Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Martin Luther King Jr. Family Services Inc. (MLKFS) announced the addition of three new members to its board of directors.

“Our mission and services have expanded to meet in part the incredible needs of the community during this time of hardship,” said Calvin Hill, MLKFS board chair and vice president of Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Engagement for Springfield College. “Therefore, adding additional and talented hands to our leadership will assist us in fulfilling the words of Dr. King as we attempt to do more for others.”

The MLKFS Emergency Food Pantry now helps more than 500 people, and after-school and night-spot programs support literacy and academic achievement essential for the life success that disrupts the cycle of poverty. MLKFS also runs a historically black college-tour program. Funding for such socially focused programming continues to become increasingly limited at a time when needs are especially pressing.

At the regular meeting of the board on Jan. 21, the board voted unanimously to accept the three new nominees Rose Colon, John Garvey, and Dr. Allison Sullivan.

Colon is a criminal-defense and personal-injury attorney based in Springfield. She engages in all aspects of criminal-defense and civil personal-injury litigation. She earned her paralegal certificate from the American Bar Assoc., earned a bachelor’s degree with a concentration in legal studies at Bay Path University, and earned her juris doctorate at Western New England University.

Garvey is the founder of Garvey Communication Associates Inc., a Springfield-based digital public-relations and marketing agency. He is a graduate of Marquette University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in arts and sciences with honors, and of American International College, where he earned a master’s degree in organizational development with an emphasis on strategic planning. He is a volunteer at Wild Care Cape Cod, a former board member of Valley Venture Mentors, and a past mentor for the startup accelerators MassChallenge and SparkHolyoke/EforAll.

Sullivan is lead faculty for the Occupational Therapy doctorate program at American International College. As an occupational therapist and educator, she has dedicated her 27-year career to improving the lives of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the lifespan, working in day-habilitation services, school-based occupational therapy, and residential settings. She is the chair of the MAOT Western Massachusetts Mental Health Special Interest Group, a certified group-exercise and yoga instructor, and the co-founder and leader of #OTalk2US, a Twitter chat for occupational therapists with tens of millions of views of tweets carrying this tag.

Sullivan earned a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Amherst College, a master’s degree in occupational therapy from Springfield College, and a doctorate in occupational therapy from Temple University. She currently volunteers as an advisory board member for Lighthouse and a board member and social media committee chair for Allen Cognitive Network, and serves on the human rights committee for Viability.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — New to the beer and brewing industry, Ezra Bleau is introducing his business, Na Brews, with the launch of a Kickstarter campaign, “Na Brews (Nah Brooz) – Craft Beer for All People, for All Occasions.” This campaign will raise money for his mobile de-alcoholization production plan, increasing access to social, healthy alternatives nationwide.

“Na Brews is a craft solution to the ever-growing industry of non-alcoholic options in the market,” Bleau said. As a young professional, he wants to give independent breweries, not just the large production breweries, the power to produce quality non-alcoholic craft beer. At the same time, he wants to give consumers the chance to enjoy the social settings of being at a bar, taproom, or watching the big game on Sunday, and be able to enjoy craft beer without the hangover the next morning. Na Brews represents inclusivity, whether a 30-year-old man cutting alcohol for health reasons or the pregnant mom who wants to enjoy alcohol-free champagne on New Year’s Eve. “It’s all about substitution to promote a healthier lifestyle that anyone can enjoy,” he added.

The main draw of the campaign is a $20 pledge to be part of the “world’s largest non-alcoholic beer collaboration, which he intends to do during a livestreamed interactive event with his brewer. The company has been in contact with the Guinness Book of World Records and is working on certifying the event.

Bleau said he aims to “make the industry aware that there is a need for quality craft non-alcoholic beer, and we are tired of sitting in the penalty box waiting for it to happen. My company, Na Brews, is here to spark the N/A revolution and give the power to the independent brewer.”

Participants will be a part of this new craft beer every step of the way, selecting everything from style, grains, and hops to label design. With their $20 pledge, each participant’s name will be included in the collaboration can label for a future keepsake, and they will also be sent a can for their enjoyment and have exclusivity to purchase more before it is opened up to the general public.

NA Brews currently is an e-commerce operation based in Holyoke, offering online retail sales of non-alcoholic beer, spirits, and wine selections, including specialty boxes and subscription services for others to enjoy in the comfort of their own home or any social setting. Bleau also has a manufacturing and full alcohol-free production plan, partnering with independent breweries in surrounding communities to produce quality craft non-alcoholic beer.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. (MBK) announced a new website this week. The primary goal during the redesign process was to create a more user-friendly and valuable resource for clients and community alike. More specifically, the firm wanted users to easily locate information about accounting services, industries it serves, the firm’s story and team members, career opportunities, and community support.

MBK’s recent rebrand extends beyond a new style guide, logo, and aesthetic to include key concepts the website reflects upon: depth, drive, and experience. As the company notes, “we have the depth to provide a quality team to every client. We have the drive to deliver an excellent work product, every time. And we have the experience to solve our clients’ accounting and financial goals.”

Partner James Krupienski, CPA, noted that, “over the past few years, MBK has undertaken a significant transformation with a brand-new mission and vision statement. One of the ways that we are building on our tradition of excellence is by becoming a better online resource and authority for our clients and community. By updating our website, increasing our blog activity, and having a consistent presence on social media, we are making ourselves and our knowledge more accessible to others.”

MBK’s new website features an active blog with articles about taxation, accounting, advisory, news, and community. Additionally, the firm offers free newsletters centered around taxation, business, not-for-profits, and healthcare. These newsletters help readers stay informed on recent provisions and guidance, access articles, get invitations to special webinars or podcasts, and gain industry knowledge. You can subscribe to any or all of these newsletters for free by adding your e-mail address into the ‘subscribe’ feature located in the footer of the new website.

Daily News

LONGMEADOW — Bay Path University announce it was selected as a winner of the Virtual Innovation Awards: Excellence in Delivering Virtual Student Services hosted by NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. Bay Path is among 10 schools recognized across the nation for exemplary virtual student support services, and one of only three schools to receive the top award of $50,000.

The award highlights the effectiveness of the work being done to support both Bay Path’s traditional undergraduates and adult students enrolled in its online undergraduate degree program, the American Women’s College. These best practices will serve as case studies to inform the field at large.

“Student-support services are essential to students’ progress in college,” said Maura Devlin, associate vice president and dean of Undergraduate Studies at Bay Path. “These supports include advising, orientation, emergency aid to help with textbook costs and other essentials, clubs and activities, academic and learning supports, and health and well-being programs.”

As Bay Path’s online program for adult women, the American Women’s College has been continually developing and enhancing its virtual support services since 2013. At the onset of the pandemic, university staff were able to put these supports into overdrive to ensure campus-based undergraduate students could easily access services despite the abrupt move to remote.

Some of the virtual services that have allowed Bay Path University to be responsive to its diverse student body, whether in person or online, include a virtual career-services hub; UWill, a telecounseling service; and Tutor.com, which provides access to online tutoring services 24/7. Similarly, programming related to orientation, peer-to-peer engagement, community building, and multi-cultural affairs was provided by a support team that was able to quickly pivot to virtual platforms and social-media tools.

“We are so honored to be the recipient of this award. Our focus is fully on the students we serve and how we can continue to meet them where they are, in even the most trying of times, to help them to achieve their educational goals,” said Anne Chapdelaine, Bay Path’s dean of students and director of persistence. “This award will allow us to continue to pilot new, responsive tools and expand our resource availability, to make sure that we can flex and bend with the complex lives of our students.”

Cover Story

In Demand

Tanya Vital-Basile

Tanya Vital-Basile with a common sight — a ‘sold’ sign.

Tanya Vital-Basile recently sold a house in Longmeadow to someone who might not have considered buying it a year ago.

But life changed — and so did the residential real-estate market. Considerably, in both cases.

Specifically, the buyer had lived in Boston for many years, and still has a job there, but she has been working remotely, and plans — like so many others these days — to continue doing so.

“She was paying $2,900 a month to rent in Boston, and here, she’s paying a $2,000 mortgage, and owning it,” said Vital-Basile, who heads a team at Executive Real Estate. “We’ve seen a lot of people moving out of Boston just because they don’t need to be out there anymore.”

It’s a story BusinessWest heard multiple times from area Realtors.

“It’s not unlike what we saw after 9/11 — a migration from the city to smaller towns and villages, a more rural environment,” said Kathy Zeamer of Jones Realty. “A lot of people today are looking for a place that gives them a little more space, private outdoor areas, home-office space, a place for their kids to do their schooling from home.”

“She was paying $2,900 a month to rent in Boston, and here, she’s paying a $2,000 mortgage, and owning it. We’ve seen a lot of people moving out of Boston just because they don’t need to be out there anymore.”

Call it the new normal wrought by a still-raging pandemic.

“COVID has a lot to do with it,” said Lesley Lambert of Park Square Realty. “People are working from home, and they’re realizing their home doesn’t work for their life. I’ve spoken to so many clients who want to continue working from home, even once all this clears, and they’re looking at their space and saying, ‘we thought we wanted a big, open floor plan, but what we actually want is a music room, a study, a home office.’”

All this demand — for a different home, but especially one far outside the metro areas — has created a serious imbalance with supply in Western Mass., creating a seller’s market like few this industry has experienced in recent decades.

“In Hampden County, the average days a house spends on the market is three. It’s crazy,” Vital-Basile said.

The most recent statistics from the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley bear this out. In December, home sales in the Pioneer Valley were up 29.2%, and median price was up 10.1%, from December 2019. Hampden County led the way (sales up 32.0% and median price up 11.5% from the previous year), but Franklin County (26% and 10.6%) and Hampshire County (20.4% and 9.1%) weren’t far behind.

Kathy Zeamer

Kathy Zeamer says the current climate is a supply-and-demand issue — with several factors driving that demand.

“It’s definitely a seller’s market, Zeamer said. “It’s all about supply and demand. The inventory is really low, and we have new people coming into the area, so we don’t have enough inventory to meet the demand we’re seeing.”

A few factors play into the supply challenge. Many families who might be thinking about moving out of the region are hunkering down instead because of uncertainties related to the pandemic. Meanwhile, home buyers aren’t putting their own houses on the market until they’ve got a new home nailed down.

As for demand, “I think people are trying to escape more urban areas,” she added. “We have people coming in from other parts of Massachusetts, including the Boston area. Most of my sales this year involve people from New York, California, Las Vegas, Chicago — more so than ever before. I’ve had several New York sales this year, which is more than I would typically see.”

 

Escaping the City

The lifestyle shifts driven by the pandemic aren’t the only factor driving demand, Vital-Basile said, noting that interest rates are still at historic lows, creeping below 3%.

“The rates are so low that a lot of people are realizing it’s much cheaper than renting,” she told BusinessWest, adding that sellers from the Hub find they can get much more living space for their money in the Pioneer Valley.

“It’s not unlike what we saw after 9/11 — a migration from the city to smaller towns and villages, a more rural environment. A lot of people today are looking for a place that gives them a little more space, private outdoor areas, home-office space, a place for their kids to do their schooling from home.”

“We’ve had a lot of buyers from Boston. My last three sales were from Boston — cash buyers. A lot of people are realizing they don’t have to work at their company’s location any longer; a lot of companies are letting them work from home. And this is a cheaper area — instead of a little condo for $700,000, you can get a good-sized house for $700,000.”

Zeamer said she’s also seeing an increased desire for multi-generational living experiences, which typically require a larger home than the buyer currently occupies. “They might have older parents or grown children, and they need more living space or in-law apartments.”

But the main driver for more space is simply the fact that families are spending much more time at home. “Because of the pandemic, they want more space, and different types of space,” Zeamer said. “Some people are moving because they feel cooped up in their existing homes; it’s too tight with the kids being home and partners working remotely from home.”

The pandemic has also generated a desire in some people to live more sustainably — to grow more food at home, for example, instead of relying totally on grocery stores, she noted. “They want to have a nice garden, and they’re thinking more about providing their own food sources.

“And I do think people are looking for more private outdoor space, where they can gather with their people, in their pod, without exposure from the neighbors,” she went on. “A lot of condos are coming on the market, perhaps because people in close living arrangements are looking to be more isolated.”

Lesley Lambert (center, celebrating another sale)

Lesley Lambert (center, celebrating another sale) says prime properties can get dozens of offers quickly — and over the asking price.

 

Lambert said the Berkshires and the Northampton/Easthampton area are both notable hotspots right now, but all of Western Mass., much like Cape Cod, is being seen as an attractive alternative to life in a metroplex.

“If they want to get out of their cities, it’s a good time, as a lot of companies are going with mobile workers. I think the brick-and-mortar concept is going to take a hit, and we’ll see more people realizing they don’t have to live where they work.”

Zeamer agreed. “I think Western Mass. is really appealing to a lot of urban types of buyers,” she said, noting, as tourism boards and chambers of commerce have for generations, that this region offers an urbane, progressive mindset in many corners, plus the kinds of cultural and recreational amenities city dwellers appreciate, but in a quieter, morte scenic setting with myriad ways to enjoy the great outdoors.

And, as noted, there are more seekers of such homes right now than sellers. As an example, Lambert recalled one house she sold last fall. “It was a lovely house, not a crazy McMansion. I had 50 showings in two days, and 15 offers — all over the asking price. From what I’m hearing from my teammates and fellow Realtors, it’s like that for everybody.”

 

Buying Time

While that makes for an exciting home-selling experience, it can be frustrating on the other side.

“There’s so much competition that people are struggling to secure a home,” Zeamer said. “And that’s keeping them from putting their own home on the market. It’s a great time to sell, but then you have to buy, and that part is very challenging right now.”

One of her colleagues at Jones recently got 18 offers on a property, some with cash in hand. “It’s hard to compete if there’s a cash offer in the mix. In urban areas, people are liquidating properties and have lots of cash in hand, and the prices here look pretty attractive compared to what they’re used to.”

“In Hampden County, the average days a house spends on the market is three .”

Also suppressing supply is the fact that some homeowners eyeing a move simply don’t want people in their houses during the pandemic, so they’re delaying a move, Vital-Basile said. “I ask sellers, ‘what makes you comfortable? Do you want a one-time showing, an open house with three families at a time, and after that, I’ll go and clean everything?’ It depends on the client.” Meanwhile, it can be especially tricky to sell a house with tenants if those tenants don’t want visitors due to COVID-19.

“Very rarely are you seeing open houses anymore. I can’t speak for all Realtors, but I switched to doing 3D home tours, where you can sit at your desktop and ‘walk’ through the house,” Lambert said, noting that in-person walk-throughs are reserved for houses the buyer is especially interested in.

In addition, “we can’t meet with clients like we used to,” she said. “We have to do a lot more remotely, talking on a phone call of Zoom call.”

The challenges of buying a house right now — both logistical and competitive — reinforce the need to have strong representation, said all the Realtors we spoke with. And to use common sense.

For instance, Vital-Basile said, some potential buyers are waiving appraisals and inspections to get a leg up, but she doesn’t recommend that. “I tell everyone, ‘don’t force the buy; you don’t want to be in a bad situation. Even if it’s the right house at the right price, don’t force it. Always have the agent negotiate.”

Lambert is certainly an advocate for the agent-client relationship — and not just any agent. “I tell them they need the strongest buyer’s agent they can find, and not just work with your cousin because he got his license six months ago. Sometimes that’s fine, but in this market, you have to know what you’re doing.”

That includes securing preapprovals and discussing beforehand what a competitive offer should looks like. “If the first time you talk to a buyer is when the boots are hitting the road, they’re going to freak out. It’s got to be a strategy you’ve developed with them regardless of the house they find.”

And it means, in many cases these days, being prepared to offer more than the asking price right off the bat, before someone else invariably does.

“I have a team of trusted affiliates who take great care of my clients, and when my clients listen to my well-erned advice, we have smooth sailing,” Lambert said. “I’m not the only realty team like that, of course. But it’s important to have advocates on your side right now.”

That said, the “crazy prices” sellers are getting don’t seem to be slowing up, Vital-Basile said. “I don’t think the market will tank anytime soon,” she said. “But a $180,000 house going for $275,000 … it can’t continue this way, or else the average homeowner won’t be able to afford a mortgage, and then the market will have to stabilize. Right now, though, there are too many buyers out there, ready to move.”

 

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

 

Education Special Coverage

Portrait of a Graduate

 

The program is called ‘Portrait of a Graduate,’ and that name pretty much says it all.

But maybe an adjective is in order to get the complete picture, pun intended.

Indeed, what the Springfield Public Schools are focused on now is creating a portrait of a successful high-school graduate, through an initiative designed to gain feedback from a host of constituencies regarding the skills — as in all the skills — that young people will need to not only earn a high-school diploma, but thrive in an ever-changing, technology-driven economy.

And this portrait will become a valuable blueprint of sorts as school administrators go about creating a new strategic plan for the city’s public schools, said Superintendent Dan Warwick, who stressed repeatedly that Portrait of a Graduate is very much a community-driven process that will define success for Springfield students, including the values, knowledge, skills, and work habits they will need to thrive as learners, workers, and leaders.

Among those providing input are members of the business community, said Trisha Canavan, president of United Personnel and current president of Springfield Business Leaders for Education, adding that their commentary will be critical to creating that portrait and then inspiring needed changes to programming and curriculum.

Made possible by a grant from the Barr Foundation, this Portrait of a Graduate initiative is part of a broad movement across the country to involve the community in shaping a school system’s strategic plan and specific programming and curriculum for helping to ensure student success.

The list of communities that have embarked on such programs grows each year, and now includes Lowell, Shrewsbury, and other cities and towns in Massachusetts, as well as Hartford, Conn., Fairfax County, Va., and many others, said Warwick.

In most of those communities, Portrait of a Graduate is used as part of a strategic plan for a specific school system, said Paul Foster, chief information officer for Springfield Public Schools. Here, though, it will help guide development of a new strategic plan, which is an important distinction.

Dan Warwick

Dan Warwick

“Clearly, this has become a best practice — communities need to take a look at what everyone thinks our graduates should look like, not only the academic skills, but all the other skills as well.”

“Most communities make it one of the activities as part of creating a plan,” he explained. “It’s not as common to create that vision first and then build the plan based on the vision. I think it’s important that we not make decisions on how to change schools until we have that clarity of vision that a portrait provides.”

Warwick agreed. “Clearly, this has become a best practice — communities need to take a look at what everyone thinks our graduates should look like, not only the academic skills, but all the other skills as well.

“Other iterations of our strategic plans were mostly academic-focused, which is what you would expect for a school system to put forward in a strategic plan,” he went on. “But this piece is designed to take a wider look and really get the community to rally around what they want our graduates to look like and what attributes they’ll need, and then we’ll build the actual strategic plan from that profile.”

By most accounts, he noted, it has succeeded in its goal of garnering community interest in helping to create this portrait.

“I think it excited people,” Warwick told BusinessWest. “The community involvement has been tremendous — the breadth of the input from every sector of the community has been significant, and this new concept has helped us with that.”

The acknowledgment that needed skills for success in the 21st-century workplace extends well beyond academics is made clear in the six ‘pillars’ of the portrait — learn, work, thrive, lead, persist, and communicate, said Azell Cavaan, chief Communications officer for Springfield Public Schools, adding that the school system has received more than 1,400 responses to a survey regarding a draft portrait that reflects how these pillars will be addressed moving forward.

All those we spoke with noted that there are few real surprises in the feedback that has been received, and the skills and attributes identified as needed are included in most school systems’ strategic plans. However, it is important to have these sentiments reinforced, and equally important to gain input from a broad, diverse audience, one that reflects the community in question.

“We’ve had hundreds of meetings in every segment of the community, and folks have really stayed with this,” Warwick said, adding that the city has been able to maintain momentum for the initiative even in the middle of pandemic, a clear indicator of its importance to the future of the city and the region.

Paul Foster

Paul Foster

“Instead of traditional educators looking at this problem, we have a wider breadth of involvement from the community at large and the business community.”

For this issue and its focus on education, BusinessWest takes an in-depth look at the Portrait of a Graduate initiative, its goals, and why Springfield school officials believe it will pay dividends in their ongoing efforts to ensure that students not only graduate, but can succeed after they do.

 

Course of Action

Foster told BusinessWest that Portrait of a Graduate, or POG for short, is becoming an increasingly popular response to what has a national issue, or concern — helping students succeed beyond the classroom.

He said the movement, if it can be called that, started several years ago in the private-school arena, and was quickly embraced by public schools as well. The basic concept is to ask a question — what skills and attributes will students need to succeed years and decades down the road? — and ask a lot of different of people that question. It sounds logical, but it in many ways represents a new way of thinking about this issue, Warwick said.

“Instead of traditional educators looking at this problem, we have a wider breadth of involvement from the community at large and the business community,” he explained. “We’re getting a lot of input on the skills and attributes that people are looking for that, for traditional educators like myself, wouldn’t have been the first things we would be thinking about.”

What are these attributes and skills? The list includes financial literacy, problem solving, and perseverance — being able to stick with something until the problem is solved, said Foster, adding that what has been most important in this process has been not only hearing such comments, but hearing them over and over, and from different constituencies.

“What I thought was surprising, and important, was how aligned what we heard was,” he told BusinessWest. “We went from conversation to conversation and heard the same things over and over again. For example, we heard ‘financial literacy’ at every conversation. There wasn’t a group that we spoke with that didn’t say that was important.

“It was the same with things like problem solving,” he went on. “It wasn’t surprising that we heard those things; I think it was surprising that we were hearing the same things from every group; we were talking to business leaders, we were talking to parents, and we were talking to teachers, and they were identifying the same things, which is good.”

