Home Posts tagged MassDevelopment
Daily News

BOSTON— MassDevelopment has awarded grants totaling $1,056,010 to 22 community health centers across Massachusetts through its Community Health Center Grant Program. The program offers grants of up to $50,000 each to fund capital improvement projects including construction, renovation, equipment, furniture, technology-related projects, as well as facility needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“The Commonwealth is fortunate to be home to many first-rate community health centers that provide critical care to families and individuals,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s Board of Directors. “The Baker-Polito Administration is pleased to support these health centers that have proven themselves invaluable partners in our collective efforts to combat COVID-19 and address social challenges exacerbated by the pandemic.” 

Locally, the following organizations received Community Health Center Grant Program awards in FY22: 

 

Caring Health Center, Springfield — $47,725 

Founded in 1995, Caring Health Center (CHC) operates facilities in Springfield’s South End, Forest Park, and Pine Point neighborhoods. CHC provides a complete range of primary, dental, and behavioral health/substance use recovery services to more than 19,000 low-income and chronically ill patients each year including refugees, immigrants, and people experiencing homelessness. CHC will use grant funds to buy equipment and supplies for its proposed chiropractic and physical therapy programs. 

 

Holyoke Health Center Inc., Holyoke — $50,000 

Founded in 1970, Holyoke Health Center Inc. (HHC) is the only free-standing comprehensive health center serving adults and children in the greater Holyoke area with an on-site pharmacy, primary medical care, and integrated oral health and behavioral health services. HHC has two full-service sites in Holyoke and Chicopee, as well as dental sites at the Holyoke Soldier’s Home and the Western Massachusetts Hospital in Westfield. HHC recently bought a building near its existing Holyoke site that will be incorporated into the growing campus; the organization will use this grant for safety and security improvements to the new building’s parking lot, where patients can park for free.  

 

  

Community Health Programs, North Adams — $50,000 

Community Health Programs (CHP) is the only Federally Qualified Health Center in Berkshire County and exists to serve those who have limited access to care, including low-income, uninsured, underinsured, immigrant, migrant, seasonal, homeless, and public housing residents. CHP is a community-based nonprofit network of health centers, dental centers, mobile health units, and comprehensive family support programming. The organization will use grant funds to upgrade its North Adams Medical and Dental Center practice by equipping two additional dental exam rooms. 

 

Community Health Centers of Franklin County Inc., Orange — $50,000 

The Community Health Center of Franklin County, Inc. provides medical care, dental care, and behavioral health care and supports social services such as transportation, language interpretation, and insurance navigator services. The organization primarily serves vulnerable populations with barriers to care due to socioeconomic or other challenges. This grant will be used to support renovations to the organization’s Orange-based Health Center Plaza, specifically helping the center expand its operations and services into currently vacant areas of the building. 

 

“By providing affordable health care and social services to vulnerable populations across Massachusetts, community health centers are indispensable assets in our neighborhoods,” said MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera. “As we try to bounce back from the pandemic, it’s as important as ever to support the critical capital projects and improvements of these organizations through our Community Health Center Grant Program.” 

 

The Community Health Center Grant Program is funded by the MassDevelopment/Massachusetts Health Educational Facilities Authority (HEFA) Charitable Trust. MassDevelopment offers other financing options to community health centers, including tax-exempt bond financing and TechDollars, a loan program to help nonprofits buy and install technology equipment. 

 

“These grants are critical in the ongoing work of community health centers to serve their under-resourced communities,” said Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers President and CEO Michael Curry, Esq. “Funding that invests in medical equipment upgrades and facility improvements for community health centers means more care for more patients in need.” 

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — MassDevelopment has issued a $106,675,000 tax-exempt bond on behalf of Springfield College, which will use proceeds to fund several capital projects.

The college will use $45,095,000 to build and equip a new environmentally friendly and sustainable, 76,000-square-foot health sciences building; this portion of the financing received the Green Bond designation by Kestrel Verifiers, which are approved verifiers accredited by the Climate Bonds Initiative.

