years with FMET, developing curriculum and instructing in the areas of government finance and accounting for the U.S. Department of Defense. In addition to her role as associate director, McGowan has developed a credited course on post-award management of grants and contracts, which she will teach through UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management. Earlier in her career, she served as director of Onslow Community Health Improvement Process, a community nonprofit organization in Onslow County, N.C. She has a master’s degree in human resources and organizational development from Webster University and an MBA from the UMass Isenberg School of Management.

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Miriam Siegel

Miriam Siegel

Country Bank announced that Miriam Siegel has joined its team as senior vice president of Human Resources. A graduate of the State University of New York at Albany with a bachelor’s degree in business, Siegel boasts 26 years in the financial-services industry. She is also a certified compensation professional and certified benefits professional from WorldatWork. For 21 years, Siegel worked at United Bank. She began her career as a payroll clerk and worked her way through the ranks until she found her passion within the human-resources department. Her time at United Bank made a significant impact on her approach to human resources. “I live and work by the philosophy that your most valuable assets are your people,” she said. “I am very excited to be back at a local community bank where employees and customers come first.” Siegel owned and operated the Village Store Café in Wilbraham with her husband. During that time, they began a run/walk event, the Cup to Pint Fun Run, to support local charities. The Children’s Museum in Wilbraham, the Livestrong Program at the Scantic Valley YMCA, and the Wilbraham Hampden Academic Trust, have all received donations from this annual fund-raiser. Siegel is a member of the Massachusetts Bankers Assoc., WorldatWork, and the New England Human Resources Assoc., and serves on the board of directors for Behavioral Health Network in Springfield. “Miriam’s extensive expertise in human resources within the financial-services industry makes her a perfect fit for Country Bank,” said Paul Scully, the bank’s CEO and president. “We are thrilled to have her join our team; we know that Miriam will be an esteemed resource for Country Bank and its employees.”

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Bulkley Richardson announced that Seunghee Cha and Jodi Miller have been promoted to partner, and Mary Bonzagni has joined the firm as partner as well. In her comprehensive estate-planning practice, Cha assists individuals and families from all walks of life, with a particular focus on special-needs planning for individuals living with intellectual, developmental, and age-related disabilities; conservatorship and alternatives; estate settlement; and trust administration. Miller focuses her practice on commercial and other civil litigation, including class actions, as well as regulatory matters. She has a particular expertise in the area of health law and also represents public and privately held corporations, financial institutions, schools and universities, nonprofits, and individuals in a range of litigation matters. Bonzagni has an established reputation in the field of intellectual property. Her work involves prosecuting, defending, and licensing patents for a wide variety of inventions, as well as challenging the patentability of both pre-grant and post-grant patents in a number of countries and regions. In-depth experience as a chemist has equipped her with a unique perspective and allows her to provide clients with both legal and scientific strategies. She also advises businesses on strategic aspects of trademark, copyright, and trade-secret protection.

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Charlie Epstein

Charlie Epstein

Charlie Epstein, an investment adviser and author who specializes in retirement consulting, has been appointed to the Holyoke Community College board of trustees by Gov. Charlie Baker. He was sworn in Feb. 2, and is expected to join the board for its next meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 27. Epstein is principal of the Holyoke-based Epstein Financial Group LLC and Epstein Financial Services, a registered, investment advisory firm providing corporate retirement-plan consulting as well as wealth-management and financial-planning services for business owners, professionals, and individual plan participants. He is also owner of the 401K Coach Program, which offers financial-adviser education services and training; the author of two books: Paychecks for Life: How to Turn Your 401(k) into a Paycheck Manufacturing Company and Save America, Save! The Secrets of a Successful 401(k) Plan; and an industry conference speaker and commentator who has appeared on the Fox Business Network. In 1994, he founded the Family Business Center of the Pioneer Valley in Amherst and remains on its board of directors. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Colgate University.

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David W. Griffin Sr.

David W. Griffin Sr.

David W. Griffin Sr., executive vice president and treasurer of the Dowd Agencies, LLC, is the 2018 recipient of the Daniel J. Gallivan award from the Holyoke St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee. “We are honored that one of our own has received this well-deserved honor,” said John E. Dowd Jr., president and CEO. “David has provided tireless effort for Holyoke, fulfilling various leadership capacities that have benefitted our clients and the citizens of Western Massachusetts alike.” Griffin is an active member of the Holyoke community, serving as president of the West Springfield Chamber of Commerce, West Springfield Rotary, Holyoke St. Patrick’s Parade Committee, Springfield Country Club, Hampden County Insurance Agents, and chair of Mont Marie Health Care Center. He remains active with the CYO of Western Massachusetts as well. Griffin has more than 35 years of experience in the insurance industry, beginning his career in 1978 as a surety underwriter for Aetna Casualty. Since then, he has served as a broker specializing in large commercial and contracting accounts. He is a licensed insurance advisor as well as a certified insurance counselor. Since 1972, the Daniel J. Gallivan award, named after the South Hadley resident and longtime member of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee, has been awarded to long-standing members of the association who have made significant contributions to the overall success of the parade and committee.

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Meaghan Murphy

Meaghan Murphy

Bacon Wilson announced that Meaghan Murphy has joined the firm as an associate attorney. A member of the firm’s litigation department, her practice is focused on labor and employment law. Murphy is a graduate of Western New England University School of Law, and received her bachelor’s degree from Amherst College. She works primarily from Bacon Wilson’s Springfield location, and is licensed to practice in both Massachusetts and Connecticut. Founded in 1895, Bacon Wilson, P.C. is one of the largest firms in the Pioneer Valley, with 44 lawyers and approximately 60 paralegals, administrative assistants, and support staff. The firm’s offices are located in Springfield, Amherst, Hadley, Northampton, and Westfield.

