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Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — United Way of Pioneer Valley (UWPV) invites the public to a scary good time at its annual Boo Bash. This year, it will be held in Tower Square Park, next to the TDBank building in Springfield, on Sunday, Oct. 30 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Children and their families will enjoy music with a local DJ, pumpkin decorating, glitter tattoos, face painting, local food trucks, live animals from the Zoo in Forest Park (sponsored by NAI Plotkin), a magician, community tabling, and more. Dress up in your best costumes and join in the fun.

UWPV is seeking volunteers to assist during the day with setup and tabling. Anyone who would like to help with this community event should contact Alisha Santiago at (413) 693-0238 or [email protected]

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

CHICOPEE

JBC Distribution Inc., 21 Taxiway Dr., Chicopee, MA, 01022. Chad H. Weatherwax, 59 Fernwood Dr., Windsor Locks, CT 06090. Bakery delivery services.

EAST LONGMEADOW

R.C. Open Look Officiating Inc., 11 Susan St., East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Ryan Corbett, same. Basketball officiating services.

FEEDING HILLS

Tim’s Concrete Services Inc., 85 Twin Oak Road, Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Timofey Pchelka, same. Concrete contractor.

GRANBY

Mcgrann Enterprises Inc., 90 Carver St., Granby, MA 01033. Richard Mcgrann, same. Gutter installation and cleaning services.

LONGMEADOW

AI Academy Corp., 126 Pinewood Dr., Longmeadow, MA 01106. Charles Li, same. Corporation provides low-cost or free computer science related educational and consulting services for local, regional, state, national or even global level communities.

MONSON

RTL Development Inc., 149 Stafford Road, Monson, MA 01057. Ron Florek, same. Land development general contractor.

NORTH ADAMS

70 West Main St. Inc., 70 West Main St., North Adams, MA 01247. Alector Furtado Tavares, 85 Maryknoll St., Mattapan, MA 02126. Real estate investments.

NORTHAMPTON

Song Sparrow Farm Inc., 140 Meadow St., Northampton, MA 01062. Anthony Patrick Hall, same. Produce farm.

PITTSFIELD

Clearyst Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Christopher Robinson, same. Parent company in the ESG technology space whose intention is to acquire smaller subsidiary companies and provide them with centralized services.

Easnott Inc., 987 North St., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Desiree Eason, same. Provides in home services to those who are living on their own in the community and/or those who need 24-hour care or supervision.

Espetinho Carioca Inc., 48B North St., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Osmar Salles De Melo, 149 Dalton Ave., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Restaurant.

Meliora Therapeutics Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Sute 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Yuan David Li, 1126 Carlton Ave. Menlo Park, CA 94025. Cancer drug research and development.

Mental Health Support for Families Inc., 341 West St., 32-02, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Celencia Hill-Gladden, same. Contract, rent, buy, or sell personal or real property.

SOUTH HADLEY

Big Black Man Project Inc., 22 Carriage, South Hadley, MA 01075. Charles L. Greene II, same. Organization created to inspire and support the community, and a desire for actions to speak louder than words. We exist to change the world by providing black men with a platform to share their stories of hope, disappointment, patriotism, and resilience.

SOUTHWICK

C & G Crane Worx Inc., 22 Fred Jackson Road, Southwick, MA 01077. William Granfield, same. Large machinery-lifting, transport, installation.

SPRINGFIELD

Higher Expectations Corp., 49 Cadwell Dr., Springfield, MA 01104. Jordan Almore, same. Gym.

Jeffrey Place Foundation Inc., 32 Hampden St Ground Floor, Springfield MA 01103. Jeffrey W. Gaskill, same. Helps special need teenagers and adults with part-time or full-time living arrangements.

Kwik Fix Auto Body Inc., 10 Dickinson St., Springfield, MA 01108. Melissa Davila, 491 Allen St., Springfield, MA 01118. Auto body repair.

Quantum Incentives Inc., 1350 Main St., Suite 900, Springfield, MA 01103. Kasey Callender, 111 Pond View Dr. Springfield, MA 01118. The installation, maintenance, and marketing of energy-efficient equipment; to buy, sell, and hold real estate.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Trio Cleaning Service Inc., 431 Rogers Ave., West Springfield, MA 01089. Glaucia C. Rodrigues De Araujo, same. Commercial and residential cleaning services.

Birdy Ann T Designs Inc., 1187 Westfield St., Apt. 8, West Springfield, MA 01089. Tasha Thompson, same. Hand-crafted items for E-commerce sales.

The Buckman Institute for Psychological Health Inc., 10 Central St., Suite 30, West Springfield, MA 01089. Lisa Buckman, 13 Mechanic St., Apt .2 Westfield, MA 01085. Private psychotherapy practice.

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

259-A Hawley Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $334,000
Buyer: Ellen Leue
Seller: Paul R. Sabin
Date: 08/09/22

BERNARDSTON

43 Eden Trail
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $276,000
Buyer: A. Joseph Papazian
Seller: Viguers, Doris K., (Estate)
Date: 08/18/22

BUCKLAND

128 State St.
Buckland, MA 01370
Amount: $531,500
Buyer: Peter R. Allard
Seller: Marsha B. Rossi RET
Date: 08/15/22

CONWAY

221 Thompson Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $254,000
Buyer: Virginia V. Yu
Seller: Joseph J. Giandalone
Date: 08/19/22

149 Whately Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $580,000
Buyer: Carolyn S. Macchiavelli
Seller: Emily A. Edwards
Date: 08/08/22

DEERFIELD

638 Greenfield Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Christopher Mason
Seller: A. J. Wondoloski TR
Date: 08/12/22

91 Hawks Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $752,500
Buyer: Scott D. Minckler
Seller: Andrew M. Hufnagel
Date: 08/10/22

9 Jones Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Kady J. Flanagan
Seller: Richard E. Thornton
Date: 08/08/22

47 Lee Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $234,215
Buyer: Wilmington Trust
Seller: Janet M. Filarey
Date: 08/12/22

Merrigan Way
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Nupro LLC
Seller: Town Of Deerfield
Date: 08/15/22

10 Settright Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Namgyal Yangkhab
Seller: Kiel V. McAvoy
Date: 08/19/22

45 Sawmill Plain Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $525,000
Buyer: Johannah E. Morrison
Seller: Neal E. Leno
Date: 08/08/22

36 Sugarloaf St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Sarah Fuller
Seller: Jacqueline S. Beauvais
Date: 08/19/22

GILL

4 Munns Ferry Road
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Christopher Urgiel
Seller: John M. Monska
Date: 08/09/22

29 Riverview Dr.
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Dillon S. Dudek
Seller: Patricia A. Thompson
Date: 08/16/22

95 West Gill Road
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Seth P. Tuler
Seller: Betsy J. Burnham
Date: 08/12/22

GREENFIELD

193 Barton Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Matthew Roy
Seller: Nathan Santerre
Date: 08/19/22

71 Beacon St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Rebecca Messineo
Seller: Lisa A. Haag
Date: 08/17/22

73 Birch St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Jennifer Shropshire
Seller: Craig D. Ryan
Date: 08/12/22

291 Chapman St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Cayla Plasse
Seller: Paul F. Sirum
Date: 08/08/22

106 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Alice Timmons
Seller: William J. Pugliese
Date: 08/10/22

29 Highland Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $915,000
Buyer: Alexa Beach
Seller: Carl G. Burwick
Date: 08/12/22

32 Homestead Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $299,900
Buyer: Tamarin Butcher
Seller: Wendy M. Harris
Date: 08/11/22

31 Linden Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Rachel M. Fish
Seller: Jessica M. Matteson
Date: 08/11/22

274 Shelburne Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Josephine Barrale
Seller: Richard J. Bernier
Date: 08/16/22

15 Washington St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Nicole Lyskawa
Seller: Steven Podlesny
Date: 08/12/22

53 Wildwood Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $282,000
Buyer: Laura M. Place
Seller: David J. Scarfe
Date: 08/12/22

HAWLEY

12 Pudding Hollow Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Jill R. Behringer
Seller: Bryan W. Clark
Date: 08/09/22

MONTAGUE

1 K St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: Jeffrey C. Singleton
Seller: Molongoski, Edmund C., (Estate)
Date: 08/10/22

67 Oakman St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $381,500
Buyer: Viktor Iakimov
Seller: Scott D. Minckler
Date: 08/15/22

11 Poplar St.
Montague, MA 01301
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Sam McGullam
Seller: Gerry G. Simons
Date: 08/16/22

 

NORTHFIELD

291 Birnam Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Brett W. Smith
Seller: Thomas Aquinas College
Date: 08/12/22

424 Old Wendell Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Kevin Barnes
Seller: Victoria Anderson
Date: 08/11/22

ORANGE

199 East Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: M3 Innovations Inc.
Seller: 199 East Main Street Inc.
Date: 08/19/22

245 Hayden St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Herve R. Maillet
Seller: Jay M. Guilmette
Date: 08/10/22

162 Memory Lane
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $339,900
Buyer: Roger Farrow
Seller: Dana Soroka
Date: 08/12/22

48 Putnam St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $208,500
Buyer: Danielle M. Pellon
Seller: Wendy J. Labonte
Date: 08/19/22

150 Quabbin Blvd.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: 150 Quabbin Boulevard LLC
Seller: Peter A. Gerry
Date: 08/11/22

27 Winter St.
Orange, MA 01331
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Ronald J. Comeau
Seller: Oakland Development Co. LLC
Date: 08/08/22

SHELBURNE

21 High St.
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $525,000
Buyer: Douglas R. Engle
Seller: Richard G. Muller
Date: 08/10/22

SHUTESBURY

9 Birch Dr.
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Philip J. Parker
Seller: Ruben Magdaleno
Date: 08/09/22

13 Great Pines Dr. Ext.
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $266,750
Buyer: Amanda L. Nash
Seller: Victoria Feyre-Febonio
Date: 08/10/22

44 Old Egypt Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Brice O. Hereford
Seller: David A. Durham
Date: 08/15/22

 

SUNDERLAND

192 Hadley Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Hector L. Toruno
Seller: Yan Y. Ma
Date: 08/11/22

WARWICK

8 Chestnut Hill Road
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $434,900
Buyer: Andrew M. Pratt
Seller: Scott D. Walker
Date: 08/12/22

44 Hemlock Lane
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $333,000
Buyer: Agnes H. Piscopo FT
Seller: George W. Timmons
Date: 08/17/22

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

32 Alexander Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Maitri Patel
Seller: Anthony F. Grassetti
Date: 08/11/22

20 Barry St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $323,000
Buyer: Miranda M. Jurras
Seller: S. Massoia Fairway TR
Date: 08/12/22

156 Barry St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Kevin M. Martin
Seller: Louis R. Poirier
Date: 08/11/22

77 Cricket Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: Corey A. Malaquias
Seller: Richard J. Oc’Connell
Date: 08/09/22

47 Edward St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Christopher R. Colitti
Seller: Golden Gorillas LLC
Date: 08/12/22

80 Granger Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Stephanie R. Whitley
Seller: Timothy R. Sterner
Date: 08/18/22

26 Harvey Johnson Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $263,000
Buyer: Ryan Cullen
Seller: Kathleen S. Werner
Date: 08/19/22

492 North St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Kyle A. Paro
Seller: Kevin E. Paro
Date: 08/19/22

92 Poplar St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $1,100,000
Buyer: Prestige World Wide Enterprises LLC
Seller: Chabot & Parrelli Realty Inc.
Date: 08/19/22

183 School St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $366,000
Buyer: Sarah L. Landry
Seller: Francis E. Carmel
Date: 08/18/22

31 Strawberry Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Erman Acar
Seller: Vladimir Zamotayev
Date: 08/08/22

30 Tom St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Tiffany L. Gibson
Seller: Fitzgerald Home Solutions LLC
Date: 08/12/22

BLANDFORD

54 Gibbs Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $840,000
Buyer: Jarom D. Olson
Seller: Michael Peay
Date: 08/19/22

BRIMFIELD

Dunhamtown Brimfield Road Lot 3
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Brian Sacerdote
Seller: Hull Forestlands LP
Date: 08/19/22

160 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $374,900
Buyer: Taryn Gray-Storey
Seller: Hannah T. Lazo
Date: 08/19/22

CHESTER

74 Kinnebrook Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Jan C. Almquist
Seller: Nicholas A. Schwartz
Date: 08/10/22

CHICOPEE

49 Alfred St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Christopher W. Warner
Seller: Cynthia L. Forsythe
Date: 08/19/22

111 Artisan St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: David E. MacNeil
Seller: Joanna Giec
Date: 08/12/22

243 Basil Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Daniel Ruiz
Seller: Alyson A. Wilk
Date: 08/12/22

31 Beverly St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Josefa M. Cruz
Seller: Dariusz P. Drap
Date: 08/19/22

70 Bourbeau St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Taner T. Scott
Seller: Amanda E. Gaulin
Date: 08/11/22

223 Broadway St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Elizel Martinez
Seller: Andrew S. Lawton
Date: 08/12/22

444 Broadway St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $422,000
Buyer: Rossana M. Sandoval
Seller: Highland Mountain Ventures LLC
Date: 08/12/22