Canavan agreed, and said one of the broad goals of the initiative is to create a sense of ownership within the community when it comes to the city’s schools, or a stronger sense of ownership, as the case may be.

“Getting the collective wisdom of the community is important,” she said, “because I’m hopeful that one of the things that will come out of this is our community embracing that notion that this is our responsibility — that it’s not just the responsibility of the schools or just the responsibility of the parents — it’s our responsibility.”

The process of gathering feedback from these constituencies began in the fall of 2019, and the seeds were planted for the initiative maybe six months before that, said Foster, adding that the school department has been hosting what it calls ‘community conversations,’ a phrase chosen over ‘focus groups,’ which comes with some preconceived notions, not all of them good.

These conversations, organized by various stakeholders, have been going on continuously, he went on, adding that they have involved the business community, the refugee community, parents, educators, students, alumni, the faith community, and other constituencies. One was comprised of area business owners who are also alumni of Springfield Public Schools.

Traditionally, these groups, when involved in such conversations, focus on what needs to be done differently in the schools. For this exercise, they didn’t start there, but rather with two questions: ‘what are your hopes and dreams for children growing up in Springfield?’ and ‘what are the knowledge and skills that young people growing up in Springfield will need to realize those dreams?’

The feedback was intriguing, and in some cases powerful, said those we spoke with, especially when it came to students, what their dreams are, and what they need to make them reality.

This is reflected in those six aforementioned pillars and how the assembled feedback has shaped the working portrait with regard to how the school system must address each one.

Under ‘persist,’ for example, it notes that the Springfield Public Schools and the Springfield community will prepare students to:

• Remain focused on goals, using coping strategies and flexibility to overcome obstacles;

• Speak up for themselves and the issues that are important to them;

• Engage in self-reflection to build on strengths and weaknesses;

• Evaluate choices and outcomes when making decisions; and

• Give, receive, and respond to constructive feedback.

Under ‘communicate,’ the bullet points include ‘write and speak with clarity, evidence, and purpose’; and ‘know how to listen to others, ask questions, and seek to understand.’ And under ‘lead’ are these points, among others: ‘be curious, creative, open-minded, and flexible in new situations’; ‘advocate for themselves and for others’; and ‘seek opportunities to understand and serve the community.’

Now that the portrait is essentially complete, said Foster, those leading this initiative are pivoting from writing that document to writing a strategic plan, one that will attempt to prioritize what has been learned over the past year or so and create a blueprint for action and change moving forward. The aggressive timeline has the plan being completed in August, in time to implement changes for the next school year.

“We ended this with a recognition that there are some small ways and some big ways that we need to think differently and change schools,” he explained. “Schooling in the United States has been done in a relatively similar way for a very long time, and some pretty significant things need to change; some of those are going to be one-year changes, and others are going to be five-year changes.”

 

Drawing Conclusions

Moving forward, those we spoke with they expect the POG initiative to help introduce new performance measures and ways of evaluating whether students are ready to not simply receive a diploma, but succeed in what has always been the broader goal — success in the workplace and in life.

“You can have someone has mastered English and mastered math who is not ready for the workforce,” Foster said. “So part of the strategic plan will be introducing new performance measures that are not a replacement of but an addition to the ones we have today; we’re thinking about how you evaluate student performance differently.”

Where this thinking takes the school system is a question still to be answered. But the process begins with a portrait of a graduate, and in Springfield, this is still a work in progress and an important step forward.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Hampshire County Special Coverage

Uncertainty on the Menu

Fred Gohr says Fitzwilly’s shifted gears in a few ways last year, from expanded takeout service to outdoor dining under a large tent.

Fred Gohr says Fitzwilly’s shifted gears in a few ways last year, from expanded takeout service to outdoor dining under a large tent.

The weekend before March 17, Fitzwilly’s was gearing up for a great St. Patrick’s Day. That’s the day the Northampton St. Patrick’s Assoc. gathers for its annual breakfast, and then about 200 of them march on down to Fitzwilly’s and spend most of the day there.

“We have Irish bands, and we were sitting on 20 kegs of Guinness beer and a couple cases of Jameson’s Irish whiskey for a great big party — and it got pulled right out from under us,” owner Fred Gohr said.

Remember March 16? That’s the day restaurants — and most other businesses in the Commonwealth — were forced to shut down, on just two days notice, by order of Gov. Charlie Baker.

“It was awful,” Gohr went on. “We had a staff of about 75 people, and I had to tell them all, ‘we’re closed, and you guys have to go on unemployment for a while, and we’ll see what happens.’”

What happened, all across Hampshire County’s robust dining scene, has been a series of starts and stops, hope and despair, and especially two themes that kept coming up as BusinessWest sat with area proprietors: uncertainty, but also evolution.

“We were closed completely for a month or so, then we opened and started doing a little bit of curbside,” Gohr said. “And, honestly, when that’s all you’re doing — at least for us — it’s not very profitable.”

But takeout service, never a major factor in the business, has since morphed into a significant part of the model, accounting for about 25% of sales. Other restaurants have relied even more on pick-up service, because they don’t have the interior space or outdoor-dining opportunities that Fitzwilly’s has (more on those later).

“Last year, it felt like you were opening a new restaurant every single week. You had no historical data to compare; you couldn’t look at sales and ask, ‘how did we do this last time?’”

“It’s been such a whirlwind for small businesses the past 10 months, trying to get our bearings with all the changes,” said Alex Washut, who owns two Jake’s restaurants in Northampton and Amherst. “Last year, it felt like you were opening a new restaurant every single week. You had no historical data to compare; you couldn’t look at sales and ask, ‘how did we do this last time?’

That’s because there was no ‘last time’ — no comparable pandemic in the past century, anyway. “Everything was out the window,” Washut said. “We asked, ‘who are we going to be this week?’ Then there was a bunch of changes, and we had to conform to those, and then it was a new restaurant the next week.”

Like Fitzwilly’s, evolving to a takeout model early on was new territory for Jake’s. “We were never a takeout restaurant; maybe 3% of our gross was takeout food,” he said. “So we had no system for it.”

The various systems that area eateries developed, in the weeks last spring when takeout was the only option, involved details ranging from what containers to use to how to present food attractively and, for restaurants that opted for delivery, how to keep it warm in transit.

Casey Douglass

Casey Douglass with some of the supplies used in Galaxy’s takeout business, which has been its dominant model for almost a year.

“We were able to pivot quickly,” Washut noted. “From there, we moved to outdoor dining when that was allowed, but we had never had outdoor dining before” — and questions had to be answered regarding permitting, staffing, health and safety factors.

The positive, he noted, is that, if 2021 follows a similarly bumpy trajectory, “we know what’s expected, and we know how we’ll react in the spring, how we’ll react in the summer, and how we’ll react once the fall and winter come along.”

Indeed, the establishments that survived last year’s storm are, if not stronger for the experience, at least a little wiser, even as many are barely hanging on. The hope, of course, is that 2021 is nothing like 2020. But in this industry, so critical to the economy and cultural life of Hampshire County, nothing is certain.

 

Survival of the Fittest

“We’ve evolved a lot.”

Those were Casey Douglass’ first words when asked what this year has been like at Galaxy, the restaurant he’s operated in downtown Easthampton for the past five years.
The first evolution had to do with meeting customer needs. “We’re part of the food chain,” he said. “We have a lot of customers who don’t go to the supermarket. And we were like, ‘they’re going to be putting themselves at risk going to the supermarket as opposed to getting to-go.’

“So we went to the radio station and created an ad talking about ‘Casey’s comfort food,’” he went on. “And we switched to all a la carte, basic stuff — mac and cheese, mashed potatoes, roasted chicken, meatloaf — and we were cranking.”

So much that, when he secured a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan, he first thought he wouldn’t need it. “Then a couple weeks went by, and we said, ‘thank goodness we got that.’ It changed so quickly.”

Sales dropped to about 45% of what they once were, but he kept 70% of the labor on board, because that’s the main purpose of the PPP program. That money got Galaxy through the end of June. Then things got rough.

Jake’s owner Alex Washut

Jake’s owner Alex Washut says it might be a while before his two locations (this one in Amherst) are packed with patrons again.

After losing a couple of cooks to unemployment, the restaurant cut back from five days a week to four, and when summer rolled around, fewer customers wanted takeout, but outdoor dining wasn’t a draw, either.

Fall brought a reprieve of sorts, with the milder, less-humid weather boosting outdoor dining, but the winter has been exceptionally tricky. Indoor dining didn’t prove to be a workable option; in a space that seats fewer than 50, the governor’s current 25% capacity mandate is especially onerous, and Douglass and his team also felt indoor dining might not be safe — or, at least, feel safe — for a clientele that skews older than some restaurants.

So as winter wears on, Douglass is pressing on with takeout only — now a hybrid of the comfort-food concept and the creative American meals he’s known for — a bank loan, and plenty of grit.

“We’re just looking at survival at this point,” he said, noting that costs like food, loan interest, utilities, and equipment leases don’t just go away when sales are down. “We’re efficient at what we do, but we’re losing about $15,000 a month. And that’s not going to be able to continue.”

However, he insisted, “I do think the spring will increase sales a couple thousand dollars a week, and that’s all it takes. We’ll be fine.”

Evolving to a takeout model was jarring at first to Washut, especially since his two locations — an 1800s-era building in Northampton and a new, modern structure in North Amherst’s Mill District — are so different, with a different set of clientele, and not cookie-cutter businesses like quick-service chains.

“We’re just looking at survival at this point. We’re efficient at what we do, but we’re losing about $15,000 a month. And that’s not going to be able to continue.”

“We didn’t know how to be a takeout restaurant. We were making $50 in sales a day — we were in shock,” he recalled. So he shut things down completely through April, secured a PPP loan and other grant funds, and reopened for takeout in early May, then outdoor seating a couple months later. Armed with the PPP, he was able to bring back the whole staff, and the breakfast-and-lunch establishment added dinners to generate more business. When funds ran dry, dinner went away.

These days, with takeout and limited indoor seating, Washut is bringing in about 30% of typical sales, and the combined staff is down from close to 50 to around 15.

Throughout all the changes, he has prioritized safety. Even if the governor’s 25% seating rule changes tomorrow, he said, “I’m not going to increase my dining room beyond 25%; my staff and I don’t feel that’s appropriate right now. There may be things we’re allowed to do but, in reality, we choose not to do.”

Gohr had a few advantages last year when it came to keeping people safe while generating business. One was a large parking lot next to Fitzwilly’s that he rented from its owner for tented outdoor dining. He could seat 70 there, while the city of Northampton’s decision to turn parking spaces on Main Street into dining space added about eight more tables to the restaurant’s existing sidewalk seating.

“We really had a great summer,” he told BusinessWest. “Through the summer, we had a capacity of 100-plus guests, the majority of them outdoors.”

Gohr’s other advantage is a large indoor space with a normal capacity of 280. The 25% mandate has hurt this winter, for sure, as did Baker’s 9:30 p.m. curfew, which was only recently lifted. But seating 70 — separated by plexiglass barriers — is better than seating a dozen.

“We’re very fortunate to have a lot of room in here, and we’re able to distance people. These places that have even 50 seats — and there’s a lot of places in town with just six tables — but even the ones with 50 seats, now you’re down to letting 12 people in. You can’t survive. So we’re fortunate given the size we have. Seventy people gets us by. We can survive on that if it doesn’t change.”

Casey Douglass is confident Galaxy will return

Casey Douglass is confident Galaxy will return to its go-to dining status in Easthampton once it’s safe to eat out again.

A mild winter, weather-wise, helps as well. “If you start getting snowstorms on weekends on top of all the other stuff, then we’d be in trouble. But we’ve had pretty good weekends.”

A PPP loan and other grants also helped, and he’s applied for a second PPP loan, with this round capping the disbursement for certain hard-hit industries, including restaurants, higher than the first, so he’s hopeful for another influx to carry him to the spring. He’s already in talks about renting the parking lot again, and the city has discussed moving outdoor seating into Main Street again as well.

 

Pressing Through

Still, Gohr, like every other restaurant owner, knows 2021 could be another year of upheaval. “We’re hoping everyone gets the vaccine and we get back to normal. But I don’t think it’s going to be real quick.”

He’s appreciative of customers eating in the restaurant, and said gift-card sales were strong over the holidays, although not to the level of a typical year, when more people are out shopping. And he does believe outdoor dining will be a hit again. But it’s harder to pin down when customers will flock to restaurants at pre-2020 levels.

“My gut tells me it’s not going to be in the spring; it’ll be late summer or fall before we get to that point,” he said. “The mindset that I see in the public is all over the place. I know people — friends and some of my regular customers — that have not been anywhere since March. And then there are others, the minute we opened the doors, they were back. Everybody’s obviously more careful, but everyone’s comfort level is completely different. It’s a wide spectrum.”

Douglass senses real community support for Galaxy, noting that some regulars stop by three times a week, and others drop big tips and cheerlead for the establishment among their peers.

“I feel like, at least in this community, [the pandemic] hasn’t hurt on a big scale economically,” he said. “We haven’t had factories shut down. I’ve heard people are paying their rents. And I think, come the spring, people are going to be pouring out. As much as people are still nervous, if the service staff has been vaccinated, if a majority of customers have been vaccinated, people will be coming out in droves. I think people are going to hunker down all February, and then in March, with the outdoor dining, people are going to be like, ‘sign me up.’”

If that’s especially optimistic, Douglass balances the thought by saying he’s had some dark days as well, wondering if it’s worth the effort to stay open right now, and fretting over the possibility of a snowy weekend that could wipe out almost an entire week’s worth of revenues. It’s his staff who have been most enthusiastic about staying open, believing it’s important to stay in the public eye, so that Galaxy is a go-to destination when people start emerging from winter hibernation.

Still, he said, “everyone wants to go back to what normal is, but if this goes on long enough, does normal shift?”

It’s a good question, and one Washut asks himself as well. “Every day, I’m thinking about my business, trying to find that crystal ball,” he said, meaning no one really knows how 2021 will go. But he’s hopeful.

“Once it gets warm again, once the outdoor dining opens up for food-service establishments, I think the initial rush of business will be great. Unfortunately, with restaurants, it’s really hard to be proactive; we’re constantly in a reactive mode.”

Specifically, it’s tough to staff up for a rush that might be around the corner, but restaurants also don’t want to be caught flat-footed if things pick up quickly. And things might not pick up much at all in 2021.

“This will be with us for a lot longer than we want to tell ourselves, and at some level, we have to come to terms with that,” he said. “I don’t think we’ll be hosting 60 to 80 people in our dining rooms this year; we won’t have that level of business for a while.”

Yes, the combination of warm weather — and outdoor dining — come spring, and the prospect of rising herd immunity from the vaccines, might inject some life into the industry, but next winter could be just as difficult as this one, depending on how the pandemic’s endgame goes — if an endgame even materializes in 2021.

Meanwhile, Washut appreciates any community support he gets. “If you only come in for gift cards, awesome. If you only get takeout, awesome. Maybe we’re not in a financial position to pass that goodwill on in an equal manner, but I’ll be damned if we won’t later on. If we all keep that attitude in every level of our life, we’ll get through this for sure.”

 

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Accounting and Tax Planning Special Coverage

Reading the Fine Print

By Julie Quink

 

The economic stress created by the COVID-19 pandemic compelled business owners and individuals to apply for the relief funds provided by the Small Business Administration (SBA) in the form of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans and Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL).

The rollout of these programs came at a time when the reality of the pandemic began to unfold, creating a frenzy for businesses and individuals to apply for the funding, in some cases, before the funding ran out.

Before the ink on the guidance and requirements for these stimulus funds was dry, applications for the funding were being processed, and funds were in the hands of businesses and individuals. To expedite getting funds to those who needed them, much of the clarification about the use of the funds, taxability of the funds, and criteria for forgiveness were ironed out after the funding was in hand and being spent by the recipients. What ensued was months of additions to the SBA’s frequently-asked-questions (FAQ) document clarifying the eligible uses of the funding to ensure forgiveness and further attempts by Congress and the SBA to adjust program requirements as the pandemic continued.

More than 50 FAQs were issued to clarify the PPP requirements, and 20 relating to the EIDL loans.

In the frenzy to obtain the funding for the PPP and EIDL loans, it became clear that not everyone read the fine print, or that the fine print changed as clarity was provided for these programs. The fine print provided recipients with additional requirements for the funding they may have been unaware of at the time of application or even during the spend-down period.

As trained professionals, accountants and business advisors spent months learning the requirements and pivoting as they changed. It would be unreasonable to assume that those who received the funding could keep up with the fast-paced changes that were occurring, including the fine print. For accountants, there have been times we could barely keep up with the changes.

Julie Quink

Julie Quink

“With the second round of PPP funding recently released and requirements more recently clarified, reading the fine print should hopefully not be such a daunting or surprising task.”

The result is that those receiving the funding need to be aware of those items in the fine print for the PPP funding and the EIDL loans that may impact them.

 

EIDL

Recipients of the EIDL loans, which could be up to $2 million in amount, were required to sign loan paperwork, outlining the terms of the funding. In the fine print of these loan documents are provisions that the borrower should look out for and be aware of. Some of the provisions are:

• For loans under $25,000, collateral is not required. For loans of more than $25,000, the SBA is provided collateral through business assets, current and future. Transfers or sales of collateral, except inventory, require prior SBA approval. In addition, prior approval is required by the SBA in the event these business assets will be used to secure other financing;

• Borrowers are required to keep itemized receipts, paid invoices, contracts, and all related paperwork for three years from the date of disbursement;

• Borrowers are encouraged to the extent feasible to purchase only American-made equipment and products with the proceeds of this loan;

• Borrowers must keep all accounting records five years before the loan and three years after in a manner satisfactory to the SBA;

• Borrowers must agree to audits and inspection of assets, if requested by the SBA, at the expense of the borrower;

• Borrowers have a duty to provide hazard insurance on collateral and may be asked to provide proof;

• Within 90 days of the borrower’s year end, financial statements, in the format specified by the SBA, are required to be furnished by the borrower;

• The SBA may require a review-level financial statement for a borrower upon written request by the SBA at the borrower’s expense;

• Prior approval from the SBA is required for distributions of the borrower’s assets to the owners or employees, including loans, gifts, or bonuses;

• Borrowers must submit, within 180 days of receiving a loan, an SBA certificate or resolution. For most borrowers, the SBA has followed up or is following up on this requirement now;

• Default under the provisions may result if a borrower merges, consolidates, reorganizes, or changes ownership without prior SBA approval; and

• The loans can be prepaid, without penalty, if the borrower does not need the funds or secures other financing.

For most borrowers, the requirements may be routine considerations, but for others, these may be new requirements.

 

PPP

In the fine print of the PPP loan documents are also provisions that the borrower should consider, as follows:

• For borrowers who received a PPP loan greater than $2 million, the SBA has indicated it will likely audit those borrowers for compliance with spending requirements;

• Although Congress has confirmed that the proceeds of the PPP loan are not taxable and the expenses paid with PPP are deductible, some states, such as Massachusetts, are not following the federal laws relative to forgiveness of the PPP loans as they have their own rules. For individuals in Massachusetts, the loan forgiveness is taxable income. This affects sole proprietors, S-corp shareholders, and partners of partnerships. A bill, co-sponsored by state Sen. Eric Lesser, state Rep. Brian Ashe, and five other co-sponsors, has been proposed to allow for non-taxability of the forgiveness amounts in Massachusetts;

• Depending on when the PPP loan was funded, the borrower may have a repayment term of two or five years for the loan; and

• Although forgiveness may be granted, the borrower should retain the records used for forgiveness. Generally, most records should be retained for seven years.

 

Bottom Line

Navigating the fine print is key for those who received the PPP and EIDL loans. The navigation becomes increasingly more difficult when the requirements continue to change and the funds have already been received and used to operate the business.

With the second round of PPP funding recently released and requirements more recently clarified, reading the fine print should hopefully not be such a daunting or surprising task.

 

Julie Quink is managing partner with West Springfield-based Burkhart Pizzanelli; (413) 734-9040.

Insurance Special Coverage

Are You Covered?

By Mark Morris

Christine Fleury

Christine Fleury says making alterations to the home — a common sight during the pandemic — could change insurance needs.

Call it the great migration indoors.

When the pandemic first hit, many people were forced to quickly convert their homes into offices, schools, and entertainment centers. Some in the insurance industry predicted this might lead to more homeowners insurance claims. In reality, it didn’t.

Similarly, as people spend more time in their homes, they also depend more on their water, electrical, and heating systems to work. While some insurance claims have been filed due to these systems failing after increased use, the increase has not been notable.

In fact, Christine Fleury, Personal Lines manager at Encharter Insurance in Amherst, said companies have actually seen a decrease in severe claims from homeowners. “As people spend more time at home, they are catching that large loss before it happens.”

Corey Murphy agreed, noting that, because people are home, they are noticing and taking care of seemingly minor problems like leaky gutters.

“As people spend more time at home, they are catching that large loss before it happens.”

“As people pay more attention to fixing the small issues, they prevent the larger problems from ever happening. A little preventive maintenance goes a long way,” the president of First American Insurance Agency in Chicopee noted.

Most homeowners insurance claims are the result of severe weather incidents. When COVID-19 first hit, winter was ending, and warm weather soon followed. Bill Trudeau, executive vice president and partner at HUB International New England in Agawam, said the mild winter this year has helped keep claims down.

“Other than a couple isolated wind events, the weather has behaved itself, and that means claims have tended to be in line with company projections.”

The pandemic has thrown a few wrinkles into the home-insurance picture this year, however.