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Berkshire Bank promoted Lori Gazzillo to senior vice president and director of the Berkshire Bank Foundation. She was previously the foundation’s vice president. In her new position, Gazzillo is responsible for the development, planning, and implementation of strategies to support the Berkshire Bank Foundation, improving quality of life, cultivating partnerships, and fostering community relationships across the Bank’s six-state footprint. Gazzillo joined Berkshire Bank in 2011 from Legacy Banks, where she was the Community Relations officer since 2006. “Lori has more than 20 years of communications and community-relations experience and has shown exceptional leadership in improving and developing strong relationships in our existing and new markets. We look forward to continuing to foster these relationships as we grow,” said Linda Johnston, senior executive vice president and chief Human Resources officer. Gazzillo serves on the board of directors of 1Berkshire, the Brien Center, and Associated Grant Makers, is a member of the newly formed Berkshire Leadership Impact Council, and was recently appointed by Gov. Charlie Baker to the Berkshire Community College board of trustees. She has a bachelor’s degree from Keene State College and a master’s degree in education from Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. She is also a graduate of the ABA School of Bank Marketing and Management.

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Michelle Theroux of Berkshire Hills Music Academy was installed as president of the South Hadley & Granby Chamber of Commerce on Jan. 23. The election of officers and directors took place at the Willits-Hallowell Center. The other officers elected were Dina Mead, vice president; Jessica Bodon, clerk; and Alexandra Wern-LaFlamme, treasurer. New or returning directors elected that evening were Carol Constant, Mead, Darren Thomas, and Wearn-Laflamme.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts scholarship committee announced that scholarship applications are now available online at adclubwm.org. Applications will also be available through guidance departments at high schools in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties, or by contacting the Ad Club at (413) 736-2582.

In 2018, one $1,000 scholarship will be awarded. Western Mass. seniors who plan to attend an accredited college or technical school to study advertising, communications, marketing, or graphics arts and will be attending in September 2018 are encouraged to apply. The scholarship must be applied against tuition and fees at the school. Candidates will be judged on academic performance; extracurricular activities; community service and/or work experience; a demonstrated interest in advertising, communications, marketing, or graphic design; personal recommendations; and a letter of introduction outlining future plans.

Completed scholarship applications and all support materials must be submitted to the Ad Club and postmarked by Friday, March 30. Scholarship decisions are made by the scholarship committee of the Advertising Club of Western Massachusetts, and are considered final. The scholarship will be awarded at the Ad Club’s Creative Awards show in May.

Class of 2018 Difference Makers

The Bike Man’s Story Has Been a Truly Inspirational Ride

032_charlandbobmain-diff2017Bob Charland was already having enough trouble fitting everything on his plate into a 24-hour day.

He had his full-time job, as an auto mechanic at the Lyndale Garage in Springfield, and he was also teaching what he calls “deaf automotive” for students attending Willie Ross School for the Deaf. There were also his many endeavors within the community — primarily his work repairing bicycles and putting them in the hands of underprivileged children across the region, but also his latest venture, what he calls “safety bags” for the homeless and other people in need.

And then, there were also a growing number of medical appointments and tests as he grappled with a brain disorder that remains officially undiagnosed but is considered terminal.

With all that, he admits he was only getting maybe three hours of sleep each day, something he’s learned to live with. But then, the schedule got even more crowded.

He had to start making room for the media. Lots of room.

The local television stations were calling regularly as his donations of bicycles and other endeavors escalated; community newspapers wanted his time to talk about his work in their cities and towns. He’s been on Ludlow public television and a radio station in Boston. Then, the national news networks, including CNN and Fox News, picked up the story. Ellen DeGeneres’ people called. And, yes, BusinessWest wanted a few hours to discuss his selection as a Difference Maker for 2018.

Most time-consuming, however, was a documentary, titled My Last Days, on his life and deeds undertaken by the CW Network and due to be aired this month. The company had already demanded several hours from Charland for the project, and then it came asking for more.

But the ‘Bike Man,’ or ‘Bicycle Bob,’ as he’s called by different constituencies, told them they couldn’t have it. They repeated the request, and he again told them ‘no.’

So they went around Charland to his employer at the garage, told him they would compensate the company for his time lost, and finally locked him in.

And it was certainly worth it to get him out for that additional taping session, as as we’ll see in a minute.

Meanwhile, there’s a reason why Charland now has to make so such time for the media. As they say in the business, this isn’t just a story; it’s a great story.

The individual pieces are themselves compelling — the bicycle program and how it’s grown; his new work within the community, his terminal illness, and his decision to not only go on living but ramp up his work across the region; the press; and the response from that same community to all of the above. But the package … it’s captivating, and, far more importantly, inspiring, which is what really drives Charland in everything he does.

Indeed, he said people have responded to his story in ways he might have hoped, but probably couldn’t have imagined. It has left people compelled to find their own ways to help, to live life to the fullest, and, in many cases, to simply meet the Bike Man.

“I got an e-mail from a guy who wants me to come out and meet his mom,” Charland said as he reached for his phone so he could quote it directly rather than paraphrase, which he did.