729 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: BBTD Inc.
Seller: Munsing Ridge Realty LLC
Date: 08/17/22

105 Davenport St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jacek Klosowski
Seller: Luiz Edward A., (Estate)
Date: 08/09/22

315 Front St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Pah Properties LLC
Seller: Andrew Boryczka
Date: 08/12/22

102 Frontenac St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Kasha M. Wint
Seller: David Medina
Date: 08/12/22

1480 Granby Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Yadira Kazimova
Seller: Leliose C. Benoit
Date: 08/16/22

29 Jacob St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Bryan A. Torres
Seller: Kasie A. Provencal
Date: 08/15/22

281 James St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Andrew T. Argenio
Seller: Vantage Home Buyers LLC
Date: 08/12/22

47 Joy St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Dharmeshkumar R. Patel
Seller: Oussama M. Awkal
Date: 08/19/22

48 Laclede Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Shawn C. Runyon
Seller: Ashley E. Tavares
Date: 08/15/22

23 Louise Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Fernando Carvalho
Seller: Petraniuk, M. J., (Estate)
Date: 08/19/22

1361 Memorial Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $1,100,000
Buyer: G&E Jennings Bypass Trust
Seller: NVA Memorial Drive LLC
Date: 08/16/22

44 Oakwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Flora M. Bergeron
Seller: Arthur E. Geoffroy
Date: 08/19/22

23 Pleasant St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Skyspec Holdings LLC
Seller: Manuel A. Salgado
Date: 08/15/22

155 Royal St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Andrea Laviolette
Seller: Abigail Lynn
Date: 08/12/22

24 Sandtrap Way
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $502,000
Buyer: Ethan J. Goldberg
Seller: Jesse A. Wells
Date: 08/19/22

96 Stedman St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $251,000
Buyer: John J. Daley
Seller: Mark R. Willemain
Date: 08/16/22

214 Wheatland Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Dheyaa A. Zaidan
Seller: Mark F. Dubilo
Date: 08/08/22

29 Wintworth St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $229,000
Buyer: Davila Enterprises LLC
Seller: Robert Bonneau
Date: 08/10/22

86 Woodstock St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Nelson Garcia
Seller: Pierrette M. Cote
Date: 08/15/22

22 Yale St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Abimael Robles
Seller: Cameron Danalis
Date: 08/11/22

EAST LONGMEADOW

21 Baldwin St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $807,500
Buyer: JGM Holdings LLC
Seller: Wilcox Baldwin LLC
Date: 08/17/22

153 Chestnut St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Douglas Dichard
Seller: Christine A. Carroll
Date: 08/19/22

53 Fairview St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Joshua Hatch
Seller: Rachel E. Beaudet
Date: 08/15/22

1 Fairway Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $580,000
Buyer: Nolan Gluchowski
Seller: David K. Runion
Date: 08/11/22

27 Lasalle St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Yevgeniy Pilman
Seller: Marie L. Dawson
Date: 08/12/22

520 North Main St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: NMHA LLC
Seller: Caf’e Court LLC
Date: 08/19/22

526 Prospect St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: Rosanna Labonte
Seller: Bliss, Anora A., (Estate)
Date: 08/12/22

21 Rankin Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: William A. Tyler TR
Seller: Aimee J. Lawrence
Date: 08/09/22

33 Rogers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Alexa D. Liberopoulos
Seller: Antonios Liberopoulos
Date: 08/18/22

105 Sanford St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Daniel P. McCarthy
Seller: Sandra F. Feld
Date: 08/09/22

190 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Bryan Magdalensky
Seller: Chad P. Herrick
Date: 08/09/22

254 Somers Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $388,000
Buyer: Sarah A. Bedard
Seller: Northeast Asset Management LLC
Date: 08/11/22

HAMPDEN

34 Mountain Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $279,900
Buyer: Tanner D. Alves
Seller: Kellne, Virginia M., (Estate)
Date: 08/11/22

16 Old Coach Circle
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $337,500
Buyer: Wesley Harrington
Seller: Cynthia A. Spearman
Date: 08/11/22

24 Walnut Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Nancy K. Decker
Seller: Phillip B. Chesky
Date: 08/12/22

HOLLAND

9 Leisure Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Bamn Realty LLC
Seller: Paul J. Girouard
Date: 08/12/22

HOLYOKE

35 Davis St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: Johanna Feliz
Seller: Timothy V. Flouton
Date: 08/11/22

53 Dillon Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Taryn Ortiz
Seller: Gino S. Viamari
Date: 08/19/22

345-363 Dwight St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: 345 Dwight St LLC
Seller: Assets Investment Co. Inc.
Date: 08/19/22

5 Greenwood Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Benjamin Coburn
Seller: Kristina F. Deome
Date: 08/18/22

161 High St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $397,000
Buyer: Portorreal Corp.
Seller: 161 High Street LLC
Date: 08/19/22

6 Keefe Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $258,000
Buyer: Arthur E. Lustenberger
Seller: Barbara E. O’Neill
Date: 08/11/22

10 Lexington Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $525,000
Buyer: Sarah Chotkowski
Seller: Grayson A. Dewitt
Date: 08/11/22

71 Lexington Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Jun X. Qiu
Seller: Mary K. Griffith
Date: 08/18/22

79 Lynch Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Robin M. Lavalley
Seller: Minerva Marrero
Date: 08/08/22

203 Michigan Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Martha Gillispie
Seller: Mary Webster
Date: 08/15/22

521 Pleasant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Germania N. Gonzalez
Seller: Villa Verde LLC
Date: 08/12/22

42 Shawmut Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Juan Rivera
Seller: Christina L. Gusek
Date: 08/10/22

18 West Glen St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Norma I. Burgos
Seller: Dennis W. Birks
Date: 08/17/22

32 Willow St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Federico S. Delgado
Seller: Muriel C. Perrier
Date: 08/19/22

LONGMEADOW

272 Burbank Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Frederick E. Binczewski
Seller: Riccardo Albano
Date: 08/12/22

48 Colony Acres Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $500,900
Buyer: Brian Collins
Seller: Michael V. Adamski
Date: 08/11/22

245 Deepwoods Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $506,000
Buyer: Stephen A. Byrne
Seller: RHL Properties LLC
Date: 08/12/22

14 Druid Circle
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $679,000
Buyer: Hans J. Vonnahme
Seller: Robert J. Krushell
Date: 08/19/22

137 Laurel St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $462,500
Buyer: Victoria Leo
Seller: Jennifer A. Jester
Date: 08/09/22

45 Longfellow Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Ryan McDowell
Seller: Paula A. Buckovitch
Date: 08/19/22

87 Oakwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Richard Lam
Seller: Sean M. Tiret
Date: 08/09/22

63 Pinewood Hills
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $710,000
Buyer: Yizhe Zhang
Seller: Howard L. Singer
Date: 08/15/22

78 Quinnehtuk Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $626,000
Buyer: Philip Chandler
Seller: Marc D. Haber
Date: 08/12/22

29 Shady Side Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Rhonda M. Castillo-Cage
Seller: Thomas E. Cage
Date: 08/10/22

96 Tanglewood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $960,000
Buyer: Gaurav Jain
Seller: Arun S. Uthayashankar
Date: 08/08/22

40 West Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Justin A. Rivas
Seller: Ricardo Malave
Date: 08/08/22

48 Willow Brook Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $759,900
Buyer: William L. Collins
Seller: Jodie Foster
Date: 08/15/22

420 Wolf Swamp Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Raphael L. McCoy
Seller: Timothy Lucier
Date: 08/16/22

LUDLOW

30 Arbor St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Armando M. Nunes
Seller: Priscilla A. Pettell
Date: 08/19/22

132 Cedar St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Diane Mastoraski-Leal
Seller: Dulce Santiago-Diegel
Date: 08/12/22

58 Coolidge Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Joshua B. Paulino
Seller: Evelyn Pilon
Date: 08/19/22

96 East Akard St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $316,000
Buyer: Susana P. Nute
Seller: Karen M. Lindblad
Date: 08/11/22

118 Grimard St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $279,900
Buyer: Corey D. Butler
Seller: Timothy Terbush
Date: 08/12/22

61 Homestretch Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Maximo A. Gonzalez
Seller: William M. Rae
Date: 08/10/22

Jefferson Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Joshua B. Paulino
Seller: Evelyn Pilon
Date: 08/19/22

105 Kirkland Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $290,200
Buyer: Jackline Kitambi
Seller: Manuel Palatino
Date: 08/18/22

164 Lakeview Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Joao Pedroso
Seller: Delfim L. Goncalves
Date: 08/17/22

293 Moore St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Dariusz P. Drap
Seller: Daven M. Winiewski
Date: 08/19/22

Timberidge Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Derek Rodrigues
Seller: Barbara Capuano
Date: 08/08/22

35 West Akard St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $274,900
Buyer: Regina A. Morrissey
Seller: Marta M. James
Date: 08/17/22

MONSON

25 Brimfield Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Andre Dubois
Seller: Joseph M. Gonyer
Date: 08/17/22

161 Hovey Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Elijah P. Kumpf
Seller: Armando M. Nunes
Date: 08/19/22

72 Reimers Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Thomas Murphy
Seller: Jo A. Sauriol
Date: 08/19/22

33 Washington St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Newrez LLC
Seller: Ryan P. Fortier
Date: 08/17/22

PALMER

2141 Baptist Hill Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Theresa Nallett
Seller: Bradley V. Sulewski
Date: 08/16/22

4 Bowden St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Jose A. Turcios
Seller: Michael R. Magiera
Date: 08/12/22

1011 Foster St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Janise G. Fitzpatrick
Seller: Denise I. Bucior
Date: 08/18/22

4498 High St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Collin Boucher
Seller: Karen C. Sikes
Date: 08/19/22

16 Holbrook St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Carlie Ferry
Seller: Sa Holdings 2 LLC
Date: 08/10/22

2191 Main St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Mint Realty Group LLC
Seller: Amber Zuron
Date: 08/15/22

5 Packard St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: John D. Holdcraft
Seller: Wen & Lan LLC
Date: 08/16/22

124 Peterson Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Richard D. Wiesner
Seller: Hull, Daniel A., (Estate)
Date: 08/12/22

150 Ware Road
Palmer, MA 01007
Amount: $132,425
Buyer: Amos Financial LLC
Seller: Diane L. Nelson
Date: 08/17/22

RUSSELL

20 Park St.
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Jesse McComas
Seller: Robert M. Williams
Date: 08/11/22

340 Westfield Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Jason Ballou
Seller: Jeffrey M. Williams
Date: 08/15/22

SOUTHWICK

94 Berkshire Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $925,000
Buyer: Nei Global Relocation Co.
Seller: Brian E. Durand
Date: 08/15/22

20 Eagle St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $125,600
Buyer: Andrew L. Gorenc
Seller: Douglas E. Newton
Date: 08/11/22

48 Pineywood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $272,500
Buyer: Charles Spurlock
Seller: Scott A. Blais
Date: 08/08/22

8 Silvergrass Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $560,000
Buyer: Christopher Hartmann
Seller: Hamelin Framing Inc.
Date: 08/12/22

SPRINGFIELD

35 Algonquin Place
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Guivens Andre
Seller: Enrique Ortiz
Date: 08/18/22

465 Allen St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Morgan D. Plante
Seller: Brenda M. Grandbois
Date: 08/15/22

110 Appleton St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Eric A. Robinson
Seller: Adam Zeger
Date: 08/18/22

71 Balfour Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $188,000
Buyer: Gary Mascaro
Seller: Donna M. McCarthy
Date: 08/15/22

1341 Bay St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Lester Jowers
Seller: Maureen L. Landis
Date: 08/19/22

53 Bevier St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Crossover Corp
Seller: Eileen M. Heffernan
Date: 08/15/22

130 Brandon Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Luis A. Maldonado-Ortiz
Seller: Taylor Housey
Date: 08/19/22

121 Breckwood Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Gage M. Oyola
Seller: Stefany Serrano-Hernandez
Date: 08/19/22

91-93 Brunswick St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Katherine P. Robillard
Seller: Kenny Nguyen
Date: 08/08/22

68-70 Calhoun St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Elder Gonzalez-Aldana
Seller: Rodman Capital Group LLC
Date: 08/16/22

67 California Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: K&M Enterprises LLC
Seller: Tracy A. Savoie
Date: 08/18/22

73 California Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Jozlyn Squaire
Seller: Erik O. Cubi
Date: 08/12/22

145-147 Catharine St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $301,000
Buyer: Jose G. Quiroz
Seller: Felix L. Rentas
Date: 08/12/22

66 Chalmers St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $318,000
Buyer: Kevin M. Schoener
Seller: Lisa Moriarty
Date: 08/12/22

26 Colchester St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: C&M Res Rental LLC
Seller: Marie, Bankston, (Estate)
Date: 08/12/22

27-29 Coomes St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jennifer N. Pineyro
Seller: Springfield Portfolio Holdings
Date: 08/11/22

22-24 Crane St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Kelnate Realty LLC
Seller: Opus Durum LLC
Date: 08/17/22