For instance, many homeowners were motivated to invest in substantial improvements to their homes. Home construction and improvement contractors point directly to being cooped up in the house as the main motivator for people choosing to make improvements to their property.

What impact does all this renovation work have on the homeowners insurance carried on the house? The answer depends on what improvements are made and what kind of coverage is already in place.

Everyone BusinessWest spoke with agreed that, for small or cosmetic improvements, there is no need to contact an insurance agent. Some larger projects, however, may require altering or increasing a home’s coverage.

“Adding square footage to your home, doing a full remodel, or building a garage would all be reasons to consult your agent to make sure you have enough coverage,” Fleury said.

Even if they are not taking on home improvement projects, Trudeau advises people to call their insurance agent at least every couple of years so they understand the coverage that’s in place and whether they may need additional coverage.

“You can work with your agent to run a cost estimator,” Trudeau said. “It’s a software tool that takes the data from your home, including any upgrades, then shows you the current replacement cost if it was all suddenly gone.”

With the lifestyle changes wrought by the pandemic, it’s more important than ever to make sure the home — and everyone in it — are protected. Here are some key factors to consider.

 

Home Work

While they may not have set foot in the office in months, people who work from home are still protected from on-the-job injuries by workers’ compensation coverage. Office workers tend not to get injured on the job, but the coverage is in place if there is an incident.

“There has never been a distinction between whether employee actions emanate from an office at the company or from an office at the person’s home,” Trudeau said. “Because this coverage is broader in scope, COVID did not force us to make changes to workers’ comp plans.”

Bill Trudeau

Bill Trudeau says claims have been kept in check recently by a mild winter.

It’s not unusual for people working from home to have a computer, monitor, and even a printer that belongs to their employer. Murphy said some jobs may require employees to have additional business assets in the home, so it might be wise to make sure everything is covered. “Most policies will pay a little toward assets being home, but it’s usually a minimal amount.”

With homes serving as business offices and classrooms, more people — and their pets — are home at the same time. According to Trudeau, homeowners’ insurance policies consider any issues with an animal as a “strict liability event,” meaning there is no way to defend the action.

“If someone knocks on your door and your dog bites them, it generally means the insurance company pays the claim,” he explained, adding that, as people acquire more pets, the likelihood of claims increases. Most insurance companies keep a list of dog breeds they will not cover because those breeds have higher incident rates.

“You can work with your agent to run a cost estimator. It’s a software tool that takes the data from your home, including any upgrades, then shows you the current replacement cost if it was all suddenly gone.”

Murphy encourages pet owners to speak with their agent because these restrictions can vary widely among insurers. “Just because one company doesn’t want to cover your breed of dog, check with another company; it’s not a universal list.”

Whether they have pets or not, Fleury advises her clients to carry personal liability coverage, commonly known as an umbrella policy, that supplements both homeowners and auto coverage.

“When we write home and auto policies for a customer, we always recommend buying personal liability coverage as well because it gives you that additional safety net,” she said. A typical umbrella policy costs less than $200 but can provide up to $1 million in additional liability coverage when the limits of homeowners or auto coverage are exceeded.

While dog bites and leaking water pipes are obvious reasons to carry homeowners insurance, it can be much harder to detect a leak when personal data is compromised. A significant increase in identity theft has motivated insurance companies to begin offering identity-theft protection as part of their homeowners policies.

“With everyone at home and increased online activity, it’s more important than ever to safeguard your privacy from someone getting into your system and doing real damage,” Trudeau said.

Apart from identity-theft insurance, he advises everyone to follow best practices such as using multi-factor authentication. For example, when working on an important account online, a code is sent to the user’s personal phone that must be entered to gain access.

Corey Murphy

As people pay attention to small issues in the home, Corey Murphy says, they can prevent larger issues from ever arising.

When fraudsters accesses online bank accounts, they often add a payee into the account. Trudeau advises customers to check with their bank to make sure it uses multi-factor authentication to prevent an outsider from accessing their accounts and to make sure it’s turned on at home.

“If someone has logged into your computer and they don’t have your phone, they can’t get that code,” he said.

Fleury said her agency includes identity-theft coverage in all its homeowners policies. “We feel it is important insurance and recommend at least $5,000 worth of coverage for identity theft.”

 

From a Distance

The pandemic has changed the insurance business in other ways. Typically, when a homeowner files an insurance claim, an adjuster will visit the home and walk through to personally inspect the damage. With COVID-19 concerns, that’s happening much less often.

“In some ways, COVID is moving insurance companies along the digital side of things,” Murphy said. “They are allowing homeowners with a claim to submit photos and even have video calls if the insurer is set up for it.”

The trend toward relying on consumer photos rather than a visit by an adjuster follows what’s been happening on the auto-insurance side for some time.

“If someone knocks on your door and your dog bites them, it generally means the insurance company pays the claim.”

“Many auto insurers have created apps where the person making the claim takes a photo of the damage, uploads it for an adjuster to review, and then the payment is processed,” Fleury said.

The move toward more digital interaction is no surprise to Trudeau.

“Long before COVID, people e-mailed pictures and documents to us,” he said. “Companies have simply accelerated the move to modernization by using many tools they already had.”

Murphy likes to remind customers that every insurance company offers something a little different that their competitors. That’s why it’s important to put some thought into selecting a homeowners insurance policy.

“People need to assess what they have, in terms of their house and what’s in it, and then speak with an agent about what needs to be covered,” he said, adding that it’s about matching a person’s situation with the company that can best provide coverage for their needs — especially at a time when those needs, and demands on the home, are still in flux.

Community Spotlight

Community Spotlight

By Mark Morris

Jennifer Nacht

Jennifer Nacht says a heavy focus on outdoor experiences last year helped Lenox weather the economic impact of the pandemic.

For the past year, the town of Lenox showed what happens when uncertainty meets a can-do attitude.

Despite the formidable challenges of COVID-19, Town Manager Christopher Ketchen said, Lenox residents and businesses have been remarkably resilient.

“Throughout the pandemic, our residents demonstrated how much they love our town,” Ketchen said. “They make their homes here, and our businesses are invested in their customers and their community.”

What began as a normal year of planning events at the Lenox Chamber of Commerce was suddenly derailed in March. Once they realized the pandemic was going to last more than a couple months, Executive Director Jennifer Nacht said, chamber members and town officials quickly met to put together a plan to salvage at least some activity for Lenox.

“We went through each season and developed a general outline of things we could do,” Nacht said. “Even though we did not know what the year was going to look like, we were able to turn around some great activities.”

Like many towns, Lenox encouraged restaurants to offer tented outdoor dining and allowed them to expand outdoor seating into public parking spaces. The town also added covered dining terraces in public spaces around town.

“The select board lifted alcohol restrictions so people could bring a bottle of wine to Lilac Park, for example, where we had set up a dining terrace,” Nacht said.

“You couldn’t get a parking place at the trailheads in town. Even obscure trailheads that were once known only to a handful of locals were crowded.”

Some developments last spring were rough. In May, the town learned that, due to COVID-19 concerns, Tanglewood had canceled its 2020 season. For some perspective on the importance of Lenox’s largest summer attraction, a Williams College study in 2017 estimated the economic impact of Tanglewood to Berkshire County and Western Mass. at nearly $103 million annually.

Because they didn’t know what to expect when Tanglewood called off its season, Nacht said everyone concentrated their efforts on making Lenox a welcome and inviting place. Outdoor dining was a first step that helped to establish a more vibrant atmosphere, and it inspired further activities.

For example, the Lenox Cultural District and the chamber organized Lenox Loves Music, an initiative that featured live music performed at the Church Street Dining Terrace for seven straight Sundays in August and September. It was a hit.

“Because we were able to turn on a dime and get everything set up, we were able to make the outside experience fun,” Nacht said. “As a result, we were better able to weather the financial impact of the pandemic.”

 

Hit the Road

If entry points to walking and biking trails are any indication, Ketchen said the pandemic helped many people discover the town’s outdoor attractions for the first time. “You couldn’t get a parking place at the trailheads in town. Even obscure trailheads that were once known only to a handful of locals were crowded.”

For more than 40 years, Lenox has held Apple Squeeze, a harvest celebration that takes over much of the downtown area with 150 food and craft vendors. The event was canceled for 2020 because of concerns that, even with restrictions, too many people would gather, leading to unsafe crowd sizes.

Lenox Loves Music

Lenox Loves Music was a hit during a time when live music was in short supply.

As an alternative, the chamber and American Arts Marketing developed the Lenox Art Walk and scheduled it for the late-September weekend when the Apple Squeeze would have taken place. Forty artists set up in different areas around town in ‘artist villages,’ which were arranged so no more than 50 people could be in one area at a time. Foot-traffic flow was also designed to keep people moving through the exhibits.

Nacht said the Art Walk received great feedback, and the artists involved loved exhibiting their work. The event also led to phone calls from event organizers from several Eastern Mass. towns who wanted to know how to stage a similar event.

The old adage about necessity being the mother of invention definitely has proven true for Lenox. “We just tried some different things that we probably would have never attempted, or done so quickly, had it not been for the pandemic,” Nacht said.

In the beginning of the summer, traffic in town was about half of what it would be during a normal season. As the weather became warmer and travel restrictions eased around the state, both traffic and business picked up.

“We began seeing more day trippers, many from the Boston area who had never been out our way,” Nacht said, adding that good weather in the summer and fall extended the outdoor season nearly to Thanksgiving.

While lodging in the area was restricted by the number of rooms that could be offered, she noted, from September through November, inn and hotel rooms were booked to the capacity they were allowed.

As the owner of the Scoop, a Lenox ice-cream store, Nacht was one of many business owners forced to move customer interactions outdoors. She found a fun way to adjust.

“We did it sort of Cape Cod style, where people order at one window and pick up their ice cream at a second window,” she explained, adding that, while 2020 was not as successful as previous years, the Scoop still saw steady business throughout its season. Even non-food stores, inspired by all the outdoor activity, set up tents in front of their shops to add to the vitality.

In a normal year, Lenox Winterland is a tradition to kick off the holiday season that features a tree-lighting ceremony and Santa Claus meeting with children. In this very-not-normal year, Winterland was forced to cancel.

Instead of losing their holiday spirit, however, the Cultural District and chamber presented a creative alternative. Local businesses and artists teamed up to decorate 30 Christmas trees, which were displayed in a tree walk through town. Nacht said the inaugural Holiday Tree Walk was so well-received, plans are in the works to expand and make it an annual event.

“Despite the obstacles of COVID, we had a decent tourism business,” she said. “We’ll continue to offer more fun events to keep the vibrancy of the town going and improving.”

 

Passing the Test

Lenox has always been proud of its cultural amenities, such as Tanglewood, Edith Wharton’s house at the Mount, Shakespeare and Co., and others. As those were scaled back, Ketchen said, the town’s outdoor amenities gained exposure they might not have otherwise.

“Once we are allowed to enjoy our cultural institutions to their fullest again, people will also have more awareness of all the recreational opportunities Lenox has,” he told BusinessWest. “That’s a big positive for us as we look to the future.”

While Nacht hopes to see Tanglewood up and running, at least in some form, in 2021, she admits the past year was quite the learning experience. “We are so dependent on Tanglewood, it was an interesting test to see what we could do without Tanglewood there.”

Despite the challenges put on municipal budgets, Ketchen said Lenox was able to pursue several modest infrastructure projects in 2020, such as maintaining roads and public-utility infrastructure. “When folks are ready to come to Lenox for the recreation and the culture, the public utilities and infrastructure will be waiting for them.”

“We began seeing more day trippers, many from the Boston area who had never been out our way.”

In short, Lenox is not only weathering the COVID-19 storm, it’s finding ways to come out stronger on the other side. Indeed, when this community, which depends on cultural tourism, was challenged to find creative solutions to stay afloat, it answered the call. Nacht credited Lenox businesses for making quick and significant adjustments in their operations.

“It was really inspiring to see our businesses make the best out of a not-so-great situation,” she said. “It says a lot about their commitment to our town.”

Undaunted by the near future, Nacht noted several businesses are planning for April openings. And she looks forward to the new year knowing that Lenox can present all the outdoor events that worked well in 2020.

“With knowledge, you just learn to do things better, and we learned a lot last year,” she added. “Once the tulips come out, that’s when we start to see everything come alive again.”

Education

Balance Sheet

Dawn Forbes DiStefano

Dawn Forbes DiStefano

For Dawn Forbes DiStefano, it was the quintessential all-or-nothing proposition.

As the search for a successor to Joan Kagan, Square One’s long-time president and CEO, commenced last summer, Forbes DiStefano knew what few outside the organization — and probably few inside it, as well — knew: if she did not prevail in the nationwide search, she would no longer be working for the Springfield-based provider of childcare and other services for children and families.

That’s because the position she held at the time — executive vice president — was to be eliminated as the agency continued on a course of restructuring its top management.

But Forbes DiStefano, one of roughly 60 candidates to apply for the post, certainly had a leg up on the others — in large part because she was in that position. But also because she and Kagan had entered into what she described as a ‘shared management’ situation, one that familiarized her with all aspects of this operation and fully prepared her for the role she was seeking.

“I don’t think it was a shock that I was able to answer questions with more detail and probably more insight than other candidates, because I worked here,” she told BusinessWest. “But I worked really hard over the past 30 years to position myself to apply for a position like this.”

By that, she was referring to a lengthy career in the nonprofit realm, most of it at the YWCA of Western Massachusetts, but the past five at Square One, where she has displayed what she and others consider perhaps her best strength — an ability to combine a passion for the agency’s mission with a strong business sense and attention to the bottom line needed to make sure a nonprofit can survive and carry out that mission.

It’s a mindset that embodies a quote she attributes to Sr. Mary Caritas, the long-time president of what is now Mercy Medical Center, and uses often: “no margin, no mission.”

Her outlook on nonprofit management, and her take on her own management style and the need for that balance between business and mission, are further summed up as follows:

“My management style is direct, it’s collaborative, it’s mission-focused, with an acknowledgement that we’re running a business. And to a certain extent, as a nonprofit, that’s a tax status — it’s not a way to do business.”

Forbes DiStefano, who took the helm in late December, leads the agency at a time of perhaps unprecedented challenge — most of it brought on by COVID-19, although it was a difficult time for nonprofits even before the pandemic reached Western Mass. While coping with the pandemic and its day-to-day decision making, execution, and ongoing efforts to create an environment “not in crisis,” she is also planning for the long term and life after COVID.

“My management style is direct, it’s collaborative, it’s mission-focused, with an acknowledgement that we’re running a business. And to a certain extent, as a nonprofit, that’s a tax status — it’s not a way to do business.”

She admitting to disliking the word ‘normal,’ at least in the way many are using it now, and told BusinessWest she isn’t sure what ‘normal’ will mean moving forward. She will help create at definition, at Square One, anyway, while also continuing to build on the legacy and broad portfolio of programs she’s inherited.

“When Joan arrived, we were the expert in early education and care, and we remain the expert in early education and care,” she explained. “She knew that she wanted to focus on families and a holistic, family approach; she knew that children would thrive and families would stabilize and become self-sufficient if we were serving whole families. We have the foundation, and we want to keep building on it.”

For this issue and its focus on education, BusinessWest talked at length with Forbes DiStefano about her new role, her long career in nonprofit management, and how she intends to apply all she has learned to effectively write the next chapter in this agency’s long history.

 

School of Thought

In many ways, Forbes DiStefano said, her career has come full circle. Well, sort of.

Indeed, she went to Boston College and then UMass Amherst with the goal of becoming an elementary-school teacher, although she never really made it into the classroom as an instructor, as we’ll see in a minute.

But she is now leading an agency specializing in early-childhood education, but not devoted to that exclusively, as it was decades ago.

Dawn Forbes DiStefano

Dawn Forbes DiStefano wants to build on Square One’s foundation of serving whole families, not just children.

Flashing back to her college years, or just after she graduated in 1993, to be more precise, Forbes DiStefano said she encountered a challenging job market and had trouble breaking into the profession locally. She recalled a conversation she had with the superintendent in Southwick, who happened to be her high-school principal in West Springfield, about her struggles.

“He told me that it might have been worthwhile for me to do my student teaching here in Western Mass. instead of in Boston — we hire local.”

After spending some time at home thinking about what to do with her life and career, she decided to take what she could find, and this was a job at the YWCA of Greater Springfield as a receptionist. She didn’t take it expecting to stay more than 23 years, but that’s what happened, because, well, “I found my home … I found my calling,” she explained. “I was just smitten by being surrounded by women and girls whose mission — and passion — was to make life better for women and girls.”

Despite this enthusiasm, boredom quickly settled in. However, she would soon take on a new and rewarding role, somewhat by accident.

“We would get piles of mail every day with grant applications, RFPs, and proposals, and told the executive director at the time, Mary Reardon Johnson, ‘we should be applying for some of these grants; we’re doing amazing work here,’” Forbes DiStefano recalled. “She sort of flippantly said, ‘I don’t care what you do, just don’t lie too much; practice, do whatever you want to do, stay busy.’”

She did all of that and started responding to grant applications, and in short order, she started to get some approvals. And this eventually led to a role as grants manager, and then as director of Resource Development, playing a lead role in a capital campaign and raising funds for a number of building projects and new-program creation.

“It was an exciting time to be a part of the YWCA,” she said, adding that, while her teaching degree came in handy in many ways, she never did enter the classroom.

In late 2015, with a change of leadership at that agency, she decided it was time to seek a new challenge, and to get some advice on what the next chapter could and should be, she invited Kagan out for coffee.

“With 100% of our families experiencing something, whether it’s poverty, hunger, or homelessness, we know that the majority of our children have experienced some level of trauma at some point in their life.”

In that conservation, she told Kagan she liked grant writing and knew there were opportunities for people with that unique and coveted skill. But she said she couldn’t write grants for just anyone or anything.

“I told her that the magic of grant writing comes because it’s something I care deeply about,” she recalled. “I told her I wanted her help because I had been offered a few opportunities, but wasn’t sure I could make it with those agencies.”

She wasn’t expecting to be given a job offer, especially because the agency had recently hired Kris Allard as vice president of Development and Communications, and wasn’t — at least initially. But she credits Kagan with sensing, and then seizing, an opportunity to strengthen Square One by bringing her on as a full-time grants officer.

But her role would soon involve much more than that.

Indeed, she would take a deep dive into the agency’s financial status, which at that time was “very unique and somewhat worrisome,” as she put it, and would eventually take on a broader role as chief Finance and Grants officer.

Over the next several years, she and Kagan would guide the agency through some difficult but necessary steps to stabilize the agency financially. These included closing Square One’s early-childhood education center in Holyoke in early 2017 — the agency still has a presence in that city with other services — and also a consolidation of services focused on infants and toddlers, with a greater emphasis on preschool.

“It was a very methodical and financially driven decision-making process,” she recalled. “And this is where Joan and I started finding a balance between the two of us. Joan is a social worker; she understands people and the strengths people bring to an organization, and she is phenomenal at program development. I think what I brought to her is an equal understanding of people and certainly the same amount of passion for children, but I really came to it with a fiscal mindset that we need to get this business financially viable.”

Through a hard focus on maximizing enrollment, creating efficiencies, and reducing expenses (often, again, as a result of difficult decisions), the agency, which was seeing annual deficits of $1.5 million or more only a few years ago, was at the break-even point for fiscal 2019.

“We have seen a massive improvement in our financial stability,” she said. “And we did that while keeping children and families at the core of what we do.”

 

Successful Succession

Forbes DiStefano told BusinessWest that she credits Kagan with taking a number of steps to successful transition to Square One to new leadership, work she believes will create a seamless passage of the baton.

“Joan reorganized Square One back in the fall of 2019,” she explained. “One of the senior-level administrators was leaving, and she [Kagan] took the opportunity not to announce her retirement, but certainly organize and structure the agency so it would be ready for when she was ready to announce.”

As part of that organizing and structuring, Kagan created an executive vice president’s role for Forbes DiStefano, one she said would enable her to make a desired transition away from the finance side of the operation and into a shared leadership role.

“From the fall of 2019 to the summer of 2020, we enjoyed that relationship,” Forbes DiStefano explained. “Joan was very mindful, very practical, and extremely generous in that space; I think some leaders want to be in a shared-leadership position, but then, when it really comes to fruition, they don’t want to be. Joan really lived it.”

As noted, there was a nationwide search for a successor, something the agency’s board, Kagan, and Forbes DiStefano all thought was necessary. In the end, she said her 30 years of experience with nonprofits, her five years in Square One in roles that exposed her to all aspects of its operation, and especially that time in that shared-leadership role, positioned her to excel in that search.

Moving forward, she intends to use all that experience and learning, both on the job and in the classroom — over the years she has added a bachelor’s degree in nonprofit management and a master’s degree in nonprofit management and finance — to guide Square One through the next chapter in its long history.

While doing so, she must first contend with the pandemic, which has tested the agency in myriad ways. Overall, she said it has been Square One’s goal to create a calm, safe place in the midst of the pandemic, and in most all ways, it has been successful in that mission.

“We’re making decisions minute by minute about the health and safety of everyone at Square One,” she said. “What we have done very well is read, digest, interpret, and then operationalize all the CDC and DPH guidelines for health and safety. We don’t want you to be in crisis when you’re here at Square One. We understand that there’s a crisis going on our world, but our job, every single day from 7:30 to 5:30, is to create a stable, warm, non-crisis, non-traumatic environment for children to be able to learn and thrive.”

Meanwhile, Forbes DiStefano said she, Allard, and other members of the leadership team are focused on “expanding what we do well.”

That broad phrase includes early-childhood education, obviously, but also other services, including those focused on the mental health of children, needs that have only grown during the pandemic.

