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Best in Show

The Ad Club of Western Mass. staged its annual ADDY Awards ceremony on March 20 (a list of winners begins on page 61). Here, Best in Show winner Brendan Ciecko of Ten Minute Media poses with Ad Club president Alta Stark and Francisco Sole of Baystate Health, the ADDYs gold sponsor.


Hometown Heroes

The American Red Cross of the Pioneer Valley staged its sixth annual Hometown Heroes Breakfast on March 20, honoring eight individuals who have shown courage, kindness, and unselfish character through acts of heroism.

Bill Trudeau of the Insurance Center of New England presents an American Red Cross Hometown Heroes Award to Missionary Bertha Brown, volunteer program director of the Victory Temple C.O.G.I.C. food pantry, for her extraordinary service and dedication to the poor and hungry in West Springfield.

Mark Morris (left), director of Public Relations for Health New England, presents a Hometown Heroes Award to Brian Strange of Chicopee, who rescued an 87-year-old Springfield man who was trapped in his burning, overturned car after a crash on the Massachusetts Turnpike.

Opinion

There were a number of story lines and theories to consider in the wake of the state House’s resounding rejection (108-46) of Gov. Deval Patrick’s plans to locate three resort casinos across the Commonwealth — and most of them involved politics, not the real issue, which is job creation.

While some analysts were speculating that the vote provided ample evidence of the decline in power wielded by organized labor, many others were saying that House Speaker Salvadore DiMasi essentially showed Patrick, and everyone else, who’s boss around here. Still others were commenting that Patrick still has a long way to go when it comes to leadership skills and working with the Legislature, not in spite of it, to achieve real progress.

These individuals have a point, and we hope the governor learns from this setback; he basically contrived a casino plan, worked up some numbers on new jobs that didn’t stand up to scrutiny, and dared the Legislature to approve the plan or find some other way to generate revenues and close a $1.3 billion gap. That’s a textbook example of how not to get things done.

In the wake of the House vote, casino backers vowed that they would be back (what else would they say?), and racetrack owners said they would continue their hard push to get slot machines in their facilities. They may succeed, but does anyone really care? There’s no real job creation in slots and nothing by way of benefits for Western Mass. Meanwhile, the Wampanoag tribe will likely proceed with its bid to gain approval from the federal government to locate a casino in Middleborough — a plan that helped inspire the governor to act and blueprint a plan that would generate the state some licensing fees.

While all this talk goes on, we hope that there will be some real action to address the basic challenge facing this state, and that is to create some good jobs for people who don’t necessarily have the skills to compete in the so-called knowledge economy — or to get serious about helping those individuals acquire those skills. And we’re not sure that anything real will happen as long as the casino option — if we can call it that — is still out there.

We’ve supported the resort casino plan because we view it as a way to bring jobs and vibrancy to places like the Quaboag region — one of the leading candidates for a site is a parcel off the turnpike exit in Palmer — that don’t appear to have many options amid the ongoing decline in the manufacturing sector and some geographic disadvantages.

Maybe it’s time to refocus efforts on creating some options for Quaboag, and also New Bedford, Holyoke, Pittsfield, and Springfield, and this will be a stern challenge.

Indeed, DiMasi and others in the House are soon going to find that rejecting casinos was the relatively easy part of this equation. Finding new sources of jobs and revenues (beyond hikes to cigarette and gas taxes) is going to be much more difficult. But this is priority one for Massachusetts, because this challenge — like casino supporters, apparently — won’t go away easily.

Perhaps the biosciences and ‘green’ business development can help comprise an answer. The Legislature can start by priming this pump with research dollars and tax incentives and hope that, somehow, these sectors can produce tens of thousands of jobs that can be filled by the existing labor force. We have our doubts about whether this will happen.

Beyond simple tax hikes and some wishful thinking about ‘green’ businesses, many in the Legislature are simply waiting for that proverbial ‘next big thing,’ and they’ve already been waiting for a long time. Instead of waiting, they need to act.

DiMasi and others in the House are calling the casino vote a victory. Maybe it is, but unless the Legislature can manage to find some other ways to bolster this state’s economy and generate some real momentum and jobs, then it will be a hollow victory indeed.