The college will use the remaining proceeds to build an academic quad and campus pavilion; renovate classrooms, residence halls, administrative buildings, and the existing health sciences building; improve a steam-plant facility; upgrade walking and running paths and outdoor seating; and refinance previously issued debt. The bond was sold through a public offering underwritten by Hilltop Securities Inc.

“Institutions of higher education are important drivers of our state and local economies as they bring jobs, opportunities, and additional activity to communities across the Commonwealth,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors. “MassDevelopment is a valuable partner to those colleges and universities looking to modernize infrastructure and remain competitive hubs of innovation and intellectual exploration.”

MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera added that “this major investment represents Springfield College’s commitment to its students, staff, and the entire Greater Springfield community. MassDevelopment is proud to lend a helping hand to support construction of a new health sciences building and significant upgrades to the college’s campus and academic facilities.”

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno offered “a big thank you to MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera, who — once a mayor, always a mayor — understands that these types of investments into our community are essential to maintain and move forward on capital projects while not hindering an institution’s bottom line. I am very appreciative of MassDevelopment’s continued support, belief, and investment in our Springfield, especially to Springfield College over these past years. This public-private partnership continues to greatly enhance the campus of Springfield College, which in turn has increased overall quality of life to the surrounding neighborhood. In addition, and just as important, these improvements and various upgrades of the amenities and facilities the college has to offer benefits our residents, especially our students and their families.”

Daily News

BOSTON — MassDevelopment has awarded up to $330,000 in funding for 14 cities and towns through its Real Estate Services Technical Assistance program to address site-specific and district-wide economic-development challenges.

Through a combination of in-house expertise and contracts with consultants, under this program, MassDevelopment works with municipal officials, planners, local stakeholders, and others to address priority planning and development projects through creative solutions and clear, implementable action steps.

“The Baker-Polito administration is committed to helping communities achieve their economic-development goals,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors. “MassDevelopment’s Real Estate Services Technical Assistance program is one of the many tools available to cities and towns in Massachusetts looking to revitalize key properties and improve their downtowns.”

Created in 2017, MassDevelopment’s Real Estate Services Technical Assistance program has awarded $1.37 million to help 39 communities advance their economic-development goals through 41 projects.

Three of the most recent awards are in Western Mass. The Town of Buckland will use a $10,000 award to prepare a former town Highway Department garage at 50 Conway St. for private acquisition and redevelopment. The City of Greenfield will use a $25,000 award to develop an request for proposals for the First National Bank Building, the last unresolved property in the city’s Bank Row Urban Renewal District, targeting a project that will further revitalize the downtown. And the Town of Montague will use a $35,000 award to complete a property-reuse assessment of the Strathmore Mill Complex at 20 Canal St. that will help advance redevelopment of the canal district’s north end.

Construction

From Parking Lot to Plaza

MassDevelopment has awarded a $10,000 grant to the North Adams Chamber of Commerce to transform the Center Street parking lot at 55 Veterans Memorial Dr. in North Adams into a seasonal public dining corridor dubbed Mohawk Plaza.

The organization will use funds to add outdoor seating, a sidewalk surface mural, wayfinding signage, ambience lighting, and landscape work. The chamber will also crowdfund this summer and fall; if the organization reaches its $7,850 goal, it will receive an additional $7,850 matching grant from MassDevelopment.

The funds are awarded through MassDevelopment’s special Commonwealth Places COVID-19 Response Round: Resurgent Places, which was made available specifically to assist local economic-recovery efforts as community partners prepare public spaces and commercial districts to serve residents and visitors.

“Before this pandemic, the vibrant centers of our cities and towns were not only a driving force behind the strength of local economies, they were the places where we gathered to dine, to shop, and to be entertained, and the Commonwealth Places program is one way that we can help these areas bounce back stronger than ever,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors.

“The Baker-Polito administration continues to support downtowns and town centers through various economic-recovery programs,” he added, “and these Resurgent Places grants are providing nonprofit community organizations with the resources to activate public spaces, boost economic activity, and support an equitable recovery.”

