Home 2011 August
Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the month of August 2011.

AGAWAM

Kathy Ayre
644 Main St.
$40,000 — Interior renovations to office space

Mushy’s Golf Center, LLC
369 Main St.
$40,000 — Install 6 new antennas

AMHERST

Amethyst Farm, LLC
89 Northeast St.
$1,500 — Install new stairway to basement

Amherst Cinema, LLC
28 Amity St.
$9,000 — Converting existing space to GoBerry

Yosrex Limited Partnership
266 East Hadley Road
$3,000 — Repair roof

CHICOPEE

Callaway Golf Sales Co.
425 Meadow St.
$90,000 — Enclose room

Chicopee Housing Authority
28-100 Debra Dr.
$64,000 — Repair brick facade at Memorial Apartments

JND Property
107 South St.
$8,000 — Insulate existing walls and attic

Chicopee Village Limited Partnership
149-155 Eastern Dr.
$11,200 — Strip and re-shingle roof

HADLEY

Lancomb Holdings, LLC
191 Russell St.
$19,800 — new roof

W/S Hadley Properties, LLC
353 Russell St.
$30,000 — Replace existing HVAC rooftop units

HOLYOKE

Holyoke Mall
50 Holyoke St.
$100,000 — Remodel existing Spencer’s Store

LUDLOW

Oak Tree Inn
782 Center St.
$30,000 — Repair fire damage

NORTHAMPTON

Evert N. Fowle
20 Center St.
$17,000 — Install replacement windows

Florence Fire Station
69 Maple St.
$10,500 — Replace windows

Gandara Mental Health Center
25 Graves Ave.
$3,500 — Exterior renovations

Northampton Sewerage Treatment Plant
33 Hokanum Road
$10,000 — Install flat plate solar thermal collectors

Robert G. Curran Jr.
244 Main St.
$65,000 — Renovate interior

SOUTH HADLEY

Mount Holyoke College
50 College St
$7,000 — New roof

Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Action Corp.
87 Canal St.
$13,000 — Install new hood and exhaust fans

SOUTHWICK

Mount Tekoa Group
7 Veteran St.
$10,000 — Remodel store

Southwick Historical Society
86 College Highway
11,000 — Remodel bathroom

SPRINGFIELD

Cityview2 Limited Partnership
102 Armory St.
$150,000 — Exterior renovations

WESTFIELD

City of Westfield
28 West Silver St.
$1,976,000 — Erect two stair towers and elevators

Frank Demarinis
217 Root Road
$139,000 — Construction of 2,950-square-foot addition

North Elm Realty Inc.
55 North Elm St.
$17,000 — Interior renovations

Rocky’s
2 Free St.
$1,540,000 — New construction

Shell Oil Company
259 North Elm St.
$80,000 — Remodel interior

Westfield Alpine Company, LLC
1029 North Road
$10,000 — Repair fire damage to Nino’s Pizza

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Center for Human Development
332 Birnie Ave.
$137,000 — Renovate 3,088 square feet of office space

Fred L. Aaron
1472 Riverdale St.
$237,000 — Renovate 4,193 square feet in existing retail space

Fred L. Aaron
1472 Riverdale St.
$99,765 — Renovate 2,050 square feet in existing retail space

Hayden Corp.
333 River St.
$17,000 — Repair tornado damage

Hofbrahaus
1105 Main St.
$47,000 — New roof

Taco Bell
298 Memorial Ave.
$60,000 — Interior renovations

Departments People on the Move

Nicolle Cestero

Nicolle Cestero

has been named Associate Vice President of Human Resources at American International College in Springfield. Her role includes overseeing recruitment, employment relations, compliance with governing regulations, HR process and procedures, classification and compensation services, and performance management. Cestero will also focus on benefits administration, training and development, and contract negotiations.
•••••
Big Y Foods Inc. in Springfield announced the following:
Guy McFarlane

Guy McFarlane

• Guy McFarlane has been appointed Senior Director of Fresh Foods.
Gary Bolduc
Gary Bolduc

Gary Bolduc

• Gary Bolduc has been appointed Director of Meat and Seafood.
•••••
Allan Costello has joined Berkshire Bank as Senior Vice President and Audit and Compliance Manager. He will lead the internal audit and compliance teams throughout the company.
•••••
Fallon Community Health Plan has named Attorney Gerard Campbell as Privacy Officer and Compliance Manager at its Worcester headquarters. He will serve as the company’s primary resource for questions related to privacy and confidentiality as they pertain to FCHP and its employees, customers, vendors, and business partners.
•••••
Chicopee Savings Bank announced the following:
Anthony Antonopoulos

Anthony Antonopoulos

• Anthony Antonopoulos has been promoted to Vice President of Compliance and serves as the bank’s Security Officer;
Henry Downey

Henry Downey

• Henry Downey has been promoted to Vice President of Commercial Lending; and
Elizabeth Maroney

Elizabeth Maroney

• Elizabeth Maroney has been promoted to Vice President of Loan Administration.
•••••
The Western Mass Wellness Center in West Springfield announced the following:
Kelley Hamaoui

Kelley Hamaoui

• Tai Chi instructor Kelley Hamaoui has begun offering tai chi classes;
Bonnie Coopersmith

Bonnie Coopersmith

• Bonnie Coopersmith, LMFT, a licensed Individual and Relationship Therapist, has begun offering consultation services;
• Carleen Eve Fischer Hoffman, owner of the Clutter Doctor, has formed the Western Mass. Clutter Support Group through the wellness center; and
Lynn LaDuke