Sections Supplements
Atlas TC Proves that Good Communication Equals Good Business
Steve Bandarra and Patrick Correia

Atlas TC co-owner Steve Bandarra (left) and staff member Patrick Correia say efficiency and communication are two tenets of their company.

When Steve Bandarra and Nate DeLong decided to found Atlas TC, an IT consultancy firm based in Holyoke, they first pledged to do a few things differently than other, similar businesses they’d seen.

There are little signs of that objective scattered throughout the Atlas TC offices; a row of bamboo chutes in their office’s foyer suggests a certain environmental consciousness, bright yellow paint on the walls speaks to the staff’s creativity, and the receptionist is a friendly black lab-boxer mix named Lucy.

It’s a space that, deliberately, says ‘come in, we speak your language,’ and indeed, that’s a major aspect of the Atlas TC business model. Bandarra and DeLong call it “translation services,” noting that they specialize in changing ‘geek’ into English.

Sometimes, translation refers to a specific task, literally breaking down complicated terms for a client into more easily digestible pieces. But in addition, translation is an overriding part of Atlas TC’s culture, which begins with staff members doing their best to talk to clients in a clear, concise way, and to bag the industry jargon that often creates a rift between techies and the rest of the world.

“To a lot of people, the industry terms just sound like gibberish,” said Bandarra. “It’s up to us to help them understand. It’s not their job to make sense of the lingo — it’s ours.”

Another tenet on which Atlas TC (short for Atlas Technology Consulting) has been built is ‘no technology for technology’s sake.’ While Bandarra is a self-confessed ‘techno-junkie’ and DeLong has a long technology background that includes military training, they both agree that not every bell and whistle is applicable to every situation.

“We’ve seen people being sold way more than they needed,” said Bandarra. “It’s OK to be excited about technology; that’s why we do what we do. But that excitement needs to be tempered with an understanding of the specific needs a client has.”

These two major prongs of the original business plan have created a successful spot within the area’s burgeoning IT sector for Bandarra, DeLong, and their staff, which is expected to grow by at least 50% this year. They’ve carved a niche for themselves serving a wide range of clients in various industries, many of which are mid-sized firms that have reached a turning point in terms of growth and, in turn, their technological needs.

“Many of these are companies that have been around for a while, perhaps with a patched-together network that worked fine for a while,” Bandarra said. “They’ve reached a point where they’re ready for something that, essentially, works the way it’s supposed to. In other words, our clients did what they needed to do to get started, and now, they’re ready to grow up and, as the saying goes, ‘go to the next level.’”

Bandarra said it’s exciting to work with businesses at this juncture in their legacies, not only because he sees the ways his team can play an integral role in a company’s growth, but also because in many ways, Atlas TC is at the same transitional spot as its clientele, doing well and ready to turn a corner to head for new avenues.

Words Matter

When he spoke with BusinessWest, Bandarra was joined by Patrick Correia, who has been with the company nearly two years (DeLong was recuperating from minor surgery).

The firm and its staff work on two sides of the same IT coin — one half, led by Bandarra, focuses on business development, while the other, led by DeLong, puts most of its efforts into understanding and introducing new technologies. Correia, who works primarily in customer support on the so-called ‘techie side,’ said he was drawn to the company in large part due to the promises of communication and efficiency its founders made to themselves upon starting the company in 2004.

“I think using buzzwords can be a way of excluding or even controlling people,” he said, “and it’s important to put things on a level that a particular person can understand. That level is different for every client, but it’s what every person needs and deserves.”

Bandarra added that translating complicated and ever-changing technical terms for clients sounds like a small service at first, but it has become one of the bigger drivers for Atlas TC, particularly as it rolls out a host of new offerings this year.

“It reminds our clients that they are in control of their businesses and their destinies — we’re just here to help them,” he said.

Specifically, Atlas TC works with various companies to offer a menu of services that include ‘network therapy,’ designed to give slow computers a jump, and ‘hardware guide’ service, through which staff help clients choose the best systems for their business. The company also offers Web-development services, database creation and maintenance, security enhancements, and complete system builds. Two of its largest areas of concentration today are security and remote access, which often go hand-in-hand.