Created in 2016, Commonwealth Places aims to engage and mobilize community members to make individual contributions to placemaking projects, with the incentive of a funding match from MassDevelopment if the crowdfunding goal is reached. In response to the pandemic, MassDevelopment announced the opening of the first Commonwealth Places COVID-19 Response Round: Resurgent Places in June 2020, and from August through October 2020, $224,965 in funding was awarded for 21 placemaking projects across Massachusetts.

In December 2020, MassDevelopment announced the availability of $390,000 in funding for a second Commonwealth Places COVID-19 Response Round: Resurgent Places. Nonprofits and other community groups can apply to MassDevelopment for seed grants of between $250 to $7,500 to fund inclusive community engagement, visioning, and local capacity building that will support future placemaking efforts, or implementation grants of up to $50,000 to execute a placemaking project. For implementation grants, up to $10,000 per project may be awarded as an unmatched grant; awards greater than $10,000 must be matched with crowdfunding donations.

“Amazing things can happen when communities reimagine underutilized public spaces, such as North Adams Chamber of Commerce’s vision for a parking lot steps away from the city’s Main Street,” MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera said. “MassDevelopment is pleased to help the organization create Mohawk Plaza, a space that will increase foot traffic downtown, provide additional outdoor dining, and reinvigorate a prime public way.”

Daily News

BELCHERTOWN — MassDevelopment and the Belchertown Economic Development and Industrial Corp. (BEDIC) announced the selection of Brisa Ventures, LLC to develop a 12-acre parcel of land at Carriage Grove into a new mixed-income residential community featuring approximately 100 units of housing.

Brisa Ventures will also preserve and redevelop the existing former Belchertown State School administration building into a community center, museum, cultural space, meeting space, and either a restaurant, brewery, or distillery. Construction of the development is projected to begin by the end of 2022 and is expected to be complete within 18 to 24 months.

The sale of this BEDIC-owned parcel and building to Brisa Ventures will represent the first phase of a multi-phased, mixed-use project under negotiation with the company intended to include additional commercial, residential, and community-oriented investments.

“MassDevelopment’s partnership with the Belchertown Economic Development and Industrial Corporation has made significant strides in transforming the former Belchertown State School from an underutilized asset into a thriving mixed-use community,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors. “This new development marks another exciting step in that journey and will add about 100 much-needed units to the Commonwealth’s housing stock.”

Added MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera, “momentum breeds momentum, and it’s clear that the progress the town of Belchertown, the Belchertown Economic Development and Industrial Corporation, and MassDevelopment have made in breathing life back into the former Belchertown State School campus has paved the way for this landmark new development. MassDevelopment has been proud to be a strategic partner in the development of Carriage Grove. Brisa Ventures, LLC’s proposal to build about 100 mixed-income rental housing units, while preserving and transforming the existing former administration building into community space and a restaurant for the benefit of the public, stood out as the best next step for the community.”

The new rental housing units will be designed as a mix of two- and three-story apartment- and townhome-style residences and built to ultra-low energy-use standards; they are planned to use solar energy to meet net-zero energy use. The development will also include extensive common green areas with play areas, community gathering spaces, and pathways that connect the housing units to each other and to the neighboring trail network.

Daily News

BOSTON — MassDevelopment announced the availability of funding through its Real Estate Technical Assistance Program to help communities address site-specific and district-wide economic-development challenges.

Under this program, through a combination of in-house expertise and contracts with consultants, MassDevelopment works with municipal officials, planners, local stakeholders, and others to address priority planning and development projects through creative solutions and clear, implementable action steps. Awards will range from approximately $5,000 to $50,000 and can support public surplus property reuse, including feasibility analyses and RFP/Q development, and the implementation of local district-management tools such as Business Improvement Districts and District Improvement Financing.

“MassDevelopment’s Real Estate Technical Assistance program is a valuable resource for helping cities and towns throughout Massachusetts address challenges unique to their community,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors. “The Baker-Polito administration encourages local partners to apply for this targeted assistance as they consider and tackle their economic-development goals.”

The full request for proposals is available at massdevelopment.com/technicalassistance. Responses are due by Aug. 6.

