Home 2013 October
Cover Story
Medical Marijuana Poses Business Opportunities — and Concerns

COVER1013bOne year ago, marijuana use was illegal in Massachusetts. Now, it falls under the category of economic development.
“It’s a business opportunity,” said Dr. Ronald Dunlap, president of the Mass. Medical Society. “In Maine, this is a more than $300 million industry, and that’s a small state.”

Those financial opportunities come in several forms. In January, the Mass. Department of Public Health (DPH) will choose up to 35 applicants — from a field of 158 — to open marijuana dispensaries for patients who have been certified by their physicians to use the drug.
At the same time, Internet entrepreneurs have been popping up as well.
“There are online services starting up where, if you pay $250, they will find you physicians who will certify you,” Dunlap said. “The people doing this are simply business people with money who are investing.”
But such activity poses issues with the medical-marijuana law, which was written to ensure that doctors can certify only patients with whom they have an established relationship.
And that’s just one point of confusion surrounding the new law, which is why at least 130 communities have placed moratoriums on marijuana dispensaries until they can work out the myriad zoning, housing, and public-health issues posed by such a sea change in the Bay State’s drug norms.
Helen Caulton-Harris, Springfield’s director of health and human services, explained that the city’s moratorium will give it time to develop a broad strategy for addressing the ancillary issues that have arisen with the legality of medical marijuana.
For example, “the law does not give immunity under federal law or obstruct federal enforcement of federal law,” she explained, nor does it supersede Massachusetts General Laws prohibiting the possession, cultivation, transport, distribution, or sale of marijuana for non-medical purposes. In addition, she noted, the new law requires no accommodation of the medical use of marijuana in any workplace or, in fact, accommodate smoking marijuana in any public place.
“The city must have the time to study the public-safety implications and whether additional resources are necessary,” she continued. “While I am appreciative of the thoughtful process of the state Department of Public Health and was a member of the state Public Health Council when these regulations were passed, the implications will directly impact our residents and perhaps our quality of life. In addition, on the local level, there must be a process to educate the residents about the potential impact of the regulations.”

Business Plans

Helen Caulton-Harris

Helen Caulton-Harris says Springfield needs time to grapple with the health, public-safety, and other issues that marijuana poses.

What is clear is that serious money is at stake, which is why the state has set significant financial barriers for entry into the marijuana market.
Specifically, a company that wants to open a dispensary would be subject to $50,000 in annual renewal and registration costs, as well as a yearly $500 registration fee for each of its employees. Applicants also had to make a $1,500 payment for the first phase of consideration, and a $30,000 payment for the second phase. In addition, the state is requiring potential business owners to have $500,000 cash on hand.
“This is a very competitive process, and we required applicants to meet high standards to advance,” DPH Commissioner Cheryl Bartlett said after the initial field of 181 applicants was trimmed by 23 earlier this month, mainly due to incomplete applications or insufficient capital. “We are fortunate that Massachusetts has a large field of serious applicants who are capable of making a significant investment to benefit qualified patients and safeguard communities.”
Each county in the state will be assigned at least one dispensary, but no more than five, with the total capped at 35 statewide. Twenty-two applicants are currently vying for sites in Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin, and Berkshire counties. Once licenses are approved early in 2014, it will take at least 120 days for a dispensary to open — hopefully giving cities and towns time to work out their issues and lift their moratoriums.
And those temporary moratoriums are now in place in at least 130 communities, including Agawam, East Longmeadow, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Hadley, Hampden, Hatfield, Palmer, Springfield, West Springfield, Westfield, and Williamsburg — and they typically apply to not only sellers, but home cultivation of marijuana, which will be permitted under certain circumstances for certified patients who lack easy access to a dispensary.
Unlike many of the other 19 states that allow medical-marijuana dispensaries, the Massachusetts law includes what’s known as ‘hardship cultivation,’ allowing certain individuals to grow their own marijuana — specifically, those who are physically unable to access reasonable transportation, demonstrate verified financial hardship, or lack a treatment center within a reasonable distance of their home.
“The city of Springfield needs to vet the potential impact of this section of the regulation on our residents as well as housing,” Caulton-Harris said. “Our thought process must include the impact on neighborhoods and mitigation strategies.”
To be assigned a dispensary license, entrepreneurs will have to prove to the DPH that their business plan is in compliance with all municipal regulations, ordinances, and bylaws. They are required to grow the marijuana they offer for sale, and they may also sell edible forms of marijuana.
The DPH noted that applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet the health needs of patients, site appropriateness, geographical distribution of dispensaries, local support, and public-safety assurances.

Who Will Be Certified
?
Patient and physician eligibility rules run in the thousands of words, but at their heart, a patient may use marijuana for medical purposes only after receiving written certification from a doctor of a debilitating medical condition — defined as cancer, glaucoma, positive status for HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, ALS, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, or another condition as determined in writing by the certifying physician.
‘Debilitating’ is defined as “causing weakness, cachexia, wasting syndrome, intractable pain, nausea, impairing strength or ability, and progressing to such an extent that one or more of a patient’s major life activities is substantially limited.”
As for physicians, they are required to conduct a clinical visit before issuing a certification, must complete and document a full assessment of the patient’s medical history and current medical condition, must explain the potential benefits and risks of marijuana use, and must have a role in the ongoing care and treatment of the patient.
In addition, physicians may not issue a certification for themselves or their immediate family members, and certifying doctors — as well as their family members and employees — may not have a financial interest in a dispensary, receive anything of value from a dispensary or any person related to the dispensary, or offer a discount to a qualifying patient for using a particular caregiver or dispensary.
If those standards are met, physicians may certify for up to a 60-day supply, which is defined as 10 ounces of marijuana. If a physician determines that a patient needs more than 10 ounces during that 60-day period, he must document the amount and rationale in the medical record and in the written certification.
It’s the language defining a bona-fide relationship that concerns Dunlap — or, rather, the potential skirting of that language, which the Mass. Medical Society (MMS) lobbied to include in the law.
“Let’s set aside the controversy over the indicators, and let’s assume there are five or six acceptable indicators,” he said, referring to medical conditions where marijuana would be an acceptable treatment. “People that I call Internet opportunists are essentially getting a doctor or list of doctors they feel will certify patients, and simply inviting patients to pay them money as a finder’s fee.”
Dunlap called it a “second level” of for-profit centers, which essentially say, “‘I will certify you, and you pay us $250.’ Most of it goes to the doctor, the rest to the center to find the physician.”
There are reasons why it’s important that a doctor and patient have an established relationship, he noted, the first of which is a knowledge of the patient’s medical history and the types of medications they’re already taking.
“That’s a big issue. If you wanted oxycodone and your doctor didn’t agree, we would have a problem with you going to one of the pill mills in Florida to get it. You’d be going around your primary-care physician to get a controlled substance,” he said. “There’s a lot of anxiety surrounding the fact that this is a parallel system to the treatment the physician might be aware of. We already have patients taking over-the-counter medications we don’t know about.”
Add to that the fact that marijuana has never gone through the rigorous clinical trials all other prescription drugs are subjected to — which is one of the reasons the MMS originally opposed the ballot question legalizing it — and it adds up to concern among doctors, not all of whom are expected to certify patients.
“Many doctors don’t feel there are indicators for marijuana and won’t want to certify patients, but there are doctors out there who will certify — if they have a real relationship with the patient,” Dunlap said. “If they don’t have that relationship, that will run afoul of the regulations we had adjusted.”
There is one other issue, he added, and that’s existing federal law, under which all marijuana use is still illegal. That affects its use, even medicinally, when federal funds are involved, such as in community health centers and government-subsidized housing.
“The federal government has not sued any physician in any state where marijuana has been legalized for medicinal purposes or medical use,” he said. “But it recently came to light that community health centers, which are federally funded, could lose their funding if they certify patients for marijuana. They have a conflict.”

Untangling the Knot
Conflicts, in fact, are at the heart of the moratoriums municipalities have set forth.
“The city itself has an internal team meeting on this,” Caulton-Harris said. “The Planning Department has issued a moratorium, and the Public Health Council has supported that moratorium, and we are going through the process now. We are thinking critically about some of the issues that might be before us as we think about dispensaries, as well as cultivation sites.”
Addressing all conceivable impacts — as well as the issues of fees, zoning changes, and municipal oversight — takes time, she added. For instance, while the law addresses the proximity of dispensaries and cultivation sites to schools, buildings that contain a doctor or pharmacy, motels, and hotels, other scenarios are less clear.
“While the regulations attempt to assure broad definition location exemptions, there are areas of concerns for the city of Springfield,” she noted. “For example, while we hope that all day-care facilities are licensed, we know that there are unlicensed facilities that exist with the city of Springfield. It is important that we have the time to think about and thoughtfully address those areas that are not covered in the regulations.”
She added that public-health officials have also expressed concern about the DPH’s strategy to inspect medical-marijuana treatment centers that dispense edible forms of the drug.
“The sanitary code does not currently have regulations in place to address inspection of medical-marijuana dispensaries,” she noted. “Depending on the number of centers in the city, additional staff may be required. The council felt it is critical that we are thoughtful about the implementation process as well as our responsibility to educate the residents about the potential impact of the legislation.”