“People are still realizing they can access files and networks from anywhere,” said Bandarra. “Our job is to bring a mix of access and security to them, and to educate our clients about the realities of the threats out there. No one should be terrified of viruses and hackers — security is a must for everyone, but it’s not that scary if you use best practices, and again, it’s our job to bring those to the table.”

That philosophy also extends to another aspect of the IT consulting model. After Atlas TC staff have translated and educated, they’ll often draft an action plan for a client, which in turn sometimes helps a client secure work or products from other IT firms.

“When a project gets bigger, we’ll sometimes shift to operate in a different capacity,” Bandarra explained, noting, however, that other times, it leads to a much deeper relationship with a company. “We have the ability to work with an IT department or as an IT department, preparing budgets and plans for the next year. Financially, it makes sense for the client because they’re not paying a full-time employee, and at the same time, each of us here has our own individual strength.”

Host with the Most

However, that’s not to say Atlas TC isn’t adding to its own repertoire as well. In 2007, the company began gearing up for a new virtual-hosting service that uses a more-efficient approach to providing and managing space within individual servers.

“Most servers use a lot of power, but using virtual servers is a way to provide the same functionality while consuming less power, and lowering cooling costs,” said Bandarra.

Plus, like Atlas’s computer new computer recycling program, which will reduce electronic waste by appropriately disposing of some units and donating others to area non-profits and educational bodies, Bandarra said a major driver behind adding virtualization to its list of services are the ‘green’ components it creates. “This allows us to be more eco-friendly as well as more customer friendly.”

This technology also only recently became more accessible and affordable to small and medium-sized businesses, added Correia, making its introduction to Atlas TC’s client base that much more important.

“That’s the beauty of being a smaller business,” he said. “We have the agility to stay on top of emerging technology, and to roll things out to our clients when the time is right.”

That attention to timing refers back to Atlas TC’s golden rule of providing necessary technology that helps businesses run more smoothly.

“We maintain the perspective needed to bridge business needs with new technology,” he said. “More than anyone else today, IT professionals like us are in a position to help businesses identify new opportunities.”

I Won the Sandbox

In addition, there’s no shortage of businesses to help, either. Bandarra said Atlas TC does very little formal advertising, relying on its Web site (which has two versions, on written in English and the other in the universal language of IT — ‘geek’) and word of mouth, which is keeping referrals brisk and workloads big.

“So many people out there need our services,” he said. “There’s competition, but there are a lot of clients. The sandbox is huge, and it’s an exciting place to be.”

While Bandarra said he, DeLong, and his staff are looking forward to long careers in that same sandbox, they’re also keeping an eye on new opportunities and developments that will help them, and their clients, open new doors.

Their own front door, in the meantime, is under the watchful eye of a black dog in a bright yellow room.

Jaclyn Stevenson can be reached at

[email protected]

Features
2007 Regional ADDY Winners Announced
Best in Show: Lily Allen microsite, by Ten Minute Media

Best in Show: Lily Allen microsite, by Ten Minute Media

Amid the mysterious tricks of professional mentalists and the acrobatic feats of award-winning trapeze artists, the creative professionals of Western Mass. had a chance to show their own magic at the second annual regional ADDY Awards, staged March 20 at CityStage in Springfield. The event was hosted by the AdClub of Western Mass., in conjunction with the American Advertising Federation, and this year celebrated the best design and marketing materials the region has to offer in an atmosphere worthy of any circus or carnival.

The competition awarded 61 gold, silver, and bronze ADDYs to various marketing and design firms and in-house graphics and advertising departments that do business in all four counties of Western Mass. The winners were culled from more than 160 entries, and gold and silver ADDY winners are eligible to move on to the national-level competition in June.

The 2007 regional ADDY winners are listed below by category. The entrant as well as the client for which a project was created appear next to each award, as well as the names of staff who contributed to each entry.

BusinessWest congratulates the 2007 ADDY winners, and wishes luck to the local companies moving on to the next level.