“Every community has that one parcel, district, or neighborhood that has the potential for more,” MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera said. “Using the expertise of MassDevelopment’s in-house staff as well as top-tier consultants, our Real Estate Technical Assistance program can help cities and towns across the Commonwealth take on challenging planning and development projects to more fully leverage their assets.”

Construction

Soaring Again

 

MassDevelopment has provided an $800,000 loan to Eagle Mill Redevelopment, LLC, which is using the proceeds to redevelop the former Eagle Mill and surrounding parcels in Lee into a mixed-use complex featuring 128 residential housing units and 14,000 square feet of retail and office space.

The developer used loan proceeds and additional financing from Adams Community Bank to buy 10 adjacent properties that will be combined and subdivided into six separate parcels for future redevelopment. Construction on the project, which is expected to cost approximately $55 million, is slated to begin in the fourth quarter of 2021, with its first phase completed within 14 to 18 months.

“A priority of the Baker-Polito administration is to breathe life back into underutilized factory and mill buildings that were once integral to the Commonwealth’s industrial success,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors. “These properties are uniquely situated for redevelopment into mixed-use communities that accelerate economic growth and expand housing opportunities, and we were proud to deliver a $4.9 million MassWorks award to facilitate needed infrastructure work at Eagle Mill. MassDevelopment’s contribution of loan financing advances the transformation of the site and complements the other state, local, and private investments.”

“Bringing additional housing, businesses, and jobs back to Eagle Mill, a defining site in Lee’s industrial history, will be an important part of the community’s next chapter.”

Built in 1808, Eagle Mill is located along the Housatonic River in Lee. In the later part of that century, Lee was the national leader in papermaking and home to 25 paper mills. As operations dwindled, Eagle Mill closed in 2008 — resulting in the loss of 165 factory jobs — and has remained vacant since. The town received a $4.9 million MassWorks Infrastructure Program grant in 2018 to upgrade the water main in the town and install 9,000 linear feet of new water main to the development site, allowing the Eagle Mill project to move forward. The project is also supported with both state and federal historic tax credits.

“Bringing additional housing, businesses, and jobs back to Eagle Mill, a defining site in Lee’s industrial history, will be an important part of the community’s next chapter,” MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera said. “MassDevelopment is proud to be a financial partner in Eagle Mill Redevelopment, LLC’s plans to unlock the economic potential of this property.”

Jeffrey Cohen, the lead developer in the Eagle Mill redevelopment, has been involved in the project since 2012. He has done similar, large-scale historic restoration and redevelopment projects in Washington, D.C.; Portland, Maine; and St. Paul, Minn. DEW Construction, another partner and the project’s general contractor, brings similar experience and expertise to the effort, with projects of more than $150 million each year.

“It is incredibly fortunate that MassDevelopment has so many tools by which they are able to enhance the likelihood of our project’s success,” Cohen said. “They provide financing for predevelopment, amongst other things, which is otherwise so difficult to obtain, making their support invaluable to our project. The essential turning point that will lead to the project’s ultimate success was, and is, the approval by then-Secretary [Jay] Ash and MassWorks of the $4.9 million grant to the town of Lee, enabling the replacement of the water line to the mill, without which we would not have been able to move forward.”

MassDevelopment, the state’s finance and development agency, works with businesses, nonprofits, banks, and communities to stimulate economic growth across the Commonwealth. During FY 2020, MassDevelopment financed or managed 341 projects generating investment of more than $2.69 billion in the Massachusetts economy. These projects are estimated to create or support 10,871 jobs and build or preserve 1,787 housing units.

Daily News

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration and MassDevelopment announced up to $1 million in funding for the sixth round of the Collaborative Workspace Program, a MassDevelopment program that accelerates business formation, job creation, and entrepreneurial activity in communities by supporting infrastructure that fuels locally based innovation.