“He says ‘Rob, thanks for being such an inspiration with all you’re doing. I have followed your bike story for about a year now. My stepmom, who is basically my real mom when my mother backed out and left us, is terminally ill with stage-4 bone cancer. You give a different, great, positive outlook on things. My stepmom appreciates all you do; you’re an inspiration to all. Thank you.’

“So I told him I’d come out and meet her,” he went on, adding that this was another thing he would gladly make time to do.

Maybe the most compelling part of this story is that his illness hasn’t slowed him down one bit. In fact, it has made him more determined — if that’s actually possible — to cram even more into each day.

“I’m not going to let it slow me down,” he told BusinessWest with tangible conviction in his voice. “Every day that I get up, I can make a difference in someone’s life, and that’s what I’m going to do; that’s what drives me.”

Those few words, more than any that would follow or that came before, make it abundantly clear why the Bike Man will be at the podium at the Log Cabin on March 22 to accept a Difference Maker plaque.

Chain of Events

As noted earlier, those documentary makers had a very good reason for being so persistent in wanting Charland back for another round of filming, or still photos, as they told him. But as things turned out, he didn’t really spend too much time in front of the camera.

For an explanation, well, as they do in a good documentary, we’ll let him do the talking.

“They told me to bring a couple of changes of clothes with me because they wanted to get some photos in a few different places,” he recalled. “We took my truck and ended up in Bernardston, a beautiful little town.

Bob Charland says his terminal illness has inspired him to try to pack even more into each day and find new ways to give back.

Bob Charland says his terminal illness has inspired him to try to pack even more into each day and find new ways to give back.

“Going back to when we first started with this, they asked me a lot of questions, and one of them was, ‘what’s one thing from your childhood that you regret not doing?’ And I said, ‘me and my dad, who’s really my stepdad, but he raised me, always said we were going to go camping together — just him and I — and it never happened,’” he went on. “So we’re there in Bernardston, and I have no idea where we’re going. The next thing you know, we go across a wooden bridge out in the woods to a cabin right on a lake. I didn’t think anything of it.

“The guy told me the camera crew would be there in a while, and that I should just get out, walk around, and check out the place,” Charland continued. “I look around … there’s a nice dock that went out on the water; I saw a guy sitting on the end of the dock. It turned out to be my father. I was shocked that he was there, and I didn’t know why. He just turned to me and said, ‘are you going to give me a hug, boy, or not?’”

The two would spend the next week having that camping trip they never went on decades ago, expressing as much emotion — and talking to each other more — in that short time than they probably had in all those years leading up to that moment.

The documentary producer left the two there with a camera operator, who would shoot a little footage and then leave them alone for the week. More importantly, though, he left them with some thoughts about why they were there.

Put simply, the two had done so much for others throughout their lives; now it was time for someone to do something for them.

And with that, it might be best to tell more of the story of how that documentary — and that bonding between father and son — came to be. We begin, again, like a good documentary, at the place where the story starts to come into focus.

For Charland, that was when his daughter, now 23, was raped by her mother’s boyfriend when she was 9.

“At that point, I was given full custody,” he explained. “The courts and the counselors had told me to get her involved in as many things as possible because of what happened to her. So she got involved — and I got involved.”

Indeed, when the leader of the Girl Scout troop his daughter joined decided she couldn’t continue in that role, Charland took over. Not for a little while, but 10 or 11 years, by his count.

“I was cookie coach — I have all the T-shirts from all the years I did it,” he said, adding that, as you might have guessed, he was one of the first male leaders of a Girl Scout troop in this region.

He also started coaching girls softball at Holy Cross Parish School in Springfield — another assignment that lasted a decade or so — among other work in the community, usually alongside his daughter.

“I was afraid to leave her anywhere as a result of what happened to her,” he went on, adding quickly that, because he had no child support, he was also working several jobs — the one at the shop, as a bouncer at an area club a few nights a week, and as a chef at A Touch of Garlic restaurant.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno says Bob Charland has become an inspiration and a role model at a time when the world — and Springfield — need more of such individuals.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno says Bob Charland has become an inspiration and a role model at a time when the world — and Springfield — need more of such individuals.

Eventually, his daughter grew out of Girl Scouts, softball, and other activities, and this development left a void of sorts and something Charland’s seemingly never had much of — spare time.

He filled the void and the hours in the day in various ways. Teaching automotive skills to deaf children — after learning sign language — become one outlet (students are bused to the Lyndale Garage). And eventually there was what he came to call simply “the bike thing.”

Into a Higher Gear

It started, sort of, when his daughter was in middle school. One of her guidance counselors was a nun who would bring Charland a few bikes to fix up for some of her students. And it grew from there.

As most everyone in the region knows by now, thanks to all that press he’s been getting, the bike thing has become not only a Springfield phenomenon, but a regional one as well. Charland has given away bikes in several area communities, including Hartford, and to nearly a dozen schools. To organize it all, he created a nonprofit called Pedal Thru Youth.

In the beginning, Charland would pay for bikes out of his own pocket, but as the news spread, the donations started to flow in, even from some of the neurologists who have treated him. So did other forms of support; AAA donates a helmet for every bike donated, local police departments and the Sheriff’s Department are heavily involved (with bike-safety instruction and other initiatives), and the city of Springfield and Columbia Gas have both donated space to warehouse bicycles while they’re being fixed up and readied for beneficiaries.