30 Daytona St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Ibrahim Mohamed
Seller: Sumayya M. Ghalaini
Date: 08/19/22

25-27 Dorset St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Autumn A. Hodge
Seller: Mengru Li
Date: 08/10/22

961 East Columbus Ave.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Pena Lopez Auto Repair
Seller: Jeremy D. Ober
Date: 08/11/22

154 Ellsworth Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: William Fabbri
Seller: Darci A. Morrisette
Date: 08/19/22

34 Entrybrook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Paula A. Buckovitch
Seller: Lynn Lessard
Date: 08/19/22

45 Florida St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Felix L. Rentas-Torres
Seller: My Dream Properties LLC
Date: 08/12/22

84 Glenwood St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Eyeri M. Perez-Padilla
Seller: Kasha M. Wint
Date: 08/12/22

21-23 Governor St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Kelnate Realty LLC
Seller: Opus Durum LLC
Date: 08/17/22

16 Grove St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $274,900
Buyer: Katia Abdallah
Seller: Home LLC
Date: 08/16/22

33 Hawthorne St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Prestigious 1 LLC
Seller: Alycar Investments LLC
Date: 08/11/22

23 Hillside Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Dennis Davis
Seller: Melanie Bisson
Date: 08/08/22

116-118 Johnson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Kelnate Realty LLC
Seller: Opus Durum LLC
Date: 08/17/22

69 Kenwood Park
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: JJJ17 LLC
Seller: Felix D. Menendez
Date: 08/11/22

43 Lang St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $151,240
Buyer: Bank New York Mellon
Seller: Gregory W. Tapp
Date: 08/08/22

55-57 Lansing Place
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Johnathan Jiminian
Seller: Vince LLC
Date: 08/08/22

130 Leitch St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Maria Ramos
Seller: Michelle A. Shilasi
Date: 08/12/22

14 Leroy Place
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $133,000
Buyer: Maven Investments Co. LLC
Seller: Lizbeth Cruz
Date: 08/08/22

133 Lexington St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Luz Lopez
Seller: Miguel A. Rodriguez
Date: 08/12/22

132 Lumae St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Roseann Amaya
Seller: Jeremiah J. Ocasio
Date: 08/18/22

64 Lyndale St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Joseph T. Lastowski
Seller: Jennifer Diaz
Date: 08/12/22

147 Marion St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Reina A. Rodriguez
Seller: JJJ17 LLC
Date: 08/12/22

74 Margerie St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Suzette Kerr-Nelson
Seller: Amat Victoria Curam LLC
Date: 08/18/22

104 Massachusetts Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Center For Human Development Inc.
Seller: Round 2 LLC
Date: 08/11/22

22-24 Massasoit Place
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: J. Dasilva
Seller: Kobi Grant
Date: 08/09/22

171 Newhouse St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Michael Smith
Seller: James Cordero
Date: 08/12/22

146 North Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Carlos A. Torres-Gonzalez
Seller: Oscar Castro
Date: 08/09/22

181 Northampton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $352,000
Buyer: Nathan H. McClain
Seller: Donald A. Smith
Date: 08/17/22

206-208 Northampton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Miguel A. Acevedo
Seller: Glen Zuffelato
Date: 08/08/22

197-199 Nottingham St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Yue Yang
Seller: Kenneth H. Allen
Date: 08/11/22

136 Oak Hollow Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Jeffrey P. Meunier
Seller: Michael Hyder
Date: 08/09/22

54 Osgood St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Frandel M. Delrosario
Seller: Wilner Abel
Date: 08/12/22

463 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Albert E. Rauh
Seller: Becker, Giuseppina, (Estate)
Date: 08/15/22

1029 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: K&M Enterprises LLC
Seller: Ericson, Lorraine A., (Estate)
Date: 08/18/22

106 Paulk Ter.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $407,000
Buyer: Frank J. Golfieri
Seller: Kenneth R. Cote
Date: 08/16/22

103 Phillips Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Anna Digregorio
Seller: Yarida Cruz
Date: 08/16/22

11-17 Putnam Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $342,000
Buyer: Reshmi Muthraja
Seller: Christine Giera
Date: 08/19/22

21 Radner St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Donald A. Smith
Seller: Willie G. Ndungu
Date: 08/18/22

447 Riverside Road
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Melro Associates Inc.
Seller: Pablo Rivera
Date: 08/08/22

50 Saint Lawrence Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $244,000
Buyer: Mark Ako-Abrew
Seller: Nehal Parekh
Date: 08/16/22

115 Santa Barbara St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Chelsea Wait
Seller: Lake Rentals LLC
Date: 08/17/22

105-111 School St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $2,070,000
Buyer: Matthew Rasetta
Seller: New Man Ventures
Date: 08/10/22

9 Shamrock St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $304,000
Buyer: Samuel D. Carter
Seller: Chad Lynch
Date: 08/17/22

54-56 Stanton St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $399,900
Buyer: Phillip Lwasa
Seller: Anatoliy Ovdiychuk
Date: 08/10/22

443 State St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: DM Renaissance Development LLC
Seller: William Kavanagh Furniture Co
Date: 08/19/22

31 Steuben St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Michael M. Barile
Seller: O’Connor Mary Kate B., (Estate)
Date: 08/19/22

1319 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Maribel A. Lajara
Seller: Marisabelle Hernandez
Date: 08/12/22

12 Sunset Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $263,000
Buyer: Brian P. Manning
Seller: Guy M. Lorenzo
Date: 08/09/22

57 Tamarack Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: James A. Jackson
Seller: Michael J. Anderson
Date: 08/08/22

448 Tinkham Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $430,000
Buyer: Jennifer L. Keefe
Seller: Dennis P. Garvey
Date: 08/19/22

6 Tyrone St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Charles Stokes
Seller: Barbara A. Burgen
Date: 08/10/22

166 Waldorf St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: H&P Investments LLC
Seller: HSB Investments LLC
Date: 08/10/22

108 Webber St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Rozaida Velazquez
Seller: Scott M. Johnson-Yasufuku
Date: 08/11/22

186-188 Westford Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Sonia Cartagena
Seller: Yanjie Wang
Date: 08/08/22

83 Wexford St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $324,000
Buyer: Moussa H. Danioko
Seller: Verman H. Brown
Date: 08/19/22

193-195 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Prestigious 1 LLC
Seller: Paz LLC
Date: 08/16/22

47-49 Whittier St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Raquel Medina
Seller: Javier Flores-Baez
Date: 08/12/22

175 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: David E. Quezada-Andrade
Seller: Crystal D. Chambers
Date: 08/12/22

836 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $186,000
Buyer: Feliciano Bonilla
Seller: Rhodlyn K. Thomas
Date: 08/11/22

135-137 Woodlawn St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $327,000
Buyer: Steven Jimenez
Seller: Desiree Lopez-Olan
Date: 08/10/22

935-937 Worthington St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Ramon Tapia
Seller: Luz M. Lazala
Date: 08/16/22

45 Wrona St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $256,500
Buyer: Alisa Troncoso
Seller: Patricia C. Rivera
Date: 08/19/22

68 Yale St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: John H. Meissner
Seller: Alonzo Williams
Date: 08/16/22

TOLLAND

115 Covell Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $131,300
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Homer L. Rogers
Date: 08/15/22

203 Lands End Dr.
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $630,000
Buyer: Ashley A. Matlow
Seller: Steven R. Southiere
Date: 08/08/22

17 View Dr.
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $421,700
Buyer: Robert G. Pelletier
Seller: Lisa J. Ioli
Date: 08/11/22

WALES

44 Fountain Road
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: Louis A. Rizoli TR
Seller: Barbara Baratz 2001 RET
Date: 08/12/22

WEST SPRINGFIELD

76-82 Capital Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $2,439,000
Buyer: Capital Drive Properties LLC
Seller: Robin C. Taylor LLC
Date: 08/15/22

46 Chestnut St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $296,642
Buyer: Isanthes LLC
Seller: Sandra L. Lapan
Date: 08/17/22

15 East School St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $153,500
Buyer: Wicked Deals LLC
Seller: Yelena Vlasyuk
Date: 08/18/22

56 Elmdale St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Barrak H. Abdraba
Seller: John M. McCarthy
Date: 08/12/22

50-52 Irving St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Danil Kudryashov
Seller: Mario J. Ronghi
Date: 08/19/22

61 Lancaster Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Sarahlee Trumball
Seller: Sajid Khan
Date: 08/15/22

29-31 Merrick St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Jose Gutierrez
Date: 08/08/22

250 Morgan Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: Vertex Design & Build LLC
Seller: Beatrice A. Panto
Date: 08/09/22

101 Peachstone Glen
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Vladimir Shandrin
Seller: Ducharme, Marjorie C., (Estate)
Date: 08/18/22

75 Piper Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Heather Watson
Seller: Karen M. Tetrault
Date: 08/12/22

356 Sibley Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Jorge G. Fonseca
Seller: Robert C. Oliver
Date: 08/18/22

1740 Westfield St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Jodi M. Williams
Seller: Dharas Realty LLC
Date: 08/08/22

WESTFIELD

19 Adams St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Timothy M. Rivers
Seller: Brian M. Barlow
Date: 08/09/22

18 Allen Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Malia Homebuyers LLC
Seller: Joseph P. Czerbinski
Date: 08/12/22

111 Big Wood Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Michael V. Adamski
Seller: Songja No
Date: 08/11/22

14 Cherry St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Jakob Boutet
Seller: John West
Date: 08/19/22

92 Christopher Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $465,500
Buyer: William Allard
Seller: Gary R. Nault
Date: 08/08/22

225 East Main St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $825,000
Buyer: 228 East Main Street LLC
Seller: Double Play Properties LLC
Date: 08/16/22

2 Fowler Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $257,500
Buyer: Jason Howard
Seller: Glenn Korostynski
Date: 08/17/22

33 Fowler Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Cody Livingston
Seller: Nicolasa Marcil
Date: 08/12/22

20 Fox Hill Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $367,000
Buyer: Luke K. Barlar
Seller: Marjorie M. Palmer
Date: 08/19/22

17 Jeanne Marie Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Darryl A. Bonner
Seller: Joseph H. Potts
Date: 08/12/22

400 Loomis St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $294,900
Buyer: Danylo Shmyglya
Seller: Jeffrey L. Cos
Date: 08/19/22

18 Lynnwood Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Joseph Arsenault
Seller: Charles D. Spurlock
Date: 08/08/22

321 Montgomery Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $359,900
Buyer: Cole J. Labonte
Seller: Glenn Samuel
Date: 08/19/22

27 North Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Jacob Shokov
Seller: Peter Sychev
Date: 08/19/22

59 Notre Dame St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Alyson K. Finnerty
Seller: Nicholas S. Tillman
Date: 08/15/22

22 Phillip Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Samantha J. Bara
Seller: Carol Hicks
Date: 08/19/22

45 Pleasant St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Ahmet Cayan
Seller: Argishti Gukasyan
Date: 08/19/22

54 Pontoosic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $149,000
Buyer: Sergey Domnenko
Seller: Ronayne, David J. Jr., (Estate)
Date: 08/16/22

62 Pontoosic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $387,000
Buyer: Nicole Tillman
Seller: Olsen, Christopher, (Estate)
Date: 08/15/22

64 Roosevelt Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $142,000
Buyer: LKN Realty Investments LLC
Seller: Bank New York Mellon
Date: 08/12/22

41 Washington St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Marisa Lisette-Castro
Seller: Martin Nunez
Date: 08/12/22

142 Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $306,000
Buyer: Babatunde O. Adeyemi
Seller: Seth A. Bush
Date: 08/17/22

WILBRAHAM

2138 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $1,100,000
Buyer: Prestige World Wide Enterprises
Seller: JCJC Realty Corp.
Date: 08/19/22

8 Carla Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $530,000
Buyer: Mark A. Duda
Seller: Jason A. Mancuso
Date: 08/19/22

76 Crane Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $490,000
Buyer: Scott B. Gifford
Seller: Christopher H. Raymond
Date: 08/08/22

19 Deerfield Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: Daniele Decesare
Seller: Joseph M. Pafumi
Date: 08/18/22

911 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $387,000
Buyer: Christopher Broughton
Seller: Hesham M. Asif
Date: 08/15/22

20 Oaks Farm Lane, Lot 20
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $489,900
Buyer: Louis J. Scungio
Seller: AC Homebuilding LLC
Date: 08/15/22

16 Shirley St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $535,000
Buyer: David K. Runion
Seller: William T. Bradford
Date: 08/12/22

140 Springfield St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $508,885
Buyer: Daniil Effraimidis
Seller: Kevin J. Czaplicki
Date: 08/19/22

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

20-40 Ball Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $850,000
Buyer: Valley Community Development Corp.
Seller: Carl T. Matuszko RET
Date: 08/15/22

63 Chestnut St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $462,550
Buyer: Maina C. Handmaker
Seller: Margaret A. Perkins
Date: 08/15/22

561 Flat Hills Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $1,288,500
Buyer: Katrina Goldsaito
Seller: Peter M. Seterdahl
Date: 08/18/22