Eligible organizations may apply for seed grants of up to $15,000 to study the feasibility of new collaborative workspaces or fit-out grants of up to $100,000 for new equipment or building improvements, including adjustments to help spaces adhere to the social-distancing and health and safety standards outlined in the Commonwealth’s sector-specific COVID-19 Workplace Safety Standards.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the outlook for what it means to be at work for many people, with Massachusetts’ vast network of co-working spaces offering another avenue for working, creating, and collaborating,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chair of MassDevelopment’s board of directors. “Through MassDevelopment’s Collaborative Workspace Program, our administration is pleased to offer co-working spaces the resources they need to grow their membership, expand offerings, and make adjustments to keep members safe.”

Since its pilot launch, and through the first five rounds of grants, the Collaborative Workspace Program has made 164 awards totaling $9,842,041 for the planning, development, and build-out of collaborative workspaces.

“From shared kitchens to startup incubators, co-working spaces support a wide variety of industries in Massachusetts by offering space for innovation, collaboration, and networking,” MassDevelopment President and CEO Dan Rivera said. “MassDevelopment is excited to launch a sixth round of the Collaborative Workspace Program with up to $1 million in funding available to help co-working spaces of all kinds plan, expand, and improve.”

The full request for proposals is available at massdevelopment.com/cowork. Responses are due by 5 p.m. on July 2, 2021.

Daily News

BOSTON — MassDevelopment recently announced the availability of $390,000 in funding for a new round of the Commonwealth Places program, a statewide initiative that leverages public support for placemaking projects in Massachusetts. Funding is being made available specifically to assist local economic-recovery efforts as community partners prepare public spaces and commercial districts to serve residents and visitors.

Eligible projects will comply with the Commonwealth’s Reopening Massachusetts plan, and may include outdoor seating spaces, sidewalk retail venues, partitions to support social distancing, and more.

“Our administration is committed to supporting local economic-recovery efforts as communities adjust and respond to the impacts of COVID-19,” Gov. Charlie Baker said. “It’s more important than ever to find new and creative ways to drive foot traffic to our Main Streets and commercial districts, keeping safety and distancing in mind.”

Added MassDevelopment President and CEO Lauren Liss, “earlier this year, MassDevelopment pivoted our annual Commonwealth Places crowdfunding program to more quickly assist nonprofits and other community groups looking to reimagine and reopen public spaces for safe dining, shopping, and recreation during the pandemic. We are pleased to double down with another, larger round of available funding to continue to support place-based recovery efforts across Massachusetts.”

Nonprofits and other community groups can apply to MassDevelopment for seed grants of between $250 to $7,500 to fund inclusive community engagement, visioning, and local capacity building that will support future placemaking efforts, or implementation grants of up to $50,000 to execute a placemaking project. For implementation grants, up to $10,000 per project may be awarded as an unmatched grant; awards greater than $10,000 must be matched with crowdfunding donations.

Expressions of interest will be accepted on a rolling basis until June 30, 2021, and are available at massdevelopment.com/commonwealthplaces. MassDevelopment will host an informational webinar about the program on Tuesday, Jan. 12. Register at massdevelopment.com/cp-webinar​.

Daily News

BOSTON — MassDevelopment announced that, after three years as president and CEO, Lauren Liss will step down from this position at the end of the calendar year. Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, who serves as chairman of the board of directors of MassDevelopment, will lead the search for the next head of the state’s finance and development agency.

“Lauren has been an incredible partner and leader as she has put MassDevelopment’s many programs and resources to work creating jobs for our residents, increasing investment in our communities, and spurring economic growth statewide,” Kennealy said. “From providing critical financing to growing businesses to supporting the construction of new housing units, Lauren and the MassDevelopment team have played an essential role in our administration’s work on countless projects and initiatives.”

Before taking the reins at MassDevelopment in 2017, Liss held leadership positions in both the private and public sectors, including commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and a partner in a Boston law firm.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to return to public service to lead MassDevelopment during a period of such tremendous growth,” she said. “I have thoroughly enjoyed my tenure, working with the Baker-Polito administration, the MassDevelopment board, and all our dedicated colleagues and staff to spur economic development across the Commonwealth, particularly in our underserved communities.”