Joint Concerns
When it comes to the Mass. Medical Society’s concerns about the health and legal risks of marijuana, Dunlap admits that ship has sailed, and today, he’s more focused on the role of physicians in the process.
“This is an opportunity to have a fast way to get marijuana to some people who need it, but they really would be better off just legalizing it as opposed to putting physicians in the pathway for potential liabilities,” he told BusinessWest. In short, he worries that some people — both doctors and business owners — might game the system.
“Again, we don’t have an issue if they have an existing relationship and the patient has one of the indicators,” he said of doctors issuing certifications. “But if you were the person who wrote 300 of those in your neighborhood, that will be an issue.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Sections Women in Businesss
How Anne Paradis Put a Charge into MicroTek

Anne Paradis

Anne Paradis

When Anne Paradis took the helm at MicroTek in 1987 — thus making an abrupt and significant career change, moving from human-services work to running a nonprofit manufacturing outfit — she ventured back to some of the exercises from her MBA program at UMass Amherst for help with the transition.
What she found is that what’s written in a book doesn’t usually — or easily — translate into what one will find on the shop floor.
“I had taken manufacturing courses as part of my MBA program, but it was nothing like what I encountered here,” she explained. “You learn how to schedule machine hours and go through all the production planning, and I can remember thinking at the time, ‘I can do this.’ But quite honestly, when I got in here and tried to apply those principles, it was very, very different, because you couldn’t plan productivity at a set level, and machine hours weren’t constant, and…”
Her voice trailed off as if there was much more, which there was. And she learned just about all of it, she said, by doing.
“I learned how to do every job in the place except soldering, which to this day I can’t do,” she said, adding that there are many roles at this company that produces cables and wire harnessing and touts its team members as ‘interconnect specialists.’ “I learned on the job. All the product knowledge and assembly knowledge I got, I learned from people who were working for the company.
“I sat and assembled cables with people,” she went on. “I asked questions; I made mistakes. In those days, it was all hands on deck, and if something had to go out the door and we needed another pair of hands, I would sit at the workbench and help to finish the job. The employees got a kick out of watching me join the production lines — and they still do.”
Such occurrences are rare, though, because Paradis spends most of her time now on the broad subject of growing revenue, an assignment that has many subplots, including everything from withstanding ever-increasing competition, foreign and domestic, to weathering three recessions, to building a new plant in Chicopee’s Westover Airpark West more than a dozen years ago.
She’s obviously fared well in her career transition, taking the company from roughly $750,000 in sales when she started to nearly $8 million, and from maybe 20 employees to more than 120, and placement on such lists as the Boston Business Journal’s ‘Top 100 Women-led Companies,’ Mass High Tech’s ‘New England’s 30 Largest Women-owned Tech Companies,’ and, most recently, BusinessWest’s compilation of the region’s largest manufacturers.
Meanwhile, she has continued and greatly enhanced the company’s standing as a leader in the hiring of individuals with developmental disabilities — with roughly 15% of its workforce falling into that category. This was the original mission of the company when it was created 30 years ago, she said, adding that, while MicroTek has evolved from a service program into a strategic business, its focus on providing employment opportunities for the developmentally disabled is one, but not the only, example of why the phrase ‘making connections’ refers to much more than the company’s product lines.
And her success with the many aspects of that phrase makes Paradis an intriguing subject for a new series in BusinessWest that will focus on women in business.
In the coming months, the magazine will profile individuals in a number of sectors to gain an appreciation for how far women have come in business and the specific fields that comprise it, but also for the work that remains to be done.
We start with a woman who still can’t solder — she said there are enough skilled craftspeople at the company to keep from even wanting to try — but has mastered many of the aspects of operating a business in today’s ultra-challenging climate, especially the most important: people.

Wired for Growth
As she gave BusinessWest a tour of the 24,000-square-foot MicroTek plant on Justin Drive, Paradis stopped at a number of the workstations where she learned this business and its specific products more than 25 years ago.
She explained the processes involved with specific parts, offered high praise for the workforce, and ended with some pointed commentary.
“This is a good example of how manufacturing is still a big part of our economy in Western Mass.,” she said. “People say this sector is in decline, and maybe it’s not what it once was, but what we’re doing here shows that manufacturing is very much alive and well.”
How Paradis came to be in a position to give such a tour, speak as one of the prominent voices in the region’s manufacturing realm, and lead her company to placement on those aforementioned business-magazine lists of the largest women-owned businesses is an intriguing story, one with elements of timing and circumstance, but also perseverance and entrepreneurial spirit.
It begins with Paradis’ decision to major in psychology and gravitate toward work in human services, specifically with the state Department of Mental Retardation, now known as the state Department of Developmental Disabilities.
She eventually took a job working in the development of community residential programs for adults with developmental disabilities in the wake of the closing of Northampton State Hospital, Belchertown State School, and other facilities. Specifically, she said she was involved with a pioneering concept that would enable individuals to remain in their residences on a permanent basis, rather than transition into different facilities as they gained more independence and their need for services and support diminished, which was the accepted model at the time.
“This was 30 to 35 years ago, and in those days, the community movement for people with disabilities was still in its infancy,” she explained. “And one of my first jobs was to help push the agenda of these more progressive program types.
However, he would soon become frustrated with the lack of progress with this movement, and especially with the funding restraints that soon emerged, and decided to make what would be her first career course change, pursue her MBA at UMass, and move into what she called the “business arena.”
Her first stop was at New England Business Associates in Holyoke, a management-consulting firm that assisted small businesses with the hiring of those with disabilities. One of her eventual clients was Microtek, which was created in the early 80s by human-services advocates working in conjunction with the University of Oregon, which was at the time researching models for employing people with disabilities. One of those models was to start a company where one controls the environment, provides the training, and brings in the work. In this case, the work — developed through a connection between one of the researchers at the University of Oregon and Hewlett Packard — was assembly of cables and wire harnesses.
When Paradis first started working for MicroTek, it was one of four operations — there was another in Orange, Mass. and two more in Virginia — for which she helped develop a marketing cooperative designed to generate new business and enable the participating companies to grow and eventually add more employees to the payroll.
While the other three ventures enjoyed success in this endeavor, MicroTek suffered from what Paradis called “poor management.” The company’s board eventually asked her to step in and run the company for a short time while a search for a new CEO was carried out.
That ‘short time’ has turned out to be 26 years — and counting.
“I came in to find problems a bit more complicated than the board realized,” she told BusinessWest. “I took a year’s leave of absence to run the company, and at the end of that year they made me an offer to stay.”
She accepted that challenge knowing that she had overcame what she described as a “lack of skills in certain areas.” Elaborating, she said her biggest challenges were learning manufacturing in general, and MicroTek’s line of products (custom wire harnesses and cable assemblies) in particular.
“I did not have an engineering background, and that made it challenging,” she noted. “But I was fortunate, because at the time, MicroTek was a very small company, and that afforded me the opportunity to learn on the job.
“I had a lot of strengths — managing staff, putting systems in place, and organizational development, because my undergraduate degree was in psychology — but I needed to learn this business,” she went on, adding that she completed much of this learning while serving as interim CEO, progress that gave her the confidence to accept the board’s offer and stay on.

People Power

Over the past 26 years, Paradis has coped not only with the everyday challenges facing all business and managers —  everything from cash flow to inventory control to finding qualified workers — but also more global matters, such as mounting competitors, especially from overseas operations, new-product development, and the worst economic downturn since the 1930s.
She described it all as a continuation that learning experience that began when she became interim CEO, one that is clearly still ongoing.
Indeed, while the plaques on the wall containing those business-magazine lists show that the company has clearly come a long way, there are some new challenges to face — and some old ones as well.
At or near the top of that list is mounting competition. While there have historically been some barriers to taking this kind of manufacturing overseas — including the high quality of work demanded and transportation costs — they have been coming down in recent years, said Paradis, noting that the company is facing intense competition from China, Mexico, and other countries.
It has responded by working to automate more processes in what is still a labor-intensive business, while also diversifying into some new product lines, specifically control panels built for customers in the security and medical fields.
The company, which suffered, as all manufacturers did, during the Great Recession, has rebounded, and growth has been steady over the past several years, said Paradis, adding that she has set an aggressive, but realistic, goal of reaching $12 million in sales over the next few years.
But the term ‘success’ has many meanings at MicroTek, she went on, adding that, while the bottom line is perhaps the most important, the company’s original mission is still an important barometer when it comes to that word.
And in this realm, more goes into this equation than simply hiring the developmentally disabled, she went on, adding that the company’s broader goal is to integrate such individuals, treat them as they would any employee, and make them part of highly successful and efficient teams.
One of the reasons for the company’s success has been its ability to do this by effectively giving these employees both the support and the tools they need to succeed, she told BusinessWest, adding that this is a philosophy that permeates the company and all aspects of its workforce.
“Everyone has the same benefits and the same access to company services, and people work on some part of all of the work that goes out of here,” she explained. “We have integrated teams, and the idea of partnering people with co-workers and providing them with the support they need extends well beyond the employees with disabilities, because we also employ a number of people who speak English as a second language and may have difficulty reading English.
“The transformation for the company over the years has been in this area,” she went on. “There were special supports and training that we started out using for the individuals with disabilities, and over the years, we’ve just adopted those as standard operating procedure for the company.”

Current Events
Paradis says that, while she’s quite proud of the plaques in the front lobby and what they represent in terms of both the company’s success and her standing as a woman in business, she’s more proud of the many ways in which MicroTek has become a role model.
Its success in the current, highly competitive environment provides evidence that manufacturing is still very much alive in the Bay State and this region. Meanwhile, its success with hiring, training, and integrating individuals with a wide range of challenges shows that ‘diversity’ can be much more than a buzzword.
These are among the many accomplishments for Paradis, who still can’t solder, but has developed a rare talent for making connections — and in a number of very important ways.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Departments Picture This

Send photos with a caption and contact information to:  ‘Picture This’ c/o BusinessWest Magazine, 1441 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103 or to [email protected]

Tea for Many
20131003_sq_0006LadyPodiumPlenty of creative hats graced the seventh annual Square One Tea, held at the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House. More than 300 men and women from the private and public sectors came together to support Square One, as proceeds will help to fund early-education programming, as well as family services and support. Left: from left, Kathryn Kirby, Youth Employment Manager at the Regional Employment Board of Hampden County; Kimberley Lee, vice president of advancement for Square One; Kathy Cardinale, principal of Cardinale Design; Francie Richardson, account manager at NEPM; and Pamela Kirby. Right: Joan Kagan, president and CEO of Square One, addresses the sellout crowd.