Lynn LaDuke

• Lynn LaDuke has joined the wellness center as a presenter and speaker on holistic options for pain relief for fibromyalgia sufferers. Her program is titled Restoring Quality of Life.
•••••
Bevan Brunelle has been appointed Marketing Manager at CityStage & Symphony Hall in Springfield.
•••••
MassMutual Retirement Services in Springfield announced the following:
• Garrett Carlough has joined MassMutual as Sales Director. He is based in New York City and is providing additional coverage for New York City, Long Island, Westchester County, Rockland County, and Northern New Jersey; and
• Andrew Hanlon has been appointed Sales Director. He is based in Boston, increasing coverage for eastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Maine.
•••••
Danielle Goldaper has been named Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving at American International College in Springfield.
•••••
Best Tile of Springfield announced the following:
•  Walt Sawa, Manager, has announced his retirement after 44 years of service with the company.
• Karen Belezarian-Tesini has been promoted to Branch Manager. She has served as Showroom Manager since 1996.
•••••
Mark Haynes, President and Chief Operating Officer of Environmental Compliance Services in Agawam, has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts  Chamber of Business and Industry.
•••••
Karen Stonehouse has been invited by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime to take part in establishing a national curriculum to train new protective-service caseworkers. This initiative is part of a nationwide pilot program to develop standardized competency trainings that can be used as a framework by other states to adapt to fit their regulations. In most states, the protective-service caseworkers are the first responders to report elder abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation. Stonehouse will conduct a course titled “Working within the Criminal Justice System” in September. She is a Supervisor in the Protective Services Unit at Greater Springfield Senior Services Inc., based in Springfield.
•••••
Wayne Budd, a longtime member of AAA Southern New England’s Board of Directors and most recently the Vice Chairman of AAA’s National Board of Directors, will now serve as Chairman of the national board. A Springfield native, Budd is a Senior Counsel at the Boston law firm of Goodwin Procter, and is a former U.S. attorney and former U.S. associate attorney general.
•••••
Michael Tucker, President of Greenfield Co-operative Bank, has been elected Treasurer of the Mass. Bankers Assoc.
•••••
Keith G. Roy Construction of Westfield announced the following:
• Keith Roy, President, has completed the Vinyl Siding Institute’s certified installer program; and
• Joshua Roy, Crew Leader, has also completed the certified installer program.
The firm has been in operation since 1946 and is a second-generation, family-owned company that provides siding and roofing installation and repair as well as other home-construction services.
•••••
Linda Carfora has been named Assistant Director of Educational Services for the Willie Ross School for the Deaf in Longmeadow. She is responsible for coordination of the school’s two campuses, the management of the center-based home campus in Longmeadow as well as the partnership, mainstreaming campus in the East Longmeadow Public Schools.
•••••
Shanda Reynelli has been appointed Clinical Director of Children’s Services for the Center for Human Development, based in Springfield. Reynelli, a licensed mental health counselor, will oversee clinical services for all CHD programs serving children and adolescents.
•••••
Thomas Devivo has joined the Charter Department sales team at Peter Pan Bus Lines in Springfield. Devivo handles outside charter sales business for Peter Pan throughout the Greater New York and Northeast areas.
•••••
Western New England University in Springfield recently announced new members of its Board of Trustees. They are:
∙ Stephen J. Rourke, Vice President of System Planning for ISO New England.
∙ Neville S. Bogle, Senior Financial Consultant with Travelers Insurance Co. in Hartford, Conn.
∙ Robert W. Dobek, Pharmacist, in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Briefcase Departments

Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Coming to Springfield
SPRINGFIELD — A deserving family in Springfield will have their dreams come true in just a few weeks thanks to ABC’s Emmy-winning reality show Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. That family will learn of their good fortune with a knock on the door on Sept. 11, when the show’s team of designers will surprise them with the news that their home will be completely renovated. The build is a race against time involving a team of designers, contractors, and several hundred workers who have just seven days (one week for the actual construction) to rebuild an entire house — every room, the exterior, and landscaping. Normally, a project of this scope would take months, not days. Chicopee-based N. Riley Construction was selected by Extreme Makeover: Home Edition’s producers to be the lead builder on the project. The Home Builders Assoc. of Western Mass. has also signed on to collect donations and help coordinate volunteer contractors. “We look for builders with big hearts, great skills, and a strong connection within their own community,” explained Milan Vasic, the show’s senior producer. “Nick and his crew at N. Riley Construction were the perfect fit.” The build officially kicked off with an announcement by Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno on Aug. 19. A kickoff pep rally is scheduled for Aug. 30 at 6 p.m. (location TBA) with work beginning on Sept. 11, and continuing around the clock until Sept. 18. “We are thrilled to be part of this project and already have tons of support from the community,” noted Riley. “But we need your help and donations. So please go online and sign up to volunteer and donate.” Organizations and companies that have already signed on include: the city of Springfield, Abide, Ingram and Associates, Southampton Environmental, Durkee, White, Towne, and Chapdelaine, Ondrick, Kohler, Kitchen Encounters, Kraftmaid Cabinets, Silestone, Emtek, Dki, John Pelland Electric, Fontaine Bros., Galen and Sons, Superior Walls, Mvg Home Improvement, Crystal Brook Decorative Concrete, Sherwin Williams, Masterpiece Finishes, Shubee, Contemporary Structures, USG, ABC Supply, Daltile, Baystate Rug and Flooring, Bouchard, Pro-Tech, Select Blinds, Lumber Liquidators, Garvey Communication Associates Inc., James Langone Photography, and Viz-Bang. To donate, volunteer, or for more information, visit www.joinextreme.com/mass. Several families are being considered, and the recipients will be announced on the door-knock date. Local information, including the most up-to-date sponsors’ lists, behind-the-scenes photos, and news flashes, will be posted at facebook.com/emheSpringfield.

State’s Jobless Rate Holds Steady
BOSTON — Massachusetts continues to outperform the nation in job growth, according to the latest statistics from the state Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development. Employers in the state added nearly 13,000 jobs in July, building on strong gains in the first half of the year, the agency reported. The state’s unemployment rate held steady in July at 7.6%, well below the national rate of 9.1% in July, the office reported. Massachusetts has added more than 50,000 jobs since the beginning of the year.

HCC Plans ‘Working Green’ Training, Certification Programs
HOLYOKE — This fall, the Kittredge Center at Holyoke Community College will introduce new training courses that provide technical skills and a framework for developing sustainable facilities. “Green Facilities Training for Managers” is an introductory course that focuses on practical ideas and a plan of action for businesses to immediately save money. In addition, HCC will offer “Introduction to Cleaning Green,” “Getting to Sustainability Through Changes in Waste Contracting,” and “Introduction to Green Purchasing.” Also, a “Facility Team Green” program is designed for restaurant and lodging establishments. For more information on programming, visit www.hcc.edu/bcs or contact Rachel Bishop-Cook at (413) 552-2730 or [email protected]

Kindergartners to Receive Literacy Packets
SPRINGFIELD — Children entering the Springfield Public School kindergarten programs this fall will receive a special gift thanks to Link to Libraries Inc. Welcome to Kindergarten, the newest initiative by Link to Libraries, will include a bookbag, new book, bookmark, and educational materials that are bilingual. It is hoped that the selected youths participating in the test pilot program will have the opportunity to read their book with their parents or guardians at home. Classroom teachers will be asked to generate discussion among their pupils to gauge if the sharing of the book occurred at home between the parents or guardians and the youths. It will be requested of each teacher to return a brief survey to Link to Libraries to help determine the success and effectiveness of the program. Link to Libraries has donated more than 26,000 books to schools and nonprofit organizations throughout Western Mass. and Northern and Central Conn., and more than 10,000 books to Springfield public elementary schools since its inception in 2008. For more information, visit www.linktolibraries.org.

NH, Maine Join FastLane/E-ZPass Pacts
BOSTON — The Mass. Department of Transportation recently announced agreements with New Hampshire and Maine enabling all three states to impose sanctions on FastLane/E-ZPass toll violators across each other’s state lines. Enforceable penalties now include registration suspension (Maine) and denial of vehicle registration renewal (New Hampshire and Massachusetts). The tri-state reciprocity agreements are the first such agreements in the nation and mark an important step in ensuring toll equity by addressing revenue losses caused by motorists without FastLane or E-ZPass transponders or whose electronic accounts perennially have insufficient funds. “Electronic tolling accounts accounts for about 70% of our toll revenue,” said Jeffrey Mullan, MassDOT secretary and CEO. “These first-in-the-nation agreements allow us to continue to collect tolls more efficiently, to address toll equity issues, and to collect tolls from out-of-state violators.” The agreements will be in force for one year. After that, the agencies have the option to extend the term of the pilot program for up to two additional one-year periods or create permanent agreements. For more details, visit www.mass.gov/massdot.