In fiscal year 2020, MassDevelopment financed or managed 341 projects, generating investment of more than $2.69 billion in the Massachusetts economy. These projects are estimated to create or support 10,871 jobs and build or preserve 1,787 housing units. As president and CEO, Liss expanded its work in gateway cities through an array of finance programs and real-estate services, such as the Transformative Development Initiative (TDI) and Commonwealth Places program, and oversaw tremendous growth at Devens, MassDevelpment’s iconic mixed-use redevelopment of the former Fort Devens.

This year, under Liss’ leadership and in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, MassDevelopment pivoted programs and tools to support small businesses in some of the state’s hardest-hit communities and aid in economic recovery. These efforts helped to stabilize businesses in TDI districts and created crowdfunding opportunities for community partners to prepare public spaces and commercial districts to safely serve residents and visitors.

MassDevelopment, the state’s finance and development agency, works with businesses, nonprofits, banks, and communities to stimulate economic growth across the Commonwealth.

Daily News

BOSTON — MassDevelopment awarded $86,415 for 10 projects, three of them in Western Mass., through the Commonwealth Places COVID-19 Response Round: Resurgent Places, a program made available specifically to assist local economic recovery efforts as community partners prepare public spaces and commercial districts to serve residents and visitors. Projects receiving awards include the creation of outdoor dining spaces, sidewalk retail venues, and partitions to support social distancing.

“The Commonwealth Places program is a tool to help drive foot traffic to downtowns and commercial districts by providing opportunities for safe dining and recreation,” Gov. Charlie Baker said, “and we look forward to continuing to work with municipalities to support local communities across the state.”

The Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce will receive a $10,000 grant for the Amherst Resilience Initiative – A Play in Three Acts, a project in which the organization will reopen an outdoor version of the Downtown Amherst Visitor Information Center and install COVID-19 public-health and wayfinding signage and landscaping in downtown Amherst.

The Chicopee Chamber of Commerce will receive a $10,000 grant for Chicopee Center Public Spaces, to transform a remediated lot in the city’s Transformative Development Initiative (TDI) district at 181 Center St. into a mixed-use public space for outdoor programming, including farmers’ markets, food trucks, performances, community gatherings, and more.

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives will receive a $7,200 grant for A Path to Reopening: Repurposing Public Space in Stockbridge, a project in which the organization will host three monthly pop-up events featuring artist shows and presentations on the library’s front lawn.

Daily News

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration and MassDevelopment announced a new round of available funding from the Brownfields Redevelopment Fund to support the environmental assessment and cleanup of contaminated and challenging sites across the Commonwealth. Municipalities, municipal agencies and authorities, economic-development and industrial corporations, and economic-development authorities may apply for up to $100,000 in site-assessment funding or up to $250,000 in remediation funding.

“Converting contaminated and challenging sites into new, constructive uses like affordable housing and commercial opportunities is critical to our goal of building vibrant communities across the Commonwealth,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy. “Through the Brownfields Redevelopment Fund, we can remove a major barrier that would otherwise inhibit our progress toward economic recovery.”

MassDevelopment oversees the Brownfields Redevelopment Fund, which helps to transform vacant, abandoned, or underused industrial or commercial properties by financing the environmental assessment and remediation of brownfield sites in ‘economically distressed areas’ of the Commonwealth. Since the fund’s inception in 1998, it has supported 747 projects for a total investment of more than $108 million.
“MassDevelopment is pleased to administer the Brownfields Redevelopment Fund, a critical resource for revitalizing challenging properties into new housing units, commercial space, and other productive uses,” said MassDevelopment President and CEO Lauren Liss. “We thank the Baker-Polito administration and the Legislature for their continued support for this program and encourage cities, towns, and their economic -development partners to apply for funding.”

This competitive round seeks to advance the redevelopment of sites without a committed end-user where market potential has been identified. It will not replace the traditional process of accepting applications on a rolling basis for eligible proposals with an identified developer. The full request for proposals is available at massdevelopment.com/brownfields. Responses are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 18.

buy ivermectin for humans buy ivermectin online buy generic cialis buy cialis