“We target the most poverty-stricken areas throughout Western Mass., and they see the worst of the police departments,” Charland said while explaining that there’s much more to this than a child getting a bike. “If these kids see a cop down on their level fitting them with a helmet and helping them adjust their seat or the handlebars, they’re going to look at these officers in a more positive light.”

It’s a great story, but what makes it more remarkable is that it doesn’t take place in a vacuum. It plays out amid — and largely because of — a worsening medical condition that has left Charland quite unsure of how much time he has left and what his quality of life will be.

Back in 2011, around when the bike thing started picking up some speed, Charland suffered what he called a minor stroke. An MRI discovered an arachnoid cyst in his left cerebellum, which specialists would attribute to a concussion he suffered when he was struck in the back of the head by someone wielding a baseball bat after leaving the club following his bouncing shift.

“The cyst grew to protect my brain, and they noticed a lot of dead spots,” Charland explained. “Over the years, things got progressively worse. There were times I would get extremely dizzy, I would stutter, other times my hands would shake. I was having tremors … and the right side of my body was shaking a lot.”

Doctors have never given him an official diagnosis, but they suspect Charland has CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy), the condition that has affected dozens, if not hundreds, of pro football players and other athletes.

“They say they think that’s what it is,” he told BusinessWest. “But they can’t give me 100% diagnosis until post-mortem. So I jokingly said to them, ‘call me when I’m dead and let me know.’”

After that diagnosis, or non-diagnosis, as the case may be, Charland went to Vermont, one of three states in the country to enact a death-with-dignity law, and quickly put his affairs in order, deciding, among other things, what to do with his five trucks.

What brought him back to Springfield early last year was a request from a Springfield school administrator for bicycles he might be able to donate, one that he fulfilled.

And that donation became a news story, one that fueled others and also took the bike thing to new heights.

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By Easter morning, Charland had 25 to 30 bikes repaired and ready for distribution. He called a friend who was also a Chicopee police officer and suggested the two go to one of the city’s poorer neighborhoods and donate the bikes.

“We started knocking on doors and handing bikes out,” he said, adding that the local TV crews were tipped off and came to report the developing story.

More press led to more requests for bicycles, which led to more donations, which led to more press, which led to … you get the idea. Soon, the story had traveled literally around the world.

Braking News

And then, remarkably — or not, considering the individual in question — the story got even better. Indeed, Charland kept looking for new ways to give back and pack more into his typical day.

Which brings us to those safety bags mentioned earlier. They’re also called ‘necessity bags,’ and that might be a more accurate description, because that’s what they contain — hats, gloves, scarves, toothpaste, a toothbrush, some toiletries, protein shakes, granola bars, and more.

He started with the Massachusetts State Police, who would give them to homeless individuals and others deemed in need of such a package. And it spread from there. The Springfield Police even have a name for it — Operation Basic Necessities — and Charland has outfitted each cruiser with two bags, each gender-specific; once a bag is given out, he replenishes it. He’s also donated bags to the Connecticut State Police and the Hampden County’s Sheriff’s Department. Last fall, he attended the National Police Chiefs Assoc. convention, and fielded requests from more departments for the bags.

The bags were intended to meet a recognized need, to fill a void, he explained, adding that he has always been driven to step in and address such deficiencies.

With all the press he’s been getting, Charland started keeping a scrapbook of sorts. Actually, it’s just a manila folder with some press clippings, letters and notes from elected leaders (U.S. Rep. Richard Neal sent him one, state Rep. John Velis did as well, and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno has corresponded on something approaching a regular basis), a proclamation or two, and some certificates from groups ranging from the Springfield Thunderbirds to the Center for Human Development.

There’s also a handwritten note, source unknown, that says, in large capital letters, “THANKS BOB FOR ALL YOU DO.”

Collectively, the contents of that manila folder speak to probably the best part of this remarkable story — the manner in which Charland is connecting with people, inspiring them, and, in some cases, getting them involved as well.

Sarno spoke about it as he talked with BusinessWest about one of his now-best-known constituents. Specifically, he discussed how the Bike Man replied to one of his correspondences wishing him good luck and good health.

“He called me and said, ‘mayor I need a little help … I just wanted to help some kids with bikes, but this is really blossoming,’” Sarno recalled, adding that he helped arrange some storage space.

Overall, Sarno said Charland’s work with children and the police is a positive development, but more important is his emergence as a role model at a time when society sorely needs some.

“At this time of reality TV, when negativity sells, and ‘if it bleeds, it leads,’ this story resonates with people,” he told BusinessWest. “He’s like the Energizer bunny; he keeps going and going and going, and he never says, ‘woe is me.’ His attitude is so positive — it’s not about himself, it’s about making a better opportunity for these kids and showing that people do care. He’s a one-man wrecking crew.”

Charland’s ability to inspire others and enrich their lives with more than a two-wheeler is perhaps best summed up in the words on the latest addition to that scrapbook, a plaque declaring him the winner of the Citizen Award in conjunction with the Safe Neighborhood Initiative. It reads, in part:

“You have taken a learned skill and turned it into an everlasting blessing for children. They will carry the value of giving back to the community into adulthood and will in turn help nurture the development of our community, making your work immortal.”

The Ride Stuff

Sarno is known for being prompt and prolific with correspondences of thanks and support to individuals and groups over the years, and Charland is no exception.