61 Gray St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $715,000
Buyer: Eastern Realty LLC
Seller: Niels L. Nielsen
Date: 08/10/22

25 Hedgerow Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $457,000
Buyer: Beverly Prager
Seller: Howe FT
Date: 08/15/22

30 Kestrel Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $825,000
Buyer: Nathan T. Wilson
Seller: Mark Bucciarelli
Date: 08/15/22

83 Morgan Circle
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Hummad Ijaz
Seller: Stephan Gharabegian
Date: 08/16/22

86 Northampton Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Katharine F. Correia
Seller: Amherst College
Date: 08/15/22

241 Old Farm Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $689,500
Buyer: Megan M. Patton-Lopez
Seller: Teter FT
Date: 08/17/22

370 Potwine Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $398,000
Buyer: Desy Raturoma-Williams
Seller: Peter M. Levy
Date: 08/16/22

34 Shumway St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $353,420
Buyer: Ronald Keith
Seller: Kosarick, Everett A., (Estate)
Date: 08/11/22

613 South Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $776,000
Buyer: Michael J. Coolong
Seller: Karl Jeffries
Date: 08/12/22

194 Strong St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $439,200
Buyer: Maria Stager
Seller: 194 Strong Street LLC
Date: 08/19/22

76 Woodlot Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $560,000
Buyer: Marc Littman
Seller: Frieda B. Friedman
Date: 08/16/22

BELCHERTOWN

134 Allen Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $258,700
Buyer: Kyle J. Snide
Seller: Cornerstone Homebuying LLC
Date: 08/19/22

53 Amherst Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: Kyle G. Unsderfer
Seller: Nicholas J. Smetana
Date: 08/09/22

9 Autumn Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $421,000
Buyer: Nathaniel L. Wilson
Seller: Benjamin McCullough
Date: 08/11/22

11 Chestnut Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $540,000
Buyer: Joseph G. Carofano
Seller: Laura B. Laramee
Date: 08/16/22

25 Dogwood Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $524,500
Buyer: Ghazaleh Parvini
Seller: Allen J. Bousquet
Date: 08/10/22

28 Lloyd Ave.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Catherine L. McEachern
Seller: Tamara J. Dennehy
Date: 08/12/22

594 North Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $630,000
Buyer: Vincent Cardona
Seller: Richard A. Twining
Date: 08/11/22

160 Old Bay Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Christian Nielsen
Seller: Richard R. Martin
Date: 08/19/22

185 Railroad St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Curtis Miarecki
Seller: Jennifer L. Greene
Date: 08/18/22

85 Wilson Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $250,844
Buyer: Jehoram RT
Seller: David M. Jalbert
Date: 08/09/22

CHESTERFIELD

213 Ireland St.
Chesterfield, MA 01084
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Justin Sherratt
Seller: Kamil Zakrzewski
Date: 08/17/22

163 Sugar Hill Road
Chesterfield, MA 01096
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Anthony Service
Seller: Steven D. Root
Date: 08/08/22

EASTHAMPTON

5 Hannum Brook Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Ya Ching Hsu
Seller: Denise M. Blais
Date: 08/19/22

152 Northampton St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Nicholas D. Duprey
Seller: ANK LLC
Date: 08/08/22

5 Plaza Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: Wicked Deals LLC
Seller: Richard C. Peterson
Date: 08/18/22

61 Pomeroy St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Laura S. Derr
Seller: Alan R. Lavigne
Date: 08/12/22

46-54 Union St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $825,000
Buyer: Union West LLC
Seller: Stephen C. Robinson
Date: 08/12/22

3 Willow Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $555,000
Buyer: Ryan P. Anderson
Seller: Matthew P. Boruchowski
Date: 08/16/22

GOSHEN

8 Bissell Road
Goshen, MA 01096
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Bryan W. Clark
Seller: Troy Glaszcz
Date: 08/09/22

GRANBY

205 Batchelor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $271,500
Buyer: Lobsang Gyatso
Seller: Emond FT
Date: 08/15/22

Cold Hill Road, Lot 7
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: L. J. Development LLC
Seller: Stephen P. Brunetti
Date: 08/08/22

Cold Hill Road, Lot 8
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: L. J. Development LLC
Seller: Stephen P. Brunetti
Date: 08/08/22

Cold Hill Road, Lot 6
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: L. J. Development LLC
Seller: Stephen P. Brunetti
Date: 08/08/22

Cold Hill Road, Lot 5
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: L. J. Development LLC
Seller: Stephen P. Brunetti
Date: 08/08/22

HADLEY

4 Crystal Lane
Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $948,000
Buyer: Todd R. Brees
Seller: Bercume Construction LLC
Date: 08/12/22

10 Farm Lane
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $426,550
Buyer: Kamal Dangi
Seller: Cartus Financial Corp.
Date: 08/15/22

10 Farm Lane
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $426,550
Buyer: Cartus Financial Corp.
Seller: Dallas Kalbacher
Date: 08/15/22

56 River Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Marjorie F. Southworth
Seller: Martin Rule
Date: 08/10/22

HATFIELD

19 Bridge St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Victoria Slysz
Seller: Slysz, Darleen S., (Estate)
Date: 08/18/22

15 Elm St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $763,000
Buyer: Roni Almog
Seller: Phoebe D. Sheldon
Date: 08/15/22

Jericho Road
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: SMD 3 LLC
Seller: Boyle FT
Date: 08/10/22

75 Pantry Road
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: W. Marek Inc.
Seller: Gary A. Wood
Date: 08/12/22

171 West St.
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $1,250,000
Buyer: Union West LLC
Seller: Stephen C. Robinson
Date: 08/12/22

177 West St.
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $1,250,000
Buyer: Union West LLC
Seller: Stephen C. Robinson
Date: 08/12/22

HUNTINGTON

11 Cullen Hill Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Jonathan Robadue
Seller: Karen Rain
Date: 08/09/22

52 Worthington Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $128,250
Buyer: Stephen J. Fisk
Seller: David G. Fisk
Date: 08/12/22

NORTHAMPTON

351 Bridge St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Manuel Leyton-Palacios
Seller: Michael J. Lyons
Date: 08/12/22

Cardinal Way Lot 1
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: William A. Brown
Seller: Laurence Cadorette
Date: 08/15/22

357 Coles Meadow Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Jeffrey T. Sullivan
Seller: Cheryl L. Pascucci
Date: 08/10/22

134 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $789,270
Buyer: Graham Immerman
Seller: Sunwood Development Corp.
Date: 08/12/22

77 Harrison Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $875,000
Buyer: Mary B. Caschetta
Seller: Kessler, Greta M., (Estate)
Date: 08/09/22

12 Hockanum Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $763,000
Buyer: ADB 1 Properties LLC
Seller: Powers Laperle FT
Date: 08/17/22

16 Hockanum Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $763,000
Buyer: ADB 1 Properties LLC
Seller: Powers Laperle FT
Date: 08/17/22

66 Massasoit St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $237,120
Buyer: Amy Stein
Seller: Amy Stein
Date: 08/16/22

98 Nonotuck St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $479,900
Buyer: Stephen G. Claps
Seller: Augustine M. O’Grady
Date: 08/11/22

17 Villone Dr.
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $710,000
Buyer: 17 Villone Drive LLC
Seller: Alice G. McKusick
Date: 08/16/22

19 Western Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $749,000
Buyer: Melanie Greenman
Seller: Alexa Beach
Date: 08/11/22

PELHAM

23 Amherst Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Lauren M. Leonardis
Seller: William M. Rock
Date: 08/19/22

17 Enfield Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $570,000
Buyer: Althea Topek
Seller: Lance Hodes
Date: 08/16/22

178 North Valley Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $538,000
Buyer: Benjamin Ladd
Seller: Marianna Marguglio
Date: 08/15/22

SOUTH HADLEY

35 Chestnut Hill Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Kelly Richardson
Seller: Alanna R. Darling
Date: 08/18/22

9 Helm St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Matthew Wolanczyk
Seller: Kevin P. Corley
Date: 08/17/22

1 Hunter Ter.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $324,900
Buyer: Angelyn Thornton
Seller: Chelsea K. Barnicle
Date: 08/18/22

4 Karen Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $372,500
Buyer: Samuel T. Lev
Seller: Richard L. Wilson
Date: 08/09/22

35 Lorraine Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Dean M. Rankin
Seller: Jeannette M. Ensor
Date: 08/19/22

332 Newton St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $264,000
Buyer: Felicia J. Heredia
Seller: Dreamwake Homes Inc.
Date: 08/18/22

Pine St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Cynthia I. Overgaag
Seller: Ciolek, Bernice K., (Estate)
Date: 08/19/22

Valley View Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Lucid Development Inc.
Seller: Pheasants LLC
Date: 08/12/22

SOUTHAMPTON

85 Pleasant St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $750,000
Buyer: Chelsea E. Halon RET
Seller: Vandeberghe FT
Date: 08/09/22

16 Thomas Circle
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Stephen R. Deloach
Seller: Christopher J. Wayne
Date: 08/12/22

WARE

24 Clinton St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jessie Rivera
Seller: Janet A. Suprise
Date: 08/11/22

120 Main St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Jeammessa Brimage
Seller: Jeremiah A. Patrie
Date: 08/18/22

 

101 Malboeuf Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $589,000
Buyer: Cierra Figueroa
Seller: Martin J. Sweeney
Date: 08/16/22

112 Monson Turnpike Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Travis Mitchell
Seller: Christopher D. Broughton
Date: 08/15/22

181 Monson Turnpike Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Jesse H. Usher-Barrett
Seller: Megan K. Scott
Date: 08/19/22

55 North St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Jeremiah Pinto
Seller: Matthew Robidoux
Date: 08/18/22

64 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Gary Ajootian
Seller: Chad Roy
Date: 08/10/22

WESTHAMPTON

10 Main Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Lori D. Taylor
Seller: Glenda C. Hall RT
Date: 08/10/22

 

412 Main Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Lori D. Taylor
Seller: Glenda C. Hall RT
Date: 08/10/22

Daily News Employment Health Care News Women in Businesss

HOLYOKEHolyoke Medical Center has announced the appointment of Lisa Wray-Schechterle, as the hospital’s director of Community Benefits.

Wray-Schechterle joins the hospital from Pyramid Management Group where she served as the marketing director of the Holyoke Mall at Ingleside, a position she held for more than 20 years.

Wray-Schechterle holds both a master of Arts in Communication and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Western New England University. She serves as a marketing committee member for Girls Inc. of the Valley, a board member of the Holyoke Chamber of Commerce, and as an advisory board member for the Holyoke Community College School of Business.

“We are happy to welcome Lisa to our team,” said Spiros Hatiras, Holyoke Medical Center’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “Her proven ability to build collaborative partnerships coupled with her knowledge of Holyoke and the many community based organizations we work with throughout the region, will enable her to successfully manage and expand our Community Benefits program.”

Holyoke Medical Center Community Benefits provides programs and services to improve health in communities and helps to increase access to health care. This is done to advance medical and health knowledge in the community and relieve or reduce the burden of government and other community efforts. Wray-Schechterle has succeeded Kathy Anderson as the director of the department, following Anderson’s retirement. 

“I am excited to extend my knowledge and networking connections to help improve the health needs of the Pioneer Valley,” said Wray-Schechterle.  

“As the hospital has just completed their 2022 Community Health Needs Assessment, I look forward to creating the next implementation strategy based on the feedback we received and expressed needs identified by the community.”

Daily News


SPRINGFIELD — In honor of its 100th anniversary, United Way of Pioneer Valley will be recognizing area businesses at a luncheon to take place on June 2, from noon to 2 p.m., at the Sheraton Springfield Monarch Place Hotel. 

The luncheon will serve as a thank-you to the businesses and individuals of Pioneer Valley who have helped United Way fulfill its mission to serve the Commonwealth through services like feeding the hungry, youth development programs, mental health and substance use treatment, and more. Awards will go to the following companies and individuals:  

Centennial Award: MassMutual; the Summit Award: Big Y and Baystate Health; First 50 Years Award: Smith & Wesson; Local Legacy Award: American Saw and the Irene E. & George A. Davis Foundation; Lifetime Achievement Award: R. Lyman Wood and Robert Bolduc; Women’s Leadership Council Naming: Dora Robinson; Alexis de Tocqueville Volunteer Award: John Baker, Trinity Health; and theMichael Serafino Hero Award: The Serafino Family  

In addition to the awards, United Way will be accepting legacy gifts — one-time contributions starting at $500 — to commemorate its 100th anniversary. All legacy-level gifts will be memorialized on their 100th anniversary ‘Wall of Hope.’ With the assistance of community investors, United Way has been able to put $193 million toward the community through its various support programs. 

Tickets to this event are free and available on United Way Pioneer Valley’s website, www.uwpv.org. 

Special Coverage Veterans in Business

Serving Those Who Serve

Al Tracy, with volunteers Andrea Luppi, left, and Darlene Slater.

Al Tracy, with volunteers Andrea Luppi, left, and Darlene Slater.