School’s In
Ribbon-CuttingBaystate Academy Charter Public School, a college preparatory school founded by Baystate Health in Springfield, opened its doors recently with a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony and community day. Students participated in dancing and other activities at the school’s newly renovated campus on Franklin Street. The academy has a curricular focus on health sciences and a longer school day, encouraging students to engage in extracurricular activities and community service. Pictured, from left: students Nathan Santiago, Aidan Kesler, Mulan Foggs, Jayden Orr, Aaliyah Lopez, and Taryn Cheeks; Dean of Students and trustee Marjorie Hurst; and Tim Sneed, the school’s executive director, take part in the ribbon cutting.



Center for Recovery
Frank_Gallo2Michael_StraiteThe Center for Human Development recently announced the opening of the Traumatic Stress Recovery Center, a new outpatient clinic, located at 342 Birnie Ave. in Springfield. An open house introduced Clinic Director Frank Gallo, left, a retired Rhode Island police officer and former associate professor of Criminal Justice at Western New England University. At right is Michael Straite, director of the state Department of Veterans’ Services.

Virtual Concerns
CYBERCyberspace has been called a “bad neighborhood with bad people lurking in virtual places.” Bay Path College, in collaboration with the Economic Development Council of Western Mass., recently hosted a Cybersecurity Summit focusing on anti-terrorism and information security, to launch its new master’s degree program in Cybersecurity Management. Pictured, from left, are keynote speaker Robert Milton, retired commander of the London Metropolitan Police Service, New Scotland Yard, and Managing Director, Milton Tezelin Ltd. providing international
antiterrorism security training; David Martin, Risk Management Expert; and Dr. Larry Snyder, Director of Bay Path’s MS in Cybersecurity Management.



Celebrity Weekend
YcelebrityJeffSattlerTravisBestReneeMcDonald_KirkSmithThe YMCA of Greater Springfield’s Celebrity Classic Weekend recently brought together celebrities for a weekend of socializing, golf, and bowling. The fund-raiser will enable the Y to continue to improve the lives of area teens. Pictured at the Cold Spring Golf Club in Belchertown is YMCA Board Chair Jeff Sattler, retired NBA player and Springfield native Travis Best, Renee MacDonald, and YMCA of Greater Springfield President and CEO Kirk Smith.









Tribute to Jimmy
3-with-statueStatueFamily and friends of Jim Vinick, long-time Dana-Farber Cancer Institute supporter and BusinessWest 2013 Difference Maker, joined him on Oct. 12 to unveil a statue he commissioned to celebrate Dana-Farber’s rich history. The bronze sculpture features Dr. Sidney Farber, a pioneer in childhood cancer, and his 12-year-old patient, Einar “Jimmy” Gustafson, whose bedside broadcast on the radio program Truth or Consequences in 1948 moved New Englanders to champion the fight against cancer. Above left, from left, are Vinick; Suzanne Fountain, director of the Jimmy Fund; and Brian Hanlon, the sculptor who created the statue.

Opinion
The Mandate for Medical Marijuana

One year ago, the Mass. Medical Society (MMS) was busy lobbying against a ballot question that proposed to legalize marijuana in the Commonwealth for medicinal purposes.
Its leaders argued that marijuana has never been subjected to clinical trials like every other prescription. That its benefits are unproven on a large scale. That doctors are concerned about violating federal law.
All valid arguments. But after voters overwhelmingly approved medical marijuana at the polls, the MMS didn’t just rehash the same complaints. Rather, over the next several months, doctors found a seat at the table with the state Department of Public Health (DPH), contributing to the regulations being hammered out.
For example, when the state laid out certain conditions for which marijuana would be an acceptable treatment, the society argued for language that the condition must be ‘debilitating.’ And it insisted that physicians certifying patients for the drug must have a real, established relationship with those individuals.
In short, despite its concerns — and the MMS remains vocal about the lack of clinical trials — it recognized that, like in 19 other states and the District of Columbia, the ship of public opinion had sailed. Marijuana was now legal for medicinal purposes. At that point, the goal was simply to craft as solid a set of rules as possible to govern its use.
It’s an example worth noting by the many Commonwealth residents and municipal officials who retain serious qualms about introducing pot into their neighborhoods. But arguing against medical marijuana now is as ineffectual as arguing against casinos. They’re both definitely coming to this area.
That said, communities like Springfield and dozens of others in Western Mass. are right to establish temporary moratoriums on any economic activity related to marijuana. Why? Because the DPH’s guidelines — it will award up to 35 licenses across the state to sell the drug — don’t address every issue that cities and towns might have.
Questions abound. Are there public-safety concerns arising from new drug use in neighborhoods, even if it’s legally prescribed? What if a patient certified by a doctor to use marijuana lives in federally subsidized housing? Will marijuana be sold, as Springfield’s top health official posed, near unlicensed day-care centers? How will marijuana dispensaries be regulated on the local level? What privacy and security issues might arise?
But anyone who thinks medical marijuana is still a question of if, not when, might as well get elected to Congress and try to repeal Obamacare, to name another controversial piece of legislation that’s not going anywhere. The states that have legalized the drug for medicinal purposes have not imploded in a hazy stupor, and polls show that most people feel the benefits far outweigh the drawbacks.
Those drawbacks should be considered, though, and cities have the right to do so. But at the end of the day, like casinos, this is one bet the state — and a majority of its voters — are willing to make, and that mandate should be respected.

Construction Sections
Region’s Construction Activity Is a Mixed Bag

R.J. Chapdelaine

R.J. Chapdelaine says he’s busy with both remodeling jobs and new homes, like this one going up in West Springfield.

In the post-recession world of construction, when jobs are few and far between, diversity is a good thing.
“We’re on the upswing. It was a pretty solid year, a lot of phone calls,” said A.J. Crane, operations manager at A. Crane Construction in Chicopee. “It’s nice for us that we’re kind of diverse; we don’t specialize in any one thing. We’re interested in quality more than anything.
“A lot of guys do just kitchens and baths, or just additions, or just houses,” he continued. “But we had a really diverse year. We were all over the map — a lot of commercial work, a lot of residential work.”
The general consensus among the builders BusinessWest spoke with is that housing is rebounding from the recession faster than commercial building, but that’s not true for every contractor.
“We’re actually doing a little more commercial, which is different for us,” Crane said. “It’s typically like 60-40 residential, and it’s the other way around this year. It’s not that we’re doing less residential; we’re just doing more commercial. But it doesn’t matter to us who the property owners are — commercial businesses, government, homeowners — we’re interested in doing the work.”
Joe Marois, president of Marois Construction in South Hadley, said his workload picked up this year, but the near horizon is less encouraging.
“So far, we’ve survived the year,” he told BusinessWest. “We’ve been very busy, but we have very guarded profits we have to be careful about, because there’s not a whole lot of foreseeable work right now. Things have slowed down a little bit; my contemporaries are saying the same thing.”
Paul Ugolini, president of Western Builders in Granby, is one of them.
“We’re in the same predicament — we’re having a good year, not bad, we’re paying the bills, but it looks like it’s going to slump off,” he noted. “The way this market is, there’s just not much commercial work out there. It seems like the colleges and universities aren’t spending too much money these days, and that’s a problem for us.”
However, he noted, “we do have some housing backlog. We’re going to be doing four buildings in Holyoke, and there’s some housing in Easthampton we’ll chase — but you still have to land it.”
As for the commercial market, it tends to lag behind single-family homes, Ugolini noted, and builders hope activity starts to perk up soon. “The way this business is, it’s been rough the last few years. It’s just supply and demand — there are a lot of contractors, but not a lot of work.”

Moving Along
Crane said he’s gotten mixed messages from fellow builders. “From what we’ve heard, people are very busy or very slow — there aren’t a lot of guys in between.”
One rising trend has to do with next-generation housing, he noted — “older people moving back in with their kids, kids moving back in with their parents. We just finished one of those up.”
This is more than a localized phenomenon, according to Jed Kolko, chief economist for Trulia Trends.
During the recession, he notes at truliablog.com, fewer households were created than normal. Typically, 1.1 million new households are added each year in the U.S., mostly due to population growth. However, from the first quarter of 2008 to the first quarter of 2011, only 450,000 new households were created annually. “Slower household growth means less demand for homes, so annual construction starts dropped during this period from a norm of 1.4 million to below 600,000. Most recently, only 521,000 households were created between the first quarter of 2012 and the first quarter of 2013.”

Paul Ugolini

Paul Ugolini says his company has a residential backlog, but commercial projects remain frustratingly elusive.

A big part of this slowdown, he notes, is due to young people living with parents or doubling up with roommates rather than buying their own house. “Since most kids won’t live with their parents forever, these young adults represent pent-up demand for housing that the recovery should unleash. The problem is, the kids aren’t moving out yet.”
RJ Chapdelaine, president of Jos. Chapdelaine & Sons in East Longmeadow — which focuses largely on residential building and remodeling — said business is definitely on the upswing.
“Right now, we’re working on two new homes, and we’ve been working on quite a few additions and renovations,” he noted. “Our kitchen and bath renovations have been very solid, and we’re feeling as though things are heading in a more positive direction. We’re even anticipating starting a new 10-lot subdivision in East Longmeadow. We’ve had quite a lot of good feedback.”
Meanwhile, “I got three calls yesterday for new homes. That, to me, is a good sign — that people want to talk about new homes. It’s very refreshing. Hopefully, it’s a good sign; over the last few years, those calls were more rare, and the fact that we’re starting to get new-home calls and larger remodel jobs is nice.”
Chapdelaine credits a couple of colliding developments — an improving economy giving consumers confidence to make big purchases again, and still-low mortgage rates (and the fear that they won’t stay that low forever).
“I would say some of it is pent-up desire,” he said. “People have been sitting for awhile, and they’re starting to see the rates creep back up a little bit, and it puts them in a position where they feel they need to move because the rates are obviously still at historic lows, and they don’t want to see them creep up to where they were even two, three, five years ago. So they’re thinking it might be time to build or remodel.