The mayor has written him several times, as noted, usually after another press report of his work. The typical missive is part thank-you letter, part note of encouragement. Here’s the one sent last June, prompted by little more, it seems, than a desire to stay in touch:

“Thinking of you and just wanted to drop you a note of good health, encouragement, and thanks. So heartwarming what you are doing for our kids. You’re making their dreams/miracles come true. You’re in my thoughts and prayers … that a miracle can and will happen for you.”

With those words, he essentially spoke for an entire region about someone who truly defines that phrase Difference Maker.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Departments People on the Move
James Harnsberger

James Harnsberger

After an extended national search, James Harnsberger has been named associate vice president for Graduate Education, Grants, and Sponsored Research at Springfield College. President Mary-Beth Cooper and Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Martha Potvin recently made the announcement. Harnsberger will join the college on Feb. 15, and will be responsible for elevating the status of graduate education at Springfield College as well as for increasing the college’s capacity to generate and support externally funded grants and sponsored funding. “In both of these primary responsibilities, his thoughtful approach, his experiences in supporting students and the work of faculty, and his success in managing large contracts and overseas operations will serve him well,” said Potvin. A linguist and speech scientist with extensive experience in experimental phonetics, forensic acoustics, and clinical applications, Harnsberger comes to Springfield College from the University of New Haven, having previously overseen the launch of an international branch campus as campus dean. His responsibilities included international grants and contracts, program development, and operations, as well as the inaugural Academic Bridge Program for international students at UNH. Harnsberger earned his doctorate in linguistics from the University of Michigan, where he conducted research on cross-language variation in the perception of non-native speech sounds. Following a post-doctoral fellowship at Indiana University, he served at the Department of Linguistics at the University of Florida, conducting research on the perception of speaker characteristics such age, gender, emotion, dialect, stress, and deception. His research has been published in numerous academic journals and reported in the popular media, including ABC News Primetime, BBC Radio, and Science News. He has served as a linguistic consultant in numerous criminal and civil cases in the U.S., as well as government agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the Defense Academy for Credibility Assessment, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the House Armed Services Committee.

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Dr. Mark Dumais

Dr. Mark Dumais

Dr. Mark Dumais was appointed to the position of chief medical officer for Mercy Medical Center. In this position, he provides clinical leadership and administrative direction in developing and attaining strategic and operating objectives related to medical practice and patient care at Mercy Medical Center and its affiliates. He also serves as a liaison between administration and the medical staff and provides leadership in advancing quality initiatives, clinical care, patient satisfaction, and physician/employee satisfaction. With almost 20 years of clinical leadership experience, Dumais most recently served as a medical hospitalist at Massachusetts General Hospital and as an instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Before coming to Boston, he served as chief medical officer and Senior Vice President of the University of Maryland Charles Regional Medical Center (UMCRMC) in LaPlata, Md., where he oversaw performance management, quality, safety, risk management, compliance, and privacy, and gained extensive experience in population health, physician network planning, and information technology. Prior to his role at UMCRMC, he served as vice president of Medical Affairs, clinical chief of Internal Medicine, and director of hospitalists at Southern Maryland Hospital Center in Clinton. Board-certified in internal medicine, Dumais received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School in Boston and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. In addition to his medical education, he holds a master’s degree in business administration from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. “Dr. Dumais brings a wide range of clinical, operational, and leadership experience to this important position at Mercy Medical Center. We are pleased to welcome him to the Mercy team,” said Mark Fulco, president of Mercy Medical Center and its affiliates. Added Dumais, “Mercy Medical Center has a longstanding reputation for delivering high-quality, patient-centered care, and I welcome the opportunity to serve as a leader at this outstanding facility.

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Karri May

Karri May

Pinck & Co. Inc., a comprehensive real-estate-development and project-management services firm, announced Karri May joined the firm’s Springfield office as senior project manager. May brings to the firm 13 years of design and planning experience with a focus on healthcare, design for the aging, commercial, and higher education. She also has extensive client-management and business-development experience and will help grow the firm’s portfolio in Western Mass. and Connecticut. She previously worked at Steffian Bradley Architects as senior associate, where she specialized in the design and planning of healthcare projects in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York. Prior to that, she worked at Amenta/Emma Architects as a project architect, focusing on design for higher education, commercial, and senior housing/accommodations. May earned a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Pratt Institute and is a registered architect in Connecticut, a member of the American Institute of Architects, and a LEED-accredited professional. She also holds a Massachusetts Certified Public Purchasing Official Program designation and a Lean for Healthcare certificate. She is a frequent keynote speaker at industry and community events, has volunteered as a design mentor with CANstruction — a charitable organization for the design and construction industry — and has received several awards, including a Woman on the Rise designation from the Connecticut Professional Women in Construction. “As we continue to position our business to grow in Western Massachusetts and Connecticut, I am thrilled that Karri has joined our team,” said Jennifer Pinck, president and founder of Pinck & Co. “Not only does she bring a high level of expertise in planning and design and project management, she is passionate about the lasting impact built environments have on communities. Karri shares our commitment to putting our clients’ best interests first and going above and beyond to help them realize their vision.”