The USO (United Service Organizations) turned 80 this year. It celebrated, in essence, by enthusiastically carrying out the same mission it has had since 1941 — ‘strengthening America’s military service members by keeping them connected to family, home, and country throughout their service to our nation.’ The organization, and the local chapter based in Chicopee (Pioneer Valley USO), does this in a number of ways, from care packages to Monday night dinners at the Westover base, to a program that helps transition servicemen and women to the civilian workforce. For Al Tracy, executive director of the chapter, this isn’t a job — it’s a passion.

 

When Al Tracy was serving with the First Marines along the DMZ in Vietnam, the highlight of his day, week, or month — fill in the blank — was receiving a care package from home.

He would get one from his mother pretty much every month, he recalled, adding that the best thing in them was her apple pie, always wrapped in tinfoil, which was almost as precious — and welcome — as the food.

“We needed that tinfoil — we would reuse it to cook things,” recalled Tracy, flashing back more than a half-century as best his memory would allow, adding that such recollections certainly help drive him in a role that is far more a passion than it is a job — executive director of the Pioneer Valley USO, housed at Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee.

There is no ‘interim’ next to Tracy’s title, but technically … perhaps there should be. Involved with the USO (United Service Organizations) since the ’80s, he agreed to serve temporarily as executive director when the person in that job left it roughly 15 years ago.

“They’re still looking for an executive director,” said Tracy with a laugh, adding that he likes everything about his job — except all the paperwork — and especially anything that has to do with helping active-duty servicemen and women and also veterans in need.

“I have a passion, and I love taking care of our military. I think that what they do, the sacrifices they make, are countless. You’re up all night, you don’t get weekends off … you’re stuck wherever you’re deployed. They need to know that we’re thinking of them.”

And there are many programs and services that fall into that category, from the care packages that are sent out to destinations around the globe to the Monday-night dinners the USO prepares for those serving at Westover, and also other servicemen and veterans as well (he and his staff were doing the prep work for one as he talked with BusinessWest on Nov. 1); from a program called Pathfinder that helps retiring servicemen and women transition to the workforce to providing tickets to Thunderbirds games and other sporting events.

“I have a passion, and I love taking care of our military,” he said. “I think that what they do, the sacrifices they make, are countless. You’re up all night, you don’t get weekends off … you’re stuck wherever you’re deployed. They need to know that we’re thinking of them.”

Tracy is even busier than normal these days as he coordinates a transition of sorts for the local chapter, which is giving up its independent charter and becoming part of the World USO.

“Our charter was dissolved on Oct. 1 — we’re now part of World USO. I’m excited. Maybe I won’t have as much paperwork, but I haven’t seen that yet,” he said, adding that the agency at Westover will continue doing what it’s been doing from the beginning: “strengthening America’s military service members by keeping them connected to family, home, and country throughout their service to our nation.”

That’s the official wording in the mission statement, but it’s more than words for those tasked with carrying it out. It is a passion, and one that prompts a pause for reflection as the USO, started by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1941, marks its 80th anniversary. Best known perhaps as the agency that sent Bob Hope to entertain troops in hotspots around the globe, the USO has changed over the years, and some adjustments certainly had to be made during COVID. But at its core, the agency and its purpose remain the same: it’s there to keep deployed service members, and also veterans, connected.

For this issue and its focus on veterans in business, we talked at length with Tracy about the USO, its all-important mission, and the many ways in which it is carried out.

 

Corps Mission

As he talked with BusinessWest, Tracy was thinking ahead to the Nov. 27 Thunderbirds game against the Hartford Wolf Pack, a matinee, at which he will drop the ceremonial puck. It’s an assignment he’s looking forward to.

“I told them I wanted a crash helmet, so when I fall on the ice I don’t hit the back of my head,” he said, adding that the agency partners with the team to get servicemen and women discounted admission, and also tries to secure tickets (to raffle off or simply give away) for area concerts and other types of shows.

Al Tracy says the USO’s mission comes down to a simple assignment

Al Tracy says the USO’s mission comes down to a simple assignment: keeping servicemen and women connected — to their family, their hometown, and their country.

Dropping the puck is just one of many rewarding aspects to a job Tracy has grown into over the past decade and a half after serving the USO in a variety of capacities, incuding board member and treasurer. Indeed, he’s put his own stamp on a position, and an agency, with a proud legacy and an important mission, one that brings him back to his time in Vietnam, which he can pinpoint with astonishing detail after all these years.

“Let’s see … 11 months, 28 days, four hours, 15 minutes, and maybe 30 seconds, but who’s counting? I was looking at my watch as we left the ground,” he recalled, adding that the best of those days were the ones when the care packages arrived. “During the war, my best buddy was my mom; she sent care packages all the time, and it was pretty awesome. Now … I’m just passing it on.”

And in all kinds of ways.

The care packages might be the best-known and perhaps the most symbolic part of the mission, he said, adding that the proud tradition is carried on today.

“It’s a wonderful organization and my favorite charity. I like everything we do — and I get to laugh everyday, so that makes it even better.”

“We have a huge care-package program,” he noted, adding that the local chapter will send them anywhere — all it needs is an address. “Those packages keep them connected to home; it lets them know people are thinking about them.”

Elaborating, he said the packages can be personalized, and many are, but there are many staples — personal-care items, beef jerky, snacks, sunscreen, and wet wipes, which can and often are used to clean weapons.

But there are many other ways in which the local USO carries out its mission, starting with the Monday dinners served at the base (the cafeteria is closed that night). There are usually 125 to 150 people who partake, including some area veterans, he said, adding that meals are delivered to those serving at guard posts, on the runways, and other locations.

The USO facility at Westover Air Reserve Base

The USO facility at Westover Air Reserve Base provides servicemen and women with a number of services and needed items, including books to read in what’s known as the ‘relaxing room.’

There’s also a food pantry at which service members can buy items; that facility also provides items to veterans in need.

The agency also marks deployments and homecomings, and it will also help take fallen servicemen from the area to their final resting place. It will assist servicemen and women in transition with furniture and other needs, said Tracy, and even provide small loans to those in need.

Then there’s the Pathfinder program that assists those transitioning from the service to the workforce.

“We’ll help them put together a résumé and learn how to interview,” he explained, adding that participants in the program are assigned a ‘scout’ who will assist in a job search on many levels.

There’s also the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program, he went on, a program that enables servicemen and women to be recorded while reading a portion of a book or poem. That tape will then be sent to a designated family on a specified date, such as the holidays.

 

Finishing Touch

“That’s just another way that those off serving their country can stay connected,” Tracy noted, adding that this has been the simple yet all-important mission of the USO from the beginning.

For him, as noted, it’s not a job, but rather a passion.

“It’s a wonderful organization and my favorite charity,” he said. “I like everything we do — and I get to laugh everyday, so that makes it even better.”

It’s a unique mission, and for 80 years, it’s been mission accomplished.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Features Special Coverage

Marking a Milestone

Over the years, Paul Mina says, the name over the door and on the stationery has changed many times — previous incarnations include Community Chest, Red Feather, and United Fund — but the basic mission of the United Way of Pioneer Valley (UWPV) certainly hasn’t.

“The names have changed, the faces have changed, but the work is the same,” said Mina, who serves as administrator of both the United Way of Pioneer Valley and the United Way of Tri County in Framingham in an arrangement that speaks to the many fiscal challenges the organization has confronted in recent years and the need to consolidate and achieve economies of scale. “And that is, very simply, to improve the quality of life for people living in the Pioneer Valley area.”

As he talked with BusinessWest about this mission, on the occasion of the agency’s centennial (the actual birthday is Jan. 10), Mina was looking through some old news clippings, brochures, and assorted memorabilia that had been gathered to help with various efforts to mark this milestone. Together, these pieces help tell the story, he said, adding that the United Way has certainly evolved, as its name has, over the years.

But, as he noted, the underlying mission hasn’t.

“I look for a golden thread throughout the narrative,” he said as he thumbed through a large scrapbook and collections of news stories and promotional material. “And through all of that narrative, all of that archival material … the golden thread that links 1921 to 2021 is helping to improve people’s lives; that’s the endgame.

Paul Mina

Paul Mina

“The names have changed, the faces have changed, but the work is the same.”

“And it’s very significant to note that it was never about giving a handout — it was always about giving a helping hand — and to do it with as much dignity and respect as possible,” he continued. “Whether it’s 1921 or 2021, there are still people who need a helping hand so they can move from dependence to independence and self-sufficiency. That has been the goal, it is the goal, and it will always be the goal.”

 

It is somewhat fitting, said Mina, that the agency’s milestone celebration comes in the midst of a crisis — the COVID-19 pandemic — because, while the United Way of Pioneer Valley has been there to serve those in need every month of every year since January 1921, it has always come forward and stepped up at especially challenging times to meet greater and often different needs.

With that, Mina offered some history lessons. During World War II, for example, the agency, historically linked very closely with the Red Cross, worked to provide a number of services to returning veterans, and in the case of the local chapter, there was a specific focus on helping to reunite families broken apart by the war, and then help them assimilate to a very changed landscape.

“There was a lot of upheaval back home,” he said. “The men were off fighting overseas, the women were in factory jobs … there was a very different kind of assimilation. When a lot of these men came home, their wives, who were basically homemakers prior to them leaving, many of them had good jobs and careers in factories. This wasn’t something that any of them were used to seeing.

“When the men came back, there was a great amount of adjustment that had to take place,” he went on. “The women had to go back to their previous domestic role because the men had to get their jobs back to go back to work. There was a lot of assimilating, and that’s when philanthropy really took off because, now that women had been outside the home, they were involved in many, many things they hadn’t been involved in before, charity being one of them.”

 

That’s just one example, he said, noting that the agency has stepped up during other periods of turbulence, change, and need, providing help with everything from administering the polio vaccine in the 1950s to supplying food to the many who needed it during the Great Depression.

Bringing things right up to the present, Mina noted that, in recent years, the agency has added new services and new ways to help those in need, with everything from prescription savings to financial-literacy efforts to a Mass 211 hotline and its companion suicide-prevention ‘call-to-talk’ line.

And during this pandemic, UWPV, which serves Hampden County, Granby, and South Hadley, has continued that pattern of stepping up.

Indeed, it created a COVID-19 relief fund that including the awarding of grants to roughly 40 organizations, bringing a truckload of 5,000 hot meals to the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts, delivering another truckload of food-relief boxes (20 pounds per box) to the Holyoke Boys & Girls Club for distribution throughout the city, an initiative called Project Toybox that brought 15,000 new toys to affiliated agencies across the region for distribution to young people, and even a drive-up Halloween event at the TD Banknorth building in downtown Springfield, which served to fill a void left by formal and informal bans on trick-or-treating (more on some of these later).

For this issue, BusinessWest talked with Mina about the many things being celebrated as this agency celebrates this milestone, and how the work being carried out during the pandemic is in many ways simply the latest chapter in a century-old story of meeting needs within the community.

 

Past Is Prologue

To emphasize his repeated points about how things have changed over the past century or so — and how they haven’t — Mina pulled a clipping from the pile he had collected, an advertisement of sorts for something called the ‘Charity Chest,’ and pointed to the date, 1918, and then the headline over the piece:

“Charity is not a pocket for the shiftless to dip into,” it read, with the subhead “Far from it. Charity is a long ways from being a lazy man’s paradise.”

Mina noted that this was a reference to how many looked upon those seeking help in those days. He also noted that the language regarding charitable efforts has long since changed, with those involved no longer making any references to the ‘shiftless’ or the ‘lazy,’ for obvious reasons.

But the rest of the ad could almost run today, he said, noting phrases like these with regard to charity: “Its prime function is to relieve distress. Always has been and always will be. Yet, while giving relief in deserving cases, it does far more than that.” And also: “Its main object is to prevent the cause, thereby vitally affecting you and me and everybody. Distress does not always mean poverty. It may mean misfortune, sickness, or the suffering of innocents from wrongdoing of others. All of these charity tries to prevent.”

Again, some of the language has obviously changed over the years, but those sentiments expressed back at the height of World War I are those that still define the United Way today. As Mina noted, it’s not a handout, but a helping hand, and it has been this way through a host of name changes, affiliations, and partnerships.

Tracing the history of all those names the agency has used, Mina said the organization got its start as the Springfield Community Chest. Later, it became the Springfield Community Chest Red Feather Drive (he still has a red feather mounted in a large frame), with the feather being a symbol of charitable giving for more than 150 years. In fact, he noted, the Red Cross and the Red Feather ran an annual appeal together, before the two organizations separated.

Later, the organization was known under the names United Appeal and United Fund, before United Way came into use in the late 1960s.

Regardless of the name on the door, the organization has been carrying out the same essential mission, said Mina, adding that the agency’s programmatic niche, if that’s the proper phrase for it, can be summed up with three simple words: basic human needs.

Elaborating, he said these include food, clothing, shelter, and programs for children and seniors. “These are the things we focus on for a reason, because these are the things that resonate with people. These are the things, whether people are black, white, no matter what ethnicity or color, people in need are in need. Period. That’s the way it’s always been here, and I’m proud to say that it continues to be that way.”

To put the mission and its importance in perspective, Mina rewound the tape on a phone call he received only a half-hour before he talked with BusinessWest from a woman now living in New Mexico after relocating from this region.