Crisis of Confidence
Kolko notes, however, that the housing market has a long way to rebound, and it will — eventually.
“Jobs will help, but the job recovery for young people still has a long way to go,” he writes. “While more young adults are working now than a year ago, their employment rate is still much closer to the worst of the recession than to pre-recession levels. As late as mid-2008, 71% of adults ages 18-34 were employed. That dropped to a low of 65% in mid-2011 and has risen back only to 66.8%. But you don’t get a job one day and move out of mom and dad’s the next. It could still take years before young people have built up the savings and economic security to leave the nest.”
Meanwhile, the commercial sector is still feeling a distinct lack of security and confidence, Marois noted, partly driven by the chaos coming out of Washington, represented most recently by the federal shutdown, and lingering uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act, which will increasingly impact employers in 2014.
“You have to throw into the mix what’s going on in Washington,” he said. “The shutdown has had far-reaching effects, given the fact that we’ve got looming budget cuts, and the healthcare law is starting to look like it will be a problematic program to get initiated. I think it’s going to have an impact on everyone’s confidence going forward with projects. It’s affecting our psyche right now.”
All those factors, layered atop an economy that never returned to pre-recession levels, makes it difficult to generate building activity.
“I’m not too confident in the traditional way we used to do things,” Marois said. “Our way of thinking, running businesses and understanding the economy, seems to be different right now because it’s intermixed with uncertainty over new programs and new regulations. It’s a time like we’ve never seen before.”
In short, largely commercial builders are hoping that they soon begin to see the signs of life appearing in the housing-construction market.
“We’re pretty optimistic. Things seem to be a lot better than they were,” Chapdelaine said, echoing Crane’s perception as he added, “we hear there’s no middle ground; you’re either very busy or very slow. I’m glad to be on the busy side.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Community Profile Features
Tourism, Nostalgia Help Stockbridge Thrive

Michele Kotek, right, and Stephanie Gravalese-Wood

Michele Kotek, right, and Stephanie Gravalese-Wood say Stockbridge brings tradition and nostalgia to life, but looks to the future as well.

It’s been called the most famous Main Street in America.
And there is little disputing that Stockbridge’s main thoroughfare has earned that distinction. It was cinched in the years and decades after the town’s most famous resident, Norman Rockwell, made it famous in his “Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas” painting, created in 1967.
“If people want to experience that classic New England Christmas, then Stockbridge is the place to do it,” said Stephanie Gravalese-Wood, marketing and communications manager for both the Red Lion Inn and the Porches Inn at MassMoCA in North Adams.
Indeed, that classic experience comes to life annually in a weekend event that takes the same name as the Rockwell painting and celebrates both the artist and the holidays through various family-friendly activities. This year’s 24th edition of the event, slated for Dec. 6-8, will include holiday readings, festive home tours, caroling, a luminaria walk, and the sold-out holiday concert at the First Congregational Church. All events lead to the weekend highlight: the closing of Main Street to recreate Rockwell’s scene, complete with 50 antique cars.
Michele Kotek, innkeeper for the Red Lion Inn, has also been involved with the Stockbridge Chamber of Commerce for the past several years; currently she is president of the board. She told BusinessWest that the annual event was launched to help invigorate the holiday season in Stockbridge, and the success is evident, especially for the Red Lion, which is sold out for that weekend a year in advance.
“We [the chamber] have obviously perfected the event, and if you are at all ‘bah, humbug,’ come to Stockbridge and see,” said Kotek, adding that, while the community isn’t shy about celebrating its past, this is definitely not a town where time stands still.
Indeed, the community — as well as those charged with promoting it — are in some ways changing with the times, said Barbara Zanetti, long-time director of the Stockbridge Chamber of Commerce, noting that everything from a recently updated chamber website to mobile apps are being used by the chamber and specific venues to make a number of audiences, and especially the younger generations, aware of all that Stockbridge offers.
Jeremy Clowe

Jeremy Clowe says myriad creative initiatives have helped put the Norman Rockwell Museum — and the town — on the map.

However, ever-advancing technology brings challenges along with opportunities. And one of those challenges is cell-phone coverage and GPS identity, said Town Administrator Jorja-Ann Marsden, noting that dead zones are common and GPS searches for many Stockbridge addresses lead to the wrong locations (more on this later).
But despite these difficulties, people are finding Stockbridge, in both a literal and figurative sense, said Jeremy Clowe, manager of Media Services for the Norman Rockwell Museum, where that famous painting of Main Street hangs, along with hundreds of others.
“People want to experience American history and values, and even the name ‘Norman Rockwell’ has become an adjective, as in ‘a Norman Rockwell moment,’” he said, noting that the artist’s work — and the town in general — resonates with younger audiences, and with people from across the country and around the world. “That’s what a lot of people are looking for when they come here.”
For this latest installment of its Community Profile series, BusinessWest turns the spotlight on Stockbridge, where tourism is the main economic driver, and nostalgia has long been the main ingredient in a recipe for success.

Culture Club
Zanetti said that, while most everyone knows that the official address for Tanglewood, the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1937, carries a Lenox zip code, far fewer know that perhaps 90% of the property is in Stockbridge.
And she and others in the community are not shy about reminding people of that.
“In some of the advertisements for Tanglewood, they’re now saying ‘between Stockbridge and Lenox,’ but we do like to get our name in there for sure,” said Marsden, who has worked for the town since 1985. She noted that Tanglewood — in whatever town people believe it’s in — is one of many venues in the Berkshires that make the area a truly regional attraction, with Stockbridge being a key part of that equation.
And the regional approach is certainly one of the strategic approaches being used by those charged with promoting the community and stimulating tourist activity, said Zanetti, adding that Stockbridge, like Lenox, Great Barrington, Lee, and other communities, certainly benefits from its proximity to other popular locations and the large number of true destinations within an hour of each other.
But Stockbridge itself has long been a major draw, said Zanetti, noting that the museum, Main Street, the Red Lion Inn, and, yes, Tanglewood are some of the many attractions that help bring up to 25,000 people to the town (population: 2,000) in the summer and fall.
And these visitors have helped keep Main Street and its small commercial district — just a few blocks in size — thriving, said Marsden. “Tourism continues to thrive in our small business area, and the few times a storefront has gone empty, it hasn’t stayed empty for long.”
Rockwell and the values ever present in his work play a huge role in the town’s vibrancy, said Clowe, noting that the license plates in the museum parking lot are from all over the country, not just Massachusetts, New York, and Connecticut, and there are bus tours bringing people from China, Japan, France, and other countries as well.
But while Rockwell still seems to resonate with all generations, it doesn’t hurt to have much more to offer the younger audiences, said those we spoke with, and the regional aspect of Berkshires tourism has been part of this equation.
Tanglewood has added popular talent that is drawing a much younger audience over the past several years, said Clowe, adding that the Solid Sound music series at MassMoCA (the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art) in North Adams, featuring such bands as Wilco, has also brought more young people to the Berkshires — and to Stockbridge.
“I think it’s been some of these initiatives that have been really creative that are helping to get our name on the map,” he said. “People don’t always know where this [the Rockwell museum] is, but we’ve found new ways to market ourselves online and with mobile apps, and maybe it’s a combination of all these things making the younger generations aware.”
Overall, the younger generations are “a different type of person and traveler,” said Zanetti, adding that that individual destinations must adapt and create programming that will appeal to such audiences.
Clowe concurred, and cited, as one example, a recent exhibit at the Rockwell museum — “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: The Creation of a Classic,” which celebrated the 75th anniversary of the famous film. On display from early June until the end of October, the successful exhibit evolved from the personal friendship between Rockwell and Walt Disney and has drawn Disney fans of all ages from across the country.
“Everyone has to work harder and keep things fresh,” said Clowe, adding that, by doing so, Stockbridge and its individual attractions can make nostalgia just one of many selling points.

History Channel
Marsden told BusinessWest that Stockbridge’s problems with cell-phone dead zones (including some stretches of that famous Main Street) and GPS identity are real and somewhat frustrating, although carriers are looking to perhaps add another tower.
“I think it’s just a matter of time,” she said. “We’re continuing to talk to Verizon and AT&T and pushing for that cell service. While we may have a small year-round population, we’re a tourism destination, and our population swells, and for the people that travel here, we really need that cell service.”
But while it waits for that service to improve, Stockbridge will continue to focus on what enabled visitors of all ages to find — and eventually cherish — this community long before anyone knew what the acronym GPS stood for.
“A visit to Stockbridge and the Red Lion Inn is the classic New England experience,” said Gravalese-Wood. “And sometimes innovation is just keeping things the way they are.”
Stockbridge has continued to prove that point for more than a half-century now.

Elizabeth Taras can be reached at [email protected]

Sections Super 60
Depth, Diversity Define the 2013 List of Top-performing Companies