Best in Show

Ten Minute Media,

for Lily Allen LDN microsite, Capitol Records

Sales Promotion

(Exhibits and Displays)

n Point-of-purchase, trade show exhibit

Bronze — Winstanley Associates, for Smith & Wesson trade show exhibit

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

David Morrison, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Collateral Material

(Stationery, Brochures, Annual Reports, Posters, etc.)

n Stationery package

Silver — Rob and Damia Design, travel stationery for Babydue Travel

Rob Stewart, Designer

Damia Stewart, Producer

n Annual Report

Silver — John C. Otto Printing, for Springfield College Annual Report

Radwell Communication by Design, Designer

Bronze — Springfield Technical Community College, for STCC Annual Report

Kerry Tufts, Designer/Production Manager

Setta McCabe, Director of Public Relations

AM Lithography, Printer

Bronze — Baystate Health, for Baystate Health Annual Report

Bronze — TSM Design, for Vision 2006 Mass. Mutual Wholesale Electric Co.

Marisa Fillippone, Designer

David Tuohey, Copywriter

Bassette, Printer

n Brochure, four-color

Silver — TigerPress, for Image the Possibilities, Williston Northampton School

Silver — Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. for MBK 3D Capabilities, Meyers Brothers Kalicka

Silver — Robert Charles Photography, for Exceeding All Expectations, DuRocher Florist

Edward Zemba, Creative Director

Leah Martin, Photographer

Robert Francis, Photographer

Julia Goldberg, Designer

Kara Lavelle, Designer

Susanna Zemba, Designer

Graphi Studio, Printer

Pip Printing, Printer (stickers)

Silver — Bidwell ID, for Glenmeadow brochure, Glenmeadow Retirement Community

Todd Verlander, Creative Director

Bronze — TSM Design, for Convergence, Environmental Compliance Services

Noel Szado, Designer

Nancy Urbschat, Copywriter

Marcus Bordeaux, Printer

Bronze — Radwell Communication by Design, for the MacDuffie School admissions viewbook

Laura Radwell, Designer

Hadley Printing, Printer

n Publication design

Bronze — TigerPress, for Supermodels, Supermodels LLC

n Posters, single

Gold — W.F. Young Inc. for Absorbine 115th anniversary poster, W.F. Young Inc.

Jamie Young, Art Director

Amy Johnquest, Artist

Bronze — lshd advertising, for USCRA North American Vintage Grand Prix poster, USCRA

Bob Demetrius, Creative Director, Account Executive

n Posters, campaign

Bronze — Springfield Technical Community College, for STCC Black History Month posters, STCC

Kerry Tufts, Designer, Production Manager

Myra Smith, VP Human Resources and Multicultural Affairs

n Special event material/invitations

Gold — Health New England, for City of Bright Nights Ball 2007 Invitation, Spirit of Springfield

Leslie Bercume, Manager of Advertising & Graphic Design

Greg Desrochers, Hadley Printing

Direct Marketing

Silver — TSM Design, for Get Watermarked, Southworth Paper

Noel Szado, Designer

Soren Johnson, Copywriter

AM Lithography, Printer

Silver — lshd advertising, for MassMutual IRA Consolidation direct mailer

Paul McCullen, Account Executive, Creative Director

Fred Crisp, Art Director

Margot Zalkind, Copywriter

Bronze — chemetal/treefrog for Cubes and Tiles postcard, interior51.com

Meg Broughton, Graphic Designer

Geoff Schaefer, Creative Director

Out-of-home Advertising

(Billboards and Placards)

n Single

Gold — Advertus Media, for In the Way, Westfield State College

Adam Wright, Creative Director

Todd Lemieux, Graphic Artist

n Campaign

Gold — Winstanley Associates, for Hampden Bank ‘Evolved’ billboards

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

David Morrison, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Consumer or Trade

Publication Advertising

n Fractional page, four-color

Silver — chemetal/treefrog for ‘Palpable Angst,’ chemetal

Geoff Schaefer, Creative Director, Copywriter, Art Director

Bronze — chemetal/treefrog for ‘More metal than …,’ chemetal

Geoff Schaefer, Creative Director, Copywriter, Art Director

n Full page, four-color

Silver — Winstanley Associates, Suddekor Dimension Ad, Suddekor LLC

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

Meghan Dewar, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Mark McCarty, Photographer

n Campaign, four-color

Gold — chemetal/treefrog for Interior51 campaign, Interior51.com

Geoff Schaefer, Creative Director, Copywriter, Art Director

Brent Hale, Art Director, logo

Gold — Winstanley Associates, for Hardigg Animal Testing campaign, Hardigg Industries