“With 100% of our families experiencing something, whether it’s poverty, hunger, or homelessness, we know that the majority of our children have experienced some level of trauma at some point in their life,” she explained, noting that Square One has, in recent years, expanded what would be considered traditional mental-health services — referrals to therapists — with an early-childhood mental-services center called Cornerstone.

Launched as a pilot program, the center has grown in size, scope, and services.

“It’s designed to be both a physical and a social/emotional space — you can’t help but feel calm when you walk in,” she explained. “And I think it’s the most outstanding achievement we’ve made at Square One in the last five years.

“What we’ve created is a space where children can come with their peers,” she went on, adding that, instead of one-on-one therapy, there are group activities, such as games and book reading. “Everyone is experiencing some level of healing; it’s children helping each other learn how to cope, have healthy reactions, and reduce the triggers. And teachers are learning as well; they’re watching the therapist engage with the children.”

 

Bottom Line

Moving forward, Forbes DiStefano said it’s her goal — and now her job — to build on the solid foundation that’s been built at the agency and continually look for new ways to carry out the overriding mission: to improve quality of life for children and families. And there are many aspects to that work.

“It’s my job to welcome everyone to the table, make sure that our services are working seamlessly, and then find opportunities to bring new partners, new donors, new investors, and new ways of thinking to build on the good work that exists here,” she said.

That’s all part of managing Square One with that mindset, and with that balance, she described earlier.

As she said, ‘nonprofit’ is a tax status; it’s not a way to do business.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Education

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Christina Royal

Christina Royal

Yves Salomon-Fernández

Yves Salomon-Fernández

Harry Dumay

Harry Dumay

Three local college presidents are among only 13 nationwide to be recognized last week for leadership in the areas of diversity, equity, and inclusion by the Assoc. of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and the education-technology company Cengage.

Holyoke Community College President Christina Royal, Greenfield Community College President Yves Salomon-Fernández, and Elms College President Harry Dumay were among that select group of 13 to receive the AAC&U-Cengage Inclusion Scholarship, which recognizes college and university presidents whose outstanding leadership to advance liberal education has resulted in reduced equity gaps, improved inclusion and belonging for minority students, and reformed hiring practices to promote greater diversity.

“Growing up as a first-generation, low-income, multi-racial college student, I understand some of the challenges today’s students face and the importance of having an inclusive environment where everyone can thrive,” said Royal, who was also honored last week by BusinessWest as one of the 2020 Women of Impact. “These are very important issues to me personally and professionally, as well as to our college community, and I’m honored to receive this recognition on behalf of HCC.”

The recipients were announced on Jan. 22 at the AAC&U Presidents’ Trust Symposium, part of the organization’s virtual annual meeting. The symposium brings together higher-education leaders from all institutional types to explore the most pressing issues facing colleges and universities and to share strategies for success.

“I am honored by this recognition, and I am most proud of the work that my colleagues and I are engaged in at Greenfield Community College with and for our local communities,” Salomon-Fernández said. “We know that a more just and equitable world is most conducive to citizenship and democracy.”

The other recipients of the 2021 AAC&U-Cengage Inclusion Scholarship are Sandra Boham, president of Salish Kootenai College in Montana; Roslyn Clark Artis, president of Benedict College in South Carolina; Karrie Dixon, president of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina; Alicia Harvey-Smith, president of Pittsburgh Technical College in Pennsylvania; Walter Kimbrough, president of Dillard University in Louisiana; Valerie Roberson, president of Roxbury Community College in Massachusetts; Ron Rochon, president of University of Southern Indiana; Ivy Taylor, president of Rust College in Mississippi; Dwaun Warmack, president of Claflin University in South Carolina; and David Yarlott Jr., president of Little Big Horn College in Montana.

“We are so excited to be able to support these amazing higher-ed leaders who are making a real difference by reducing inequities and increasing access to education. At Cengage, we believe learning transforms lives, and the work of these leaders is so critical in giving students the opportunity to better their lives and in creating an educated, informed, and just society.”

Four Massachusetts presidents made the cut, two more than any other state.

“AAC&U is proud to recognize and support these exceptional leaders in their efforts to advance equity and quality as hallmarks of a liberal education across a diverse range of campuses and student populations,” AAC&U President Lynn Pasquerella said.

The AAC&U-Cengage Inclusion Scholarship recognizes higher-education leaders who support and advance quality, equity, and student success in undergraduate education. This includes improving degree completion or transfer for students from underrepresented groups; closing equity gaps in student success; improving diversity in hiring practices and creating more equitable hiring policies; and increasing the sense of belonging, well-being, and inclusion among students from historically underserved populations (including racial and ethnic minorities, religious minorities, and LGBTQIA students).

“We are so excited to be able to support these amazing higher-ed leaders who are making a real difference by reducing inequities and increasing access to education,” said Fernando Bleichmar, executive vice president and general manager for U.S. Higher Education at Cengage. “At Cengage, we believe learning transforms lives, and the work of these leaders is so critical in giving students the opportunity to better their lives and in creating an educated, informed, and just society.”

In recognition of their accomplishments, the AAC&U-Cengage Inclusion Scholarship recipients will each receive a one-year, complimentary AAC&U campus membership and a one-year complimentary membership in the AAC&U Presidents’ Trust, a diverse network of CEOs who are committed to advancing the vision, values, and practices that connect liberal education with the needs of an increasingly diverse student body, a global workforce, and thriving communities. The trust provides members with access to dedicated resources and events as well as exclusive opportunities to promote their thought leadership.

Hampshire County

Growth Market

Elly Vaughan

Elly Vaughan with some of the trees that will blossom with life — and fruit — when the weather warms up.

Elly Vaughan knows a lot about the global food system — and the myriad problems it has posed over the decades.

“Local food is so important for so many reasons,” she said. “The global food system has a lot of issues — environmental issues, workers’ human-rights violations, the way the global agricultural food system tends to strip people of their water rights in some countries.

“Globalized food — a large, centralized food system — can really damage the environment and communities, and when we buy local, we break that cycle,” she added. And, as owner of Phoenix Fruit Farm in Belchertown, she’s certainly doing her part.

“We’re delivering money directly from the consumer to the farmer, so that eliminates the middleman — the consumer gets a fresher product, and the farmer gets a better price point,” she said. “The farmer can pay their workers living wages and can be conservative about environmental resources, which affects climate change, while offering affordable, high-quality food to local communities and families. That’s what a local food system does.”

Taking notice of how Vaughan has grown and diversified Phoenix since purchasing the property in 2017, the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce gave her the Leader in Innovation Award at its 2020 A+ Awards, “for being instrumental in cultivating relationships with other local businesses to improve the economic climate of Belchertown.”

That’s gratifying for someone whose business motto is “fruit with a conscience.”

“Small farms are disappearing all the time in this country — it’s been a perennial struggle for the last 30 or 40 years,” she told BusinessWest. “You keep seeing more and more small farms going out of business as they succumb to the pressures of trying to compete with large agribusinesses that are the worst offenders in terms of environmental damage and pollinator collapse and workers’-rights violations.

“But I think that local food is a model for an alternative to that,” she went on. “Producing food and feeding people doesn’t like to look like this. It does not have to be actively harming the environment; it does not have to be actively exploiting workers and excluding low-income families from being able to afford healthy food. Small farms don’t have to struggle to compete in a wholesale marketplace when they can deliver directly to their community.”

 

Community Focus

Vaughan became interested in farming as a career while in college, and she worked on various organic vegetable farms for about a decade before becoming the orchard manager for Phoenix, which was then owned and operated by Amherst-based Atkins Farms.

When Atkins decided to sell the Belchertown property, Vaughan bought it, and renovated the 1935 horse barn on the property as her residence.

“When I first bought it, it was apples and peaches — and those are still my largest crops,” she said. “But I have replanted and started diversifying.”

New crops include more varieties of apples, as well as table grapes, strawberries, and other fruits. In 2018, she planted new blocks of peach, nectarine, and pear trees, and she’ll see the first harvest of peaches and nectarines from those trees this spring, with the pears coming along in subsequent years. She’s also begun planting more vegetables, including asparagus, tomatoes, kale, onions, and basil. “I want to ramp all that up, now that I have a store and an outlet for a diverse market garden.”

The nearby store on Route 181 was a dilapidated garage with no foundation, plumbing, or … well, much else, actually, when she decided to turn it into a country store.

“Small farms are disappearing all the time in this country — it’s been a perennial struggle for the last 30 or 40 years. You keep seeing more and more small farms going out of business as they succumb to the pressures of trying to compete with large agribusinesses that are the worst offenders in terms of environmental damage and pollinator collapse and workers’-rights violations.”

“It was just a shell of a garage,” Vaughan said. “It was a major, major undertaking to get it to where it is now. But it’s really starting to catch on, I think.”

Since opening in July 2019, the store sells locally produced fruits and vegetables, meats, dairy, eggs, bread, baked goods, and coffee, as well as prepared foods, like grab-and-go wraps, side dishes and soups to heat up at home, and plenty of pantry staples. “You can grab everything you need to make a meal for your family in the store.”

That’s been a plus for patrons who don’t want to go in supermarkets these days; in response to COVID-19 anxieties, the store launched curbside pickup last year and expanded its product lines — with items like cleaning supplies, toilet paper, and more staple foods — to minimize the need for shoppers to visit large stores.

Phoenix Fruit Farm’s country store

Phoenix Fruit Farm’s country store has been growing in popularity since its opening in July 2019.

“It was an effort to create a more comprehensive, one-stop grocery experience. They could get a lot of what they needed from us,” Vaughan said. “I think people really appreciated that.”

While offering an outlet for other local food producers, the country store is a critical element — along with a growing business in pick-your-own apples and peaches — in selling Phoenix’s own products directly to customers.

Vaughan wholesales apples to Big Y and a couple of smaller stores, for about $30 a bushel, because she produces too many — on more than 20 acres of apple trees — to sell on her own.

“But when I sell them in my store, I can get $50 to $60 for that same case because I’m eliminating the middleman, selling direct to the consumer, all while giving them a reasonable price point; it’s not a super expensive apple,” she explained. Direct consumer sales, in fact, are “the difference between me paying my bills and not paying my bills. As a medium to small-sized farm, it’s important to be able to market directly to people in a community-based system like this.”

Not that people should abandon the supermarket, she added. “You need to go to the supermarket for some things. You need paper towels; you need a big case of ramen noodles or whatever. But if you go to a local farmstand and get as many items as you can there instead of the store as part of your weekly or monthly routine, that makes a huge difference. And I wish people knew how much impact they can have just by including more locally oriented shopping in their routine.”

One benefit, of course, is fresher produce; while local chains like Big Y do buy from local farms, many of the fruits and vegetables they sell are not local, and, in many cases, not even in season in Massachusetts. So people are eating produce that’s been in transit for a week or two.

Switching exclusively to local produce requires some changed habits from consumers, she added, and occasionally some sacrifice.

“Part of it is people learning to eat in season and not expecting to have strawberries year-round and not expecting to have perfect, flawless-looking fruit if they want to eat organic; something grown with less chemicals is not going to look as picture-perfect,” she explained. “There needs to be somewhat of a shift with the way that people view what kind of produce they should have, and in exchange for making that shift, they can have high-quality, locally grown food that doesn’t break the bank and can support local farmers.”

While that education process is ongoing, it’s a culture that has taken root (literally and figuratively) in Western Mass. more than in many regions of the country.

“I think we are very fortunate in this community — people are really hip to local foods, and we have so much great local food in this region, and you don’t have to look very far to find everything you need to feed your family just with food produced in the Pioneer Valley,” Vaughan said. “There’s such a wealth of really great, locally produced foods around here. I’m really proud to be a part of that.”

 

Looking Ahead

Now in her fourth year running the farm, Vaughan has no intention of slowing down. As she waits for the first harvests from those new peach, nectarine, and pear trees and diversifies into vegetables, she’s also looking into new business opportunities, like making hard cider. For that, she’s been gathering equipment and trying to nail down the right recipe.

The store continues to grow, too. “It typically takes a few years for a business like that to optimize and settle into what it’s going to be like,” she said, adding that she also wants to expand the pick-your-own business.

“That’s another necessary piece of the business. Our fruit is the difference between being in the red and being in the black. We need direct markets through the store and pick-your-own to survive, and we’re still building those things up. Both need to continue to grow if the business will be sustainable.”

But, as evidenced by that A+ Award and, more importantly, the growing number of locals heading to Phoenix for something fresh, she’s on the right track.

“We’re not there yet,” Vaughan said. “It’s going to be a lifelong journey, shaping this place into what it’s going to be for the future.”

 

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

 

Accounting and Tax Planning

Round 2

By Jonathan Cohen-Gorczyca, CPA, and Amila Hadzic

On Dec. 27, 2020, the Economic Aid to Hard-Hit Small Businesses, Nonprofits, and Venues Act was signed into law to assist businesses who have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result of the Economic Aid Act, the Paycheck Protection Program’s second-draw loan program was created.

This program will allow the U.S. Small Business Administration to provide eligible businesses with additional loans, similar to those from the original Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The last day to apply for the second-draw loan is March 31, 2021, and there are eligibility and documentation requirements that need to be met during the application process.

 

Eligibility

This loan can only be made to a business that has received a first-draw PPP loan and has used the full amount of the loan on eligible expenses before the disbursement of the second loan. A business that was ineligible for the first loan cannot receive the second-draw PPP loan.

In order to be eligible for this second-draw PPP loan, the business must have 300 or fewer employees. The business must have also experienced at least a 25% reduction in revenue in 2020 compared to 2019. The revenue reduction can be calculated by comparing one quarter in 2019 with the same quarter in 2020. However, if the business was not in operation for the full year in 2019, there are other periods that can be used for this calculation. If an entity was in operation for all four quarters in 2019, then the annual revenue can be compared with 2020.

 

Loan Amount

The maximum loan amount for the second loan is the lesser of $2 million or two and half months of the business’ average monthly payroll. For those who are assigned a NAICS code with 72 or are a seasonal employer, the loan amount can be greater than two and a half months. The borrower can use either total wages paid in 2019 or wages paid in a 12-month period before the loan was made to calculate average monthly payroll. There is also the option to use 2020 wages.

 

Application and Documentation

In order to apply for this loan, the SBA Form 2483-SD needs to be completed. Form 941, state quarterly wage unemployment forms for the applicable quarter used, and other payroll records may be needed depending on the payroll period used to calculate the loan amount. For ease of applying for a second-draw loan, it is recommended that you apply using the same lender, as much less payroll documentation will be needed because it should already be on file with the institution.

The documentation requirements are similar to the first PPP loan. If the loan is greater than $150,000, documentation will be needed to show the revenue reduction at the time of application. Bank statements, annual tax forms, and quarterly financial statements can be provided as documentation. For loans under $150,000, this information can be submitted during the loan-forgiveness process.

 

What If I Did Not Receive a First-draw PPP Loan?

The SBA is also accepting applications for first-time PPP borrowers. The loan is capped at $10 million for eligible businesses. If the loan is used to pay for payroll and other eligible expenses during the eight- or 24-week period, it is eligible for forgiveness. Eligible costs for both the second-draw loan and first-draw PPP loan include payroll costs, business mortgage interest, rent, lease payments, utility payments, worker-protection costs, property damage costs due to looting and vandalism not covered by insurance, and other supplier and operation costs. Payments made to an independent contractor do not qualify.

As with the first-draw PPP loan, it is best to reach out to both your accountant and loan provider to find out if a second-draw PPP loan is right for you. They will be able to help you determine what is right for your business and help walk you through the application process.

 

Jonathan Cohen-Gorczyca, CPA, is a manager, and Amila Hadzic is a staff accountant with the accounting firm Melanson, which has offices in Greenfield and Andover, as well as Merrimack, N.H. and Ellsworth, Maine.

Accounting and Tax Planning

A Tax-planning Checklist

By Dan Eger

 

It is that time again, your favorite and mine, tax season!

As we have made it through hopefully the worst of the pandemic, dealing with all the ups and downs of learning this new normal in life, one thing will remain the same — the IRS still wants our money. At some things have not changed due to COVID-19.

Here are some steps to take now to help make filing for the 2020 tax season easier. Below is a list of items to gather. These are the most common required forms and items. The list is not all-inclusive, as everyone’s tax situation is different. Also included are a few other things for you to consider as you prepare to file your 2020 tax return.

 

Documentation of Income

• W-2 – Wages, salaries, and tips

• W-2G – Gambling winnings

• 1099-Int and 1099-OID – Interest income statements

• 1099-DIV – Dividend income statements

• 1099-B – Capital gains (sales of stock, land, and other items)

• 1099-G – Certain government payments

— Statement of state tax refunds

— Unemployment benefits

• 1099-Misc – Miscellaneous income

• 1099-S – Sale of real estate (home)

• 1099-R – Retirement income

• 1099-SSA – Social Security income

• K-1 – Income from partnerships, trusts, and S-corporations

 

Documentation for Deductions

If you think all your deductions for Schedule A will not add up to more than $12,400 for single, $18,650 for head of household, or $24,800 for married filing jointly, save yourself the time required to itemize deductions and just plan to take the standard deduction.

 

• Medical Expenses (out of pocket, limited to 7.5% of adjusted gross income)

— Medical insurance (paid with post-tax dollars)

— Long-term-care insurance

— Prescription medicine and drugs

— Hospital expenses

— Long-term care expenses (in-home nurse, nursing home, etc.)

— Doctor and dentist payments

— Eyeglasses and contacts

— Miles traveled for medical purposes

 

• Taxes You Paid (limited to $10,000)

— State withholding from your W-2

— Real-estate taxes paid

— Estimated state tax payments and amount paid with prior year return

— Personal property (excise)

 

• Interest You Paid

— 1098-Misc – mortgage-interest statement

— Interest paid to private party for home purchase

— Qualified investment interest

— Points paid on purchase of principal residence

— Points paid to refinance (amortized over life of loan)

— Mortgage-insurance premiums

 

• Gifts to Charity (For 2020, filers who claim the standard deduction can take an additional deduction up to $300 for cash contributions.)

— Cash and check receipts from qualified organization

— Non-cash items, which need a summary list and responsible gift calculation (IRS tables). If the gift is more than $5,000, a written appraisal is required.

— Donation and acknowledgement letters (over $250)

— Gifts of stocks (you need the market value on the date of gift)

 

• Additional Adjustments (Non-Schedule A)

— 1098-T – Tuition statement

— Educator expenses (up to $250)

— 1098-E – Student-loan interest deduction

— 5498 HSA – Health savings account contributions

— 1099-SA – Distributions from HAS

— Qualified child and dependent care expenses

— Verify any estimated tax payments (does not include taxes withheld)

 

Sole proprietors (Schedule C) or owners of rental real estate (Schedule E, Part I) need to compile all income and expenses for the year. You need to retain adequate documentation to substantiate the amounts that are reported.

 

Other Items to Consider

Identity-protection PIN

If you are a confirmed identity-theft victim, the IRS will mail you a notice with your IP PIN each year. You need this number to electronically file your tax return.

Starting in 2021, you may opt into the IP PIN program. Visit www.irs.gov/identity-theft-fraud-scams/get-an-identity-protection-pin to set up your IP PIN. An IP PIN helps prevent someone else from filing a fraudulent tax return using your Social Security number.

 

What If You Have Been Compromised?

How do you know if someone has filed a return with your information? The most common way is that your tax return will get rejected for e-file. These scammers file early. You may also get a letter from the IRS requesting you verify certain information.

If this does happen, there are steps to take to get this rectified:

1. File Form 14039 (Identity Theft Affidavit).

2. Paper-file your return.

3. Visit identitytheft.gov for additional steps.

 

New for 2021: Recovery Rebate Credit

Eligible individuals who did not receive a 2020 economic impact payment (stimulus check), or received a reduced amount, may be able to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit on their 2020 tax return. There is a worksheet to use to figure the amount of credit for which you are eligible based on your 2020 tax return. Generally, this credit will increase the amount of your tax refund or lower the amount of the tax you owe.

 

Who Will Prepare My Return?

Are you going to be preparing your tax return, or will you hire someone to file on your behalf? You might want to plan that out now so you know the required information you will need and the fee structure you can expect to pay for completion of all applicable forms. In addition to all the items listed above, the tax preparer will ask you for a copy of your last tax return that was filed. The IRS offers a ‘file free platform’ to file your tax return if your income is under $72,000. You can find this at irs.gov or the IRS2Go app. There are also some local tax-assistance and counseling programs, depending on your age and income levels (VITA/TCE).

 

Interactive Tax Assistant

The Interactive Tax Assist (ITA) is an IRS online tool (irs.gov) to help you get answers to several tax-law items. ITA can help you determine what income is taxable, which deductions are allowed, filing status, who can be claimed as a dependent, and available tax credits.

 

Be Vigilant

Finally, be especially careful during this time of year to protect yourself against those trying to defraud or scam you. The IRS will never — let me repeat that: NEVER — call you directly unless you are already in litigation with them. They will not initiate contact by e-mail, text, or social media. The IRS will contact you by U.S. mail.

However, you still need to be wary of items received by mail. Anything requesting your Social Security number or any credit-card information is a dead giveaway. Watch out for websites and social-media attempts that request money or personal information and for schemes tied to economic impact payments. You can check the irs.gov website to research any notice you receive or any concerns you may have. You can also contact your tax practitioner for help and assistance.

 

Dan Eger is a senior associate at Holyoke-based accounting firm Meyers Brothers Kalicka; (413) 536-8510.

Insurance

Expanding the Footprint

Lussier-Dowd’s new office

Lussier-Dowd’s new office at 181 Park Ave. in West Springfield expands the merged company’s footprint to six locations.