Departments Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AGAWAM

JFBH Business Consulting Inc., 54 Colonial Ave., Agawam, MA 01001. James Hansmann, same. Business consultation services.

AMHERST

Local Links Inc., 36 Hallock St, #2, Amherst, MA 01002. Katie Byrne, 50 Castle Hill Road, Westfield, MA, 01085. Nonprofit organization designed to promote volunteerism and create opportunities for people to volunteer with various charitable organizations.

BELCHERTOWN

RBN Construction Inc., 38 Cedar Glen, Belchertown, MA 01007. Roman Nowakowski, same. Construction services.

CHICOPEE

New Amazon Foods Corp., 96 Chestnut St., #2, Chicopee, MA 01013. Luis Tavares Junior, 22-19 74th St. East Elmhurst, NY 11106. Frozen foods distribution.

GRANVILLE

Houston Enterprises-CT Inc., 43 Dickinson Dr., Granville, MA 01034. Thomas Houston, same. Pizza Hut franchise.

EAST LONGMEADOW

Lux Boutique Inc., 632 North Main St., East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Patrizia Anna Liquori, 35 Cross Meadow Road, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Clothing and accessories retail store.

EASTHAMPTON

Music and Poetry Synchronized Inc., 116 Pleasant St., Suite 328, Easthampton, MA 01027. Thomas Willits, 39 Massasoit St., Northampton, MA 01060. Nonprofit organization developed to provide music and poetry educational programs to children.

FEEDING HILLS

Responsible Driver Inc., 547 Springfield St., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Gerald Smith, Jr. 52 Clematis Road, Agawam, MA 01001. Driving school.

GREENFIELD

Just Roots Inc., 97 Shelburne Road, Greenfield, MA 01301. Ted Wat, 87 Oakland St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Nonprofit organization.

HAMPDEN

La Cucina Express Inc., 4 Allen St., Hampden MA 01036. Geri Ann Cimmino, same. Restaurant.

HOLYOKE

HIM Tech Inc., 62 B Lower Westfield Road, Holyoke, MA 01040. Sirjana Lamichhane, same. IT consultation services.

LEE

Sullivan Station Restaurant Inc., 109 Railroad St., Lee, MA 01238. Darleen Marie Zradi Miss, 3 Vin Bebert Blvd., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Restaurant.

MONSON

Suffield Lumber Company Inc., 202 Palmer Road, Monson, MA 01057. David Kenniston, same. Lumber sales.

NORTHAMPTON

Wilde Investment Corp., 126 Vernon St., Northampton, MA 01061. Will Carswell, same. Investment holding services.

SPRINGFIELD

G.R.A.M.M. Corporation, 62 Kirk Dr., Springfield, MA 01109. Terrelle castle, same. Distribution of finished goods.

Hampden Entertainment District Inc., 11-13 Hampden St., Springfield, MA 01103. Heriberto Flores, 833 Chestnut St., Springfield, MA 01107.

Iglesia Pentecostal La Senda De La Vida En Cristo Inc., 312 Locust St., Springfield, MA 01118. Jose De Jesus, 1144 Summer Ave., Springfield, MA 01118. Church.

Jablonski Devriese Architects Inc., 29 Elliot St., Springfield, MA 01105. Stephen Jablonski, 22 Green Lane, Springfield, MA 01107. Architectural design firm.

New England International Chaplaincy Inc., 39 Groton St., Springfield, MA 01129. Religious ministry.

Northstar Recycling Company Inc., 89 Guion St., Springfield, MA 01104. Seth Goodman, 47 Academy Dr., Longmeadow, MA 01106. Materials Brokerage.

Roebuck Investment Corporation Inc., 1331 Main St., 2nd Floor, Springfield, MA 01103. John Santanella, same. Investment company.

Tropical Food Marketing Deli Inc., 343 Wilbraham Road, Springfield, MA 01109. Antonio Jimenez, same. Deli.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

OGI Trans Incorporated, 39 Colony Road, West Springfield, MA 01089. Zdenko Dosen, same. Trucking and freight transportation services.

WESTFIELD

First Slavic Pentecostal Church of Springfield Inc., 64 Kennsington Ave., Westfield, MA 01085. Pawel Lubanski, same.

Genesis Spiritual Life and Conference Center Inc., 53 Mill St., Westfield, MA 01085. Frank Irr, 18 Huntington Lane, Norwich, CT 06360. Retreat and educational conference center for individuals and groups.

Features
For Holyoke, the High- performance Computing Center Is Only the Beginning

Holyoke Canals

Holyoke Canals

The high-performance computing center soon to take shape in downtown Holyoke is a large project creating a good deal of excitement. Two things it won’t create directly, however, are large numbers of jobs and tax revenue. So area planning officials are hard at work looking at ways to generate both indirectly. They call it leveraging an asset. The strategies being developed have many facets, and are summed up by one official as a “surround-sound approach to economic development.”

The high-performance computing center being developed in downtown Holyoke brings together a group of public and private partners in a groundbreaking initiative that will eventually provide unparalleled computing power for the state’s most prestigious universities.
Imagine its impact on … farming.
No, really.
“The high-performance computing center will generate a lot of heat,” said Kathleen Anderson, director of Holyoke’s Office of Planning and Development. “If we did urban agriculture, we could take the heat from the computing center and pump it into greenhouses or possibly older mill buildings and start growing things.”Such a project, she said, could generate more than 100 jobs.
“Then there’s distributors, processing plants up and down the Valley … how do you include them? An asset like that in Holyoke would need distribution, processing, transportation — how can we leverage that asset to help other businesses in the Valley?”

Tim Brennan

Tim Brennan says efforts to leverage the computing centers can be described as “the surround-sound approach to economic development.”

Tim Brennan, executive director of the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, also cited agriculture as a way to create economic development from a facility that in itself won’t generate many jobs for the city.
“Can we capture the heat it gives off and create a very large-scale urban greenhouse where we could have vegetable production year-round?” he said. “That’s an asset to much of the region; many farmers are active in agricultural production but see the winter period as downtime, because the climate in New England is not conducive to growing in every season. And it could help create middle-income jobs with benefits for people in Holyoke.”
What has members of the Holyoke Innovation District Task Force — a broad partnership charged with leveraging the computing center and related downtown efforts into large-scale economic development — so excited isn’t the prospect of growing crops in a former mill. It’s that urban agriculture represents only one of many ways to make the city’s (and region’s) economy more robust.
Urban farming, said Brennan, “is an example people can get their heads around of how we can create leverage out of the computing center and get jobs and also off-site benefits that ripple positively to the regional economy. This region is disposed to being at the cutting edge, so can we use that quality to fuel more innovation, more technological entities here? And they don’t necessarily need to all be in Holyoke.”
“The strategy,” said Anderson, “is basically to determine what industries are most likely to take advantage of the assets in Holyoke and the Pioneer Valley and where they’re likely to locate. So we’re looking at economic opportunities within the Innovation District, the entire city of Holyoke, and the whole Pioneer Valley, and asking, what are the related investment pieces and strategies needed to achieve this economic potential?”