“We helped her and her family when they were very much in need about 10 years ago,” he said. “And she called me to say, ‘I don’t know if you remember me or not … but I’m so and so, and I moved from the Pioneer Valley down to New Mexico, and a friend of mine who still lives there needs a helping hand right now — she’s got it very tough, she’s unemployed. I told her that I would call you because I was treated so well by the United Way back then that I wanted her to know that there was someone they could call that would treat them with dignity and respect and do the best they can for you. They’re not going to promise you the moon, but they’ll do the best to help you.’

“That’s a nice compliment she paid us there,” he went on, “because that’s the goal; that’s the whole goal.”

 

Where There’s a Will …

Carrying out these goals has never been anything approaching easy, but in recent years, it has become much more difficult, for a number of reasons.

For starters, the way individuals undertake charitable giving has changed, with many now choosing to give directly to specific groups, rather than to larger umbrella agencies like the United Way that funnel money to other nonprofits, said Mina. Meanwhile, the business landscape has changed dramatically through mergers and consolidations, especially in the financial-services sector, and with many small, family businesses simply disappearing from the landscape.

Also, some major corporations have created their own charitable foundations or giving arms, as was the case with MassMutual in Springfield, which had long been one of the primary supporters of the United Way of Pioneer Valley, he said, noting that all these factors have contributed to making the organization itself much smaller — as well as the level of donations it makes annually. Indeed, while this was a $5 million United Way years ago, in terms of total donations, it is now closer to $2 million.

It was these challenges that prompted the UWPV board to explore a number of options when it came to creating efficiencies and reducing the cost of doing business, for lack of a better phrase, while still carrying out its mission. One of those options was a partnership with the United Way of Tri County whereby that agency would share an administrator and also handle backroom operations — bookkeeping, marketing, and others — for this region’s United Way for a percentage of the funds raised during its annual campaign.

The partnership, which came after several years of unsettledness at the UWPV, one that included two CEOs and two interim CEOs between 2016 and 2018, has brought what the board desired most — stability and continued autonomy.

Those qualities have been needed during a pandemic that has further tested the agency, forcing staff to work remotely for a lengthy stretch because its services were not deemed essential, and further impacting its ability to raise money because of the way it has impacted businesses and families alike.

Indeed, this 100th year for the UWPV has been very different, and also very challenging. Need within the communities has obviously increased, but raising funds to meet those needs has been made much more difficult during the pandemic, especially when it comes to the United Way’s time-honored, preferred method of soliciting donations — via payroll deduction.

“Many of the [annual] campaigns are going to be hurting this year because companies are not going back to work in the time frame we need them to,” Mina said earlier this year. “You can’t ask for people to make contributions through payroll deduction if they’re working, and it’s very hard to ask people for support when they themselves are hurting for the first time maybe in many years.

“We’ve found that a very significant number of people in the hospitality industry, restaurants, and food and beverage operations are only a shadow of what they once were,” he went on. “And some of them are never going to recover; a lot of support isn’t there.”

Yet, amid these challenges, the UWPV has found new and different ways to meet its mission during this difficult year, and new and different ways to remind people of the importance of its basic mission.

Through efforts ranging from the food-distribution efforts to the Halloween gathering, the agency was able to meet growing need within the community and address the many ways in which the pandemic impacted day-to-day living and overall quality of life.

Mina was especially proud of Project Toybox.

“It was a wonderful thing,” he said of that initiative. “A lot of the kids that live in the urban area don’t have a backyard, they couldn’t go to the park, they weren’t allowed to congregate … so we figured this was a great opportunity to give them something they could do indoors.”

All this came on top of the annual Stuff the Bus program, which, as that name suggests, fills a school bus each August with age-appropriate backpacks with all the school supplies kids need.

This year, the agency filled 2,600 such backpacks, but in this era of COVID, the exercise was quite bit a different than it has been in previous years.

“It was difficult to come by this stuff because it’s usually donated by the public,” said Mina. “People come to Six Flags, and they get a free roller-coaster ride when they bring items for the backbacks. There’s also a huge collection point at the Holyoke Mall. All those things were not allowed this year.”

So the agency relied instead on a large donation from the MassMutual Foundation as well as some money from the COVID-19 Relief Fund to purchase the needed items at a discounted price.

Overall, these various efforts have been a continuation of that golden thread Mina mentioned earlier, a concerted effort to enable individual donors to collectively make a huge difference in the lives of countless people.

“It’s about empowering the masses to do things that they can’t do alone,” said Mina in summing it all up. “That’s why payroll deduction, which has been the hallmark of the United Way since its inception, is so important. It allows people who don’t have money in the bank, who aren’t necessarily individuals of high net worth, to be able to take a little money out of their paycheck every week, so, at the end of the year, they might have a $52 donation. That $52 donation, added together with the other folks at their company who do the same thing and give a dollar a week, ends up being an enormous amount of money. But they could never do that on their own if they had to give a lump sum.”

 

Finding a Way

Looking to the future, though, payroll deduction is becoming a less-effective way to raise money, for those reasons mentioned earlier, he said. Meanwhile, instead of channeling funds to other agencies, the United Way will be looking to provide more direct services to the residents of this region.

“We just finished a needs assessment, and 90% of the respondents were donors, and of those 90%, 82% thought that the model we had of funding agencies to do good work, to be a middleman of sorts, was not a model that is modern; it’s not a model that they’re willing to continue to support at the levels that they have in the past.

“They want to know that their contribution is directly impacting things,” he went on. “So we looked at the areas that these donors were identifying as gaps, and we put that together with some intelligence work we did on our own, plus what other agencies were telling us, and we identified three huge gaps that we’re going to fill: food insecurity, continuation and expansion of the call-to-talk and Mass 211 lines, and youth-development programs.

“These are our core areas,” he explained. “The survey only reinforced what we already knew — that our niche is basic human needs and helping people improve their quality of life.”

Looking ahead to 2021, Mina said it will be a milestone year for the United Way, and the occasion will be marked in a number of ways.

But for many of the region’s residents, there won’t be much to celebrate. Indeed, while 2020 was the roughest year in memory for many, the coming months are projected to be in some ways even worse as those basic human needs he mentioned continue to mount, healthcare issues multiply because of the many effects of the pandemic, and resources become more scarce.

“There’s going to be a major shortfall in resources in the next year because COVID is having devastating effects on our economy as well as our health,” he said. “But we’ll figure out a way to deal with it; we’ll figure out a way to continue doing our job. We’ve faced tough times before — we’ve faced World War I, World War II, the Korean conflict, Vietnam, the ’60s … we’ve been there through all these things, and we’ll be there through this, too.”

Figuring out a way and doing its job. This is what the United Way of Pioneer Valley has been doing for a century now. And as its second century starts, this track record of success is certainly worth celebrating.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Daily News

AMHERST — AmherstWorks, a coworking space dedicated to serving the Pioneer Valley community by providing a premium remote-working environment, has reopened and is accepting new applications for membership passes and private offices.

AmherstWorks has implemented new policies and procedures, in addition to restructuring the space to adhere to all of the state’s health and safety regulations in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

All members will be required to wear masks and practice social distancing of six feet at all times. Previously shared desks will be assigned exclusively to individuals each day, with hand sanitizer readily available. AmherstWorks membership assistants will sanitize all surfaces a minimum of three times a day.

AmherstWorks provides a professional and beautiful environment for getting work done. The newly renovated downtown workspace includes large windows for natural light, fast internet and premium amenities for members.

Learn more about membership at AmherstWorks.io.

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AMHERST

Kinase Health Inc., 23 Woodlot Road, Amherst, MA 01002. Byung Hoon Kim, same. Cancer related health monitoring service.

CHICOPEE

NCO Services Corp., 128 Wheatland Ave., Chicopee, MA 01020. Otavio J. Da Silva, same. Janitorial and cleaning services.

GREAT BARRINGTON

New Myths Inc., 188 East St., Unit A, Great Barrington, MA 01238. Patrick J. Toole, same. Actively engage and promote, through theatrical productions, education in the theater arts including film making.

GREENFIELD

Nolan Plumbing & HVAC Inc., 26 Clark St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Tyler Nolan, same. The installation of plumbing work and HVAC.

Shri Samar Corp., 49 Main St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Suresh Chaudhari, same. Convenience store.

HOLYOKE

Philly Wings Express Inc., 50 Holyoke St., R113, Holyoke, MA 01040. Gui Da Pan, same. Food service.

Shepard Renovations Inc., 542 Rock Valley Road, Holyoke, MA 01040. Michael Shepard, same. Home renovations, door and window installation, carpentry, trim work, and painting.

LEE

Longship Berkshire Corporation, 157 Columbia St., Lee, MA 01238. Mervyn H. Yan, same. Investment holdings.

Robin Schoen Public Relations Inc., 196 Main St., #3, Lee, MA 01238. Robin Shoen, same. Public relations.

Snap 247 Inc., 10 Pleasant St., Lee, MA 01238. Ashley M. Soules, 2776 Jacobs Ladder Road, Beckton, MA 01223. Retail exercise facility.

NORTHAMPTON

New England Institute for CPR Education Inc., 11-13 Maple Ave., Floor 3, Northampton, MA 01060. Ryan Flynn, same. Provide first aid education; train individuals in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Safe and Healthy Education Edu Inc, 247 Northampton St., Suite 1, Easthampton, MA 01027. Michelle D. Mulea, 573 Burts Pit Road, Florence, MA 01062. Safe and healthy training and education.

PALMER

Reflexology Inc., 1026 Central St., Palmer, MA 01069. Zhanhua Wu, same. Spa.

PITTSFIELD

Nantucket Rowing Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Ste 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Michael Springer, same. Increase awareness of rowing and grow lifetime participation in rowing with the Nantucket community.

SPRINGFIELD

Ramriv Inc., 263 Hancock St., Springfield, MA 01109. Jose Ramos, 56 Putnam Circle, Springfield, MA 01104. Auto detailing.

WARE

M. Mcguigan Inc., 17 Pulaski St., Ware, MA 01082. Michelle McGuigan, same. CPA services.

Features

Training Ground

In all of the region’s key economic sectors, such as healthcare, education, and manufacturing, organizations say, almost with one voice, that the number-one barrier to growth is finding and keeping talented workers — a task made even more difficult at a time of historically low unemployment. BusinessWest sat down with one of the Pioneer Valley’s leading workforce-development voices to discuss an evolving, long-term blueprint to meet those needs — and grow the economy even further.

Healthcare. Education. Advanced manufacturing.

In any conversation about the economic character of the Pioneer Valley — both its rich past and promising future — those three sectors would be high on the list of key factors.

Indeed, a late-2018 report produced by the MassHire Hampden County Workforce Board and the MassHire Franklin Hampshire Workforce Board calls them ‘priority industries,’ meaning the most important to the region’s economic success, and they form the basis of a comprehensive ‘labor-market blueprint’ which aims to narrow workforce talent gaps and help companies — and the overall economy — grow.

A new report, issued just a few weeks ago, follows up on that blueprint, outlining the many ways employers, economic-development agencies, vocational and technical schools, area colleges, and other entities have partnered to do just that.

Needless to say, it’s a daunting challenge, said David Cruise, president and CEO of MassHire Hampden County.

“What we’re doing at the moment is actually going in and implementing the goals and strategies we laid out in the blueprint,” he explained. “One of the priority works we did was to identify, through looking at both supply and demand data, the three priority industries in Pioneer Valley region.”

Beyond healthcare, education, and manufacturing, however, the blueprint also identifies four other critical industries: business and finance; professional, scientific, and technical, including information technology (IT); food services and accommodation, which takes into account the impact of MGM Springfield; and sustainable food systems, a growing sector particularly in Franklin and Hampshire counties.

“We have been working pretty carefully within those seven industries, trying to collect data, trying to make certain the programs we run are consistent with that data,” Cruise said.

The priority industries have two things in common, he noted: long-term growth opportunities for individual companies and the sectors as a whole, and clear career pathways, where people cannot just land entry-level jobs, but steadily progress in their career from there.

“That’s why we’re spending a significant amount of time — and we’re very excited about the work we’re doing — with our regional education partners to make certain they’re developing programs and courses that align with those occupations, within those priority industries, that will allow someone to take courses and get into programs where there’s a pathway that will allow them to, yes, get a job, earn more money, and take care of their families, but also be able to see some pathway forward. That’s what we’re really focused on.”

It’s another way of looking at the value of retention, he added, which allows companies to avoid the time and cost of losing employees and training replacements, but also helps individuals gain career stability and establish deeper roots in the region.

“How do we put in place opportunities that will allow workers, both new and incumbent, to be able to move forward in these companies and in their occupation?” he asked. “That’s how you drive economic growth.”

Getting Resourceful

In the Pioneer Valley, Cruise noted, job growth isn’t generated by a few massive companies.