Super60logoJeffrey Ciuffreda says there are a number of encouraging signs to take from this year’s roster of Super 60 companies — the 24th compilation of the region’s top-performing businesses.
For starters, there are the numbers — for both revenue and revenue growth — posted by the winners, said Ciuffreda, president of the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield, which has presented the program since 1990. He noted that companies in the first category averaged more than $35 million last year and combined for more than $1 billion. Meanwhile, one-third of the companies in the revenue-growth category averaged in excess of 50% growth over the past three years, and the average for those 30 honorees was 49%.
These figures speak to how well the area business community has rebounded from the deep and lengthy recession that began in 2008, said Ciuffreda, noting that another positive sign is the diversity represented by this year’s list, which includes everything from colleges to technology companies; healthcare facilities to manufacturers; financial-services firms to retailers.
The number of small, and in some cases very small, businesses on the list is also encouraging, he noted, adding that perhaps the most noteworthy quality when it comes to this year’s roster is the number of first-timers; there are seven, the largest group of newcomers in several years.
“To get new folks on there shows that maybe over the past few years, when people had their heads down and were just surviving, there were some businesses that were experiencing pretty good progress,” he told BusinessWest, adding that their participation in Super 60 shows a desire to tell their story. “It’s a good sign for the economy when you can get new businesses that can exhibit that kind of growth.”
Still another source of encouragement is the large number of companies — 12 in all — that qualified for both categories, said Ciuffreda, noting that this stat indicates that some larger companies have been experiencing strong growth.
The 2013 edition of the Super 60 will be feted at the program’s annual luncheon on Oct. 25, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam. The event will feature introductions of the winners and include a presentation on a unique business venture in the region — Simple Diaper and Linen, a growing enterprise that has mastered the technique of eco-friendly laundering.
Principals Angie Gregory and Jessica Montagna will detail the company’s profound growth and unique business model, and thus continue a pattern of letting emerging entrepreneurs take center stage at the Super 60 lunch. In recent years, Paul Kozub, founder of V-One Vodka, and Stanley Kowalski, founder of FloDesign, have been keynoters.
Meanwhile, for this issue, BusinessWest spotlights the 60 winners (snapshot profiles begin on page 21) in both the total-revenue and revenue-growth categories.
Topping the former is Springfield College, led by new president Mary-Beth Cooper, followed by Noonan Energy Corp., a residential heating and cooling company, and Whalley Computer Associates Inc., a Southwick-based technology-solutions firm.
Whalley is one of six companies in the category to also qualify for the revenue-growth list. The others are Gandara Mental Health, Joseph Freedman Co. Inc., Maybury Associates, Millennium Power Services Inc., and Tighe & Bond.
Topping the revenue-growth category (where there are actually 31 winners)  is Mahan Slate Roofing Co. Inc., which specializes in slate and copper roofing for residential, institutional, and commercial structures, followed by Paragus IT, the Hadley-based outsourced IT solutions firm, and Troy Industries Inc., a U.S. government contractor that designs and manufactures small-arms components and accessories.
Troy was one of six in that category to also qualify for the total-revenue list. The others are ABLE Machine Tool Sales Inc., the Futures Health Group, LLC, NUVO Bank, Specialty Bolt & Screw Inc., and Titan USA Enterprises Inc.
To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire counties or be a member of the ACCGS, have revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and have been in business at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year.
For more information regarding the Super 60 or to make reservations for the luncheon, call (413) 755-1313 or order online at www.myonlinechamber.com.  Tickets cost $50 for ACCGS members and $70 for non-members.

Elizabeth Taras can be reached at [email protected]

TOTAL REVENUE

* Indicates company qualifed in both categories

1. Springfield College
263 Alden St., Springfield
(413) 748-3000
www.springfieldcollege.edu
Mary-Beth Cooper, President
Founded in 1885, Springfield College is a private, independent, coeducational, four-year college offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs with its Humanics philosophy — educating students in spirit, mind, and body for leadership in service to others.

2. Noonan Energy Corp.
86 Robbins Road, Springfield
(413) 734-7396
www.noonanenergy.com
Ted Noonan, President
Founded by Timothy Noonan in 1890, the fifth-generation energy company is now led by Ted Noonan, and installs, replaces, maintains, and upgrades heating and cooling systems throughout the Pioneer Valley.

3. Whalley Computer
Associates Inc. *
One Whalley Way, Southwick
(413) 569-4200
www.wca.com
John Whalley, President
WCA is a locally owned family business that has evolved from a hardware resale and service group in the ’70s and ’80s into a company that now focuses on lowering the total cost of ownership of technology and productivity enhancement for its customers. Whalley carries name-brand computers as well as low-cost performance compatibles.

Aegis Energy Services Inc.
55 Jackson St., Holyoke
(800) 373-3411
www.aegisenergyservices.com
Lee Vardakas, Owner
Founded in 1985, Aegis Energy Services is a turn-key, full-service provider of combined heat and power systems (CHPs) that generate heat and electricity using clean, efficient, natural-gas-powered engines. These modular CHP systems reduce a facility’s dependence on expensive utility power, reduce energy costs, and reduce one’s carbon footprint.

American International College
1000 State St., Springfield
(800) 242-3142
www.aic.com
Vincent Maniaci, President
The 128-year-old private, coeducational, liberal-arts school is interracial, interfaith, and international. One of the keystones of the AIC experience is the opportunity to interact with students from many different backgrounds. The college is organized into schools of Arts, Education, and Sciences; Business Administration; Health Sciences; and Continuing Education.

Associated Electro-Mechanics Inc.
185 Rowland St., Springfield
(800) 288-4276
www.aemservices.com
Elayne Lebeau, Owner/CEO
Associated Electro-Mechanics is a diversified, one-stop industrial sales and service center servicing the New England region and beyond, with a variety of industrial repair and rebuilding services.

The Association for Community Living
220 Brookdale Dr., Springfield
(413) 732-0531
www.theassociationinc.org
Barbara Pilarcik, Executive Director
For 60 years, the Association For Community Living has been creating opportunities, building relationships, and improving lives of children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families. The agency’s caring and experienced workforce empowers individuals with developmental disabilities to live with dignity, bringing fulfillment, community, and valuable relationships into their lives.

Baystate OB/GYN Group Inc.
2 Medical Center Dr., #206, Springfield
(413) 794-8484
www.bogg.com
dr. Howard Trietsch, managing partner
Caring for patients for more than 25 years, Baystate Ob/Gyn Group Inc. offers experienced care for pregnancy, gynecology, menopause, and surgical gynecology for women from teens through the elder years at four office locations in the region.

Braman Chemical Enterprises
147 Almgren Dr., Agawam
(413) 732-9009
www.braman.biz
Gerald Lazarus, President
Braman has been serving New England since 1890, using state-of-the-art pest-elimination procedures for commercial and residential customers. The company has offices in Agawam, Worcester, and Lee, as well as Hartford and New Haven, Conn.

Bridgeport National Bindery Inc.
662 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 789-1981
www.bnbindery.com
Bruce Jacobsen, Executive Vice President
A full-service bindery with on-demand book-printing capabilities, BNB offers a wide variety of binding styles and professional rebinding services, including binding for libraries, pre-binding, textbooks, editions, and conservation. The company also offers digitization, the process of reformatting a print item into an electronic format.

Charter Oak Insurance and Financial Services Co.
330 Whitney Ave., Holyoke
(413) 374-5430
www.charteroakfinancial.com
Peter Novak, General Agent
A member of the MassMutual Financial Group, Charter Oak been servicing clients for 127 years. The team of professionals serves individuals, families, and businesses with risk-management products, business planning and protection, retirement-planning and investment services, and fee-based financial planning.

City Tire Company Inc.
25 Avocado St., Springfield
(413) 737-1419
www.city-tire.com
Peter Greenberg, President
Brothers Peter and Dan Greenberg, the third generation of a family-owned business founded in 1927, have grown the business to 11 locations in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont. The company offers one-stop shopping for tires of all shapes and sizes and a full complement of maintenance and repair services.

Commercial Distributing Co. Inc.
46 South Broad St., Westfield
(413) 562-9691
www.commercialdist.com
Richard Placek, Chairman
Founded in 1935 by Joseph Placek, Commercial Distributing Company is a family-owned and operated business servicing more than 1,000 bars, restaurants, and clubs, as well as more than 400 package and liquor stores. Now in its third generation, the company continues to grow through the values established by its founder by building brands and offering new products as the market changes.

The Dennis Group, LLC *
1537 Main St., Springfield
(413) 746-0054
www.dennisgrp.com
Tom Dennis, CEO
The Dennis Group offers complete planning, design, architectural, engineering, and construction-management services. The firm is comprised of experienced engineering and design professionals specializing in the implementation of food-manufacturing processes and facilities.

Environmental Compliance Services Inc.
588 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 789-3530
www.ecsconsult.com
Mark Hellstein, CEO
For more than 25 years, ECS has specialized in environmental site assessments; testing for asbestos, lead, indoor air quality, and mold; drilling and subsurface investigations; and emergency-response management.

Gandara Mental Health Inc. *
147 Norman St., West Springfield
(413) 736-8329
www.gandaracenter.org
Dr. Henry East-Trou, CEO
Focusing on the Latino/Hispanic community, Gandara Center provides substance-abuse recovery, mental-health, and housing services for men, women, children, adolescents, and families throughout the Pioneer Valley.

Joseph Freedman Co. Inc. *
115 Stevens St., Springfield
(888) 677-7818
www.josephfreedmanco.com
John Freedman, President
Founded in 1891, the company provides industrial scrap-metal recycling, specializing in aluminum, copper, nickel alloys, and aircraft scrap, and has two facilities in Springfield — a 120,000-square-foot indoor ferrous facility and a 60,000-square-foot chopping operation.

Delaney Restaurant Inc. / The Log Cabin
500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke
(413) 535-5077
www.logcabin-delaney.com
Peter Rosskothen, President
The Delaney House restaurant offers 13 private-themed rooms for any special occasion, with seating for up to 260. It offers two dining options — fine dining and the more casual Mick. The Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House offers banquet facilities for weddings, showers, anniversaries, engagement parties, bar/bat mitzvahs, business meetings, holiday parties, and other events.

Marcotte Ford Sales
1025 Main St., Holyoke
(800) 923-9810
www.marcotteford.com
Bryan Marcotte, President
The dealership sells new Ford vehicles as well as pre-owned cars, trucks, and SUVs, and features a full service department. Marcotte has achieved the President’s Award, one of the most prestigious honors given to dealerships by Ford Motor Co., on multiple occasions over the past decade.

Maybury Material Handling *
90 Denslow Road, East Longmeadow
(413) 525-4216
www.maybury.com
John Maybury, President
Since 1976, Maybury Material Handling has been designing, supplying, and servicing all types of material-handling equipment throughout New England. Maybury provides customers in a wide range of industries with solutions to move, lift, and store their parts and products.

Millennium Power Services Inc. *
79 Mainline Dr., Westfield
www.millenniumpower.net
(413) 562-5332
Michael Pellegrini, President
Founded in 2000, Millennium Power Services is a full-service valve-repair shop and manufacturer of new valve parts. With a fleet of mobile machine shops, the company offers on-site service throughout the U.S., which allows customers to monitor their jobs, and also offers emergency valve service both at customer sites and in shops located in Massachusetts, Maine, and Florida.