The Dowd Agencies and the J. Raymond Lussier Insurance Agency announced last week they have merged their operations and will be known as Lussier-Dowd Insurance.

The merger and addition of a branch in West Springfield expands Dowd’s footprint to six offices located throughout the Pioneer Valley. The new office, located at 181 Park Ave., is minutes from Routes 5 and 20, and Interstates 91, 291 and 391. An open house will be planned at a later date.

“We’re excited for the Lussier Agency to be part of our team. I have known the Lussier family for many years, and they have always been a highly professional, customer-driven insurance agency,” said John Dowd Jr., president and CEO of the Dowd Agencies. “We are also excited to have a location in the fine town of West Springfield.”

The West Springfield office will be a full-service insurance agency providing personal, commercial, wealth-management, and employee-benefits products and services.

A native of West Springfield, David Griffin Jr., vice president of the Dowd Agencies, said he is excited about his company planting roots in his hometown. “I was born and raised in West Side, so it is particularly exciting for me. More importantly, West Side is a great and vibrant town here in Western Mass.”

The Lussier-Dowd Insurance Agency is open Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and can be reached by calling (413) 737-5359.

A full-service agency, the Dowd Agencies has been helping individuals and businesses in Western Mass. with their personal insurance, commercial insurance, employee benefits, and financial needs for more than 120 years. Established in Holyoke in 1898, the Dowd Agencies is the oldest insurance agency in Massachusetts with operations and management under continuous family ownership.

 

Opinion

Editorial

The story of restaurants during the pandemic has not been a good one.

While that may be the most obvious of observations, it’s still important to keep at the forefront of any discussion of this industry — because restaurateurs will spin the past year as positively as they can. “We discovered a strong market for takeout.” “Outdoor dining was an unexpected success we’ll stick with.” “Our loyal customers tell us they can’t wait to dine out again.”

But don’t confuse those sentiments — which testify to the grit and resourcefulness of the region’s many dining establishments — with good news. There is no good news. Among the restaurant owners we spoke with for this issue, total sales over the past year have been significantly curtailed — in some cases halved, or worse.

Yes, they’ve done what they could to hang onto their dedicated staffs, with much-appreciated help from Paycheck Protection Program loans and state and local grants. And the pivots they made — one told us it was like opening a new restaurant every week — are admirable, as they were willing to change menus on the fly, install takeout and delivery, set up outdoor dining, and take any number of other steps to survive.

Some have not. And even among those that have, no one had a good year, and some are hanging by a thread. That 25% indoor capacity restriction, however needed to keep people safe, is just not going to cut it through a New England winter. That 9:30 p.m. curfew, only recently lifted, might pose an inconvenience to customers, but for a restaurant owner, those extra hours could be the difference between paying their bills and … well, not.

The economic impact on the region is massive; according to the Massachusetts Restaurant Assoc., the Bay State’s restaurants generated $18.7 billion in sales in 2018, while employing almost 350,000 workers. Meanwhile, every dollar spent on table-service dining contributes $1.87 to the state economy. And in a place like Hampshire County, where restaurants are such a key part of the culture and economy of Northampton, Easthampton, Amherst, and other communities, the damage of 2020 — which is clearly extending into 2021 — is even more dire.

A Pioneer Institute report lists a few steps local and state governments can make to ease the strain a little, from allowing alcoholic-beverage takeout and delivery on a permanent basis to allowing restaurants to sell fresh produce, meats, and other whole foods during the pandemic to compete with grocery stores; from prioritizing local permitting for food trucks owned by restaurants to allowing outdoor seating in parking lots and on sidewalks, as happened last summer in downtown Northampton.

But none of these steps, or the pivots restaurants have already made, will solve the main issue — that, even at reduced capacity, diners aren’t filling tables right now, and might not until they feel it’s safe, and that gets into vaccine distribution, a whole other story.

In the meantime, why not do what you can? Order more takeout. Buy more gift cards. Sit down for a meal if you feel safe doing so; area restaurants have been transparent about their sanitization procedures. And, once the COVID fog lifts and restaurants can open more fully, support them as much as possible.

The loss of more restaurants in Western Mass. would be a blow to our economy and a culture that values good food. But mostly, it would be a blow to some good, smart people who are tired of pivoting — but continue to do so, just to stay alive.

 

Opinion

Opinion

By Chris Geehern

The unprecedented upheaval of 2020 will change the way we live and work for years to come, says John Regan, president and CEO of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM).

Regan punctuated his annual State of Massachusetts Business Address with a call for state policymakers to support the recovery of an economy that remains fragile in the wake of the ongoing public-health crisis.

“Hundreds of thousands of our friends and neighbors in Massachusetts remain out of work because of the pandemic. Many have left the workforce altogether,” Regan said during a virtual speech to the AIM Executive Forum. “Addressing the COVID crisis by shutting down the economy again and impeding the ability of people to support their families is not a solution. Neither is imposing Draconian tax increases to address the state’s fiscal issues on the backs of businesspeople trying to keep people employed amid permanent, structural changes to the way we live and work.”

Regan noted that the unprecedented convergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, a cataclysmic recession, and a reckoning on racial equity combined to alter the economy, the workplace, healthcare, manufacturing supply chains, and transportation. It affected schools, government, family life, shopping patterns, the housing market, race relations, and social interactions.

The upheaval has accelerated ongoing seismic shifts in the nature of the workplace, Regan noted. “What the e-commerce revolution did for physical stores, the telepresence revolution could do for office-adjacent employment. Some of the repercussions are positive — less traffic in major urban areas, more flexibility for workers, and expanded opportunities for employers to hire talented people virtually anywhere.”

The bad news? “Cities like Boston that have thrived on proximity-driven innovation and community intellectual energy could see that energy dissipate as companies accelerate the move toward virtual operations,” he said. “Given the OK to go remote, workers may use their freedom to move to cheaper metros where they can afford more space, inside and outside.”

“What the e-commerce revolution did for physical stores, the telepresence revolution could do for office-adjacent employment. Some of the repercussions are positive — less traffic in major urban areas, more flexibility for workers, and expanded opportunities for employers to hire talented people virtually anywhere.”

Four distinguished economic experts offered commentary about which changes generated by the pandemic might be lasting. Pamela Everhart of Fidelity Investments, Edward Glaeser of Harvard University, Dr. Lee Schwamm of Mass General Brigham, and Nada Sanders of Northeastern University said the nature of any long-term structural economic shifts will become evident only after governments moderate the spread of the pandemic.

Regan said AIM and its 3,300 members look forward to working with state and federal leaders to craft a long-term economic recovery for the Commonwealth.

“Massachusetts businesses have responded responsibly to the pandemic by prioritizing their employees and customers, investing in workplace-safety protocols, adapting operations to ensure compliance with business-specific requirements, and finding creative ways to offer services and goods while remaining operational,” Regan said. “Businesses prioritized these things because this is what our businesses do. They invest, they change, and they adapt. These are the qualities that have made Massachusetts an economic leader for decades.” v

 

Chris Geehern is executive vice president of Associated Industries of Massachusetts.

Insurance

Premium Concerns

By Mike Horan

Insurance costs have already been rising — the property and casualty space has seen 11% rate increases annually, on average — due to uncertainty around pandemic losses, catastrophic natural-disaster claims, a lack of capacity in the reinsurance market, low interest rates, and increased size of claims due to social inflation.

Now, just a couple weeks into Joe Biden’s presidency, we are asking ourselves: how will the incoming administration impact businesses like yours, and, consequently, the insurance marketplace and your premiums?

With the inauguration of Biden on Jan. 20, we expect a return to a highly pro-union, pro-workers’-rights administration similar to what we saw under President Obama (and Vice President Biden) from 2009 to 2017. This could very well come with a change of leadership at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The current acting administrator, Loren Sweatt, has been in the role as an interim since 2017, and experts anticipate a changing of the guard.

“To prepare for the incoming administration and the changes that will accompany it, we encourage you to prioritize your safety practices. OSHA will be examining this much more closely, and so will the insurance companies.”

Most importantly for your business, you can count on a shift back to heavier enforcement of OSHA workplace violations. During his campaign for the presidency, Biden called on OSHA to “double the number of OSHA investigators to enforce the law and existing standards and guidelines.” Based on this, we expect more inspectors visiting businesses to ensure compliance, and heavier fines for infractions. We also anticipate a return to practices such as issuing press releases publicly naming companies that have been fined for workplace-safety violations, in an effort to discourage other businesses from making the same mistakes.

At Webber and Grinnell, we place heavy emphasis on loss control and creating a culture of safety within our clients’ operations. This is not just because we care about doing the right thing and keeping everyone safe (although that is certainly the primary reason). It’s also because we know that insurance companies are scrutinizing safety and losses more than ever due to the aforementioned facts about rising costs in the marketplace. They are rewarding safe companies and penalizing unsafe companies. One of the primary resources they use to make these decisions is OSHA records, so it is absolutely essential that you adhere to OSHA’s policies and guidelines.

To prepare for the incoming administration and the changes that will accompany it, we encourage you to prioritize your safety practices. OSHA will be examining this much more closely, and so will the insurance companies.

You need to be a step ahead by doing everything you can to create a culture of safety. Long-term benefits include fewer injuries, less downtime, lower insurance costs, better employee morale, and a work culture that will attract the best talent.

 

Mike Horan is a business insurance specialist and RiSC consultant at Webber and Grinnell Insurance.

 

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 


 

Recognizing 45 Years

Jim Conroy (left) and Jeff Gonyer (right) were recently recognized by President Eric Forish for their 45 years of service as Forish Construction team members. Conroy is a Massachusetts-licensed construction supervisor, and Gonyer is a Massachusetts-licensed hoisting and heavy-equipment operator, and also a federally licensed CDL driver.

 


 

 

Cold-weather Concerns

As the weather turns colder, many homeless individuals do not have functioning coats and cannot afford new ones. Led by team leader Fran Murphy, Meyers Brothers Kalicka recently conducted a coat drive within the office and collected 50 new and gently used coats to be donated to the Springfield Rescue Mission.

 


 

 

Page-turning News

Monson Savings Bank President and future CEO Dan Moriarty recently met with Hope Bodwell, library director of the Monson Free Library, to present a $1,000 donation of behalf of the bank. The donation was made following the public voting results of the 2021 Monson Savings Bank Community Giving Initiative.

 

 


 

 

Suit Your Socks

Lenny Underwood, owner of Upscale Socks, recently met Nikki Burnett (left), executive director of Educare Springfield, to donate 333 pairs of socks to the early-childhood education center, following the “Suit Your Soles” campaign in which Underwood matched a donation for every pair of socks purchased from Nov. 18 to Dec. 18.

 


 

Court Dockets

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

 

HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COURT

Gerald Laclaire v. Family Ford of Northampton Inc. and John S. Sarat Jr.

Allegation: Non-payment of wages: <$50,000

Filed: 11/9/20

 

Scott Tillinghast v. Center for Human Development Inc. and Innovative Care Partners, LLC

Allegation: Non-payment of wages, breach of contract: $2,000

Filed: 11/9/20

 

Peak Performance Roofing v. Crocker Building Co. Inc.

Allegation: Breach of contract: $10,960

Filed: 11/16/20

 

American Builders & Contractors Supply Co. Inc. d/b/a ABC Supply Co. Inc. v. Laurin Builders Inc. and Ronald D. Laurin a/k/a Ronald Laurin

Allegation: Breach of contract for goods sold and delivered, breach of personal guaranty: $3,871.84

Filed: 11/16/20

 

National Lumber Co. v. Unlimited Construction Services Inc., Neri D. Teo, Joel Cardenas, Sergeant House LP, and Travelers Casualty and Surety Co. of America

Allegation: Money owed for goods sold and delivered: $24,320.07

Filed: 1/7/21

 

Maria Terron v. Meadowbrook Preservation Associates LP, Poah Communities, and Preservation of Affordable Housing Inc.

Allegation: Negligence; slip and fall causing injury: $4,155.08

Filed: 1/12/21

 

NORTHAMPTON SUPERIOR COURT

Regina Post v. HFS of America Inc. and Eric M. Moberg

Allegation: Motor-vehicle negligence causing personal injury: $18,505.19

Filed: 11/3/20

 

Cecile Humphrey as personal representative of the estate of Christopher Humphrey v. Anthony’s Dance Club Inc.

Allegation: Wrongful death: $15,954+

Filed: 11/3/20

 

University of Massachusetts Building Authority and University of Massachusetts v. Adams Plumbing & Heating Inc.; Bruner/Cott & Associates Inc.; Garcia, Galuska & DeSousa Inc.; Halton Group Americas Inc.; Lee Kennedy Co. Inc.; Leftfield, LLC; Tekon Technical Consultants Inc; and WSP Group

Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury and property damage: $2,857,280

Filed: 11/30/20

 

Jane Philipson v. Eagle Crest Property Management, LLC and 18 Piece Chicopee, LLC

Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury and property damage: $613,000+

Filed: 1/4/21

 

Karen Lindsey v. AGR Realty Inc.

Allegation: Negligence; slip and fall causing personal injury: $83,004.80

Filed: 1/7/21

 

Brigitte Kahnert and Jens Christiansen v. Lia Automotive Inc. d/b/a Lia Toyota of Northampton

Allegation: Negligence; slip and fall causing personal injury: $54,836+

Filed: 1/15/21

 

Agenda

Dental Radiology Course

Feb. 1-17: Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) is accepting applications for an intensive, two-week dental radiology certificate training for dental assistants, the only program of its kind west of Boston. This hybrid (online and clinical component) course, which opens Feb. 1 at 9 a.m., trains dental assistants in the fundamentals of dental radiography. The labs will be held Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m., on Feb. 8 and 10 and Feb. 17 and 17. Participants must successfully complete the first two modules before the first lab on Feb. 8, and must successfully complete the last two modules by Feb. 17. Offered through the Workforce Development Center at STCC, the course explores the basics of dental radiography, which includes X-ray physics, effects of radiation exposure, radiation protection, image receptors, digital radiography, dental radiographic anatomy, and intra- and extra-oral radiographic procedures. Dental assistants who enroll in the program will gain experience exposing digital radiographs and correctly mounting them using a digital mount. This experience will be gained by hands-on exposure on a manikin and hands-on placement on both a manikin and a lab partner. A final laboratory competency consists of exposure and evaluation of a full-mouth series on a live patient selected by the student. For more information about the course and to enroll online, visit stcc.io/radiology.

 

COVID-19 Vaccine Community Webinars

Feb. 1, 8, 15: Trinity Health Of New England experts will continue its weekly series of educational webinar presentations, “COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need to Know.” The Monday-evening series, which began Jan. 11, run for one hour, from 6 to 7 p.m. A question-and-answer session will follow the presentation with Dr. Syed Hussain, chief clinical officer of Trinity Health Of New England. These sessions are free and open to the public, but registration is required. To register for an upcoming session, visit trinityhealthofne.org/vaccine-webinar.

 

‘Establishing Resilience: Building Happiness’

Feb. 6: Past year got you down? Need a brighter outlook for 2021? Holyoke Community College has a class for you. HCC is partnering with Pam Victor, president and founder of Happier Valley Comedy, to offer a Zoom workshop titled “Establishing Resilience: Building Happiness” from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Victor, a comedian and improv facilitator who prefers the title ‘head of happiness,’ will lead participants on an experiential exploration of happiness and resilience building to enhance their joy and ease at work and home. She will share stress-relieving exercises and techniques to help people bring more well-being, laughter, gratitude, and play into their daily lives. The cost of the class is $99. To register, visit hcc.edu/happiness.

 

Phlebotomy for Healthcare Workers Class

Feb. 8 to March 2: Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) will offer a 60-hour training for healthcare workers who want to become a certified phlebotomist. The class, open to anyone licensed in various medical fields in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, runs Feb. 8 through March 2, with the exam offered on March 5. Class hours are 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Labs for the course will be held in person on the STCC campus. All students must wear masks and adhere to STCC COVID-19 procedures. The non-credit course, offered through the Workforce Development Center at STCC, prepares students to take the exam to become a certified phlebotomist in Massachusetts. The class is designed to teach workers in certified healthcare positions to draw blood for diagnostic procedures. Anyone interested in taking the class should have a current healthcare certification in at least one of the following healthcare roles (those with certification in other healthcare fields may be eligible): certified nursing assistant (CNA), emergency medical technician (EMT), patient care technician (PCT), certified medical assistant (CMA), licensed practical nurse (LPN), certified electrocardiogram technician (CET), and certified dental assistant (CDA). To enroll online and learn more about this course, visit www.stcc.edu/wdc/healthcare and click the ‘Phlebotomy Certification for Healthcare Workers’ link.

 

Company Notebook

Mount Holyoke College Receives Largest Gift in Its History

SOUTH HADLEY — Mount Holyoke College announced it has received the largest gift in support of financial aid in its history. Alumna Liz Cochary Gross and Philip Gross have committed $10 million to be directed to scholarships and financial aid.  Nancy Nordhoff, a 1954 graduate, also committed $1 million to support future Mount Holyoke students across the economic spectrum. These two gifts are the seed for Mount Holyoke’s new Meet the Moment Scholarship Challenge. This challenge offers donors the opportunity to double — or triple — their impact with their endowment gifts. For first-time donors to endowed financial aid, the Meet the Moment Scholarship Challenge will match two dollars for every one dollar contributed for gifts between $50,000 and $250,000. For repeat endowed financial-aid donors, the challenge will match new gift commitments between $50,000 and $250,000 dollar for dollar. The college is seeking to raise at least $20 million in new gifts and commitments over the next 18 months. As of Jan. 14, Mount Holyoke has already secured more than $5 million in gifts and commitments toward this effort, above and beyond the $11 million in challenge gifts.

 

Big Y Participating in Nexamp Community Solar Program

SPRINGFIELD — Big Y World Class Market has taken another step in supporting the production and consumption of clean energy by contracting with Boston-based Nexamp to participate in its community solar program. Under the agreement with Nexamp, Big Y is subscribing to 19 solar projects across Massachusetts, representing a total of 57 megawatts of capacity. Big Y will receive 50% of the energy credits generated by these projects. The projects included in Big Y’s agreement with Nexamp are located in Massachusetts in the National Grid and Eversource utility service territories. Big Y and other subscribers to these community solar projects are allocated a portion of the project’s output and receive discounted credits on their utility bills.

 

Monson Savings Bank Gives $15,000 to Nonprofits Chosen by Community

MONSON — After Monson Savings Bank asked community members to cast their votes for their favorite charitable organizations as a part of the Monson Savings Bank 2021 Community Giving Initiative, more than 3,400 votes were received. Now that the votes have been tallied, Monson Savings Bank is donating a total of $15,000 among the top 10 vote recipients. In total, 200 organizations received votes. The recipients include Women’s Empowerment Scholarship (Greater Springfield), Wilbraham United Players, Shriners Hospitals for Children – Springfield, Rick’s Place (Wilbraham), I Found Light Against All Odds (Greater Springfield), Academy Hill Private School Scholarship (Springfield), Scantic Valley YMCA (Wilbraham), Monson Free Library, St. Michael’s Players (East Longmeadow), and Link to Libraries Inc. (Hampden). This was the 11th year of the Monson Savings Bank Initiative.

 

Comcast Introduces Fastest Internet Speeds over Wi-fi Across Northeast

PHILADELPHIA — Comcast announced it has introduced the fastest internet speeds over wi-fi available across the Northeast, including 14 states from Maine to Virginia and Washington, D.C. Customers can now take advantage of advanced wi-fi technology that is capable of delivering speeds faster than a gig to support the ever-increasing number of connected devices in their homes. The speed increase was rolled out in Comcast’s Northeast markets on Jan. 7 for no additional charge to customers, and will be introduced to the rest of its service areas throughout 2021. Comcast is one of the first U.S. internet service providers to offer a Wi-Fi 6 certified gateway with the latest version of its xFi Advanced Gateway, which is capable of delivering multi-gigabit speeds via ethernet and laid the groundwork for gigabit speeds over wi-fi. Customers on the upgraded Xfinity gigabit tier will require an xFi Advanced Gateway, or one of the wi-fi-6-capable devices approved to work with the Xfinity network to receive the faster speeds. Comcast will be reaching out to customers who need to upgrade their equipment for no additional cost if they don’t have a capable device in their home.

 

Nursing Schools Almanac Names AIC Among Best Schools for Nursing

SPRINGFIELD — Nursing Schools Almanac has released its 2020 rankings of the best nursing schools in the U.S. In collecting data on more than 3,000 institutions nationwide, only 20% made the list of the best nursing schools in each geographic region. The nursing program at American International College (AIC) was named in both the New England and Massachusetts categories, placing 45th in the region and 21st in the state. Each school was evaluated on three dimensions: the institution’s academic prestige and perceived value, the breadth and depth of nursing programs offered, and student success, particularly on the NCLEX licensure examination. Nursing Schools Almanac combined the assessments into an overall score and ranked the schools accordingly.

 

The Royal Law Firm Announces New Strategic Association

SPRINGFIELD — The Royal Law Firm announced it has established a mutual of-counsel association with Minasian Becker LLC, a boutique commercial real-estate and business law firm, as of the third quarter of 2020. Complementing Royal’s business-side-only litigation practice, this association will provide Royal clients with the added benefits of commercial real-estate and corporate transactional work. The Minasian Becker team of attorneys has represented regional, national, and international companies and nonprofit organizations with their commercial real-estate and business-transaction needs for more than 25 years. Amy Royal, founding partner of the Royal Law Firm, believes the relationship with Minasian Becker will be an attractive supplement to Royal’s existing law practice of labor and employment law and other business-related litigation. With this alignment of their practices, Royal and Minasian Becker will offer their clients locations in Arlington, Springfield, and Rockport in Massachusetts, as well as in Hartford, Conn. Royal attorneys are admitted to practice in the state and federal courts of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. Both law firms are nationally certified as women’s business enterprises and women owned small businesses, and are able to offer the benefits of diversity to their clients.