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

David Morrison, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Mary Doherty, Graphic Designer

Bronze — lshd advertising, for Holyoke Medical Center Short Stay print campaign, HMC

Bob Demetrius, Creative Director

Susan Martin, Account Executive

Fred Crisp, Art Director

Paul Pereira, Art Director

Laura Cunha, Production

Newspaper Advertising

n Black and white

Gold — Cardinale Design, for ‘Six’ campaign, Hadley Printing

Kathy Cardinale, Art Director

Don Forest, Designer

Hadley Printing, Printer

Interactive Media

n Web sites, B-2-B, HTML/other

Silver — chemetal/treefrog for chemetal Web site

Geoff Schafer, Creative Director, Copywriter, Art Director

Tony Palleschi, Web Programmer

n Web sites, consumer, Flash

Gold — visual concepts media, for Spalding Web site

Silver — Ten Minute Media, for Natalie Cole Web site, Verve Music Group / UMG

Silver — Ten Minute Media, for Mick Jagger Web site, Atlantic Records

n Web sites, consumer, HTML/other

Silver — Ten Minute Media, for Triple Crown Records Web site, Triple Crown Records

Silver — visual concepts media for Peter Pan Web site, Peter Pan Bus Lines

Silver — Del Padre Visual Productions, for RileyMartin. com, Riley Martin Enterprises

Nino Del Padre, Creative Director

Mark Archer, Producer

Joe Maki, SEO Programmer

n Interactive media, online, microsites and minisites

Bronze — Ten Minute Media, for ‘Dan in Real Life’ Soundtrack microsite, Virgin Records

Radio

n Local, 60 seconds or more

Gold — Goff Media, for ‘Lie Detector,’ Providence Auto Body

David Goff, Producer

David Brinnel, Writer, Sound Engineer, Talent

n Television

Gold — Winstanley Associates, for Hampden Bank ‘Evolved’ TV spot

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

David Morrison, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Mixed Media

(Cross Platform)

n Campaigns

Gold — Winstanley Associates, for Hampden Bank ‘Evolved Banking’

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

David Morrison, Art Director

Mary Doherty, Graphic Designer

Bronze — TSM Design, for ‘Game Face,’ Springfield Falcons

Deborah Walsh, Designer

Jim Langone, Photographer

Penfield Productions, Video Producer

Jason Gonat, Talent

Brandon Dionne, Talent

Ryan Flinn, Talent

Advertising for the

Arts and Sciences

n Collateral, brochures and sales kits

Gold — TigerPress, for Japanese Tea Wares, Smith College Museum of Art

Silver — Rob & Damia Design, for Williams ’62 Center Season calendar, for Williams College Center for Theater and Dance

Rob Stewart, Designer

Damia Stewart, Producer

Ben Ruddick, Photographer

Olli Chanoff, Copywriter

Bronze — Rob & Damia Design, for UMass Fine Arts Center Season brochure

Rob Stewart, Designer

Damia Stewart, Producer

n Collateral, Posters

Bronze — Rob & Damia Design, for Nutcracker poster, the Ballet Center at Manchester

Rob Stewart, Designer

Damia Stewart, Producer

Public Service

n Collateral, brochures and sales kits

Gold — TSM Design, for ‘On the Way Home,’ Friends of the Homeless

Deborah Walsh, Designer

Nancy Urbschat, Copywriter

Jim Langone, Photographer

Getty, cover photo

Bassette, Printer

Mt. Tom Box, Printer

Silver — Rob & Damia Design, for Media Reform Information Sheets, Free Press

Rob Stewart, Designer, Illustrator

Damia Stewart, Producer

n Collateral, posters

Bronze — Rob & Damia Design, for Step it Up Rally Poster, Step It Up Northampton

Rob Stewart, Designer

Damia Stewart, Producer

Advertising

Self-promotion

n Creative services and industry suppliers, consumer

Silver — TigerPress, for TigerPress 2008 calendar

Bronze — Six-point Creative Works, for ‘Convicted: Non-profit Marketing’