PC Enterprises d/b/a Entre Computer
138 Memorial Ave., West Springfield
(413) 736-2112
www.pc-enterprises.com
Norman Fiedler, CEO
Entre assists organizations with procuring, installing, troubleshooting, servicing, and maximizing the value of technology. In business since 1983, it continues to evolve and grow as a lead provider for many businesses, healthcare providers, retailers, and state, local, and education entities.

Poly-Metal Finishing Inc.
1 Allen St # 218, Springfield
(413) 781-4535
www.poly-metal.com
Jason Kudelka, President
Poly-Metal Finishing Inc. has served the metalworking industry for more than three decades and specializes in providing the aerospace, military, and com­mercial sectors with complete anodic services: sulfuric anodizing, color anodizing, chromic, hardcoat, polylube pro­cessing, chemical conversion of aluminum, and pre-bond coatings.

Rediker Software Inc.
2 Wilbraham Road, Hampden
(800) 213-9860
www.rediker.com
Richard Rediker, President
Rediker software is used by school administrators across the U.S. and in more than 100 countries, and is designed to meet the student-information-management needs of all types of schools and districts.

Rocky’s Hardware Inc.
40 Island Pond Road, Springfield
(413) 781-1650
www.rockys.com
Rocco Falcone II, President
With locations throughout Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire, the family-run business founded in 1926 is a fully stocked, convenient source for not only typical hardware-store items but also a line of goods for the home, yard, and garden.

Sarat Ford Lincoln
245 Springfield St., Agawam
(413) 789-5400
www.saratford.com
Jeff Sarat, President
Founded in 1929 by John Sarat Sr., Sarat Ford has become the largest Ford dealership in Western Mass., and today, grandson Jeff Sarat leads the company. The full-service dealership includes a state-of-the-art body-shop facility, and a new, 10,000-square-foot expansion offers a 24-bay service center that houses a $1 million parts inventory featuring Ford, Motorcraft, Motorsport, and a variety of other specialty manufacturers.

Spectrum Analytical Inc.
11 Almgren Dr., Agawam
(413) 789-9018
www.spectrum-analytical.com
Hanibal Tayeh, CEO
For more than a decade, Spectrum Analytical Inc. has provided quantitative analysis of soil, water, and, more recently, air samples, as well as petroleum products. Consulting firms, industries, municipalities, universities, and the public sector are among the constituencies that make up the client list.

Tighe & Bond Inc. *
53 Southampton Road, Westfield
(413) 562-1600
www.tighebond.com
David Pinsky, President
Launched in 1911, Tighe & Bond specializes in environmental engineering, focusing on water, wastewater, solid-waste, and hazardous-waste issues, and provides innovative engineering services to public and private clients around the country and overseas.

United Personnel Services Inc.
1331 Main St., Springfield
(413) 736-0800
www.unitedpersonnel.com
Patricia Canavan, President
United provides a full range of staffing services, including temporary staffing and full-time placement, on-site project management, and strategic recruitment in the Springfield, Hartford, and Northampton areas, specializing in administrative, professional, medical, and light-industrial staff.

W.F. Young Inc.
302 Benton Dr., East Longmeadow
(800) 628-9653
www.absorbine.com
Tyler Young, CEO
This family-run business prides itself on offering a variety of high-quality products that can effectively improve the well-being of both people and horses with its Absorbine brands.

REVENUE GROWTH

* Indicates company qualifed in both categories

1. Mahan Slate Roofing Co. Inc.
P.O. Box 2860, Springfield
(413) 394-3513
www.mahanslate.com
John Mahan, Vice President
While Mahan Slate Roofing does not install asphalt shingle roofing or commercial flat roofing, they do specialize in beautiful and lasting slate and copper roofing for residential, institutional, municipal, and commercial structures. Mahan also has a full sheet-metal shop, which allows the company to produce a wide range of copper products including custom gutters and downspouts, and it designs snow-guard systems, often a much-needed accessory for slate roofs.

2. Paragus IT
84 Russell St., Hadley
(413) 587-2666
www.paragusit.com
Delcie Bean IV, President
While still in high school, Delcie Bean founded Paragus IT in 1999, first under the name Vertical Horizons and then Valley ComputerWorks. The name Paragus, short for asparagus, one of Hadley’s most famous agricultural products, has grown dramatically as an outsourced IT solution for area clients. From information technology solutions to CMR-17 compliance to EMR implementation, the Paragus experts in computer systems and information technology provide business computer service, computer consulting, information-technology support, and other proactive services to small and medium-sized businesses.

3. Troy Industries Inc. *
151 Capital Dr., West Springfield
(413) 788-4288; (866) 788-6412
www.troyind.com
Steve Troy, CEO
Troy Industries was founded on the principle of making reliable, innovative, over-engineered products that function without question when lives are on the line. All products are American-made and designed to perform flawlessly under intense battle conditions. The choice of special ops, law enforcement, and war fighters worldwide, Troy Industries is a leading U.S. government contractor that designs and manufactures innovative, top-quality small-arms components and accessories and complete weapon upgrades.

ABLE Machine Tool Sales Inc. *
800 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 786-4662
www.ablemts.com
Alan Lockery, President
ABLE Machine Tool Sales distributes some of the world’s finest machine tools, but it also offers clients the Able Metrology Tech Center, providing measurement tools to suit manufacturing-inspection requirements. ABLE’s experienced sales staff and service technicians are given extensive training, and the company is factory-authorized to assist with mechanical and electrical repairs, preventive maintenance programs, and employee-training programs.

Adam Quenneville Roofing and Siding
160 Old Lyman Road, South Hadley
(413) 536-5955
www.1800newroof.net
Adam Quenneville, CEO
Adam Quenneville offers a wide range of residential and commercial services, including new roofs, retrofitting, roof repair, roof cleaning, vinyl siding, replacement windows, and the no-clog Gutter Shutter system. The company earned the 2010 BBB Torch Award for trust, performance, and integrity.

Advance Welding
47 Allston Ave., West Springfield
(413) 734-4544
www.theperfectweld.com
Christopher Kielb, President
Since 1978, Advance Welding has served its clients with high-quality welding, brazing, and metal fabrication with state-of-the-art facilities and more than 100 years of combined welding experience. The company recently added 6,000 square feet of new facilities and actively participates as role models to young people who may someday seek a career in welding, by showing that the manufacturing industry still thrives in America.

Aegenco Inc.
55 Jackson St., Springfield
(413) 746-3242
Spiro Vardakas, President
Aegenco, an energy-conservation consulting firm, has grown steadily since its inception in 2005.

REVENUE GROWTH
* Indicates company qualifed in both categories

1. Mahan Slate Roofing Co. Inc.
P.O. Box 2860, Springfield
(413) 394-3513
www.mahanslate.com
John Mahan, Vice President
While Mahan Slate Roofing does not install asphalt shingle roofing or commercial flat roofing, they do specialize in beautiful and lasting slate and copper roofing for residential, institutional, municipal, and commercial structures. Mahan also has a full sheet-metal shop, which allows the company to produce a wide range of copper products including custom gutters and downspouts, and it designs snow-guard systems, often a much-needed accessory for slate roofs.

2. Paragus IT
84 Russell St., Hadley
(413) 587-2666
www.paragusit.com
Delcie Bean IV, President
While still in high school, Delcie Bean founded Paragus IT in 1999, first under the name Vertical Horizons and then Valley ComputerWorks. The name Paragus, short for asparagus, one of Hadley’s most famous agricultural products, has grown dramatically as an outsourced IT solution for area clients. From information technology solutions to CMR-17 compliance to EMR implementation, the Paragus experts in computer systems and information technology provide business computer service, computer consulting, information-technology support, and other proactive services to small and medium-sized businesses.

3. Troy Industries Inc. *
151 Capital Dr., West Springfield
(413) 788-4288; (866) 788-6412
www.troyind.com
Steve Troy, CEO
Troy Industries was founded on the principle of making reliable, innovative, over-engineered products that function without question when lives are on the line. All products are American-made and designed to perform flawlessly under intense battle conditions. The choice of special ops, law enforcement, and war fighters worldwide, Troy Industries is a leading U.S. government contractor that designs and manufactures innovative, top-quality small-arms components and accessories and complete weapon upgrades.

ABLE Machine Tool Sales Inc. *
800 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 786-4662
www.ablemts.com
Alan Lockery, President
ABLE Machine Tool Sales distributes some of the world’s finest machine tools, but it also offers clients the Able Metrology Tech Center, providing measurement tools to suit manufacturing-inspection requirements. ABLE’s experienced sales staff and service technicians are given extensive training, and the company is factory-authorized to assist with mechanical and electrical repairs, preventive maintenance programs, and employee-training programs.

Adam Quenneville Roofing and Siding
160 Old Lyman Road, South Hadley
(413) 525-0025
www.1800newroof.net
Adam Quenneville, CEO
Adam Quenneville offers a wide range of residential and commercial services, including new roofs, retrofitting, roof repair, roof cleaning, vinyl siding, replacement windows, and the no-clog Gutter Shutter system. The company earned the 2010 BBB Torch Award for trust, performance, and integrity.

Advance Welding
47 Allston Ave., West Springfield
(413) 734-4544
www.theperfectweld.com
Christopher Kielb, President
Since 1978, Advance Welding has served its clients with high-quality welding, brazing, and metal fabrication with state-of-the-art facilities and more than 100 years of combined welding experience. The company recently added 6,000 square feet of new facilities and actively participates as role models to young people who may someday seek a career in welding, by showing that the manufacturing industry still thrives in America.

Aegenco Inc.
55 Jackson St., Springfield
(413) 746-3242
Spiro Vardakas, President
Aegenco, an energy-conservation consulting firm, has grown steadily since its inception in 2005.