Thinking Big
The task force, Anderson explained, developed strategies with a threefold overall goal in mind: to increase and improve job opportunities for the residents of Holyoke and the Pioneer Valley, to attract an increased level of private investment into Holyoke, and to connect the green high-performance computing center and various regional assets into an integrated economic-development marketing and delivery system.
The eight broad strategies that sprung from this multi-pronged goal target different aspects of economic development, but tend to originate from strengths Holyoke already possesses. Clean-energy innovation and development is one example.
The idea is to maintain the city’s low-cost, renewable-energy-based competitive advantage by expanding the city’s portfolio of cost-effective renewable-energy generation capacity, and eventually transform Holyoke into a global leader in clean-energy research and applications. A longer-term objective is to convert that research into the widespread manufacturing of clean-energy products.
That goal makes sense in the context of Holyoke’s hydropower capacity, one of the significant factors in the computing center being located there.
“Holyoke Gas & Electric has the cheapest electrical rates in New England for industrial customers,” Anderson said. “They (center developers) saw the low-cost real estate and also wanted clean energy with hydro, and we were able to do that.”
Holyoke Mayor Elaine Pluta is certainly thinking big about Holyoke as a renewable-energy leader.
“Our overall goal is to become as close to 100% renewable energy as soon as possible,” she said. “That’s the message, and the word will get out, because we’re going to be promoting that to the economic developers and letting them know that, if they want to do green projects, this is the city to come to. The computing center is going to be a green project, and that’s going to be one of the first of many, we hope.”
Brennan has long been an advocate of moving toward renewable energy as the world’s primary source of power — and of thinking urgently about the issue.
“High energy costs, uncertainty of supplies, and threats from climate change are changing everything,” he said. “The transition from coal as the primary fuel source in this country took 30 to 50 years. I don’t think we have 30 to 50 years this time, so those parts of the country that don’t get out in front of this wave are going to fall behind it. We’ll also take that message about low energy costs and carry it as far as we can.”
Other strategies the task force has developed include:
• making the Innovation District a sort of laboratory for innovation and entrepreneurship, with assets in place to support startups;
• leveraging the region’s colleges and universities as a critical part of its talent base and reputation;
• creating more sites ready for development and redevelopment by identifying priority sites, selectively clearing and remediating abandoned properties, and providing incentives to encourage investment;
• coordinating among all regional economic-development players to streamline the processes for attracting and retaining businesses;
• creating and growing an information-technology industry cluster; and
• retaining and growing manufacturing opportunities in Holyoke by building from the city’s existing advantages, such as low-cost energy and real estate, available workforce, and transportation access.
In short, “the high-performance computing center is coming to Holyoke, so how do we leverage that opportunity?” Anderson said. “We know there’s going to be a minimal amount of jobs and no taxes — it’s a tax-exempt entity — so this task force was established to leverage this opportunity for economic-development opportunities.”
Pluta partly disputed those jobs-and-taxes claims, noting that “there will be a small amount of jobs, and we are going to be looking at a small amount of tax revenue from them. But, yes, we are mostly looking for the spinoff on that development, and it’s going to have an effect on all our economic development, especially in the immediate area.
“We already have the building across the way from [the computing center] being rehabbed for office space, and we’re looking for more of that,” she added. “We are making progress, and I’m assured that, within a short period of time, we’ll be targeting pieces of property where we anticipate seeing development and preparing those parcels for someone to come in and develop. We’re getting very close to being at that point in time.”

Scoring Opportunities
Brennan noted that the strategy part of the process is complete; “now we’re working with what’s been handed to us and trying not to fumble it, but taking it up the field to score.
“There are multiple tracks,” he noted. “What does Holyoke need to do, and what benefits can be derived locally, and what things does the region have to do, and what benefits can be derived from a regional perspective? Then there’s obviously heavy state interest in the whole property, as much as the state itself has an investment. This is sort of a surround-sound approach to economic development.”
Brennan stressed the need to prioritize. “We can’t do everything. We have to take these recommendations and assign some priorities to them, put them into time zones. What do we need to do in the short term that’s achievable? Mid-range and longer-range items need more time, but might have a more significant payoff.”
Pluta said she foresees a snowball effect once economic development related to the Innovation District begins in Holyoke, in no small part due to factors such as the city’s affordability and capacity for renewable energy.
“We want to create a climate for businesses to come, not only to Holyoke, but to the Pioneer Valley,” Anderson said. “A lot of people in Holyoke need jobs, so what kind of strategy could we use to create them? What things can we do to deal with that?”
Again, Brennan said, the idea is to determine what can be accomplished right away, and what needs to be cultivated over time.
“I think the Holyoke high-performance computing center is an attractive force, but the ability to be a magnet and pull firms from outside the region and outside Holyoke is one of the mid- or long-term targets,” he told BusinessWest. “I honestly see that, in the short term, small and mid-sized businesses are where the action is, and we have these within this region. We need to grow our own economic base in the Valley through entrepreneurship, and nurture the businesses we have and allow them to grow.”
In Brennan’s view – and he’s been observing the business culture in the Pioneer Valley for a long time – the raw materials are there.
“One of the things this work reinforces is that what matters most to all future economic development is not tax breaks, it’s not land – it’s about talent,” he said. “Talent matters most, and diversity is a close second. There are disguised opportunities here that the work of the task force has teased out.”
Anderson heartily agreed.
“I think right now, between the urban-renewal plan in our urban core and the whole Innovation District task-force strategies, there are a lot of eyes on Holyoke and how we can make a better business climate in the region,” she said. “To me, this work solidifies the things I know to be true, but we’re still trying to accomplish what’s been very difficult to accomplish.”
Still, she added, “I’m confident we have the strategy moving forward to benefit Holyoke and the region.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Law Sections

Law

Autism Legislation: What It Means for Your Child

By MELISSA R. GILLIS, Esq. and DENNIS G. Egan Jr.