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MGM Springfield President and Chief Operating Officer Michael Mathis announced that his full executive team is now in place. The team, a diverse group of industry professionals, will lead operations for MGM Springfield, set to open later this year. “This is an all-star team,” Mathis said. “Together, they bring years of experience and a broad expanse of skills that strengthens the deep bench of talent we already have in place. Each of them is committed, not only to the day-to-day objectives of their positions, but also to the greater role this property will play in the community. This team is the backbone of MGM Springfield, and we will proudly reflect and represent the diversity of the region in which we work.” For the 12th consecutive year, MGM Resorts International has been recognized as a Top Company for Diversity by DiversityInc, one of the nation’s leading sources on workplace-diversity management. Almost 69% of the company’s employees are minorities. About 44% of employees in MGM Resorts’ management ranks are women, while minorities comprise 43% of MGM Resorts’ management ranks. “The beating heart of MGM Springfield is our commitment to diversity,” Mathis said. Besides Mathis, the MGM Springfield management team also includes Anthony Caratozzolo, vice president, Food & Beverage; Alex Dixon, general manager; Anika Gaskins, vice president, National Marketing; Brian Jordan, director, Surveillance; Monique Messier, executive director, Sales; Sarah Moore, Vice President, Marketing, Advertising & Brand; Marikate Murren, vice president, Human Resources; Jason Rosewell, vice president, Facilities; Jason Rucker, executive director, Security; Lynn Segars, vice president, Slot Operations; Gregg Skowronski, executive director, Hotel Operations; Talia Spera, executive director, Arena Operations; Seth Stratton, vice president and general counsel; Courtney Wenleder, vice president and chief financial officer; and Robert Westerfield, vice president, Table Games. In 2000, MGM Resorts became the first company in the gaming and hospitality industry to voluntarily adopt a formal diversity and inclusion policy. This is a critical pillar of the company’s enterprise-wide social-responsibility platform, which also includes community giving and environmental sustainability as key elements.

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Mary Chiecko

Mary Chiecko

AdCare chose Mary Chiecko, Community Services representative for Western Mass., as its Employee of the Month for January. “Mary Chiecko is always positive and a great listener, which is key to knowing what our referral sources need and want,” said Georganna Koppermann, vice president of Marketing and Development at AdCare. “As part of ‘Team Springfield,’ Mary has connected new patients with our expert clinical staff helping to make Springfield the second-largest outpatient office in our system.” Chiecko’s diverse sales experience includes working as a toxicology representative, presenting services to addiction-treatment facilities, primary-care physicians, and pain-management practices regionally. She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from American International College in Springfield.

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Megan Murphy Wolf

Megan Murphy Wolf

The Solidago Foundation, a Northampton-based national social-justice foundation, announced it has hired Megan Murphy Wolf as director of partnerships. A newly created position, the director of partnerships will focus on developing, supporting, and enhancing partnerships for the Solidago Foundation. Wolf will be responsible for the design and implementation of donor cultivation and engagement, as well as foundation partnership strategies. “Megan joins our team with deep expertise in creating meaningful partnerships across unlikely actors, as well as a legislative background that will enhance our support of grassroots advocacy groups,” said Elizabeth Barajas-Román, CEO of the foundation. “We are happy to welcome her at this exciting time for the organization.” Wolf brings a strong background in both development and public-policy work. Prior to joining Solidago, she worked as director of class campaigns and annual fund leadership giving at Amherst College. During her time at Amherst, she was successful in her personal solicitations, securing multi-year pledges and outright gifts, increasing the yearly totals by 300% and successfully breaking Amherst giving and participation records every year. She has also worked as legislative director for two congressmen in the U.S. House of Representatives. “This is an incredible opportunity to be a part of an organization with a long history of impact within the field of social justice, sustainability, and the fundamental right to work,” Wolf said. “I have focused my career on these important issues, and I believe we have the ability to create positive social change through collaboration and collective support for shared goals. I’m honored to join the Solidago family and be a part of this impressive group of people dedicated to support for the common good.” Throughout her career, Wolf has worked to create partnerships, both political in nature and as fund-building coalitions, to bring about positive social change. As director of partnerships, she will be responsible for working on developing programming and content for donor recognition and campaign-related programs and events for the foundation. “I am thrilled to have Megan join our team and looking forward to working with someone with her expertise as we move forward with our new business model,” said Jeff Rosen, chief financial officer of the foundation. “Adding Megan to the team will enhance our ability to bring resources to the field and amplify our impact at an important time for our partners.”

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Marty Holmes was recently named top corporate search consultant at Management Search Inc. Holmes, president of the West Springfield division of the privately held recruiting firm, was recognized with the organization’s prestigious President’s Club Award for sales excellence in 2017. This year also marked Holmes’ 30th anniversary with Management Search Inc. Throughout his tenure, Holmes has worked to perfect a time-tested recruitment process and, in the process, has established deep roots in the market with a diverse client base in manufacturing and a niche focus within the shooting-sports industry. His hands-on consultative approach, along with his extensive knowledge of the industries he works in, have worked together to build and strengthen his reputation among clients and candidates alike. Headquartered in West Springfield with an office in Providence, R.I., Management Search Inc. has grown to become one of the largest privately held recruiting firms in New England, boasting 35 years of recruiting experience and 15 established consultants.