American Pest Solutions Inc.
169 William St., Springfield
(413) 781-0044
www.413pestfree.com
Robert Russell, President
For nearly 100 years, American Pest Solutions has been taking care of families and business owners to keep their properties free from ants, bedbugs, rodents, roaches, termites, and other harmful pest infestations. By utilizing products and pest-treatment solutions designed to minimize impacts on the surrounding environment, American takes an ecologically sensitive approach to pest control for the environmentally concerned client.

Axia Insurance & Affiliates
933 East Columbus Ave., Springfield
(413) 788-9000
www.axiagroup.net
Michael Long, CEO
“AXiA” translates from Greek to mean ‘value, capability, merit, and worthiness’; it’s Axia Insurance’s philosophy of doing business. Representing several carriers for commercial clients, Axia also represents other personal-insurance companies specifically for MassMutual employee services, but can service to anyone for personal lines.

Con-Test Analytical Laboratory
39 Spruce St., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-2332
www.contestlabs.com
Thomas Veratti Sr., Founder
Established in 1984, Con-Test provides environmental consulting and testing services to a variety of clients throughout Western Mass. The laboratory-testing division originally focused on industrial hygiene analysis, but rapidly expanded to include numerous techniques in air analysis, classical (wet) chemistry, metals, and organics, and has the capability for analyzing nearly all water, air, soil, and solid materials.

Dynamic Dock & Door Inc.
64 Lowell St., West Springfield
(413) 731-1114
www.dynamic-dock-door.com
Bret Leveillee, Vice President
Dynamic Dock and Door is a complete materials-handling company specializing in loading-dock equipment, overhead doors, storage systems, and energy conservation. Providing companies across New England and New Jersey for more than 20 years with quality overhead door and loading-dock equipment, installation, and service, the company has recently added installation, sales, and service of traditional commercial man doors to its product and service mix.

FIT Solutions
25 Bremen St., Springfield
(413) 733-6466
www.fitsolutions.us
Jackie Fallon, President
Since 2004, FIT Solutions has been partnering with clients, from small-business owners who have only a few IT needs to large companies that have small IT departments, to provide the best candidates for a variety of IT positions. Meeting with the hiring manager, FIT Solutions determines the exact qualifications and skills needed, as well as the personality traits desired in order to find candidates that fit an array of technology-based positions. FIT Solutions now serves both the Massachusetts and Connecticut markets.

Fletcher Sewer & Drain Inc.
824a Perimeter Road, Ludlow
(413) 547-8180
www.fletcherseweranddrain.com
Teri Marinello, President
Since 1985, Fletcher Sewer & Drain has provided service to homeowners as well as municipalities and construction companies for large pipeline jobs from Western Mass. to Southern Conn. From unblocking kitchen sinks to replacing sewer lines, this woman-owned company keeps up-to-date with all the latest technology, from high-pressure sewer jetters to the newest camera-inspection equipment.

The Futures Health Group, LLC *
136 Williams St., Springfield
(800) 218-9280
Peter Bittel, CEO
The Futures Health Group provides special-education and clinical services and management to 25,000 students and individuals. Bittel has more than 35 years of clinical and executive leadership experience in the areas of special education, rehabilitation, and developmental disabilities.

The Gaudreau Group
1984 Boston Road, Wilbraham
(413) 543-3534
www.gaudreaugroup.com
Jules Gaudreau, President
A multi-line insurance and financial-service agency established in 1921, the Gaudreau Group combines the traditional service philosophy of an agency with the talents of a dynamic marketing organization. With the expertise and resources that enable clients to respond to an ever-changing economic environment, the agency offers a broad range of insurance and financial products from basic life, home, and auto insurance to complex corporate services, employee benefits, and retirement plans.

GMH Fence Co. Inc.
15 Benton Dr., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-3361
www.gmhfence.com
Glenn Hastie, Owner
Serving the Western Mass. area for more than over 20 years, GMH Fence Co. is one of largest and most respected fence companies in the region. The fencing contractor offers quality service and fence installations from a selection of wood, aluminum, steel, and vinyl fencing that are durable and virtually trouble-free for residential, commercial, and industrial fencing requests.

Janice Yanni, DDS, PC
180 Westfield St., West Springfield
(413) 739-4400
www.yanniorthodontics.com
Dr. Janice Yanni, Owner
It’s never too early or too late to think about improving a smile, and Yanni Orthodontics has a mission to make all their patients smile. Dr. Janice Yanni specializes in orthodontic treatment for children, teens, and adults with offices in West Springfield as well as Tolland, Conn., using the latest in technology and a variety of treatment options, including Invisalign, Invisalign Express, Incognito, Six Month Smiles, and traditional braces.

Lattitude
1338 Memorial Ave., West Springfield
(413) 241-8888
www.lattitude1338.com
Jeff Daigneau, Owner
Executive chef and owner Jeff Daigneau opened Lattitude in 2007 and offers a unique, continually changing menu, based on local, seasonal product and his own classically trained talent for inimitable cuisine. The recent addition of a large outdoor patio-bar area for dining and live music will complement new interior expansions, including a new, 80-seat banquet room. Lattitude offers private, on-site events as well as off-site catering for 10 to several hundred people.

Market Mentors, LLC
1680 Riverdale St., West Springfield
(413) 787-1133
www.marketmentors.com
Michelle Abdow, Principal
A full-service marketing firm, Market Mentors handles all forms of marketing, including advertising in all mediums, media buying, graphic design, public relations, and event planning.

NetLogix Inc.
181 Notre Dame St., Westfield
(413) 586-2777
www.netlgx.com
Marco Liquori, President
NetLogix offers a wide range of IT services, including equipment sales; managed network services and remote monitoring; network design, installation, and management; network security and firewalls; disaster-recovery and business-continuity services; VoIP; wi-fi; and more.

NUVO Bank & Trust Co. *
1500 Main St., Springfield
(413) 787-2700
www.nuvobank.com
M. Dale Janes, CEO
Chartered in 2007, NUVO is an independent, locally owned bank that provides deposits, residential and commercial loans, and cash-management services for both personal-banking and business-banking needs.

O’Connell Professional Nurse Service Inc.
14 Bobala Road, Suite 1B, Holyoke
(413) 533-1030
www.opns.com
Francis O’Connell, President
For more than two decades, O’Connell Professional Nurse Service Inc., (O’Connell Care at Home and Healthcare Staffing) has grown to deliver a range of home-health and staffing services across the Pioneer Valley. Services range from nursing care and geriatric healthcare management to advocacy and transportation.

Powervestors, LLC
55 Jackson St., Holyoke
(413) 536-1156
www.aegisenergyservices.com
Spiro Vardakas, Owner
Powervestors provides services in power-generating equipment installation throughout the region.

R & R Industries Inc.
195 Rocus St., Springfield
(413) 733-2118
www.randrind.com
Bruce Robinovitz, President
Family-owned and operated since 1957, R & R Industries is a full-service metal and auto recycler serving Western Mass. and Northern Conn., providing recycling and container services to commercial, industrial, and residential customers.   The company also purchases all ferrous and non-ferrous metals at market prices and supplies hard-to-find auto parts for older models.

Robert F. Scott Co. Inc.
467 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow
(413) 567-7089
Leonard Rising III, President
Robert F. Scott Co. Inc. (known as Longmeadow Garage) is a locally owned and operated, full-service gasoline and automotive service station. Its staff includes ASE-certified technicians well-versed in all makes and models.

Specialty Bolt & Screw Inc. *
235 Bowles Road, Agawam
(413) 789-6700
www.specialtybolt.com
Alan Crosby, CEO
Founded in 1977, Specialty Bolt & Screw Inc. is a distributor of innovative fastener solutions. The company has engineering resources on staff to help determine the optimum fastener for each application, and utilizes state-of-the-art technology along with more than 30 years of experience to help clients achieve their objectives.

Titan USA Enterprises Inc. *
140 Baldwin St., West Springfield
(888) 482-6872
www.titanman.com
Ralph Colby, CEO
For almost four decades, Titan USA Enterprises has served industrial distributors as a manufacturer of premium-quality, solid-carbide, high-speed steel and cobalt cutting tools.

United Industrial Services Inc.
120 Almgren Dr., Agawam
(413) 789-0896
www.unitedindustrialinc.com
Tony Reopel, Vice President
From the simplest hand truck to the most sophisticated conveyor systems and in-plant racking layouts, United Industrial Services has been providing material handling solutions for every size of business for more than 30 years. The company supports sales, leasing, rentals, parts, and services for all forms of industrial mechanical needs, and offers OSHA experts to provide guidelines for safe operation of every machine sold.

Universal Plastics Corp. *
75 Whiting Farms Road, Holyoke
(800) 553-0120
www.universalplastics.com
Joseph Peters, CEO
Since 1965, Universal Plastics has been a leading force in the custom thermoforming industry. It specializes in precision custom thermoforming, a plastic-manufacturing process that converts a sheet of plastic into a highly detailed finished product with less tooling investment than other plastic molding processes.

Whalley Precision Inc.
28 Hudson Dr., Southwick
www.whalleyprecision.com
DAVID WHALLEY, PRESIDENT
Whalley Precision Inc. is a family-owned small business and full-service manufacturing company/FAA repair station founded in 1990. The company performs general fabrication, machining, and assembly. Its services include CNC/manual milling and turning; ID, OD, and surface grinding; jig boring; honing; MIG and TIG welding; metal forming; and robotic welding and assembly. In addition to carbon steel, the company routinely works with stainless steel, aluminum, space-age alloys and plastics, and materials such as Inconel and Kovar, as well as various other hardened materials.

Wright Architectural Millwork Corp.
115 Industrial Dr., Northampton
(413) 586-3528
www.wrightmw.com
Walt Price, President
Wright Architectural Millwork embraces current technology, blending digital technology and traditional craftsmanship for the highest quality of millwork solutions, which can be found in the facilities of some of the world’s best-known companies and institutions. The firm procures and works with non-wood materials (such as stone, glass, leather, fabrics, and architectural metals), integrating them into quality woodwork for complete, customized designs.vv
American Pest Solutions Inc.
169 William St., Springfield
(413) 781-0044
www.413pestfree.com
Robert Russell, President
For nearly 100 years, American Pest Solutions has been taking care of families and business owners to keep their properties free from ants, bedbugs, rodents, roaches, termites, and other harmful pest infestations. By utilizing products and pest-treatment solutions designed to minimize impacts on the surrounding environment, American takes an ecologically sensitive approach to pest control for the environmentally concerned client.