Melissa R. Gillis

Melissa R. Gillis

Imagine this: an issue so big that when the governor signs a much-anticipated bill into law so many parents and families want to view the historic event that the signing has to take place at Fenway Park in Boston, instead of the State House, to accommodate the crowd.
Well, that’s exactly what happened on August 3, 2010 when Gov. Deval Patrick signed House Bill 4935 (an Act Relative to Insurance Coverage for Autism Spectrum Disorder, or ARICA) into law. As the crowd cheered, Massachusetts, finally having recognized the unfair and unreasonable burden imposed on families with children diagnosed with autism, became the 23rd state to pass such legislation.
Effective Jan. 1, 2011, private health-insurance plans, employees and retirees under the state plan, hospital service plans, and HMOs are now required to provide coverage of evidence-based, medically necessary autism therapies for diagnosed persons of all ages. After being deemed medically necessary by a doctor, coverage will include habilitative and rehabilitative treatments, psychiatric and other therapeutic care, diagnostic tests, applied behavioral analysis and health treatments, pharmaceuticals, and other care provided, prescribed, or ordered by a licensed physician or psychologist for a person on the autism spectrum, including speech, occupational therapy, and physical therapy. There is no age restriction for any of these treatments to begin or end.
Additionally, insurers cannot establish dollar-amount, annual, or lifetime service limitations on the required coverage that are less than that for other physical conditions, and they are prohibited from limiting the number of visits an individual makes to an autism-service provider. Implementation of ARICA is, however, based on each policy’s specific annual renewal date, so coverage goes into effect only when your company’s insurance plan renews after Jan. 1, 2011.
Dennis G. Egan

Dennis G. Egan

There are several types of plans, however, that are not subject to ARICA. These include self-funded plans, which are regulated by ERISA and therefore subject to federal laws, unless they comply with state laws as a matter of practice. Importantly, services received under MassHealth and CommonHealth are also not subject to ARICA.
Contacting your employer is the easiest way to determine if they are subject to this new law, and for those covered by MassHealth and CommonHealth, families with autistic children under the age of 9 can apply for the Mass. Children’s Autism Medicaid Waiver through the Department of Developmental Services. Additionally, if your plan is regulated by ERISA, the recently enacted federal health care reform contains language that will eventually cover autism treatment. Other caveats to the new law include a clause wherein insurers can opt out of providing coverage for three years if their costs rise by more than1% per year. However, this determination is to be made based on an independent review and not by the insurers themselves.
Opponents of ARICA and small-business owners argue that the cost of providing health care benefits to employees will become even more difficult for businesses already struggling to absorb rising plan premiums. Concerned that increased costs will ultimately cause business owners to offer less-quality health care packages or be reluctant to hire new employees who would be eligible for health insurance, they may have no alternative but to pass the cost along to employees.
ARICA leaves those who are skeptical asking, ‘what’s the catch?’ Many suspicious parents believe the insurance companies will use it as a way to deny claims and force parents to jump through a number of hoops before agreeing to cover services, or that some will simply give up trying. Others don’t want their children to be forced into a label of being on the autism spectrum disorder, and urge everyone to make sure there are proper medical assessments and treatments prior thereto, which seemingly is a catch-22 scenario in and of itself.
Yet advocates, including Autism Speaks, say this law is one of the most comprehensive in the nation, and will finally provide families with the relief desperately needed so that children can receive the therapies they deserve in order to meet their full developmental potential. Your child will no longer be denied, and parents will no longer have to pay out of pocket for health treatment if it’s deemed medically necessary because of an autism diagnosis. Other ARICA proponents argue that, until now, many parents were prevented from actually getting a diagnosis of autism for their child because of a lack of proper insurance coverage.
Under ARICA, educational services provided under an individualized education plan are unaffected. But while insurers are not required to pay for in-school services, studies show that, in other states that have similar legislation, towns and the states themselves end up actually saving money because, when children with autism receive appropriate treatment, more of them are likely to be able to participate in regular classes, thereby reducing the cost of expensive special-education services.
That said, as with any new law or significant change, time is required to work out the kinks, but generally speaking, Massachusetts has certainly made a huge step in the right direction with the acknowledgement that autism is a growing national health crisis, if not an epidemic, and that the time is now for insurance companies to assist families in ensuring their children get the proper treatment and care, just as they would for the flu or common cold.

Melissa R. Gillis, Esq. is an associate with Bacon Wilson, P.C. in the special education, family, and real estate departments; (413) 781-0560; [email protected] Dennis G. Egan Jr. is an associate with Bacon Wilson, P.C, concentrating in special education, business, and corporate law; (413) 781-0560; [email protected]

Company Notebook Departments

HNE Files for Decrease in Premium Rates
SPRINGFIELD — Health New England (HNE) recently filed for a decrease in rates effective Oct. 1, 2011. HNE is the only plan in the state to have filed for a decrease. Juan Campbell, vice president of sales, noted in a statement that, over the past 16 months, HNE has experienced a “slowing in the rate of increase in costs and lower utilization of services which has lowered the overall medical trend.” Campbell added that medical trends drive approximately 90% of costs, while 10% covers administrative costs. “We are pleased to be in a position to pass on a reduction to individuals and employers,” he said. HNE, a provider-sponsored plan, is majority-owned by Baystate Health (approximately 97%), and the remaining 3% is held by independent practicing physicians in Western Mass. “We believe that to be successful in controlling health care costs requires a partnership between the health plan, the health care delivery system, and engagement with the member/patient,” added Peter Straley, HNE president and CEO.

Mercy Medical Center Scores High in Two National Rankings of Hospitals
SPRINGFIELD — Mercy Medical Center has been ranked in U.S. News Media & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” rankings, available online at www.usnews.com/besthospitals. The rankings, annually published by U.S. News for the past 22 years, will also be featured in the U.S. News Best Hospitals guidebook, which will go on sale August 30. The latest rankings showcase 720 hospitals out of about 5,000 hospitals nationwide. Each is ranked among the country’s top hospitals in at least one medical specialty. Mercy ranked as high-performing in urology. “At Mercy Medical Center, we continuously strive for clinical excellence through the delivery of high-quality care. The U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of Mercy Medical Center among the nation’s best hospitals provides additional validation of our team’s success in providing the highest quality of patient care,” said Daniel Moen, president and CEO of the Sisters of Providence Health System. In other news, Mercy Medical Center has once again been recognized as a Top 100 Community Value hospital by Cleverley + Associates of Columbus, Ohio, a leading health care financial consulting firm specializing in operational benchmarking and performance-enhancement strategies. Mercy’s designation  is noted in the independent organization’s recent publication, State of the Hospital Industry — 2011 Edition. “The concept of health care value has become increasing important to payers, employers, and individuals, not just here in Massachusetts, but also across the country,” said Moen. “Mercy Medical Center’s reputation for providing high quality care at a reasonable cost has again been independently validated by the presentation of both the Community Value 100 and Community Value Five Star Awards. At  Mercy Medical Center, we believe that providing high-quality care is the right thing to do for our patients. As experts in medical economics have demonstrated, high-quality care actually costs less.”