 

Boston Children’s Hospital, Baystate Health Collaborate on Specialized Pediatric Care

SPRINGFIELD — Boston Children’s Hospital and Baystate Health have formed a collaboration that will improve patient access to highly specialized pediatric care and strengthen the coordination of care between Boston Children’s and Baystate Children’s Hospital in Springfield. The collaboration will provide patients throughout Western Mass. with improved access to pediatric specialty care at Baystate Children’s Hospital, and it will streamline care planning among providers at Boston Children’s and Baystate Children’s. The collaboration anticipates that the two hospitals will jointly develop pathways to ensure that children and adolescents get the right care in the right setting. In some instances, Boston Children’s clinicians will be available to provide care at Baystate Children’s. The two hospitals already work collaboratively in cardiology, neurology, and dermatology, and by enhancing medical education, remote consults, information technology, and other initiatives, the two institutions will be better able to coordinate care for their patients.

 

Boulevard Machine & Gear Moves to Larger Headquarters

WESTFIELD — Boulevard Machine & Gear, a precision-machining facility, announced it has moved its headquarters to a new, larger space in Westfield to accommodate steady business growth over the last decade. The new address is 326 Lockhouse Road. Boulevard Machine will leverage its new facility to provide additional capacity for its customers while providing new internal operational efficiencies. The new facility also will provide Boulevard with improved, state-of-the-art production space to facilitate internal and external collaboration and communication, while providing the company with further room for growth with its ongoing investment in equipment. The newly constructed factory will accommodate leading-edge manufacturing technologies, lean equipment layout, and automated workflow, resulting in increased efficiency and better overall customer experience, company President Susan Kasa said. Boulevard Machine, founded in 1954, was acquired by Kasa in 2006. It is a certified woman-owned business that provides precision-machined components for the aerospace, defense, and medical markets.

 

Balise Auto Boosts Square One’s Campaign for Healthy Kids

SPRINGFIELD — Balise Auto, a long-time supporter of Square One, recently committed $15,000 toward the agency’s Adopt-A-Classroom initiative. “We have been so impressed by Square One’s dedication and ability to find creative and effective ways to support the education of children and families in our community,” said Alexandra Balise, director of Marketing at Balise Auto. “Balise is proud to support Square One and their ongoing efforts to shape the leaders of tomorrow.” Square One’s Adopt-A-Classroom program is part of the agency’s Campaign for Healthy Kids, a multi-year fund-development initiative focused on the agency’s commitment to providing healthy meals, physical fitness, social-emotional well-being, and a healthy learning environment. The gift from Balise comes at a critical time, as Square One continues to provide full-day remote-learning support for children in kindergarten through grade 5, in addition to its traditional preschool classrooms, childcare offerings, and family-support services. Square One currently provides early-learning services to more than 500 infants, toddlers, and school-age children each day, as well as family-support services to 1,500 families each year.

 

Academy of Music Raising Funds for Restroom Renovations

NORTHAMPTON — Northampton’s historic Academy of Music Theatre announced its “We Care!” campaign, which will expand and renovate the public restrooms in the 130-year-old landmark to provide more toilets and sinks and upgrade the facilities for cleanliness and hygiene. Among the improvements slated for the $325,000 project are the expansion of the existing restroom facilities and the installation of new plumbing, HEPA-filtered hand dryers, touch-free toilet and sink fixtures, and partitions to serve a larger patron population, as well as new wall, floor, and ceiling finishes. The project is led by Northampton-based Thomas Douglas Architects, whose previous design for the renovation of the Academy of Music’s auditorium earned a Massachusetts Historical Commission Preservation Award. The Academy secured $225,000 last winter for the project from state and foundation sources, including the Massachusetts Cultural Facilities Funds, Smith College, and the Beveridge Family Foundation. The “We Care!” campaign aims to raise the remaining $100,000 from the Pioneer Valley community.

 

Architecture Environment Life Inc. Wins Citation Award from WMAIA

EAST LONGMEADOW — Architecture Environment Life Inc., known to many as ArchitectureEL Inc. or AEL, received a Citation Award from the Western Mass. chapter of the American Institute of Architects (WMAIA). In partnership with the Western Mass. section of the Boston Society of Landscape Architects (BSLA), WMAIA hosted its biannual Celebration of Architecture and Design Awards program last month to encourage and recognize distinguished architectural and landscape-design achievement and honor project teams, including the clients and consultants who work together to improve the built environment. The WMAIA Design Awards, held every two years, includes two Honor Awards for exceptional work, easily distinguishable by exceptional quality of design and function; two Merit Awards for work that demonstrates a high level of design quality worthy of recognition; and two Citation Awards for work that demonstrates a level of design quality worthy of mention. ArchitectureEL Inc. applied for this award by submitting a portfolio displaying its design for New Valley Bank at 1930 Wilbraham Road in Springfield. Judging for the award was informed by the AIA Framework for Design Excellence, which contends that design is not solely about aesthetic components, but also concerns how buildings perform for people.

 

Big Brothers Big Sisters, Restaurants Team Up to Raise Funds for Programs

WEST SPRINGFIELD — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Hampden County (BBBSHC) and four area restaurants partnered in December to raise money to support BBBSHC’s youth-mentoring programs. The four restaurant partners were located throughout Hampden County and included Springfield’s Nadim’s Downtown Mediterranean Grill, Hampden’s La Cucina di Hampden House, Wilbraham’s Blue Elephant Restaurant, and Holyoke’s Delaney House. Staff, board members, and volunteers from BBBSHC delivered close to 100 dinners to more than 40 donors during four Fridays in December. Participants chose from customized menus created specifically for the fundraiser. BBBSHC Executive Director David Beturne formed the partnerships as a creative way to raise funds for his organization during a trying time that has seen revenues and staffing levels cut by more than half. BBBSHC captured 50% of the revenue, and the restaurant partners captured the remaining 50%. Between the fundraiser itself and a sponsorship from Freedom Credit Union, BBBSHC was able to pull in just over $7,000.

UMassFive Donates Hundreds of Winter Coats and Clothes to Amherst Survival Center

HADLEY — UMassFive College Federal Credit Union announced that its members, staff, and community partners have donated hundreds of winter coats and clothing to Amherst Survival Center. Donations were gathered through a collection drive held at UMassFive’s Hadley and Northampton branches throughout the month of December. “This is a drive that we hold annually, and we weren’t sure what to expect in terms of donations during the pandemic,” said Cait Murray, Community Outreach manager at UMassFive. “We were pleasantly surprised to receive a record number of donations this year. The generosity of our members, staff, and community partners is truly remarkable.” Five vehicle loads of donations were dropped off at the Amherst Survival Center, where they were sorted and distributed to the community. To support the Amherst Survival Center directly, visit amherstsurvival.org.

 

RT Consulting, LLC Acquires Sage Benefit Advisers, LLC

PETERBOROUGH, N.H. — RT Consulting, LLC, has acquired Sage Benefit Advisers, headquartered in Peterborough, N.H. Formed in 2006, RT Consulting is a national employee-benefits administration firm focused on employee-benefits compliance, healthcare advocacy, data transparency, communication, education, and partnerships with clients and brokers. Since inception, RT has grown to become a robust HR-management tool helping to ease the burden of all the critical activities within human resources, such as enrollment, communication, navigation, and administration. RT Consulting has worked with companies of all sizes and industries, including technology, automotive, healthcare, finance, manufacturing, and energy, and has also done extensive work with associations. The acquisition of Sage Benefit Advisers positions RT to expand its comprehensive advisory and administrative services.

 

People on the Move

Nikki Burnett

Gillian Hinkson

Gillian Hinkson

Paul Murphy

Paul Murphy

Karin George

Karin George

The Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts (CFWM) announced two new Trustees: Nikki Burnett, executive director of Educare Springfield, and Gillian Hinkson, victim witness advocate for the Hampden County District Attorney’s Office. In addition, CFWM also elected a new trustee chair, Paul Murphy, and vice chair, Karin George. Burnett began her role as executive director of Educare Springfield in August 2019. For more than 20 years, she has pursued her passion of empowering her community and building equity. She currently serves on the board of directors for the Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts and on its race and equity subcommittee; on national committees for the Educare Learning Network, including its educare policy work group and collaborative fundraising advisory board; and on the Baystate Community Benefits Advisory Council. She is also one of the founders of the Faith Based Health Advocates Alliance. In addition to her position with the Hampden County District Attorney’s Office, Hinkson is an independent business owner of a health and wellness company. She is dedicated to educating the community on the importance of living a balanced life through exercise, well-balanced eating habits, and mindfulness. She is a member of CFWM’s education committee and a CFWM scholarship reviewer; is a Ward Five Democratic Committee member; and serves on the board of directors for the League of Women Voters and Art for the Soul Gallery. She also serves as a Democratic state committeewoman and is the co-chair of the affirmative action and outreach subcommittee, and has also served as campaign manager for local political candidates. Murphy is retired legal and administrative counsel of Amherst College and serves as a trustee of Baystate Health. He was previously a partner of Foley Hoag LLP, a Boston-based law firm. His previous board work was with the WGBH Educational Foundation, Tufts Medical Center, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and Hillside School, as well as New England Public Media, the United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley, Boston Architectural College, and the Partnership Inc. Murphy was appointed as a CFWM trustee in 2015, served as chair of the distribution committee for two years, and is a member of the committee on trustees and executive committee. George is a principal and co-owner of Washburn & McGoldrick Inc., a global consulting firm focused on fundraising, communications, strategic planning, alumni engagement, training, and board development in education and educationally related nonprofits. She previously served as vice president for Advancement at Smith College and vice president for Development at Vassar College. George was appointed as a CFWM trustee in 2013, served as a member and the former chair of the CFWM education committee, has volunteered as a scholarship reviewer since 2009, and is a member of the committee on trustees and executive committee.

•••••

Heather Arbour

Heather Arbour

Monson Savings Bank (MSB) recently announced the promotion of Heather Arbour to the role of BSA officer and compliance manager. In her new role, Arbour is responsible for overseeing MSB’s Bank Secrecy Act and anti-money-laundering programs and ensuring compliance with banking regulations. Additionally, she manages the Retail Operations department. Arbour has been with Monson Savings Bank for 13 years, previously serving in the role of compliance and BSA manager. She is currently enrolled in the New England School of Financial Studies and will be graduating in the spring from Springfield Technical Community College with a business administration degree. A volunteer and co-treasurer for the Monson and Palmer Salvation Army and a dedicated parent volunteer for the Monson Parent Teacher Student Assoc., Arbour also serves on the Monson Savings Bank pandemic reopening preparedness committee.

•••••

Webber and Grinnell Insurance recently hired Reynolds Whalen as its director of Culture and Communication. This new position focuses on company culture, sponsorships, community engagement, and helping advance the agency further into the digital age of marketing and communication. Reynolds comes to the job from his role as founder and executive director of Performing Arts Abroad, based in Easthampton, where he built the business with a focus on creativity, core values, and efficiency through integrations. He serves on the board of the International Language Institute in Northampton and is active in the Pioneer Valley theater scene as an actor and creative collaborator. Reynolds holds a bachelor’s degree in African and African-American studies and drama from Washington University in St. Louis, a master’s degree in education from Hunter College in New York City, and a master’s degree in African studies from Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind.

•••••

Eugene Cassidy

Eugene Cassidy

Eugene Cassidy, president and CEO of Eastern States Exposition (ESE), was elected chairman of the International Assoc. of Fairs and Expositions (IAFE) during the organization’s annual business meeting. Cassidy will serve in this international leadership role for 2021, spearheading the direction of the international group of fairs. The IAFE currently has 911 member fairs and affiliated organizations worldwide. The theme for IAFE 2021 is “Grow Fair Strong,” with a focus on growing as in all things agriculture, but also the growth in fairs and the economies they impact in the wake of the pandemic. Cassidy joined ESE as director of Finance in 1993 and was named executive vice president and chief operating officer in 2011. He assumed the position of president and CEO in 2012 and is the exposition’s seventh CEO in its 105-year history. He holds a bachelor of science degree in business administration and accounting from Western New England University. He serves as vice chairman of the Greater Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau, treasurer of the Western Massachusetts chapter of Legatus, treasurer and board member of MassHire Hampden County, member of the Springfield Technical Community College Foundation board, finance board member at St. Mary’s Parish, and board member at St. Thomas the Apostle School. He is also accredited as a certified fair executive by the IAFE and has served the organization as treasurer, second vice president, and first vice president before assuming his role as chairman.

•••••

Colin D’Amour

Colin D’Amour

Christian D’Amour

Christian D’Amour

The board of directors of Big Y Foods Inc. announced the promotion of two third-generation D’Amour family members. Colin D’Amour has been named senior director of the Big Y Express Gas & Convenience Stores division, and Christian D’Amour is director of E-commerce. Both appointments represent new and expanding divisions within the company. Colin’s responsibilities include oversight of store operations, site selection, site acquisition, and day-to-day responsibility for product procurement, including fuel for the division. Previously, he served as senior manager of Procurement within Big Y’s Real Estate and Development team, as well as a member of the real-estate committee, where he remains involved in evaluating viable expansion opportunities across all operating formats. In addition, he oversees multiple programs and initiatives with Topco Associates, a Chicago-based, member-owned cooperative. A graduate of Boston College, he holds personal decorations from his military service, including both the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals. Christian is responsible for Big Y’s e-commerce platform, which currently includes relationships with Instacart for grocery home deliveries and DoorDash for prepared-meal home deliveries. In addition to these services, he will be launching Big Y’s MyPicks Online ordering, in which customers will be able to order groceries online for curbside pickup or home delivery. He holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Michael’s college in Vermont and spent a semester studying at the National University of Ireland at Galway.

•••••

Erica Flores

Erica Flores

Skoler, Abbott & Presser announced that attorney Erica Flores has been named a partner in the firm. Flores, who has been with the firm since 2013, focuses her practice on employment litigation in state and federal courts and agencies, representing employers in class-action lawsuits and discrimination, harassment, and retaliation actions. Flores is a regular contributor to the Massachusetts Employment Law Letter on a variety of topics. She is a graduate of the University of Colorado, Boulder and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She is a member of the Massachusetts and Hampden County bar associations.

•••••

NAI Plotkin announced it has welcomed David Moore as a new commercial real-estate associate in its Brokerage Services division. Moore brings extensive experience in both commercial and residential real estate, as well as project management. After a notable career as vice president and general manager of the Mt. Tom Ski Area, Moore joined Allyn & O’Donnell Realty, where he gained valuable experience in the real-estate industry, including the selection of cell-tower sites. “I have known Dave for over 50 years, and I am thrilled that he will be joining our team. Adding someone with Dave’s knowledge and background allows us to assist our clients during this challenging time and to continue a forward momentum,” said Dan Moore, vice president of Brokerage Services. Dave Moore will serve new clients from NAI Plotkin’s office located on the 14th floor at One Financial Plaza, 1350 Main St., Springfield.

•••••

Monte Horst

Monte Horst

As part of its ongoing efforts to drive growth and value, OMG Roofing Products named Monte Horst vice president of Sales and Marketing. Horst is responsible for developing and executing the division’s overall sales and marketing strategies to support the three business units: Fasteners, Adhesives & Solar, and Metal Accessories. In this role, he will work closely with the company’s Marketing Communications and Customer Service departments. He reports to Peter Coyne, senior vice president and general manager of OMG Roofing Products. Horst holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas-Arlington and a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska.

•••••

Joanne Marqusee

Joanne Marqusee

Joanne Marqusee, president and CEO of Cooley Dickinson since 2014, announced she will leave that role to become chief integration officer for Wellforce, a growing healthcare system in Eastern Mass. that includes Tufts Medical Center, four community hospital sites, a broad provider network, and a homecare/hospice agency. At Wellforce, she will be responsible for developing and enhancing system-wide services to support operational excellence and growth. Marqusee joined Cooley Dickinson following its affiliation with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the larger Mass General Brigham (MGB) system. She oversaw the creation of a behavioral-health pod in the Emergency Department, the opening of a new Breast Center, and substantial expansion in provider practices across a range of locations and specialties. She will also be remembered for her diversity, equity, and inclusion work, starting with LGBTQ programs and more recently launching a comprehensive anti-racism plan. In addition, she has frequently spoken out on important public-health and policy issues, particularly those that affect marginalized communities. Prior to her tenure at Cooley Dickinson, Marqusee, a graduate of Cornell University and the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government, was COO of MelroseWakefield Healthcare (formerly Hallmark Health) and spent 16 years at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where she consistently was promoted to positions of greater responsibility, including vice president of Access; vice president of Ancillary, Support and Community Services; and senior vice president of Operations. She is a board member of the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Assoc. and serves on the steering committee of Extraordinary Women Advancing Health Care. In addition to her roles in Massachusetts, she previously worked for the New York State Department of Health in the Division of Health Care Financing, the New York City Health and Hospitals Corp., and the New York City Office of the Mayor.

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

Becket

Becket Village Kitchen Inc., 30 Washington St., Becket, MA 01223. Jill Weinberg, same. Restaurant.

BELCHERTOWN

Heavy Timber Craft Co., 325 Gold St., Belchertown, MA 01107. Christina Gudmand, same. Timber frame construction.

TeeTee Press Corp., 203 Packardville Road, Belchertown, MA 01007. Michael Weisser, same. Publishing books.

EASTHAMPTON

Furs’ A Flyin’ Inc., 69 Ferry St., Suite 19, Easthampton, MA 01027. Mary-Kate E. Murray, same. Pet grooming and pet day care business.

Overlord Inc., 122 Pleasant St., Suite 234, Easthampton, MA 01027. James R. Witmer II., 3 Franklin St. Easthampton, MA 01027. Property management.

EAST LONGMEADOW

Golden Years Staffing Inc., 46 Center Square, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Cesar Ruiz Jr., 96 Windham Dr. East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Medical staffing agency.

FLORENCE

Hatfield Construction Inc., 35 Main St. Florence, MA 01062. Jill Keiter, same. Construction.

PITTSFIELD

Nathan Cintron Inc., 100 North St., Suite 317, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Nathan Cintron, same. Holdings.

QCS Staffing Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Stephen Trigg, same. Recruitment services.

Today’s Limousine Inc., 703 West Housatonic St., Suite 21 Pittsfield, MA 01201. Michael Rosenthal, 16 Hiawatha Dr. Clifton Park, NY 10265. Sedan service, limousine service, van service, bus service — transportation service.

WR Investments Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Wander Rodriguez, same. Investments.

SPRINGFIELD

Move Athletics Inc., 573 Plumbtree Road, Springfield, MA 01118. Roger St. Onge Jr., same. Physical therapy, wellness, and performance training.

Teamwork Painting Corp., 1 Federal St., Building 103, Springfield, MA 01105. Lewis Boynton, 110 Preston St. Windsor, CT 06095. Painting contractor.

US IT Consultant, Inc., 78 Silver St., 3rd Floor, Springfield, MA 01107. Victor Aguayo, same. IT consultant services and software reseller.

Y & J Transportation Inc., 127 Spring St., Apt. 3B, Springfield, MA 01105. Yamarko A Villa, 77 Moore St. Providence, RI 02907. Delivery transportation.

TOLLAND

Littlefield Landscaping Inc., 1437 Burthill Road, Tolland, MA 01034. Kevin David Littlefield, same. To provide landscaping services.

WESTFIELD

Simply Electrifying Inc., 85 Skyline Dr., Westfield, MA 01085. William Poehlman, same. Lighting supplies.

Slavik Transportation Inc., 85 Otis St., Westfield, MA 01085. Vyacheslav Sidoryuk, same. Trucking.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and/or trade names were issued or renewed during the month of January 2021. (Filings are limited due to closures or reduced staffing hours at municipal offices due to COVID-19 restrictions).

HADLEY

Bibliotechnica
119 Middle St.
Robie Grant

Heamour Farm
245 Bay Road
Shannon Rice-Nichols

Original Body Wisdom
104 Russell St.
Donna Brooks

Z Auto
105 East St.
Michael Zera

NORTHAMPTON

Balin Eye and Laser Center
269 Locust St.
Nancy Balin

Chadams Glass
148 Crescent St.
Elliot Adams

Florence Cannabis Co.
131 Texas Road
Chris Rivers; FCC Holdings, LLC

Hamp Hybrids, LLC
10 Michelman Ave.
Roberta Wooldridge

Liberty Tax Service
242 King St.
Saqib Tasneem

Mill River Design Build
6 High St.
Matthew Kozveh

North Street BNB
117 North St.
Susan McEvoy

O’Rourke’s Auto School
122 Federal St.
Robert Demers

Play Incubation Collective
264 Riverside Dr.
Sarah Marcus, Rachel Schneider

Shewman Copyediting Services
30 Allison St.
Kathleen Shewman

Street Lather
256 Pleasant St., #202
Candice Streeter

Valley Performance Playground
264 Riverside Dr.
Sarah Marcus

The Vintage Cellar
11 Bridge St.
Daniel Egan

SOUTHWICK

Down to Earth Stump Grinding and Landscaping
14 Granaudo Circle
Michael Morris

WESTFIELD

Bountiful Baskets
23B Hubbard St.
Anna Stanton

Castle – the Window People
1029 North Road
Francisco Cortes Jr.