Marsha Montori, Copywriter

David Wicks, Art Director

White Point Imaging, Photography

n Creative services and industry suppliers, direct

Gold — Winstanley Associates, for ‘Winstanley Nothing’

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

Meghan Dewar, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Bronze — Robert Charles Photography, for ‘Celebrating Life in Motion’ fall mailer

Edward Zemba, Creative Director

Robert Francis, Photographer

Leah Martin, Photographer

Julia Goldberg, Designer

Kara Lavelle, Designer

Susanna Zemba, Designer

Lucky Designs, Printer (postcards)

Pip Printing, Printer (stickers)

Marathon Press, Printer (belly band)

n Creative services and industry suppliers, cards and other printed materials

Gold — Winstanley Associates, holiday greeting

Ralph Frisina, Creative Director

David Morrison, Art Director

Annette Ragan, ACD, Copywriter

Winstanley Staff, assembly

n Campaign, single medium

Bronze — TSM Design, for ‘Breakout Work,’ AdClub of Western Mass.

Noel Szado, Designer, Illustrator

Soren Johnson, Copywriter

Hadley Printing, Printer

Elements of Advertising

n Logo

Bronze — Bidwell ID, for Glenmeadow Retirement Community

Todd Verlander, Creative Director

Bronze — Bidwell ID, for Page Product Design

Todd Verlander, Art Director

Mark Verlander, Designer

Bronze — lshd advertising, for Bacon & Wilson P.C.

Bob Demetrius, Creative Director

Mario Pereira, Creative Director

Maya Whitman, Art Director

Aliya Mamdani, Account Executive

Laura Cunha, Production

n Illustration, illustration campaign

Silver — MicaBlue Creative, for Paintbox Theatre

Silver — Rob & Damia Design, for Media Reform Illustrations, Free Press

Rob Stewart, Illustrator

Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Al Leger Home Improvement,
American Building Contractors
Leger, Albert Michael
L&S Enclosures
100 Lockhouse Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Abair, Brian A.
a/k/a Benoit, Brian A.
40 Prospect St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Alston, Mary E.
60 Switzer Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Arts & Flowers
Lewis, Jill Robin
29 Briggs St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/15/08

Badillo, Robert
Hague-Badillo, Megan K.
169 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Baez, Maria M.
34 Northern Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Barnes, Robert L.
Barnes, Melissa J.
118 Old Farm Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Beauliere, Cedric
444 Prince Hall – UMass
286 Sunset Ave.
Amherst, MA 01003
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/12/08

Bell, Turman R.
Bell, Eleanor C.
287 Osborn Road
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/06/08

Bessette, Richard Allen
60 Montague St.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/08

Bousquet, Kelli E.
7 Stanley Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/11/08

Brust, Dean S.
148 Birch Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/02/08

Burns, Mark Thomas
57 Decorie Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/07/08

Candido, Michael L.
59 Melba St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/28/08

Capen, Nancy
394 Long Plain Road
South Deerfield, MA 01373
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/04/08

Carchedi, Jason Corey
PO Box 1802
Pittsfield, MA 01202
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/28/08

Carlson, Christina L.
64 Pleasant St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Chirgwin, Gary W.
Chirgwin, Audrey W.
19 Cedar Knoll Drive
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/15/08

Christopher, Jonathan R.
66 Main St.
Northfield, MA 01360
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/07/08

Cocco, Leonard L.
Cocco, Wanda M.
11 Laura Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/08

Collins, Corey L.
Collins, Linda A.
91 Manchester Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Creative Temp Services
Riel, Debra J.
11 Maple Terrace
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/01/08

Czelusniak, John L.
143 Maple St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Diaz Rivera, Maribel
129 Champlain St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Doleva, Joan C.
127 Raymond Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/30/08

Driver, Edward B.
419 Montcalm St., Apt. 301M
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/08

Duffy, Susan J.
a/k/a Hall, Susan
P.O. Box 914
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/15/08