Baystate Medical Center Recognized as a ‘High-performing Hospital’ in Report
SPRINGFIELD — Baystate Medical Center is recognized as Massachusetts’ top hospital outside of Boston based on the most high-performing specialties, according to the latest edition of the U.S. News Media & World Reports 2011-12 Best Hospitals rankings. The rankings, annually published by U.S. News for the past 22 years, listed Baystate Medical Center as “high-performing” in the following specialties: cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, geriatrics, gynecology, nephrology, orthopedics, pulmonology, urology, and ear, nose, and throat. The latest rankings showcase 720 hospitals out of about 5,000 hospitals nationwide. Each is ranked among the country’s top hospitals in at least one medical specialty and/or ranked among the best hospitals in its metro area. “We are proud to be recognized by U.S. News and World Report for the quality of care we provide to patients right here in Western Mass. Baystate Medical Center has invested significantly in our quality and safety programs, and we are gratified by this recognition,” said Dr. Evan Benjamin, the hospital’s senior vice president of Healthcare Quality.

Big Y Opens New Store in Meriden
SPRINGFIELD —  State and community officials attended a cake-cutting ceremony Aug. 25 as Big Y Foods opened its newest World Class Market at 533 South Broad St. in Meriden, Conn. The 55,500-square-foot market was completely refurbished after being vacated by its former operator. The new Big Y reflects today’s modern supermarket standards along with an in-store pharmacy, prepared meals section, and eat-in café. Bowdoin Construction of Needham served as general contractor for this expansion in conjunction with several local subcontractors for the completion of the $3 million project. As part of Big Y’s grand reopening celebration, 15 schools in Meriden will each receive a check for $500 as part of the company’s longstanding commitment to education.

WMECo, Employees Assist Tornado Victims
SPRINGFIELD — Western Massachusetts Electric Co. (WMECo) and its employees recently contributed $28,600 to the American Red Cross Pioneer Valley Chapter and the Salvation Army to assist victims of the severe storms and tornado that struck Western Mass. on June 1, and for future disaster relief initiatives. “Many of our customers experienced unprecedented losses and disruptions to their lives,” said Peter Clarke, WMECo president and CEO. “We’re privileged to be able to help those organizations that are providing such essential services to the residents of the affected communities.” A check for $13,600 will be presented to the Red Cross, and $15,000 will be donated to the Salvation Army. The contributions are from WMECo employees; members of the Greater Springfield Reliability Project team, including its contractor, Burns & McDonnell; and corporate donations.

Chicopee Savings Bank Awards Scholarships
CHICOPEE — The Chicopee Savings Bank Charitable Foundation recently awarded six scholarships, each for $3,000, to eligible high-school students attending one of eight participating high schools within the market area. Scholarships were awarded to Amanda Pierce, graduate of Ware Jr./Sr. High School; Allison O’Shea, Chicopee High School; Kyle Benoit, Ludlow High School; Kaitlyn Baranowski, South Hadley High School; Trent Domingos, Chicopee Comprehensive High School; and Alyssa Sawyer, West Springfield High School. For the fifth year, this program replaced the Chicopee Savings Bank Medallion Scholarship Program, which was established in 1976 in conjunction with the nation’s bicentennial celebration. After 30 years in existence, an estimated $80,000 was awarded to high-school students residing in Chicopee.

Credit Union, CES Create Partnership to Assist Students
AMHERST — The UMass Five College Credit Union and the Collaborative for Educational Services (CES) have formed a unique partnership to provide loans to eligible students enrolled in the CES educator licensure and graduate programs. The collaborative offers programs leading to initial licensure in a wide variety of subjects, including high-need areas such as special education, English as a second language, science, and math. The loan offers a variable interest rate and terms up to seven years. Payment deferments are also available. The maximum loan amount is $20,000. Students enrolled in any CES program are eligible to join the credit union and apply for the financing opportunity. “Over the next few years, many teachers who are Baby Boomers are going to retire, opening up a lot of jobs in the educational field,” said Phyllis White, director of programs for the Franklin Hampshire Career Center. “With the new loan program, students enrolled in the collaborative’s licensure programs can get the financial help they need to enter teaching or school administration careers.” For more information on the loan program, visit www.umassfive.org/ces_student_loan. For more about the CES licensure program, visit www.techinmass.org.

MassMutual Webcast Attendance Up
SPRINGFIELD — More than 800 retirement-plan advisors and sponsors attended the recent “Plan Health and Retirement Readiness” webcast hosted by PLANSPONSOR magazine and sponsored by MassMutual Retirement Services. The informational webcast addressed two key challenges facing the retirement industry today — the importance of measuring plan health and helping plan participants prepare for retirement. Presenters reviewed the critical characteristics of the new retirement plan and discussed ways that plan advisors and sponsors can help improve overall plan health, prepare participants for retirement, and fulfill their fiduciary responsibilities. An integral part of this framework, the MassMutual PlanSmart Analysis report, allows advisors and sponsors to gauge the health of a plan by assessing the percentage of employees likely to have enough income in retirement. And for participants, the RetireSmart Ready tool provides a simple way to assess their personal level of retirement readiness. “The outstanding attendance of this webcast signifies how important the topics of plan health and retirement readiness are to the retirement services industry today,” said Elaine Sarsynski, executive vice president of MassMutual’s Retirement Services Division and chairman and CEO of MassMutual International LLC.

Central Scores High in Ranking of High Schools
SPRINGFIELD — The Washington Post recently recognized Springfield Central High School among the top of all academic high schools in the United States, citing the school’s strong commitment to preparing students for college as a key factor in its rating. Principal Thaddeus Tokarz said the school is elated by the good news. “This is a huge accomplishment and a testament to all of the tireless hours our students and staff put in every day,” said Tokarz, adding that the ranking places Central in the nation’s top 5% of high schools. “It affirms we are on the right track toward our goal to be one of the top high schools in the country by 2015. This is a terrific step along the way.” The ranking by the Post places the school as one of the top 1,900 academic high schools in the country, and identifies the school as a national leader in college preparation. Over the past five years, the number of Central High School students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses more than doubled going from 222 to 517. And Central High School students’ performance on Advanced Placement examinations outpaces the national average. Advanced Placement classes are college-level courses that earn high school students college credit upon successful completion.

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the month of August 2011.