Great Clips
253 East Main St.
Catie Laraway

Little Jess Conversation
50 Roosevelt Ave.
Jessica Gambale

Pardon Our Appearance
77 Mill St.
Dezaray Negron

Salon Thairapy
338 Springdale Road
Trisha Carpenter

Smart Systems Cleaning
15 Cornish Dr.
Smart Systems Cleaning

Studio 1 Workshop
80 West Silver St.
Marie Matthews

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Abideen, Syed Zainul
Zain, Sahrish Syeda
19 Ballard St., Apt. J
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/30/2020

Boone, Ricky
17 Olmsted Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/31/2020

Collazo, Emilio V.
310 Nottingham St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/12/2020

Coulombe, Dawn Marie
62 Claire St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/29/2020

Cruz, Mayra
413 Pleasant St., Apt. 3A
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/29/2020

Doulette, Timothy
50 Bray Park Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/30/2020

Gorman, Brian Michael
512 Irene St.
Chicopee, MA 01020-2246
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/30/2020

Jack’s Backyard, LLC
Guilmette, Tyler Robert
214 West St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/24/2020

Joubert, Daniel J.
29 Northumberland St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/21/2020

Martin, Karen P.
104 Johnson Road, Unit 201
Chicopee, MA 01022
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/12/2020

Monarca, Edward M.
a/k/a Monarca, Monseratte Eduardo
a/k/a Monarca, Edwardo M.
34 Willow St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/22/2020

Murphy, Christopher A.
783 Lampblack Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 13
Date: 12/31/2020

Negron, Rosemary
63 Kingsley St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/29/2020

Romero, Marisol
Carrasquillo, Marisol Romero
64 Federal St. Apt. 2A
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/31/2020

Ruiz, Annette
199 Fernbank Road #9
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/22/2020

Schirmer, Michael P.
14 Bell St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/22/2020

Schirmer, Michele M.
29 Fillmore St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/22/2020

Schmuck, Marcie Ann
1049 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/22/2020

Shelton Brothers, Inc.
205 Ware Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 11
Date: 12/18/2020

Walch, Erica Ann
a/k/a Beaulieu, Erica
16 Maplecrest Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/18/2020

Wright, Carl
P.O. Box 46
Russell, MA 01071
Chapter: 7
Date: 12/19/2020

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

194 Buckland Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $199,000
Buyer: Eli R. Willey
Seller: Jason H. Clark
Date: 12/29/20

21 Thayer Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $272,600
Buyer: Rachel D. Chagnon
Seller: Arthur P. Pantermehl
Date: 12/30/20

BERNARDSTON

25 Raymond Dr.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $231,000
Buyer: John Dunphy
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 12/24/20

BUCKLAND

186 Lower St.
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Alexander L. Nutter
Seller: Rachael L. Dube
Date: 01/07/21

75 North St.
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Joyce C. Hollyday
Seller: Michael E. Gerry
Date: 12/31/20

63-65 State St.
Buckland, MA 01338
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Phillip S. Billitz
Seller: Chris E. Singley
Date: 12/30/20

COLRAIN

9 Dunnell Dr.
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $442,000
Buyer: Rudel LT
Seller: Katherine Lee Cole RET
Date: 01/08/21

15 Foundry Village Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Scott T. Reade
Seller: Judith A. Maloney
Date: 12/31/20

CONWAY

474 Wilder Hill Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Andrew J. Lively
Seller: Wayne C. Woodward
Date: 01/08/21

DEERFIELD

1 Community Place
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $4,250,000
Buyer: Landreau Realty LLC
Seller: CBC Realty Holding LLC
Date: 12/30/20

23 Lee Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Nicole R. Talbot
Seller: Anthony Martino
Date: 01/08/21

4 Park St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Escalante LLC
Seller: 4 Park Avenue LLC
Date: 01/07/21

33-A&B Pleasant St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $348,000
Buyer: Julie M. Paquette
Seller: Richard A. Walton
Date: 01/05/21

35 Thayer St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Sally J. Cary
Seller: Nicole R. Talbot
Date: 01/08/21

GREENFIELD

452 Adams Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Melanie J. Wiles
Seller: Kisloski, Stanley E., (Estate)
Date: 12/30/20

17 Barber Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Tia K. Neilson
Seller: Property Advantage Inc.
Date: 12/29/20

24 Factory Hollow
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $146,560
Buyer: Joseph Czajkowski
Seller: James A. Giknis
Date: 01/06/21

70 Hastings St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Paul B. Kohler
Seller: Nancy E. Fish
Date: 12/29/20

182 High St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $291,000
Buyer: Victoria Baeger-Daffner
Seller: Roman Catholic Bishop of Springfield
Date: 01/08/21

18 Homestead Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Holly Crowell
Seller: Kelson Ting
Date: 01/08/21

28 Kenwood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Joann P. Allan
Seller: Douglas A. Pratt
Date: 12/28/20

31 Montague City Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $152,500
Buyer: Lindsey Stokley
Seller: Staci M. Miner
Date: 12/30/20

36 Oak Hill Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $369,900
Buyer: John D. Taylor
Seller: Terry A. Gadomski
Date: 01/04/21

35 Prospect St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Laura G. Grohe
Seller: Thomas Friedman
Date: 12/30/20

HEATH

351 Route 8A
Heath, MA 01346
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Jason H. Clark
Seller: Kristi L. Nartowicz
Date: 12/29/20

LEVERETT

69 Amherst Road
Leverett, MA 01054
Amount: $374,000
Buyer: Darren Pierce
Seller: 69 Amherst Road LLC
Date: 12/29/20

MONTAGUE

7-9 Federal St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Benjamin Crane-Miller
Seller: Richard A. Young
Date: 01/07/21

136 Montague City Road
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Corey J. Richotte
Seller: Todd R. Little
Date: 01/08/21

34 Oakman St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Todd R. Little
Seller: Kevin J. Labelle
Date: 01/08/21

13-15 West Main St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Ana N. Groza
Seller: Marilyn C. Watroba
Date: 12/31/20

20 West Main St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Brittany A. Porter
Seller: Jason S. Edson
Date: 12/29/20

NEW SALEM

414 Daniel Shays Hwy.
New Salem, MA 01355
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Laferriere
Seller: Elaine Haskins
Date: 12/29/20

416 Daniel Shays Hwy.
New Salem, MA 01355
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Laferriere
Seller: Elaine Haskins
Date: 12/29/20

NORTHFIELD

749 Millers Falls Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Nathaniel R. Boyd
Seller: Ray W. Becker
Date: 01/08/21

ORANGE

459 East River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Bruno Barreto-Conceicao
Seller: FNMA
Date: 12/29/20

43 Horton Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: George J. Batista
Seller: Edgewater Const Inc.
Date: 12/28/20

48 Lincoln Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Myra P. Chapman
Seller: Baldwin, Allan R., (Estate)
Date: 12/31/20

New Athol Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Tire Barns Realty LLC
Seller: Tool Town RT
Date: 12/29/20

231 Oxbow Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Daniel Johnson
Seller: Julie A. Wright
Date: 12/30/20

89 West Myrtle St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Martha Lenz
Seller: Christopher B. Morse
Date: 12/30/20

344 West River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $288,000
Buyer: Karl T. Spooner
Seller: Kevin J. McHugh
Date: 12/31/20

SHELBURNE

72 Mechanic St.
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $198,900
Buyer: Stephanie Bellinger
Seller: Elizabeth J. Bukolsky RET
Date: 12/29/20

SHUTESBURY

853 Wendell Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Theresa Emerson
Seller: Daniel Emerson
Date: 12/31/20

SUNDERLAND

61 Old Amherst Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $262,500
Buyer: Old Amherst Road LLC
Seller: 61 Old Amherst Road LLC
Date: 01/07/21

67 Old Amherst Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $262,500
Buyer: Old Amherst Road LLC
Seller: 61 Old Amherst Road LLC
Date: 01/07/21

211 Russell St.
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $382,000
Buyer: Ann K. Zimmerman TR
Seller: Judith Mayrand
Date: 12/30/20

WARWICK

24 Kirk Road
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Leanne Limoges
Seller: Nicholas C. Arguimbau
Date: 12/30/20

770 Wendell Road
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $595,000
Buyer: Disa K. Pratt
Seller: Charles E. Dunn
Date: 12/30/20

WENDELL

245 Lockes Village Road
Wendell, MA 01379
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Aaron Lempert
Seller: Rowan Stephenson-Gay
Date: 12/28/20

WHATELY

59 River Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Gabriel Russo
Seller: EDS Enterprises LLC
Date: 12/30/20

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

42 Anthony St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $207,000
Buyer: Marisel Olmeda
Seller: Marigza Rodriguez
Date: 12/24/20

31 Arnold St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $305,500
Buyer: Brian Dixon
Seller: Joseph J. Roncarati
Date: 12/28/20

240 Bowles Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $3,697,000
Buyer: Suddekor LLC
Seller: Surteco GMBH LLC
Date: 12/31/20

31 Cedar Knoll Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $442,500
Buyer: Daquan Holmes
Seller: Michael J. Hutchinson
Date: 12/29/20

186 Clover Hill Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $329,900
Buyer: Ozkan Yagan
Seller: David Wilbur
Date: 12/31/20

79 Cosgrove Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Jennifer Burbank
Seller: Daniel D. Osborn-Schray
Date: 01/07/21

35 Elbert Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $273,000
Buyer: Adam J. Martins
Seller: Nicole M. Megazzini
Date: 12/28/20

49 Letendre Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $399,000
Buyer: Edwin E. Cintron
Seller: Tirone Development Corp.
Date: 01/08/21

17-19 Maple St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Mohammed A. Dastigir
Seller: Dianne Robare
Date: 12/30/20

997 North Westfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: Lori Wetzel
Seller: Claire T. Hannah
Date: 01/04/21

71 Oak Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $170,625
Buyer: Malia Homebuyers LLC
Seller: Tremblay, Gerard N., (Estate)
Date: 12/31/20

70 Reed St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $269,500
Buyer: Giani S. Depalma
Seller: Shaye A. Roberts
Date: 01/07/21

155 Shoemaker Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $277,000
Buyer: Alesya Karpolyuk
Seller: Marcus Trinchini
Date: 01/04/21

181 Shoemaker Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $272,500
Buyer: Marissa Ronchi
Seller: Corey L. Moquin
Date: 12/30/20

3 Spring St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Patriot Living LLC
Seller: Town Of Agawam
Date: 01/06/21

7 Spring St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Patriot Living LLC
Seller: Town Of Agawam
Date: 01/06/21

82 Sunnyslope Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Naylor Nation RE LLC
Seller: Zadkiel RT
Date: 01/08/21

31 Valentine Ter.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Karla Callahan
Seller: Paige M. Preston
Date: 12/28/20

19 Wilson St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $244,800
Buyer: Brian P. Riordan
Seller: Karla A. Vandal
Date: 12/28/20

CHESTER

21 Sylvester Hamilton Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Douglas P. Ranck
Seller: Maurice Vernon-Spear
Date: 12/30/20

CHICOPEE

51 Angela Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $354,000
Buyer: Adam Pietrzykowski
Seller: James P. McInerney
Date: 12/28/20

54 Artisan St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Edwin A. Diaz
Seller: Alker, Sandra L., (Estate)
Date: 12/30/20

2 Broadway Court
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Miguel A. Rodriquez
Seller: Kaali Huang LLC
Date: 12/29/20

185 Chapel St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $231,000
Buyer: Caitlin Oelrich
Seller: Ronald R. Donais
Date: 01/07/21

182 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: RBLA RT
Seller: Wilbraham Builders Inc.
Date: 01/07/21

985 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Jennifer A. Medina
Seller: Castle Headquarters Inc.
Date: 01/08/21

110 Clarendon Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Leyda M. Quinones
Seller: Miriam Pagano
Date: 01/06/21

254 Dale St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Jaeleen A. Martinez
Seller: Brenden Eck
Date: 12/31/20

11 Garrity St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Jose R. Anaya
Seller: Charlene Anderson
Date: 12/31/20

599 Granby Road
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $269,500
Buyer: Yadiris Nater
Seller: Jeremy Rudzik
Date: 01/05/21

268 Hampden St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Winners O. LLC
Seller: Kenneth G. Diegel
Date: 12/31/20

303 Hampden St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Hailyn Rodriguez
Seller: Agostinho M. Coutinho
Date: 01/06/21

39 Joy St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $158,000
Buyer: Kenneth Guyott
Seller: John J. Krasinkiewicz
Date: 01/05/21

56 Liberty St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Jason Bane
Seller: Nicholas J. Cyr
Date: 12/30/20

Marion St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Winners O. LLC
Seller: Kenneth G. Diegel
Date: 12/31/20

89 Northwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $220,500
Buyer: Victor M. Rosado
Seller: Kathleen A. Stewart
Date: 01/07/21

28 Pendleton Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Allan M. Lehouillier
Seller: John F. Minkler
Date: 12/30/20

110 Silvin Road
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Jose L. Cajamarca
Seller: Lynne M. Vasquez
Date: 01/06/21

77 South St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $390,000
Buyer: Kyle Callendar
Seller: Rosa M. Pires
Date: 12/30/20

54 Watson St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $207,925
Buyer: Amber R. Boles
Seller: Mary E. Oshea
Date: 12/28/20

20 Whitin Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Diane McClellan
Seller: Scott Conway
Date: 12/28/20

88 Worthington St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Hashim Al Sammarraie
Seller: Susan M. Cadieux-Smith
Date: 01/08/21

EAST LONGMEADOW

137 Allen St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Sampath Sundararajan
Seller: Elaine F. Santaniello
Date: 01/08/21

38 Bayne St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: Andrew R. Halgas
Seller: Joseph S. Malvezzi
Date: 12/30/20

10 Kelsey St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $216,099
Buyer: Daniel J. Wilson
Seller: Dianne Ostrander
Date: 01/08/21

51 Maplehurst Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $132,112
Buyer: Bank New York Mellon
Seller: Nancy J. Carabetta
Date: 12/30/20

55 Moore St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Ronald R. Donais
Seller: Michael Giuggio
Date: 01/07/21

365 Pease Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Pasquale Liquori
Seller: Blanche B. Colby
Date: 12/30/20

157 Pleasant St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Alexis Turowsky
Seller: Nicole Bartholomew
Date: 12/31/20

79 Prospect St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: IJN Equities LLC
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 01/04/21

421 Prospect St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $201,200
Buyer: Marth-E LLC
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 01/08/21

 

GRANVILLE

1566 Main Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Dylan Berge
Seller: Thomas Kaczorowski
Date: 01/07/21

385 South Lane
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $134,600
Buyer: Anthony Whitehead
Seller: John E. Rigby
Date: 12/31/20

HAMPDEN

46 Brookside Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $242,500
Buyer: Tara M. Czaplicki
Seller: Shepard, Marjorie C., (Estate)
Date: 01/04/21

487 Chapin Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $259,900
Buyer: Chad Lynch
Seller: FNMA
Date: 12/30/20

16 Fisher Lane
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $306,000
Buyer: Todd Bousquet
Seller: Matthew R. Fisher
Date: 12/30/20

21 Hillside Lane
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $525,000
Buyer: Michelle Schwab
Seller: Richard J. Markham
Date: 01/06/21

9 Perennial Lane
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $519,000
Buyer: Akwasi Duah
Seller: Michael A. Nallen
Date: 12/30/20

256 South Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Joseph Malvezzi
Seller: Philip T. Grant
Date: 12/30/20

72 Stony Hill Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Leeann M. Bergeron
Seller: Russell N. Bergeron
Date: 01/08/21

HOLLAND

70 Allen Hill Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $775,000
Buyer: Kurt A. Noe
Seller: Raymond P. Korny
Date: 01/04/21

23 Cherokee Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Maple Ledge Assocs. Inc.
Seller: Nicole Coburn
Date: 12/30/20

85 Sturbridge Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $218,000
Buyer: Richard G. Johnson
Seller: James R. Zehelski
Date: 12/30/20

HOLYOKE

94 Beacon Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Thomas Dejesus
Seller: Ileana M. Cruz
Date: 12/30/20

4 Blaine Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $194,000
Buyer: Zuleica Ramirez-Rivera
Seller: McHugh, John E. Jr, (Estate)
Date: 12/31/20

392 Cherry St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Rahiza Gallardo-Vazquez
Seller: James F. Murphy
Date: 01/05/21

372-374 Linden St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Heriberto Fontanez
Seller: Carmen L. Salgado-Gerena
Date: 12/29/20

210 Lower Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $319,900
Buyer: William Matte
Seller: Arlene Duncan
Date: 12/30/20

109 Lyman St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Enamel Properties LLC
Seller: Makajo Realty LLC
Date: 01/08/21

180 Michigan Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Paola Ferrario
Seller: Marie A. Hunter
Date: 12/28/20

Old Jarvis Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Kestrel Land TR
Seller: Anniversary Hill Development LLC
Date: 12/29/20

Overlook Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Kestrel Land TR
Seller: Anniversary Hill Development LLC
Date: 12/29/20

288-290 Pleasant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Francheska Rosario
Seller: Justin Beyer
Date: 01/05/21

340 Pleasant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $202,500
Buyer: Sokunthea Som
Seller: Daniel A. Warner
Date: 01/05/21

123 Sheehan Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Audrey L. Weston
Seller: Timothy M. Brassil
Date: 12/30/20

24 Thomas Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Yael Petretti
Seller: Richard R. Filley
Date: 12/30/20

23-25 Washington Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $244,000
Buyer: Mary J. Seid
Seller: Avraham A. Harris
Date: 01/05/21

469 Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Regina F. Sanders
Seller: Tkacz, Martin M., (Estate)
Date: 01/04/21

LONGMEADOW

69 Chiswick St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $326,000
Buyer: Maksymilian Nowak
Seller: Timothy Giguere
Date: 12/31/20

68 Crestview Circle
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $346,400
Buyer: Lakshmi Sathianathan
Seller: Vijaya R. Lakamraju
Date: 12/29/20

25 Dover Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Travis H. Lynch
Seller: Robert Heap
Date: 12/29/20

147 Laurel St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Mary E. Vahadji
Seller: Mary M. Brunton
Date: 12/30/20

133 Longmeadow St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $469,000
Buyer: James Sanchez
Seller: Hedge Hog Industries
Date: 01/07/21

153 Viscount Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $403,000
Buyer: Daniel Zwirko
Seller: Paul F. Schneider
Date: 12/31/20

LUDLOW

81 Atlantic St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $302,500
Buyer: Marissa Z. DosSantos
Seller: Richard T. Santos
Date: 12/29/20

32 Focosi Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $449,900
Buyer: Kevin A. Quiterio
Seller: Dedan M. Karanja
Date: 12/29/20

268 Howard St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Intha Lepkham
Seller: Bruno G. Varandas
Date: 12/30/20

116 John St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Jennifer Sullivan
Seller: Joseph Lafleur
Date: 12/30/20

24 John St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Kim A. Wills
Seller: Bryan Mahoney
Date: 12/24/20

51 Libby St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $226,000
Buyer: 65 West LLC
Seller: Patrick M. Winslow
Date: 12/24/20

162 Lockland Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Daven M. Winiewski
Seller: Horacio Salvador
Date: 12/30/20

45 Park Place
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Adam W. Eriksen
Seller: Saudade R. Fonseca
Date: 12/29/20

16 Pine St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Liliana Azevedo
Seller: Augusto G. Crespo
Date: 12/24/20

47 Pondview Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Cody Jaramillo
Seller: Samuel Shaw
Date: 12/31/20

719 West St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $449,900
Buyer: Richard T. Santos
Seller: Daniil Gerasimchuk
Date: 12/29/20

12 Wenonah Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Michael S. McCray
Seller: Edwin Cintron
Date: 01/08/21

MONSON

33 Upper Palmer Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $297,500
Buyer: Lester White
Seller: Deborah Winchester
Date: 01/05/21

PALMER

142 3 Rivers Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $347,500
Buyer: Jason Ahlman
Seller: Christopher P. Katopis
Date: 12/31/20

98 Beech St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Casper Hacker RT
Seller: Maureen A. Casper
Date: 12/31/20

104 Breckenridge St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $267,500
Buyer: Victoria C. Snyder
Seller: Scott Croteau
Date: 01/04/21

1180 Calkins Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Brittany A. Cormier
Seller: Dimitri A. Bryant
Date: 01/06/21

19 Converse St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Thrive Properties LLC
Seller: Daniel C. McManus
Date: 12/30/20

34 Glenn St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Kaitlyn M. Cormier
Seller: Eric D. Abreu
Date: 01/04/21

30 Harvey St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $332,000
Buyer: Joshua E. Dinelle
Seller: Joshua E. Dinelle
Date: 12/29/20

4125 High St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Andrew R. Thompson
Seller: Warren R. Thompson
Date: 12/30/20

SOUTHWICK

95 Congamond Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $208,500
Buyer: Hannah E. Wyman
Seller: Kimberly J. Bombard
Date: 12/30/20

25 Eagle St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Crystal A. Pilecki
Seller: Shawn M. Rutola
Date: 12/29/20

152 Feeding Hills Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $246,000
Buyer: Christopher M. Thomas
Seller: John S. Arnold
Date: 01/06/21

44 Fernwood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $171,600
Buyer: Miroslav Tkach
Seller: US Bank
Date: 12/30/20

22 Grove St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $484,500
Buyer: Richard P. Beaulieu
Seller: Drew W. Seibert
Date: 01/08/21

6 Logie Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Tyler M. Buscemi
Seller: John J. Meares
Date: 12/30/20

181 South Longyard Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Gabriella F. Benea
Seller: Christopher L. Belinda
Date: 12/30/20

7 Tree Top Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Jaydub LLC
Seller: Dorothy A. Lobik
Date: 01/05/21

SPRINGFIELD

15 Albee St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Angel L. Velazquez
Seller: Daniel McNeill
Date: 01/06/21

54 Alden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Victor M. Jimenez-Aponte
Seller: Alexander Mora
Date: 12/30/20