Eaton, Vicki Lee
5 Merkel Ter.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Fein, Jonathan L.
60 Tecumseh Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Felt, Lynn M.
27 Waite Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/04/08

Fenn, Darrin T.
622 Westfield St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Flores, Carmelo
Flores, Cristina I.
209 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Fontanez, Gill L.
60 Newland St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/07/08

Gallerani, Ernest
31 Dutton St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/05/08

Gaskins, Arthur R.
Gaskins, Victoria M.
a/k/a Dixon, Victoria M.
144 Warrenton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Ghassemi, Ebrahim
303 Maple St., Apt B51
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Gondek, Debra A.
a/k/a Mango, Debra A.
2032 Maple St.
Three Rivers, MA 01080
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Gossman, David Paul
6 Jeffrey Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/08

Granger, Geraldine M.
93 Armstrong St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Gregory, Bonnie S.
879 North St.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Hannon, Martha M.
a/k/a Hannon, Martha Marie
72 Harmon St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Harley’s Janitorial Service
Tarr, Michele Anne
a/k/a Courchesne, Michele Anne
66 Brookside Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Hayward, Rebecca L.
1806 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Hogan, Ann M.
148 Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Janisieski, Stephen F.
44 Granville Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Keeney, Robert F.
P.O. Box 1151
Chicopee, MA 01021
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/30/08

Kuzin, Paul N.
9 Walnut St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/28/08

 

Litwin, Jeffrey M.
Litwin, Tammy A.
341 Springdale Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Lussier, Jeffrey Matthew
16 Hubbard Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Mainville, Raymond A.
Mainville, Lynn M.
2077 Calkins Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Marcoullier, George E
221 Russellville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/15/08

Martin, Christian A.
183 Brookhaven Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/08

McCormack, Timothy J.
62 Craig Dr., Apt. A-1
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

McNeil, Theodore R.
PO Box 4028
Springfield, MA 01101
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/30/08

Melendez, Estervina
36 Chapin St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Michaud, Michael P.
100 Lockhouse Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/30/08

Miller, Elton W.
Miller, Patricia F.
163 Dubois St.
Indian Orchard, MA 01151
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/08

Morann, Ernest W.
1 G St.
Turners Falls, MA 01376
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/12/08

Moskal, Tracey
43 Briarwood Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/11/08

Napolitan, John M.
Napolitan, Alice T.
517 Whitney Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Pacheco, Lenin
134 Bristol St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/06/08

Pelletier, Bernard
15 Hunt St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/04/08

Racine, Katherine Y.
8 Cornell St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Ramonas, Roy V.
20 Murray Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/07/08

Rapa, Timothy J.
147 Virginia Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Reed, Matthew B.
169 Allen St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/05/08

Richards, Ernest W.
Richards, Sandra M.
10 Seneca Dr.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/15/08

Rios, Juan Jose
142 Shawmut St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/12/08

Rivera, Pedro
174 River St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/07/08

Rovero, Donald Paul
15-E Maple Circle
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 01/28/08

Roy, Lucy R.
2597 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/08

Ryan, John C.
6 University Dr.
Suite 206, #169
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/12/08

Sharp, Kathy A.
60 Columbia St.
Lee, MA 01238
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Sicard, Donald P.
69 Berkshire Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Singleton, Herbert L
PO Box 90842
Springfield, MA 01139
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Smith, Edwin D.
10 Grant St., Apt. B
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/11/08

Solomon, Steven C.
81 Prospect St. #38
Northampton, MA 01060
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Soto, Angel
Soto, Brenda
79 W. Alvord St., 2nd
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/08

Spruell, Judy
126 Harvard St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/06/08

Szczepanski, Roger P.
50 Rood St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Szenkum, Irmgard I.
6 Gold St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/29/08

Talbot, Theresa E.
164 Prouty St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Taylor, Charles S.
785 Parker St.
Ease Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/12/08

Thomas, Amanda E.
58 Charles St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/28/08

Trigo, Christopher J.
194 Dayton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/01/08

Typrowicz Painting
Typrowicz, Brenda Lee
Typrowicz, James R.
63 Belvidere Ave.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