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On Jan. 1, Aelan Tierney became the third principal and the president of Kuhn Riddle Architects. Tierney joins Jonathan Salvon and Charles Roberts, who became principals in 2010 when Chris Riddle retired. John Kuhn passes the torch of leadership and ownership to these three, and he will continue to work on selected projects at Kuhn Riddle. Kuhn Riddle Architects moves into the future as a woman-owned architecture firm as Tierney now owns the majority share of the company. She will continue to work on architectural project design, while also taking on a larger role in day-to-day management of the firm, focusing on business growth and maintaining a strong connection with clients and business partners. “I see this transition as an opportunity to carry on the legacy of Kuhn Riddle Architects, as well as an opportunity for growth,” said Tierney, who has been an architect at Kuhn Riddle Architects since August 2005. “I am honored that the partners have put their faith and trust in me to take on such an important leadership role. We will continue the company culture and its legacy of good design, excellent service, commitment to the environment, and giving back to our community that John Kuhn and Chris Riddle have built over the last 40 years.” Kuhn Riddle projects in which Tierney has played a lead role include Amherst Montessori School and Children First in Granby, the Kringle Candle flagship store and Farm Table Restaurant in Bernardston, the historic Easthampton Town Hall performance space for CitySpace, the Northeast Veterans Rehabilitation and Training Center in Gardner, Olympia Oaks multi-family affordable housing in Amherst, PVPA Charter School Theater in South Hadley, and projects at American International College, Western New England University, and Elms College. Kuhn Riddle Architects has been in business since Riddle and Kuhn founded it in 1977, when they negotiated a $500 fee to produce a design for Northampton’s Armory building renovation and rented two drafting tables in a fellow architect’s office. Since that time, the firm has become a well-known architectural firm in the Pioneer Valley and designs commercial, educational, and residential projects throughout Massachusetts.

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Terry Ramey

Terry Ramey

A seasoned chief information officer for some of the world’s largest healthcare payor organizations, Terry Ramey has joined Holyoke-based healthcare consultancy VertitechIT as an executive project officer (EPO). He will lead engagements with large healthcare systems as the company continues to expand operations throughout the East Coast and across the country. Ramey previously held senior technology titles at PerformRX (a subsidiary of AmeriHealth Caritas), Penn Mutual Life Insurance, CIGNA Health Services, and Dendrite International. As a nationally recognized healthcare technology executive, he says he was looking to make an impact on the provider side of the industry. “At CIGNA, Penn Mutual, and other major payor organizations, my responsibilities were to leverage technology to positively affect the bottom line,” he noted. “At VertitechIT, I have the opportunity to help transform hospital IT departments with a direct impact on patient care. It’s not often that an IT executive gets to do that.” VertitechIT CEO Michael Feld agrees. “Our work at work at major health systems goes far beyond designing and implementing cloud strategies, overhauling infrastructure, and streamlining operations. As an EPO, Terry will counsel clients on the IT initiatives that can literally change the way doctors do their jobs.” Working at the executive level within a healthcare organization, EPOs oversee a collaborative office of the CTO (oCTO), implementing VertitechIT’s proprietary LeverageIT process. Working side by side with senior internal managers, the oCTO refines strategic directives and implements tactical solutions that make organizations more profitable and efficient.

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Max Kiperman joined the Red Lion Inn culinary team as executive chef of the Red Lion Inn’s Main Dining Room, Widow Bingham’s Tavern, and the Lion’s Den. As executive chef, Kiperman will work closely with Vice President of Culinary Development Brian Alberg and Sous Chef Jim Corcoran on all future food- and beverage-related development in addition to day-to-day kitchen management. With a tenure of more than 25 years in the culinary industry, Kiperman comes to the Red Lion Inn most recently from Lucca in Boston’s Back Bay, where he worked as sous chef, and as culinary consultant to the Viceroy Hotel and Resort in Zihuantanejo, Mexico. Kiperman began his culinary career at Rosalie’s Restaurant in Marblehead before training under three Michelin chefs, including Sylvain Portay and Alain Ducasse. Kiperman now brings his expertise and passion for cooking with locally sourced products to the Berkshires. “Max’s diverse culinary portfolio and his commitment to the farm-to-table movement make him the perfect addition to lead the Red Lion Inn’s culinary team,” said Alberg. “We are confident his leadership and expertise will elevate the inn’s dining experience and continue to evolve the offerings to exceed our guests’ culinary expectations.” Kiperman’s extensive résumé includes work in hotels and resorts such as the Ritz Carlton properties in San Francisco, New York City, and Boston, and the Four Seasons Hotel and Resort in Nevis West Indies; restaurants like On Lot Restaurant in Hong Kong and Mix Restaurant in Las Vegas; and work as a private chef in New York and Connecticut. Recently refreshed breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus await guests at the Red Lion Inn’s Main Dining Room and Widow Bingham’s Tavern, highlighting the inn’s long-standing relationships with local and regional purveyors. The inn offers guests two additional dining options, the Lion’s Den, with nightly live entertainment, and seasonal outdoor dining in the Courtyard from June through September.