AGAWAM

Bonavita Law Office
1775 Main St.
Anthony Bonavita

Jack Patterson Medical Sales
77 Debra Lane
Jack Patterson

Pondside Garage
704 Springfield St.
John Warren

Pure Power RF
50 Witheridge St.
Fred Stefanik

Silver Leaf Enterprises, LLC
36 Danny Lane
Bradley Wright

AMHERST

Game Central Station
220 North Pleasant St.
Younis Ghulam

Minuteman Cleaners Inc.
5 Pray St.
Moon J. Chang

V.I.D. Nail
181B University Dr.
Huy N. Thai

Winsome Smiles
50 Autumn Lane
Danielle Intile

CHICOPEE

Accounting Solutions
64 Robin Ridge Road
Traci Hopkins

Cosmo Cut & Style Salon
1890 Memorial Dr.
Viet N. Nguyen

Royal Coach Limousines, LLC
658 Fuller Road
John Garcia

HADLEY

Easy Mattress Stores, LLC
206 Russell St.
Paul Neto

Gomes Homes Health Care
18 New Lane
Ester Gomes

HOLYOKE

All in One Plus
92 Suffolk St.
Javier Rosa

B & V Automotive
101 North Bridge St.
Robert S. Vogel

M & L Car Audio & Clothing Accessories
119 High St.
Miguel A. Vega

Points East Accupuncture and Herbal Medicine
4 Open Square Way
Mark Mamuszka

The Hair Place
103 Chapin St.
Ronald E. Holland

NORTHAMPTON

L & T Respess Books
136 West St.
Linwood Respess

Pilar’s Cleaning Service
51 Con St.
Pilar Serpa

Kelli @ Continuous Creations
30 North Maple St.
Kelli Richardson

SOUTHWICK

Dang Shades
45 Rosewood Lane

Jimmy’s Pizza
81 Point Grove Road
K & S Restaurant Group, LLC

NWST, LLC
267 Hillside Road
Ralph Depalma

Silvercrest Farm
233 Mortvining Road
Paul Gregoire

Splatter Room
108 Congamond Road
Jeffrey Caron

SPRINGFIELD

M & P Cleaning Services
49 Ranney St.
Michely Acevedo

Omar’s Fashion
469 Main St.
Djibrilla Bonkano

Orchard Medical Associate
835 Worcester St.
Kevin Epstein

P & J Rentals
31 Florida St.
Jack Rodrigues

Pea Soup Catering
183 Emerson St.
Dianna Lemieux

Quick Pic Convenience Store
1343 Carew St.
Amir M. Paracha

Radiance Wellness Center
108 Dartmouth St.
Will G. Llewellyn

Santos Home Repair
76 Edgement St.
Jesus M. Santos

Smartalk
351 Bridge St.
Leonard Weitz

The Onlinebiz
55 Revere St.
Ormond Husbands

Town Pizza
459 Main St.
Waqar S. Khokhar

Travel Adventures
26 Hanson Dr.
Yelena Vatnikova

Wicked Tan
1760 Boston Road
Anna M. Major

WESTFIELD

DAS Alarm Systems Inc.
845 Airport Industrial Park Road
David Schenna

Debbie Reynolds Dance Academy
132 Elm St.
Debbie Reynolds

Guidance for Inner Peace
509 Southwick Road
Janice Pagano

Mayflowers at Pilgrim Candle Market Place
16 Union Ave.
Melissa Fouche

Menard Construction & Design
46 Stuart Place
Dennis Menard

P & C Group
50 Castle Hill Road
Paul Byrne

Patriot Freightliner Western Star, LLC
910 Southampton Road
Deborah Barss

Real China
116 Elm St.
Bizhen Zhu

Roberts Construction
31 Valley View Dr.
Jeffrey Roberts

Salvador’s Engraving and Awards
22 North Cherry St.
Bernadette Salvador Toomey

Shaker Farms Country Club
866 Shaker Road
Daniel Kotowicz

Tina Escalante Cleaning Service
80 George St.
Tina F. Escalante

TSC International
20 Camelot Lane
Todd S. Cieplinski

Western Mass Alliance
21-25 Montgomery St.
Brandon Palmer

Yellow Stonehouse Farm
354 Root Road
Constance Adams

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Absolute Transportation
59 Day St.
Ismat Niyazov

Agawam Melody Band
181 Park Ave.
George W. David

Anthony Wheeler Real Estate
116 Cedar Woods Glenn
Anthony Wheeler

Avada Hearing Care Center
459 Riverdale St.
Edbar Corporation Inc.

Capital Enterprises
172 Harwich Road
Arthur A. Arena

Discount Medical Depot, LLC
70 Windsor ST.
John Crean

Entre Computer Center
138 Memorial Ave.
P.C. Enterprises Inc.

HGL Transport
59 Lowell St.
Latipsha Kaimov

Kozar Realty, LLC
70 Greystone Ave.
Steven Kozar

LTG, Inc.
41 Oleander St.
Rachel L. Aibee

Mass Trans Insurance Agency
54 Oleander St.
Roman Shtetan

Music Tuitions
66 Irving St.
Mera Goroshit

Quality Appraisal Company
73 Rogers Ave.
Donald C. Pinkerman

The Friendly Barber Shop
90 Elm St.
Daniel V. Dineen

The Klassic Beauty Spot
2003 Riverdale St.
Sukhpal Kaur

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
Tayisha Guzman v. Chicopee Village Townhouses
Allegation: Negligent maintenance of property, causing slip and fall: $3,389.33
Filed: 6/30/11

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
Edwin Diaz v. CSX Intermobil Inc.
Allegation: Defendant misclassified as an independent contractor instead of employee, transferring numerous costs unlawfully from the defendant to the plaintiff: $495,463.91
Filed: 4/25/11

Geodesign Inc. v. Purcell Associates and the Town of West Springfield
Allegation: Collection of outstanding fees for design services rendered on a construction project: $1,090,295
Filed: 4/20/11

Peter Mayberry v. Allcare Dental Management Inc.
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $50,000+
Filed: 4/27/11

Ted Ondrick Company, LLC v. Green River Development, LLC
Allegation: Non-payment of paving services rendered: $25,350.30
Filed: 5/6/11

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Rose P. Gamin v. Five Star Aviation Inc.
Allegation: Crash of aircraft due to negligence of maintenance facility: $65,000
Filed: 7/18/11

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
JP Elastomerics Corp. v. Soltech Inc.
Allegation: Breach of contract and failure to pay commission: $16,646.80
Filed: 6/14/11

Shawn Mineau and Kevin Mullen v. Decosino Construction and Five Star Building Construction
Allegation: Failure to pay prevailing wages: $25,000
Filed: 6/9/11

Michael Elbery v. City Tire Inc.
Allegation: Unfair and deceptive trade practices and fraud: $10,000
Filed: 6/27/11

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Advanta Bank Corp. v. Alpha Builders Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment on credit account: $10,533.95
Filed: 6/19/11

Arthur C. Lamb Co. Inc. v. National Maintenance and Service Corp.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $8,417.37
Filed: 6/3/11

Beacon Sales Co. v. Keith G. Roy Home Improvement and Construction
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $10,629.76
Filed: 6/19/11

BSI, LLC v. Tigar Refrigeration Co., LLC
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $9,123.72
Filed: 6/19/11

Catherine Nguyen v. Faces of Phobia
Allegation: Plaintiff was injured after being struck in the face by another patron who was startled and trying to flee: $24,999.99
Filed: 6/6/11

Concord Electrical Supply Limited v. Precision Electric Enterprise, LLC
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $22,243.99
Filed: 6/24/11

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Industrial Air Solutions v. Creative Hardware Floors Inc.
Allegation: Enforcement of a previous judgment: $5,488.54
Filed: 6/3/11

Bankruptcies Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Allen, John E.
143 Ardsley Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 11
Filing Date: 07/09/11

Alukonis, David P.
616 Cottage St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Alvarado, Carmen I.
311 Columba St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/11/11

Alvarado, Pedro
405 Allen Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/11

Baker, Jason Allen
Baker, Carrie Lyn
60 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Beach, Diane Rita
240 East St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/06/11