VanAnne, Heather
338 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/04/08

Veremey, Judith Mary
356 Park St., Apt. 142
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Vreeland, Glenn Allan
Vreeland, Felicia Fara
171 Morton St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/04/08

Wallner, Robert J.
575 Country Club Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/08

Wetherell, Ellen C.
189 Springfield Road #19
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Williams, Heather-Jill Kuzmeskus
6 Fordham Ave.
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/08

Young, Steadman John
545 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/07/08

Landry, Susan M.
438 Springfield St., A
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 01/31/08

Sections Supplements
Life in the Quirky Northampton Real Estate Market

Each time I pass by the Ten Thousand Villages store on Main Street in Northampton — a retail chain that sells what is described as ‘fair-trade products’ from 100 artisan groups in 30 countries — I am reminded of how I perceive the Northampton office real estate market: 10,000 psychotherapists.

Northampton is honeycombed with countless small-office users. Some are attorneys, some financial advisors and other professions, but most seem to be related to providing some sort of mental health counseling. The net result is that, in the aggregate, they all occupy a vast amount of space in very small increments — about 200 square feet on average.

They are all over town. Much of the upper-floor space on both sides of Main Street hasn’t changed much from the days of Sam Spade. Small offices with translucent-glass-paneled doors and creaky wooden floors. All are walk-ups, although some buildings do have elevators. The former Elks Lodge on Gothic Street was sold several years ago and converted into very handsome office space. What was once a tired and fairly wide-open building is now the home of dozens of social service or mental health practices. This is typical all along the Route 9 corridor into Florence and Haydenville as well. And nowhere is this pattern more apparent that at the Potpourri Plaza on King Street.

This community of small users is generally a favorable one from a landlord’s perspective, in that many tenants in one building have a tendency to spread the risk. But it makes it very difficult for a company in need of 5,000 square feet or more to find space in the city. Many companies looking to expand simply can’t find large blocks of space in the market. Everyone wants to be downtown, and who can blame them?

The largest single office user in Northampton is Disney Publishing, which occupies 10,000 square feet at the former post office building on Pleasant Street.

In 2006, Disney relocated from another downtown site, the Roundhouse Building, which contains 15,000 square feet of truly unique space. That building, just off Pulaski Park, proved too large for Disney, which was downsizing at the time. Also, the building was about to go through a protracted environmental remediation by Baystate Gas. That project will be concluded within the next few weeks, and the building will once again be available to accommodate the needs of larger users.

Another large space, at 109 Main St., was most recently occupied by Fleet Bank, a victim of the merger and acquisition quicksand, and is in the process of being leased. The owners have responded aggressively to unmet requirements in the market, and the results are becoming apparent.

The top floor of Thorne’s Marketplace is also being converted into much needed larger blocks of downtown office space — fortunately, however, not at the expense of relocating PACE into nearby street-level space on Main Street.

I expect this available supply of larger blocks of downtown office space to be absorbed in the next 12 to 18 months. Once the inventory is depleted, the only alternative will be new construction elsewhere.

The project planned for King Street, a commercial-office mix at the former Lea Honda dealership site, was out of step and has stalled. Rents associated with new construction there, coupled with a less-than-desirable ‘strip’ location, have proven to be impassable obstacles for the project. The Hospital Hill commercial development, at the site of the former Northampton State Hospital, will offer a more desirable office venue than King Street, but it’s a far cry from downtown. And, as previously mentioned, everyone wants to be downtown.

Several office-conversion projects that are not located downtown have succeeded nonetheless. The Cutlery Building complex in the Baystate section of the city is near capacity and offers affordable and somewhat non-traditional office space. The building has plenty of on-site parking and is located in a safe rustic setting along the Mill River. While such office locations can succeed as alternatives to downtown, they often prove to be much more challenging.

Northampton’s allure is so compelling that, most days, we are willing to endure the inconvenience of circling the block for a parking place only to wait again for a table at one of downtown’s many wonderful restaurants.

I guess that’s why those 10,000 psychotherapists are there, too — ready to help us work out all such stresses and pressures in our lives.

John Williamson is president of Springfield-based Williamson Commercial Properties; (413) 736-9400.