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The Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, in partnership with the Estate Planning Council of Hampden County and the Pioneer Valley Estate Planning Council, has awarded Kate Kane the 2018 Distinguished Advisor in Philanthropy Award. The award was presented by Katie Allan Zobel, president and CEO of the Community Foundation, and Amy Jamrog, wealth management advisor at the Jamrog Group, at a luncheon on Jan. 9. The purpose of the Distinguished Advisor in Philanthropy Award is to recognize the important work that professional advisors (estate-planning attorneys, financial advisors, and accountants) do in encouraging their clients to engage in local philanthropy for the region. As Zobel noted, “professional advisors play a quiet and often unsung role in advancing philanthropy. The Community Foundation has been working alongside local advisors for over 25 years, and we see first-hand the meaningful work they do by connecting their clients’ generous intentions to needs in our community. Their efforts have helped create a significant base of funding for scholarships and grants to nonprofits in our region.” Zobel also said she is pleased to be giving this award to its first female recipient. Past awardees include George Keady III, Dick Gaberman, Dennis Bidwell, Jack Ferriter, and Steven Schwartz. Kane received a plaque and $1,000 to recommend as a grant to the charity of her choice. Kane is managing director of Northwestern Mutual in Springfield, where she matches clients’ needs with innovative solutions utilizing insurance services and internationally recognized investment products. “Financial advising is a business of words and stories,” she said. “The numbers are simply tools to further the pursuit of hopes and dreams for ourselves, our families, and our communities. We give our clients the gift of listening to their stories and helping them connect with the right decisions to fulfill their aspirations and leave a legacy.” Well-known for her volunteerism and philanthropic spirit, Kane is a former board member (2008-15) and past board president of the Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts. She currently serves on the boards of directors for Elms College and Girls Inc. of Holyoke and is vice chair of the board of trustees for Springfield Museums. She co-wrote the original business plan for the local chapter of the Dress for Success, which supports the career and economic advancement of women, and she serves as a business mentor for many young entrepreneurs in the region. Kane has been recognized with many awards in the past for her commitment to strengthening her community, including Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield’s Richard J. Moriarty Citizen of the Year in 2015, Western Mass Women magazine’s Professional Woman of the Year in 2012, Professional Women’s Chamber Woman of the Year in 2011, and a BusinessWest Difference Maker in 2009.

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Edward Alford of South Hadley was installed as president of the 1,800-member Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley on Jan. 9. The installation of officers and directors took place at the Log Cabin in Holyoke. More than 100 people attended the organization’s 103rd annual installation ceremony. Donald Thompson, the association’s 2008 president, served as emcee for the event. The other officers installed were Kelly Bowman as president-elect, Sue Drumm as treasurer, Elias Acuna as secretary, and Rick Sawicki as immediate past president. The directors installed include Shawn Bowman, Peter Davies, Janise Fitzpatrick, Sara Gasparrini, Sharyn Jones, Cheryl Malandrinos, Sue Rheaume, and Russell Sabadosa. Alford was joined by Massachusetts Assoc. of Realtors (MAR) President Rita Coffey, who served as the installing officer. Coffey’s leadership team from MAR was also in attendance, including Anne Meczywor, president-elect; Kurt Thompson, secretary/treasurer; Paul Yorkis, immediate past president; and Rob Authier, CEO.

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Heather Roy recently completed the Precision Nutrition Level 1 Pro Coach certification at Conca Sport and Fitness (CSF). Members have been losing more than 20 pounds thanks to the innovative nutrition and fitness plan offered by Precision Nutrition and Conca Sport and Fitness, CSF owner Steve Conca said. He added that being able to deliver comprehensive fitness and nutrition programming that gets results and is easily adaptable for busy lifestyles was paramount in the company’s decision to move forward with the certification program. CSF, which opened in 2009, provides fitness coaching both online and in the studio, either in a one-on-one or small-group environment.

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HOLYOKE — Dr. Neil Kudler, former chief medical information officer for Baystate Health, has joined Holyoke-based healthcare consultancy VertitechIT as chief medical officer.

“IT consultants focused primarily on bits and bytes are doing their clients a disservice,” said Kudler, who has held other senior executive and strategist positions at Baystate Health, one of New England’s largest healthcare systems. “As CMO of VertitechIT, I’m in a position to bridge that all-important technology gap between clinicians and the IT departments that must support them.”

VertitechIT is among the fastest-growing healthcare IT consultancies in the country, focused on helping senior IT leaders to strategically and tactically transform the role of IT in the hospital setting.

“Any consultant worth their fee can design and implement a new cloud strategy or infrastructure platform,” said VertitechIT CEO Michael Feld. “Dr. Kudler gives us immense credibility on the clinical side of the house, providing guidance on things like diversified health-system operations, population health, and data analytics.”

Before joining VertitechIT, Kudler served as senior healthcare innovation strategist for TechSpring Technology Innovation Center, and as chief operating officer for Baycare Health Partners. He is a graduate of Colgate University and received his master’s degree from Harvard Divinity School. He received his doctor of medicine degree from New York University and trained in internal medicine at UC San Francisco.

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HOLYOKE — A seasoned chief information officer for some of the world’s largest healthcare payor organizations, Terry Ramey has joined Holyoke-based healthcare consultancy VertitechIT as an executive project officer (EPO). He will lead engagements with large healthcare systems as the company continues to expand operations throughout the East Coast and across the country.

Ramey previously held senior technology titles at PerformRX (a subsidiary of AmeriHealth Caritas), Penn Mutual Life Insurance, CIGNA Health Services, and Dendrite International.
 
As a nationally recognized healthcare technology executive, he says he was looking to make an impact on the provider side of the industry.

“At CIGNA, Penn Mutual, and other major payor organizations, my responsibilities were to leverage technology to positively affect the bottom line,” he noted. “At VertitechIT, I have the opportunity to help transform hospital IT departments with a direct impact on patient care. It’s not often that an IT executive gets to do that.”

VertitechIT CEO Michael Feld agrees. “Our work at work at major health systems goes far beyond designing and implementing cloud strategies, overhauling infrastructure, and streamlining operations. As an EPO, Terry will counsel clients on the IT initiatives that can literally change the way doctors do their jobs.”

Working at the executive level within a healthcare organization, EPOs oversee a collaborative office of the CTO (oCTO), implementing VertitechIT’s proprietary LeverageIT process. Working side by side with senior internal managers, the oCTO refines strategic directives and implements tactical solutions that make organizations more profitable and efficient.