Belanger, Donald A.
Belanger, Evelyn C.
a/k/a Poteralski, Evelyn C.
27 West St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Bellofatto, Mark A.
Bellofatto, Kristen T.
105 Via Maria
Lee, MA 01238
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Belyshev, Stanislau
Belyshev, Lyudmila
56 Federal St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/13/11

Brewster, William R.
Brewster, Janet T.
19 Muzzy St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Cairns, Thomas C.
30 Willow Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Cavanaugh, Susan F.
59 Los Angeles St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Champagne, Donald
115 Wilton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Chase, Susan S.
a/k/a Cohen, Susan Chase
1070 West Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/11

Collins, Raymond J.
53 Liberty St.
North Adams, MA 01247
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Conception, Luz E.
15 North Summer St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Cook, Janice M.
52 Kendall St.
Granby, MA 01033
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Cordi-Allen, Barbara M.
143 Ardsley Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 11
Filing Date: 07/09/11

Cortes, Zahiara C.
82 Roberto Clemente St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Coviello, Scott C.
a/k/a Knight, Scott
Coviello, Marcy V.
125 South Loomis
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Crockwell, Jason M.
102 Brown St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/05/11

Dean, Gary E
Of Sports, Gary Dean D/ Sorts
37 Enterprise St.
Adams, MA 01220
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Delgado, Ramon A.
Delgado, Marina A.
660 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Dodge, Christopher James
Dodge, Yvette Marie
17 Mountain Road
Gill, MA 01354
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Dumas, Nicole
a/k/a Lowell, Nicole J.D.
23 Yvonne St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Ellery, Sheryll Ann
48 Demont Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Flagg, Joseph M.
PO Box 233
South Barre, MA 01074
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Fournier, Mary Ellen
72 Witheridge
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Garstka, Gregory Frank
Garstka, Nancy Kay
a/k/a Garstka, Sunshine
10 Tammy Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Gilsinger, Michael R.
Gilsinger, Krystal L.
a/k/a Ouellette, Krystal L.
14 Wayne St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Haber Home Improvement
Haber, Fred C.
Haber, Alice
1 Lansing Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/11

Hamel, Sandra
671 Springfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Haskins, Thomas L.
Haskins, Terri J.
a/k/a Moore, Terri J
5 Sanders St., Apt. D
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Heap, Donna M.
34 Pearl St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Herman, Leta Gwen
122/130 Old Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Hindle, John M.
Hindle, Beverly A.
17 Taylor St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Hopkins, Marie D.
383 East River St. Apt. #5
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Johnson, Barbara L.
110 Wheeler Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Keepin It Local
Michelin, Omer R.
Michelin, Sandra-Ann M.
161 West Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/11

Kleczek, Gregory T.
439 Prospect St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Kopacsy, Margaret S.
167 Hanson Dr.
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/11/11

Kuzminski, Casimir
Kuzminski, Doris
27 Bennett Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/11

Lanouette, Karen M.
a/k/a Rust, Karen
39 Robinson Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Lanouette, Philippe J.
39 Robinson Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Latham, Henry Francis
17 Moody Bridge Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Ledgard, John P.
Ledgard, Maria J.
185 Simonds St.
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/09/11

Lemieux, James A.
604 Poole St
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Leroux, Kevin
1241 New Braintree Road
Oakham, MA 01068
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/06/11

Longto, Dennis Norman
27 Crooked Ledge Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Longto, Raya Chandreyee
a/k/a Ontanada, Raya C.
P.O.Box 204
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Mahon, Patrick R.
50 Tyringham Road
Lee, MA 01238
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Mann, Brian M.
669 Dewey St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Martin, Martha H.
32 Pascal Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/11/11

Mathieu, Amy Beth
20 Beaver Dr.
South Deerfield, MA 01373
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/11

McAlister, Noeline R.
a/k/a Symons, Noeline
a/k/a Ahsha, Neline
97 Lincoln St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

McGale, David J.
7 Constitution Ave.
Warren, MA 01083
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Milfort, Peter M.
Milfort, Marjorie L.
a/k/a Armitage, Marjorie L.
86 Fuller St. #15
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Miner, Raymond
Miner, Diane M.
92 Massachusetts Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Mongeau, Christopher L.
9 Ralph Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/06/11

Mosijchuk, Nadezhda
38 Spencer St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

MT Trucking Co., Inc.
457 Old Dana Road
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Myers, Deborah
88 Rondeau St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Myers, Philip J.
88 Rondeau St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Naumowicz, Lori A.
13 Benefit St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Niedzielski, Joseph D.
Niedzielski, Cynthia B.
25 Northampton St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Ohlson, Beryl Elizabeth
34 Greenleaves Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/11/11

O’Neal, Michael S.
a/k/a Oneale, Michael S.
1130 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Page-Lacoff, Teri O.
38 Pomeroy St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/11

Palmer, Deborah Ann
28 Bridge St.
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Paquin, Lester W.
120 Pleasant St.
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/04/11

Parks, Neal Stuart
122/130 Old Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/12/11

Patridge, Gordon W.
Landers-Patridge, Donna L.
15 Dugan Road
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Pitts, Victoria Ann
252 Chestnut St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/06/11

Porter, Ronald N.
Porter, Elizabeth Tomaya
3 Birch Knoll Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/07/11

Potter, Nancy R.
82 Lathrop St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/05/11

Pouliot, Jeffrey
Pouliot, Faith M.
a/k/a Robare, Faith
786 East Mountain Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Rahal, Ali
5 High St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Roache, Donald R.
82 Fargo St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/11/11

Roes, Robert N.
Roes, Sandra E.
10 Third Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/07/11

Russell, Theodore C.
Russell, Lisa D.
32 Shirley St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095-2000
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/05/11

Sandgren, William
Sandgren, Heather
202 Brookfield Road
Warren, MA 01083
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Santiago, Arcangel
245 Orange St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/01/11

Sias, Annemarie
a/k/a Spear-Sias, Annmarie
155 Woodland Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 07/05/11

Smith, Philip Todd
70 Shumway St., A-1
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/11/11

Soares, Isabel M.
21 Bristol St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/11/11

Soto, Anthony
10 James St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Sponberg, Julieanne
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/05/11

Stefanelli, Paul T.
Stefanelli, Candice S.
14 Como Drive
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/05/11

Stratton, Micah P.
Stratton, Diana L.
660 East River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Tom’s Siding and Window
Breault, Thomas J.
Breault, Michele
4 Huntington Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 06/30/11

Total Property Maintenance
O’Brien, Daniel S.
O’Brien, Deborah A.
a/k/a Janik, Deborah A.
88 Butternut St.
Springfield, MA 01128-1049
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Turcotte, Raymond G.
52 Littleville Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/15/11

Turner, Kimberly M.
a/k/a Broussard, Kimberly Marie
8 Conifer Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/08/11

Vandini, Judy Ann
1286 Granby Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/13/11

Weinberg, James
Weinberg, Helene
1072 Stony Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/14/11

Zantouliadis, George
20 Hampton Terrace
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 07/11/11