“We certainly have some publicly traded companies, some large companies, but the growth in the region is really being driven by small and medium-sized enterprises. And we want to support those companies because they don’t necessarily have all the resources they need. They struggle when they can’t retain folks; it becomes a tremendous cost factor for them, spending all that time recruiting and not being able to retain their recently hired folks. We have a significant commitment to try to work with those small to medium-sized companies throughout the Pioneer Valley.”

One way the MassHires do so is through partnerships with numerous vocational and technical high schools offering a wide variety of programs, most of them aligned with the priority initiatives outlined in the blueprint, he noted — not to mention the three community colleges in the Pioneer Valley.

The more recent report on blueprint progress examines programs at the voke-tech schools and community colleges — and Westfield State University — and how their programs connect with priority industries.

David Cruise says today’s successful small to medium-sized business understands the importance of community partners like colleges and economic-development entities.

“We did an analysis of the educational programs and pathways and courses that are really aligned with these occupations within these priority industries,” Cruise said. “We’re asking, ‘where are the gaps?’”

The blueprint creators took particular interest in specific ‘priority occupations’ currently in demand. In healthcare and social assistance, these include social- and human-service assistants; direct-care workers such as registered nurses, nursing and medical assistants, and personal-care aides; and clinical workers such as dental hygienists, pharmacy technicians, medical records and health IT; physician assistants; and physical and occupational therapists.

In education, priority occupations center on educators at all levels, including vocational-technical, STEM, and trades, as well as teachers’ assistants. In manufacturing, the key jobs include supervisors, production workers such as CNC operators and machinists, and inspectors, testers, and quality-control workers.

The report — which provides plenty of detailed evidence that training and degree programs are available in all these fields — will be updated every two years, with the hope that such programs will continue to expand and adapt to evolving workforce needs.

“We’re trying to fashion a regional workforce response as opposed to trying to fashion a workforce response in Hampden County or in Hampshire-Franklin. We want to look at a regional response,” Cruise said. “We think it makes more sense, and we have a better chance at mitigating the supply gap if we combat it that way.”

One important evolution concerns apprenticeships, he added. “We’ve been very aggressively involved in developing registered apprenticeships in healthcare and advanced manufacturing. We have about 74 apprentices involved in programming in the area right now, which is significant. A year and a half ago, we had 16. We’re being very careful about making certain the funding that we have and how we deploy the money is clearly aligned with where the employers are telling us the demand is.”

The two Pioneer Valley MassHires also connected with the MassHire Berkshire Workforce Board to produce yet another study, this one taking a five-year outlook on workforce needs in manufacturing — again, focusing in on key careers, including machinist, CNC operator, quality control, supervisor, and CNC programmer.

“We did an analysis of the educational programs and pathways and courses that are really aligned with these occupations within these priority industries. We’re asking, ‘where are the gaps?”

“We’re focusing our work — at least in this industry — around two things,” he explained. “One is trying to be certain the incumbent employees in our regional companies have the skills they need to be technologically relevant and be able to work in these spaces. But the ongoing concern is, where do we find entry-level CNC operators? In most of these companies, they’re resourceful enough and do enough internal training and continuous improvement where they can deal with some of these areas, like machinists and CNC programming. Where they really struggle is getting entry-level people, particularly operators, to come in.”

To address that need, MassHire is launching three training programs in February that should yield an additional 45 workers to join local companies.

“Even though we’re excited about it, that, in itself, is certainly not going to solve all the problems of supply and demand,” Cruise went on, noting, again, that manufacturing faces the same supply challenges as healthcare and education. “In all these industries, the demand is there. We’re trying to figure out ways we can increase the supply chain so we can minimize this supply gap in all three of these areas.”

Making Connections

One intriguing development involves making connections with comprehensive high schools in the region, Cruise told BusinessWest, recognizing that the state has been innovative in making career-development opportunities available to non-vocational high schools.

“We’re doing a lot of work with these school districts. They’ve made a decision that they want their students to have career-awareness and career-focus opportunities that will allow their students to look at different career pathways. Whether they’re going on to a two- or four-year college or directly to work, they want them to be more knowledgable about what those requirements are, what the pathways look like.”

To that end, the regional workforce boards have sent information to area superintendents about hiring needs and opportunities in the priority sectors and what students need to do to access them.

“In the next few weeks, we’ll send more information to the schools that will be very helpful to superintendents, counselors, and teachers, to help them provide guidance to their students — and also the parents — around career pathway opportunities. We’re really excited about that, and I’m convinced that, over time, students and parents will be making better career decisions.”

At the end of the day — any day — the main workforce challenge for businesses is simply finding the right talent and hanging onto it.

“The people who are able to work and want to work, in a lot of cases, have found employment, yet that supply gap is still there at our two career centers and the one in Greenfield as well,” Cruise said. “We continue to get customers coming in, but the customers that are approaching us need some additional supports and services before we feel they’re able to secure employment and particularly retain employment.”

Meanwhile, he noted, employers find they’re spending more resources than they’d like onboarding individuals they don’t retain over the long term.

“So we’re trying to find ways at our two one-stop centers to talk with our customers, look at the barriers that are the reasons they are not in the labor force, and try to use our community organizations and resources to do the best we can to mitigate some of those barriers.”

Sometimes it’s a simple lack of soft skills, or employability skills, that cause matches to fail — people not reporting to work, or people not having the ability to work in a team concept, he explained. “We can at least put the job seekers that approach us in a better position for companies to retain them. It’s hard work because many folks who are not in the labor market have more than one barrier that has to be mitigated, and that requires significant allocation of resources and time and staff to be able to do that. But we have to do that; that’s our job.”

Many employers say they can train for aptitude, but not attitude. “The employers we work with are saying to us, ‘send me someone who has the aptitude and willingness to learn, who’s going to be here every day, on time, and is going to be willing to accept the instruction we give them, be able to accept constructive criticism when it’s given,’” Cruise said. “Again, it’s something we’re pretty laser-focused on.”

MassHire is fortunate, he added, to work in a region full of companies, mostly small, that understand the value of partnerships and are willing invest time and resources in working with the workforce boards and colleges.

“The whole concept of going alone isn’t going to work anymore,” he said. “You have to figure out a way to be in some collaborative partnerships where you can leverage resources, look at your assets, identify your gaps, and put in place opportunities and programs that will respond to that. We do that well out here. I’m not suggesting it’s not done well in other places, but we think we have a little bit of a copyright on that.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Education

Learning to See

Joy Baglio

When she arrived in the Pioneer Valley from New York City four years ago, Joy Baglio knew she wanted to write, and to connect with other writers. What she didn’t expect was to stumble upon a passion to teach the craft of writing, and to assemble a team to help her do that. Since its opening in 2016, the Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop has grown steadily, into a place both supportive and rigorous. And that’s an intriguing story in itself.

Joy Baglio likes sharing a quote by Flannery O’Connor, who wrote, “learning to see is the basis for learning all the arts.”

And there are many ways to see, Baglio said, including breaking apart written texts to examine the ‘how’ of writing — the craft, to employ a term Baglio uses often to describe what takes place at Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop (PVWW).

“I guess I have an inner engineer, someone who wants to understand how things work — but with stories,” she said during a candid conversation with BusinessWest, a few weeks after she was honored by the magazine as one of this year’s 40 Under Forty.

The problem is that the process of learning how to improve one’s writing requires vulnerability — and not every writer relishes that.

“People want to be recognized, they think they want to improve, but they don’t know how to take feedback,” she said. “We all have sense that what we produce is precious and sacred. That’s an earlier writer impulse — ‘this came out this way, this needs to be in this format, I’m protective of the way it is.’”

However, “there’s a moment when you emerge from that, when you really want to grow,” she went on, before hearkening back to the O’Connor quote. “Learning to see is also learning to see where your own work can grow. What can you learn from others? How can you learn those things? Taking feedback is one of the big challenges. It’s hard — it challenges our sense of self.”

But those who attend classes and workshops at PVWW quickly learn the value of feedback, of diving honestly into their work, and of honing their craft — just as Baglio does with the trusted writers to whom she sends her own manuscripts.

Joy Baglio (right) with PVWW Assistant Director Kate Senecal at the Easthampton Book Fest.

“If there’s anything not working, I want to know all of it. I want this thing to be as good as it can be,” she said of perhaps the greatest reason to take a class. “It requires deep self-honesty. What do you really want from your writing? Are you writing for yourself, in which case feedback is very threatening? Is it all about the ego, or is there something about the process of writing that you love? Do you want to be recognized and that’s all, or do you want to be the best writer you can be? If so, it requires a kind of surrendering.”

Writers — both seasoned and just starting out — have been happily surrendering, and growing, at PVWW since Baglio launched the school in 2016 as an informal Meetup.com group. It has since expanded to 13 instructors and a comprehensive curriculum that draws fiction writers, memoir writers, poets, even songwriters. One-day classes offer participants the opportunity to focus on specific elements such as dialogue, setting, and suspense, while multi-week series delve deeper into fiction fundamentals, story arc, revision, and more.

The organization also provides one-on-one consultations and writing-coach services, as well as hosting free writer gatherings and readings designed to cultivate and support the writing community at large.

It’s a collaborative environment where the instructors — who receive most of the proceeds the class fees generate — have plenty of say in what they’d like to bring to the table.

“We just slowly built it so we had more and more people teaching, and in order to sustain it, we started charging for classes, as low as we could, and it just kind of grew from sheer demand of people being interested and telling us how valuable they found it.”

“I might say, ‘it would be great if we had a class on sentence structure, creating flow on sentence level,’ and someone might fill that gap. But I want them to be passionate about what they’re teaching. We send out calls for class proposals, and I try to offer as many as we can,” Baglio said. “We offered 20 classes last spring — so it’s really kind of grown. I had no idea that it would grow like this.”

Settling Down

Baglio’s own story begins in Buffalo, N.Y. — “I grew up in blizzards and lake-effect snow” — after which she earned her undergraduate degree in English and creative writing from Bard College in New York, followed by an MFA in fiction from the New School in Manhattan.

She remained in the city for several years after that, but she and her partner were looking for a lifestyle change when they moved to the Pioneer Valley in 2015.

“My own writing started taking off when I moved here,” she recalled. “There must be something about leaving a place like New York City and coming to a place like this, a new place.”

Some early successes with published work and awards — her short stories have appeared in Tin House, Iowa Review, New Ohio Review, TriQuarterly, PANK, SmokeLong Quarterly, and many others — gave her a sense of momentum and possibility in her new home. In particular, a short story in Tin House called “Ron” — about a young woman who encounters a long series of lovers by that name — led to a film and TV option, and a film agent. Meanwhile, she’s working on a novel based loosely on her short story “How to Survive on Land,” the story of three half-mermaid siblings.

Much of Baglio’s work falls into the genre known as speculative fiction, a broad umbrella that includes sci-fi, fantasy, dystopian or futuristic fiction, and other imaginative themes. She started writing fantasy in high school, but as an undergrad, she was encouraged to write in a more realistic bent, although it wasn’t interesting to her. Inspired by the stories of Karen Russell and others, she felt she could uncover more meaning through more interesting, fantastic angles — and have fun doing it.

“It feels more playful, and I’m an advocate that writing is not drudgery,” she said. “My impulse was always that kind of story, but I got steered away from it — and then I refound it.”

A lot of her ideas lend themselves to “short exploration,” she said, which explains why she has about 20 pieces of flash fiction — very short stories — on her desktop. “I jump around and try to inch them all forward simultaneously, like an advancing army of stories. I like to work from start to finish through a piece and get that practice of what it means to begin and end something and develop it.”

That said, she’s making progress on her novel — writing much of it in a notebook instead of on a computer, which forces her to move the story forward, rather than get bogged down tweaking one section. She was awarded fellowships from the Elizabeth George Foundation and the Speculative Literature Foundation for work and research on the novel, for which she has already received early interest from agents and publishers.

She also teaches at the Boston-based creative writing center GrubStreet, and is associate fiction editor of Bucknell University’s literary magazine, West Branch.

The school’s instructors bring a deep pool of writing and editing experience to their classes.

All that would seem to take a good deal of Baglio’s time, and it does. In fact, she never planned to start a writing school — just to move to an arts-friendly region with a writing community she could tap into. When she did, through the Meetup groups gathering at Commons Coworking in Williamsburg, she saw an opportunity for more.

“There are a lot of small writing groups around here, and I loved some of them. I just felt a need for something else — I felt people wanting and needing instruction and tools,” she said. “I refer to ‘the writer’s toolbox’ — all the techniques and tools and concrete stuff that can actually help people. Like point of view — it’s a very technical craft element, and when you understand point of view and narrative distance and how to move farther and closer to your characters, it can really improve your writing a lot.”

She was particularly inspired by writing conferences she attended after earning her MFA, especially Tin House’s summer workshop in Portland, Oregon, which was very craft-based in instruction.

“We learned about technical stuff that I feel wasn’t even taught in many of my MFA classes. It really approached writing from the point of view of how to technically learn different skills,” she said. So, once her Meetup sessions became well-attended, Baglio began to put the pieces together in an entrepreneurial way.