Axia Insurance & Affiliates
933 East Columbus Ave., Springfield
(413) 788-9000
www.axiagroup.net
Michael Long, CEO
“AXiA” translates from Greek to mean ‘value, capability, merit, and worthiness’; it’s Axia Insurance’s philosophy of doing business. Representing several carriers for commercial clients, Axia also represents other personal-insurance companies specifically for MassMutual employee services, but can service to anyone for personal lines.

Con-Test Analytical Laboratory
39 Spruce St., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-2332
www.contestlabs.com
Thomas Veratti Sr., Founder
Established in 1984, Con-Test provides environmental consulting and testing services to a variety of clients throughout Western Mass. The laboratory-testing division originally focused on industrial hygiene analysis, but rapidly expanded to include numerous techniques in air analysis, classical (wet) chemistry, metals, and organics, and has the capability for analyzing nearly all water, air, soil, and solid materials.

Dynamic Dock & Door Inc.
64 Lowell St., West Springfield
(413) 731-1114
www.dynamic-dock-door.com
Bret Leveillee, Vice President
Dynamic Dock and Door is a complete materials-handling company specializing in loading-dock equipment, overhead doors, storage systems, and energy conservation. Providing companies across New England and New Jersey for more than 20 years with quality overhead door and loading-dock equipment, installation, and service, the company has recently added installation, sales, and service of traditional commercial man doors to its product and service mix.

FIT Solutions
25 Bremen St., Springfield
(413) 733-6466
www.fitsolutions.us
Jackie Fallon, President
Since 2004, FIT Solutions has been partnering with clients, from small-business owners who have only a few IT needs to large companies that have small IT departments, to provide the best candidates for a variety of IT positions. Meeting with the hiring manager, FIT Solutions determines the exact qualifications and skills needed, as well as the personality traits desired in order to find candidates that fit an array of technology-based positions. FIT Solutions now serves both the Massachusetts and Connecticut markets.

Fletcher Sewer & Drain Inc.
824a Perimeter Road, Ludlow
(413) 547-8180
www.fletcherseweranddrain.com
Teri Marinello, President
Since 1985, Fletcher Sewer & Drain has provided service to homeowners as well as municipalities and construction companies for large pipeline jobs from Western Mass. to Southern Conn. From unblocking kitchen sinks to replacing sewer lines, this woman-owned company keeps up-to-date with all the latest technology, from high-pressure sewer jetters to the newest camera-inspection equipment.

The Futures Health Group, LLC *
136 Williams St., Springfield
(800) 218-9280
Peter Bittel, CEO
The Futures Health Group provides special-education and clinical services and management to 25,000 students and individuals. Bittel has more than 35 years of clinical and executive leadership experience in the areas of special education, rehabilitation, and developmental disabilities.

The Gaudreau Group
1984 Boston Road, Wilbraham
(413) 543-3534
www.gaudreaugroup.com
Jules Gaudreau, President
A multi-line insurance and financial-service agency established in 1921, the Gaudreau Group combines the traditional service philosophy of an agency with the talents of a dynamic marketing organization. With the expertise and resources that enable clients to respond to an ever-changing economic environment, the agency offers a broad range of insurance and financial products from basic life, home, and auto insurance to complex corporate services, employee benefits, and retirement plans.

GMH Fence Co. Inc.
15 Benton Dr., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-3361
www.gmhfence.com
Glenn Hastie, Owner
Serving the Western Mass. area for more than over 20 years, GMH Fence Co. is one of largest and most respected fence companies in the region. The fencing contractor offers quality service and fence installations from a selection of wood, aluminum, steel, and vinyl fencing that are durable and virtually trouble-free for residential, commercial, and industrial fencing requests.

Janice Yanni, DDS, PC
180 Westfield St., West Springfield
(413) 739-4400
www.yanniorthodontics.com
Dr. Janice Yanni, Owner
It’s never too early or too late to think about improving a smile, and Yanni Orthodontics has a mission to make all their patients smile. Dr. Janice Yanni specializes in orthodontic treatment for children, teens, and adults with offices in West Springfield as well as Tolland, Conn., using the latest in technology and a variety of treatment options, including Invisalign, Invisalign Express, Incognito, Six Month Smiles, and traditional braces.

Lattitude
1338 Memorial Ave., West Springfield
(413) 241-8888
www.lattitude1338.com
Jeff Daigneau, Owner
Executive chef and owner Jeff Daigneau opened Lattitude in 2007 and offers a unique, continually changing menu, based on local, seasonal product and his own classically trained talent for inimitable cuisine. The recent addition of a large outdoor patio-bar area for dining and live music will complement new interior expansions, including a new, 80-seat banquet room. Lattitude offers private, on-site events as well as off-site catering for 10 to several hundred people.

Market Mentors, LLC
1680 Riverdale St., West Springfield
(413) 787-1133
www.marketmentors.com
Michelle Abdow, Principal
A full-service marketing firm, Market Mentors handles all forms of marketing, including advertising in all mediums, media buying, graphic design, public relations, and event planning.

NetLogix Inc.
181 Notre Dame St., Westfield
(413) 586-2777
www.netlgx.com
Marco Liquori, President
NetLogix offers a wide range of IT services, including equipment sales; managed network services and remote monitoring; network design, installation, and management; network security and firewalls; disaster-recovery and business-continuity services; VoIP; wi-fi; and more.

NUVO Bank & Trust Co. *
1500 Main St., Springfield
(413) 787-2700
www.nuvobank.com
M. Dale Janes, CEO
Chartered in 2007, NUVO is an independent, locally owned bank that provides deposits, residential and commercial loans, and cash-management services for both personal-banking and business-banking needs.

O’Connell Professional Nurse Service Inc.
14 Bobala Road, Suite 1B, Holyoke
(413) 533-1030
www.opns.com
Francis O’Connell, President
For more than two decades, O’Connell Professional Nurse Service Inc., (O’Connell Care at Home and Healthcare Staffing) has grown to deliver a range of home-health and staffing services across the Pioneer Valley. Services range from nursing care and geriatric healthcare management to advocacy and transportation.

Powervestors, LLC
55 Jackson St., Holyoke
(413) 536-1156
www.aegisenergyservices.com
Spiro Vardakas, Owner
Powervestors provides services in power-generating equipment installation throughout the region.

R & R Industries Inc.
195 Rocus St., Springfield
(413) 733-2118
www.randrind.com
Bruce Robinovitz, President
Family-owned and operated since 1957, R & R Industries is a full-service metal and auto recycler serving Western Mass. and Northern Conn., providing recycling and container services to commercial, industrial, and residential customers.   The company also purchases all ferrous and non-ferrous metals at market prices and supplies hard-to-find auto parts for older models.

Robert F. Scott Co. Inc.
467 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow
(413) 567-7089
Leonard Rising III, President
Robert F. Scott Co. Inc. (known as Longmeadow Garage) is a locally owned and operated, full-service gasoline and automotive service station. Its staff includes ASE-certified technicians well-versed in all makes and models.

Specialty Bolt & Screw Inc. *
235 Bowles Road, Agawam
(413) 789-6700
www.specialtybolt.com
Alan Crosby, CEO
Founded in 1977, Specialty Bolt & Screw Inc. is a distributor of innovative fastener solutions. The company has engineering resources on staff to help determine the optimum fastener for each application, and utilizes state-of-the-art technology along with more than 30 years of experience to help clients achieve their objectives.

Titan USA Enterprises Inc. *
140 Baldwin St., West Springfield
(888) 482-6872
www.titanman.com
Ralph Colby, CEO
For almost four decades, Titan USA Enterprises has served industrial distributors as a manufacturer of premium-quality, solid-carbide, high-speed steel and cobalt cutting tools.

United Industrial Services Inc.
120 Almgren Dr., Agawam
(413) 789-0896
www.unitedindustrialinc.com
Tony Reopel, Vice President
From the simplest hand truck to the most sophisticated conveyor systems and in-plant racking layouts, United Industrial Services has been providing material handling solutions for every size of business for more than 30 years. The company supports sales, leasing, rentals, parts, and services for all forms of industrial mechanical needs, and offers OSHA experts to provide guidelines for safe operation of every machine sold.

Universal Plastics Corp. *
75 Whiting Farms Road, Holyoke
(800) 553-0120
www.universalplastics.com
Joseph Peters, CEO
Since 1965, Universal Plastics has been a leading force in the custom thermoforming industry. It specializes in precision custom thermoforming, a plastic-manufacturing process that converts a sheet of plastic into a highly detailed finished product with less tooling investment than other plastic molding processes.

Whalley Precision Inc.
28 Hudson Dr., Southwick
www.whalleyprecision.com
DAVID WHALLEY, PRESIDENT
Whalley Precision Inc. is a family-owned small business and full-service manufacturing company/FAA repair station founded in 1990. The company performs general fabrication, machining, and assembly. Its services include CNC/manual milling and turning; ID, OD, and surface grinding; jig boring; honing; MIG and TIG welding; metal forming; and robotic welding and assembly. In addition to carbon steel, the company routinely works with stainless steel, aluminum, space-age alloys and plastics, and materials such as Inconel and Kovar, as well as various other hardened materials.

Wright Architectural Millwork Corp.
115 Industrial Dr., Northampton
(413) 586-3528
www.wrightmw.com
Walt Price, President
Wright Architectural Millwork embraces current technology, blending digital technology and traditional craftsmanship for the highest quality of millwork solutions, which can be found in the facilities of some of the world’s best-known companies and institutions. The firm procures and works with non-wood materials (such as stone, glass, leather, fabrics, and architectural metals), integrating them into quality woodwork for complete, customized designs.vv