“Even at the beginning, I approached it as a class, so I had a whole lesson. I think the first-ever one I did was on creating and developing characters,” she said. “I was leading it; it wasn’t just a free-for-all meeting where we’d sit and write together. I was giving out a lot of craft instruction I had accumulated over years — a lot of stuff I thought was helpful. And people kept coming back.”

Preserving the Spark

The roster of classes and workshops gradually expanded as Baglio met more writers drawn to the experience — and more instructors as well.

“We just slowly built it so we had more and more people teaching, and in order to sustain it, we started charging for classes, as low as we could, and it just kind of grew from sheer demand of people being interested and telling us how valuable they found it,” she explained. “A lot of people told us this was the first of this kind of writing instruction in the Valley. There are a lot of literary offerings and writers, but there isn’t one cohesive craft school for writing. So I felt there was a need — and we kept expanding.”

Becoming an entrepreneur was an education in itself, she added, and in many ways, running the school has taken time away from actual writing, but, on balance, she feels energized by the interactions.

“With writing, it’s always a balance of preserving your own creative spark and your own initial drive that led you to write in the first place with the practical side of how to teach others,” she told BusinessWest. “I really love teaching. I feel like I learn so much from the students and from other writers. I feel like I have this community of writers in the Valley.

Joy Baglio is seen here teaching the first-ever multi-week workshop (Intro to Fiction) at Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop — the first, as it turns out, of many more.

“It’s become this weird marriage of my own passion and the practical aspects of the business,” she went on. “Administrative work takes a lot of time. But it does give me creative energy. I just see what the other instructors are teaching, and I’m inspired by their topics, what they propose.”

The school — which draws writers of all ages and skill levels, from young people just starting out to retirees contemplating their memoirs — remains based at Common Coworking, which has been a positive symbiotic relationship; a number of current members at the space discovered it through a writing class.

Baglio also hosts free monthly community writing sessions and organizes free public literary readings and author panels at venues such as UMass Amherst, local libraries and bookstores, and other central locations in the Pioneer Valley. The school’s curriculum also includes workshops specifically geared to young creative writers, from middle through high school. On a related note, Baglio is currently teaching speculative fiction writing to high-school girls at Smith College’s summer writing program.

While her next goal is to get her novel into the world — which she feels would raise the profile of the PVWW as well as her own — she’s also looking at ways to expand the school, including online options and perhaps a residency program.

“I want to find really innovative ways to help people feel empowered creatively,” she said. “I feel like Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop can go in many different directions, but craft is always at the center of it. I want it to feel both rigorous and kind.”

She’s found plenty of both rigor and kindness through her development of a school she never planned to open when she left the urban environs of New York City.

“I remember moving here and reading some article saying this is the most densely populated area of writers in the country. So it isn’t surprising that this would emerge here,” she said. “I wasn’t dreaming of starting a writing school in New York, but I needed to get out of the city to do this. I feel like the Valley itself inspired this.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Cover Story

Pedal Power

 

Catherine Ratté, principal planner and Land Use & Environment section manager at the PVPC

Catherine Ratté, principal planner and Land Use & Environment section manager at the PVPC

ValleyBike had, by most accounts, an up-and-down first year, and we’re not talking about the hills its bikes make a little easier through electric pedal assist. But on the whole, 2018 was an encouraging success, with gradually increasing ridership across the network’s six municipalities, despite a slow and incomplete roll-out of the 50 stations and 500 bikes. With further expansion possible, hopes are high that more people will ditch their cars for a bike ride in 2019 — and then turn that ride into a habit.

A regional bike-share program may have seemed like a novel idea for many Pioneer Valley denizens last year, but for those who helped bring it about, it’s far from a new concept.

“We’ve been talking about it in the Pioneer Valley for 15 years,” said Catherine Ratté, principal planner and Land Use & Environment section manager at the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission. In fact, the PVPC produced a report in 2008 documenting previous bike-share programs around the world — including the Yellow Bike program that once existed at Hampshire College as well as the Bixi Bikeshare program in Montreal — and encouraging Pioneer Valley municipalities to look into establishing a regional program.

A lot has happened since then, but the main development was the emergence of electric pedal-assist bikes that help riders navigate hills and long distances they might not have wanted to attempt before. It was a game changer, Ratté said.

“Part of it was being a broad region — how can people get from Amherst to Northampton to Springfield? Then electric pedal assist came along, and we said, ‘oh, this could be a regional program,’” she told BusinessWest.

That program, known as ValleyBike, currently encompasses six communities — Northampton, Amherst, Springfield, Holyoke, South Hadley, and Easthampton — with others possibly on the horizon. A rider is free to pick up a bike at any of the 50 stations and drop it off at any other.

“The idea is to replace car trips with bike trips, and pedal assist makes it easier for all ages and abilities to use,” said Ratté. “It’s a big piece of acting on the climate crisis, but we also have a public-health crisis, and people don’t always have the opportunity to be physically active. ValleyBike makes it easier for people to bike to work. Maybe they aren’t physically fit enough to bike without pedal assist, and they don’t want to arrive at work sweaty — but they’re still exercising.”

A recent PVPC report detailed use of ValleyBike during 2018, its inaugural year. Even with limited availability and a slow ramp-up of stations (more on that later), the service logged 26,353 trips last year, an average of 170 per day, generating 83,735 miles — the equivalent of 3.3 times around the earth.

With the numbers expected to increase in 2019, that represents a significant front in the battle against traffic and air pollution, said Wayne Feiden, Northampton’s director of Planning & Sustainability.

“Our biggest commitment this year is to get more people to say, ‘yes, I really want to use this,’” said Feiden, who has long been one of the region’s strongest proponents of a bike-share network. “Nationwide, about a third of the people using bike shares are coming out of their car — making what would have been a car trip otherwise. If we can get you out of your car, that’s great from an environmental standpoint and a congestion standpoint. And that’s the part we need to grow most in the system.”

According to the year-end rider survey that helped the PVPC generate its report, the vast majority of users — 77.9% — rode ValleyBike less than five times per month, and 2.8% used it daily, with another 2.8% riding five or more times per week. These figures suggest that many users rode the bikes for leisure rather than to commute, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, Feiden said.

Wayne Feiden says ValleyBike organizers have several goals

Wayne Feiden says ValleyBike organizers have several goals, from reducing traffic and air pollution to getting people more physically active.

“We have a lot of goals, and each one serves different purposes,” he noted. “One is just to get people to exercise more. So that’s been great, and it’s also been a diverse set of users.”

Indeed, 28.8% of survey respondents were between 18 and 30, 52.1% were between the ages of 30 and 60, and 6.9% were over 60 years old, while the gender split was close to even.

“People who use bikes tend to be younger, but these bikes are reaching a broader range of users, which is great,” he said. “Getting people healthier is wonderful, as is giving people transportation options, whether they can’t afford a car or don’t want to drive a car for environmental reasons.”

“The idea is to replace car trips with bike trips, and pedal assist makes it easier for all ages and abilities to use. It’s a big piece of acting on the climate crisis, but we also have a public-health crisis, and people don’t always have the opportunity to be physically active.”

One goal moving forward, he said, will be to increase usage of memberships. Annual passes ($80) accounted for just 13% of all rides in 2018, and monthly passes ($20) represented another 28%.

Those riders, Feiden said, are the ones more likely to use ValleyBike Share for commuting to work or other daily commitments, and to turn biking from a leisure activity into a habit and a lifestyle. “Once you sign up for a year, you tend to build your commitment.”

For this issue, BusinessWest looks at the ways ValleyBike is building on its own commitment — and its momentum, both electric-assisted and figuratively.

Winding Path

To its proponents at the PVPC, ValleyBike is a key component of the region’s path to a sustainable future by promoting healthy habits and reducing greenhouse gases emitted by vehicle trips. If managed effectively, the year-end report notes, the program could also reduce the need for road repairs and expansion, and has the potential to improve the effectiveness of the region’s transit system.

Following the 2008 report exploring the concept, UMass Amherst launched a free bike-sharing program in 2012 funded by student government fees. The same year, Northampton’s Planning and Sustainability Department began researching a program for that city.

Mayor David Narkewicz approved a single bike-share station downtown, but by early 2013, officials determined that a larger system, either city-wide or, better yet, region-wide, was preferable. At the same time, Amherst officials were meeting with representatives from Amherst College, Hampshire College, and UMass to explore a town-wide bike-sharing program.

Soon after, the PVPC secured a Massachusetts Clean Energy Center grant to work with several area communities to advance clean-energy strategies, selecting advancement of a regional bike-share initiative as a priority for funding.

The ValleyBike station at Court Square

The ValleyBike station at Court Square, one of 11 in Springfield, saw the sixth-most ride starts across the entire network in 2018.

Between 2014 and 2016, the PVPC worked with a group of member municipalities — Amherst, Holyoke, Northampton, and Springfield — to research and advance regional bike-sharing. In 2016, Northampton, with PVPC and regional support, applied for and obtained federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funds for a regional bike-share network for four communities, later adding South Hadley as a fifth member.

A year later, Northampton, with PVPC and regional support, released a bike-share RFP and awarded a contract to Bewegen Technology for a 500-bike, 50-station system in the five communities. Toward the end of 2018, Easthampton obtained a Massachusetts Housing Choice grant for ValleyBike and joined the regional consortium, growing it to six municipalities.

The year-end report notes that ValleyBike had a rocky start due to issues with station installation, bike availability, and kiosk usability. Only 26 stations were open when the system went online on June 28, and another 17 were added in July and August. The remaining seven opened at the start of the 2019 season, bringing the total to 50.

After a slow start, the popularity of ValleyBike saw large increases in the first few weeks of August, reaching its peak ridership between Aug. 21 and Sept. 3, dipping slightly as temperatures dropped and students went back to school in early September.

“This is the first regional, multi-community, all-electric-pedal-assist bike-share program in the world. It was a really ambitious idea,” Ratté told BusinessWest. “It could have been smoother, but we had fantastic numbers of riders from all communities. And we definitely are eager to expand the coalition.”

She noted that possible expansion communities include Hadley, Chicopee, and West Springfield, should the PVPC secure the necessary additional funding. “We hope to keep it growing and expanding as well as adding some stations in the existing communities.”

“Nationwide, about a third of the people using bike shares are coming out of their car — making what would have been a car trip otherwise.”

With a longer season this year and more bikes — the network typically had about 167 available last year, but will offer 500 at the 50 stations in 2019 — she expects an uptick in ridership and increasing interest from the communities not yet on board.

“Hadley and Chicopee are the two holes in the system we’re trying to fill. We’re also trying to expand to West Springfield, but that’s more expanding out rather than filling in holes,” Feiden added. “Obviously we have to get more funding for new stations; there are many more locations that would make sense than we have money for.”

He added that more corporate sponsors are needed to make the system more sustainable. “But businesses are seeing the value for it — a third of the stations in Northampton are on private property. People gave us easements or licenses, whatever they needed to do, because they saw the value. One is at Cooper’s Corner in Florence, a small grocery store, and I hope people shop there because they gave us some really valuable real estate.”

Sustainable Future

Between climate concerns, public-health awareness, and simply enjoying the outdoors, bicycling — especially when pedal-assisted on those tricky hills — holds appeal to many demographic groups, Ratté said.

“If you ask people what they want in their region, a bike share is a popular thing. People expect their cities to fund options for getting around. And the cool thing is, you don’t have to stay inside your municipality; the same bike can go from place to place. It’s very convenient.”

That said, the program would benefit by coordinating more closely with public transit systems, she noted. According to the year-end survey, 27.5% of riders used ValleyBike in conjunction with other types of public transportation (such as rail or bus services). Organizers had hoped that bike stations could be located close to public transportation so public-transit riders could utilize the bikes to reach their final destinations. However, due to complications regarding the need for electrical outlets in close proximity to stations, this goal was not always met. That’s something planners are looking to remedy with future bike-station placements.

“People rely on the bus,” she said, “and to be able to use ValleyBike to get to and from the bus stop would be great.”

On a related note, the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts worked with the Pioneer Valley Regional Ventures Center, the not-for-profit arm of the PVPC, to allocate $12,000 per year over three years to provide subsidized memberships for economically disadvantaged residents of the region, particularly those who live in transit-rich urban cores. Bewegen was not able to launch this aspect of the ValleyBike initiative in 2018, and more people are expected to use ValleyBike when the access passes become available this year.

So far, however, people seem to be using the bikes mostly for enjoyment. Of the year-end survey respondents, 52% said they used ValleyBike mostly for leisure, while 21.2% used them to commute, 5.5% wanted to reduce pollution and traffic congestion, and 5.2% were focused on the health benefits. Notably, 36% reported an increase in riding bikes of all kinds since using the system.

“In some ways, the biggest criticism is people asking, ‘why didn’t you come to my neighborhood?’” Feiden said, noting that Northampton added one stop this year and has applied for a grant to establish four more. “And that’s great. It’s nice to get beat up for not doing it.”

The hope is that the coming years will see fewer of those complaints as ValleyBike continues to expand, giving more people an excuse to leave their cars behind, get their legs moving, and maybe leave the air a little cleaner.

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

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