1051 Allen St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Tashyana Lowe-Chin
Seller: Lucas Lora
Date: 01/08/21

30 Arden St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Joshua J. Dobiecki
Seller: Patrick Moran
Date: 12/31/20

49 Arden St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: William C. Rollins
Seller: Catherine S. Fryzel
Date: 12/31/20

45 Avon Place
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Alyssa M. Coletti
Seller: Kay E. Lessard
Date: 12/28/20

92-94 Beaumont St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $292,000
Buyer: Michael Stewart
Seller: MDDO LLC
Date: 12/24/20

14 Berkeley St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Raisa Dimoglo
Seller: Joshua R. Gasper
Date: 12/29/20

68 Bernard St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Michelle Acevedo-Maymi
Seller: Roger A. Tetreault
Date: 01/08/21

116 Birchland Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $277,000
Buyer: Elisenda Santiago-Lopez
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 01/08/21

31 Bloomfield St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $225,882
Buyer: Posiadlosc LLC
Seller: Hampden Homebuyers LLC
Date: 01/06/21

305 Breckwood Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: 305 Breckwood Blvd. LLC
Seller: Theodore J. Jez
Date: 12/30/20

71-73 Bristol St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Amy Taranto
Seller: Manirakiza Jamari
Date: 12/30/20

120 Canterbury Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $186,000
Buyer: Joi-Faith Torres
Seller: Stephen Delusa
Date: 12/30/20

166 Canterbury Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Matthew C. Schneider
Seller: Moltenbrey Builders LLC
Date: 01/06/21

225 Carando Dr.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $2,564,000
Buyer: Greenfield Development LLC
Seller: East Springfield Industrial
Date: 01/04/21

1542-1548 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $259,900
Buyer: Wahid Uddin
Seller: Shaw, William D., (Estate)
Date: 12/24/20

671 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $214,900
Buyer: Alexi Colon
Seller: Surtan Realty LLP
Date: 12/30/20

48 Champlain Ave.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Ryan John
Seller: Philip J. Ozzone
Date: 01/07/21

672 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Alex O. Abutu
Seller: Couture Partners
Date: 01/06/21

11 Cheyenne Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Juan G. Perez
Seller: Luz Acevedo
Date: 12/24/20

33 Chilson St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Mark Netherton
Seller: James Zaiken
Date: 12/28/20

58 Chilson St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Brent Dobbins
Seller: Jeremy Slater
Date: 12/29/20

128-130 Commonwealth Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $365,800
Buyer: AJ & Sons Properties LLP
Seller: HSB Investments LLC
Date: 12/30/20

96 Crestmont St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Xaver A. Sierra
Seller: Jerica Acevedo
Date: 01/08/21

194 Denver St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $210,500
Buyer: Catherine Cruz
Seller: Thong T. Vo
Date: 01/04/21

192-194 Dickinson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $139,000
Buyer: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 12/29/20

76-78 Dwight Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Junior Solano
Seller: Stuart B. Sibley
Date: 12/24/20

1571 Dwight St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: TKJM LLC
Seller: George B. Witman
Date: 12/29/20

179 East St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: Diedre Garcia
Seller: Marissa Z. DosSantos
Date: 12/28/20

95 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $134,932
Buyer: CIG 4 LLC
Seller: Darrell L. Smith
Date: 12/31/20

115 Edendale St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Christopher Fitzpatrick
Seller: B. C. Lindsey-Chamberlain
Date: 12/30/20

152 Ferncliff Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Kaitlin M. Sheehan
Seller: Ashley M. Dematos
Date: 12/31/20

71 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $336,800
Buyer: Claribel Parra
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 01/08/21

52-54 Everett St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Vanessa Colon
Seller: David W. Lewis
Date: 01/08/21

98 Florence St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Andrew Tsang
Seller: Lifang Luo-Cayode
Date: 01/08/21

131 Gardens Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Katherine Valente
Seller: Alexa Acosta
Date: 01/04/21

71 Glenmore St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Vanessa I. Feliciano
Seller: Timothy A. Reilly
Date: 12/31/20

67-69 Granby St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Juan M. Cortes-Ramos
Seller: Christine Porcello
Date: 12/29/20

32 Greenleaf St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Brianna Henriquez
Seller: Nelson H. Wells
Date: 12/28/20

15 Gresham St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $257,500
Buyer: Peter Cavette
Seller: Lewen Cotte
Date: 01/08/21

173-177 Hancock St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Property Advantage Inc.
Seller: Pasquale A. Romeo
Date: 12/31/20

19 Harbour Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Kaitlyn Kibler
Seller: Springhouse Properties LLC
Date: 01/08/21

20 Harbour Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: Kevin Covington
Seller: Mark Netherton
Date: 12/28/20

184 Harkness Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $185,650
Buyer: Kandice N. Daniels
Seller: Steven N. Rivard
Date: 01/08/21

167 Hartford Ter.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $222,500
Buyer: James A. Nai
Seller: George E. Cartier
Date: 12/30/20

78 Homestead Ave.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Yaimar Lopez-DeJesus
Seller: Christian Wiernasz
Date: 01/07/21

126 Homestead Ave.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Ryan Alvarado
Seller: Arminda Auger
Date: 01/08/21

218 Island Pond Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $248,000
Buyer: Joanne Fuentes
Seller: Virginia Makis
Date: 12/30/20

146 Jasper St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Karen Griffin-Eberhart
Seller: Kendra Braxton
Date: 12/31/20

34-36 Jenness St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $206,000
Buyer: Wilfredo Gonzalez-Rivera
Seller: Michelle Wilson
Date: 12/28/20

105 Joan St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Bank New York Mellon
Seller: Heather Wildes
Date: 12/29/20

64 Jordan St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $302,000
Buyer: Miguel A. Cordero-Cales
Seller: Juan A. Espinosa
Date: 12/30/20

19 Kingston St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Ana M. Rosa
Seller: Lance C. Koske
Date: 12/30/20

125 Laconia St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $322,000
Buyer: Singaravelu Jagadeesan
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 12/29/20

20 Langdon St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Maria Ruiz-Gonzalez
Seller: Patricia S. Reilly
Date: 01/05/21

65 Leyfred Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Amy E. Taranto
Seller: Nina M. Sartori-Ng
Date: 12/30/20

92 Lloyd Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Rudy Oferrall-Rivera
Seller: FNMA
Date: 12/29/20

74 Lyndale St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Quang Do
Seller: Cynthia N. Ortiz
Date: 12/29/20

415 Maple St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Mary A. Quigley
Seller: Flaherty, Patricia A., (Estate)
Date: 12/31/20

48 Marmon St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: John P. Ochoa
Seller: Matthew W. Gladu
Date: 12/30/20

54 Melba St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Victor T. Wilson
Seller: Desiree S. Spencer
Date: 12/28/20

118 Merrimac Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Vicente Rivera
Seller: Ontour Properties Inc.
Date: 12/31/20

21 Michigan St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $146,500
Buyer: Olivia Roberts
Seller: Yolonda Pearson
Date: 12/30/20

175 Mill St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: Paul Murphy
Seller: Icarian RE Advisors LLC
Date: 01/08/21

45 Montrose St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Eduardo Reyes-Rivera
Seller: Appreneata Navarro
Date: 01/04/21

133-135 Moxon St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Jakisha L. Pinnock
Seller: Debra A. Cameron
Date: 12/31/20

161 Newton Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $248,500
Buyer: Joseph A. Armida
Seller: Joshua F. Scott
Date: 12/30/20

205 Norfolk St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Adriana S. Lane
Seller: Eric C. Eldred
Date: 01/06/21

136 Nursery St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $800,000
Buyer: 401 Liberty Street LLC
Seller: Stafford Street Group LLC
Date: 01/06/21

162-164 Oak Grove Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $258,000
Buyer: Genaro Rodriguez
Seller: Matadormus LLC
Date: 01/08/21

1233 Page Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Dylan T. Malley
Seller: Yvette Cartagena
Date: 01/04/21

81-83 Palmer Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Lena Phommatham
Seller: Ann Grace
Date: 01/07/21

391-393 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Lourdes Buckhannon
Seller: David A. Morais
Date: 01/04/21

1731 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Carmen I. Gutierrez
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 12/31/20

182 Pasco Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Angel G. Rivas
Seller: Betsy A. Robinson
Date: 01/04/21

74 Penrose St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Orlando Serrano
Seller: Lisa E. Cousineau
Date: 12/31/20

19 Perkins St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Luis Martinez
Seller: Terry O. Paine
Date: 12/31/20

51 Pheland St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Joshua Rios
Seller: 11 RRE LLC
Date: 01/04/21

78 Phoenix Ter.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Luz M. Pereira-Torres
Seller: Ana M. Rosa
Date: 12/30/20

247 Pine St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Abigail Ragland
Seller: Pamela J. Hausser
Date: 12/31/20

524-526 Plainfield St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Emily M. Lamica
Seller: HP Rum LLC
Date: 12/31/20

162-164 Prospect St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Eleazar Ortiz-Torres
Seller: Ana I. Serrano
Date: 12/31/20

814 Roosevelt Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Eulah Turner
Seller: William L. Collins
Date: 12/30/20

135 Rosewell St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Devin Cameron
Seller: Rashad A. Collins
Date: 12/31/20

236 Rosewell St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Carlos H. Lemus
Seller: Sandra L. Kenyon
Date: 01/08/21

47 Shawmut St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Thaddeus Weaver
Seller: Jose Torres
Date: 01/07/21

23-25 Slater Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Jocelyn E. Rodriguez
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 12/29/20

70-72 Sorrento St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $365,800
Buyer: AJ & Sons Properties LLP
Seller: HSB Investments LLC
Date: 12/30/20

240 Spikenard Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Jeffrey E. Szlosek
Seller: Fred R. Aramony
Date: 12/30/20

165 Stafford St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $800,000
Buyer: 401 Liberty Street LLC
Seller: Stafford Street Group LLC
Date: 01/06/21

15 Sunapee St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $201,000
Buyer: Andrew S. Ethier
Seller: Thomas M. Rachele
Date: 12/29/20

110 Talbot Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Michelle A. Wilson-Ortas
Seller: Anthony J. Danos
Date: 12/29/20

115 Temby St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Sarmad J. Al Hakeem
Seller: Russell Cable
Date: 01/08/21

35 Texel Dr.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $237,000
Buyer: Chardem Sashagay-Taylor
Seller: Donna Cota
Date: 12/30/20

40 Timothy Circle
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Anthony R. Fernandes
Seller: Mario Nascimento
Date: 12/30/20

47 Van Buren Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Heriberto Rivera
Seller: Riccardo Albano
Date: 12/31/20

Waldorf St.
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Alvinelis C. Velazquez
Seller: Fumi Realty Inc.
Date: 01/08/21

15 Washington St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Sonya M. Fernandes
Seller: Alice G. Poirier
Date: 01/06/21

87 Weaver Road
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Elisana R. Deleon-Arias
Seller: Jeffrey B. Carpenter
Date: 01/05/21

144-146 Westford Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $298,200
Buyer: Othniel Agabert-Davey
Seller: Shirley Lowe
Date: 12/31/20

187 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: William A. Vasquez
Seller: Rosa M. Crespo
Date: 01/06/21

159 Whittum Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Latona Boyd
Seller: Carol A. Orszak
Date: 12/31/20

243-245 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Home Equity Assets Realty
Seller: Home Equity Assets Realty
Date: 01/06/21

11 Willard Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $670,000
Buyer: TKJM LLC
Seller: George B. Witman
Date: 12/30/20

70-72 Windemere St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Regina R. McGregor
Seller: Rose Owen
Date: 01/08/21

TOLLAND

306 Rivers Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Casey Ledger
Seller: Ralph M. Ledger
Date: 12/28/20

WALES

19 Shore Dr.
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Shore Drive RT
Seller: Leveillee, John C., (Estate)
Date: 01/05/21

WEST SPRINGFIELD

18 Alderbrook Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Patrick J. Kelly
Seller: Faith A. Nekitopoulos
Date: 12/30/20

27-29 Allen St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Jose R. Guerra-Soto
Seller: Carlos A. Alba
Date: 01/06/21

1209 Amostown Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: William L. Collins
Seller: William B. Goodwin
Date: 12/30/20

158 Bosworth St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Nicholas C. Bartlett
Seller: Brianna L. Henriquez
Date: 12/28/20

461 Dewey St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Mary A. Pastore
Seller: Peter Donner
Date: 12/28/20

25 Dion St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: James Corigliano
Seller: Asinas, Emanuel G., (Estate)
Date: 12/31/20

60 Druids Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Kaleigh E. Ingegncri
Seller: Elizabeth A. Marshall
Date: 12/29/20

85 Falmouth Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $349,900
Buyer: Nicole M. Megazzini
Seller: Todd P. Simon
Date: 12/28/20

94 Laurel Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Antonio V. Bastos
Seller: Brian Doyle
Date: 12/24/20

110 Monastery Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $11,950,000
Buyer: PC Monastery LLC
Seller: 110 Monastery Assocs. LP
Date: 01/06/21

235 Ohio Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Alexander Alvarado
Seller: Mary A. Pastore
Date: 12/28/20

1219 Piper Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Michelle L. Torres
Seller: Harry Melendez
Date: 12/30/20

352 Prospect Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Johanna E. Sweet
Seller: Dawn M. Gahran
Date: 01/06/21

10 Saint Andrews Way #10
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $339,900
Buyer: Christopher G. Sakellis
Seller: Country Club Partners LLC
Date: 01/07/21

7 Squassick Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Jacqueline S. Tellier
Seller: Theodore R. Schwamb
Date: 12/29/20

195 Union St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Dream Realty Group LLC
Seller: Trindade R. Agostinho
Date: 12/30/20

58 West School St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Charles M. Maranga
Seller: Alex O. Obutu
Date: 01/06/21

1967 Westfield St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $935,000
Buyer: Stoneridge Realty LLC
Seller: Mark D. Olson
Date: 12/29/20

162 Wolcott Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $251,900
Buyer: Juliet A. Zucchi
Seller: Cynthia A. Henriquez
Date: 12/29/20

WESTFIELD

5 Barbara St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $264,000
Buyer: Andtii Seryi
Seller: Donna N. Sesti
Date: 12/30/20

112 City View Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Gabriel Monjaras
Seller: Tok Chang
Date: 01/08/21

11 Clark St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Zephlin Luna
Seller: Kenneth B. Beagle
Date: 12/29/20

30 Day Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $202,800
Buyer: Naldrett Hartdegen
Seller: Cynthia P. Hartdegen
Date: 12/30/20

160 Elm St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Dong Han
Seller: Mary J. Boscher
Date: 12/30/20

11 Gold St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Nicholas Turnberg
Seller: Elizabeth A. Bernaquer
Date: 01/05/21

237 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $218,000
Buyer: Gene P. Bressette
Seller: Linda J. Doiron
Date: 01/04/21

25 Holyoke Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Donna E. West
Seller: Bridget A. Barber
Date: 01/08/21

30 Llewellyn Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: David Gaw
Seller: Michael J. Snyder
Date: 12/24/20

143 Llewellyn Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Svetlana Ryabchukova
Seller: Martin Zelazko
Date: 12/31/20

64 Servistar Industrial Way
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $1,750,000
Buyer: Seal-Ryt Corp
Seller: Chernan LLC
Date: 12/31/20

Turnpike Industrial Road #1
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: DMA Associates LLC
Seller: Westfield Gas & Electric
Date: 01/06/21

WILBRAHAM

80 3 Rivers Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $279,900
Buyer: Philip J. Ozzone
Seller: Sergio Dias
Date: 01/07/21

5 Blueberry Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $399,900
Buyer: Keith Bartle
Seller: Michael P. Mailhott
Date: 12/31/20

3092 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Brandon M. Hill
Seller: Scott Foulis
Date: 12/30/20

18-20 Cottage Ave.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $980,000
Buyer: JJM Astor SPV LLC
Seller: Stockhouse 122 Realty LLC
Date: 01/04/21

5 Edward St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Caitlyn D. Kelleher
Seller: Keith M. Bartle
Date: 12/29/20

207 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Hazel Zebian
Seller: Mary L. Assad
Date: 01/08/21

233 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Cheryl A. Stanco
Seller: Custom Home Development Group LLC
Date: 12/31/20

1 Northwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $357,000
Buyer: Rachel Bahal
Seller: Cheryl A. Stanco
Date: 12/31/20

6 Rice Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Taylor Robitaille
Seller: Janet A. Wise
Date: 12/29/20

576 Ridge Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Laura Haapanen
Seller: Eugenia T. Pikul
Date: 01/06/21

19 Victoria Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Robert J. Stephen
Seller: Kenneth N. Levesque
Date: 12/30/20

1 Webster Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $615,000
Buyer: Atron A. Gentry
Seller: Thomas E. Loper
Date: 12/28/20

6 Wilbraview Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Peter J. Badini
Seller: Shane T. Waltsak
Date: 01/08/21

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

1185 Bay Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $377,000
Buyer: M. S. & Bingqing Lu LT
Seller: John B. Gulbrandsen
Date: 12/31/20

119 Blue Hills Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Dan Wang
Seller: Yonggui Su
Date: 12/30/20

100 Cowls Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Aunt Charlottes Frozen
Seller: 100 Cowls Road LLC
Date: 12/30/20

19 Farview Way
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $453,000
Buyer: Dan Wang
Seller: Wilfrido Delsalto
Date: 01/08/21

348 Northampton Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $1,225,000
Buyer: Udrive South LLC
Seller: Janyce H. Wziontka
Date: 12/30/20

338 Pine St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Lawrence D. Hansen
Seller: Joel M. Greenbaum
Date: 12/28/20

Snell St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $1,225,000
Buyer: Udrive South LLC
Seller: Janyce H. Wziontka
Date: 12/30/20

35 Trillium Way
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $585,000
Buyer: Sven P. Birkerts
Seller: Joseph R. Vreedenburgh
Date: 12/30/20

BELCHERTOWN

884 Federal St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Andrew Reid
Seller: Agnes C. Ting
Date: 12/28/20

229 Jabish St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Carol A. Flood
Seller: Cheryl A. Lofland
Date: 12/29/20

11 Laurel Ridge Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $530,000
Buyer: Robert Hanlon
Seller: Julie A. Ayres
Date: 12/31/20

43 Meadow Pond Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $518,450
Buyer: Eric R. Devine
Seller: Lafleur & Son Inc.
Date: 01/05/21

396 Michael Sears Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $353,600
Buyer: Justin H. Satkowski
Seller: Christopher A. Rivers
Date: 12/29/20

16 Old Sawmill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: David Lawless
Seller: Joseph E. Conroy
Date: 12/28/20

495 South St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $366,000
Buyer: Shelagh L. Pearson
Seller: Edward J. Hosmer
Date: 01/07/21

EASTHAMPTON

188 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Joshua M. Gajda
Seller: Cecelia Malinowski FT
Date: 01/08/21

219 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Lauren A. Soucey
Seller: F&H Property Funding TR
Date: 12/30/20

42 Mutter St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $345,188
Buyer: Emily Haak-Frendscho
Seller: CTNA Construction LLC
Date: 12/28/20

87 Park Hill Road
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Park Hl Orchard Holding LLP
Seller: Susan J. Guertin
Date: 01/05/21

145 Pleasant St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $337,000
Buyer: Marquis Nunley
Seller: Scott M. Tundermann
Date: 12/24/20

GRANBY

670 Amherst Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $559,000
Buyer: Nancy Godbout
Seller: Patricia G. Callahan
Date: 01/05/21

284-R E. State St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $469,000
Buyer: Emily Sorbi
Seller: Frank Bogdanovich
Date: 12/30/20

151 Taylor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: JJB Builders Corp
Seller: Scott Family Prop LLC
Date: 12/29/20

1 Trout Lily Lane
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $560,000
Buyer: David M. Cordeiro
Seller: Ronald A. Gnatek
Date: 12/30/20

HADLEY

42 Mount Warner Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Benjamin M. Snyder
Seller: Wendy R. Pearson
Date: 12/28/20

397 Russell St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $1,600,000
Buyer: Gary J. Camardo RET
Seller: Focus Realty Group LLC
Date: 12/31/20

HATFIELD

North Hatfield Road
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Gregory J. Noyes
Seller: Mieke LLC
Date: 12/31/20

HUNTINGTON

6 Laurel Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Janelle M. Welton
Seller: Angelika Kochapski
Date: 12/30/20

NORTHAMPTON

354 Elm St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Southern New England Conference Assoc.
Seller: Roman Cath Bishop Of Springfield
Date: 12/30/20

65 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Wright Builders Inc.
Seller: Emerson Way LLC
Date: 01/08/21

837 Florence Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $667,500
Buyer: Ralph H. Litwin
Seller: Demetropoulos, Roger, (Estate)
Date: 01/04/21

39 Lyman Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $725,000
Buyer: Alan J. Greenhalgh
Seller: White Wing LLC
Date: 01/08/21

881 North King St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $445,000
Buyer: Lankleine Realty LLC
Seller: Philip E. Dowling
Date: 01/06/21

884 Ryan Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $259,900
Buyer: Guy F. McCracken
Seller: Henry L. Kabat
Date: 12/24/20

971 Ryan Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $309,000
Buyer: Seth Wilpan
Seller: Dutch L. Cosmian
Date: 01/04/21

PELHAM

212 Amherst Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Mukunda Feldman
Seller: Roberts, Susan B., (Estate)
Date: 12/31/20

SOUTH HADLEY

31 Chestnut Hill Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Ryan Loughrey
Seller: Irene Fitzgibbons
Date: 01/05/21

40 Fairview St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Marisa Murray
Seller: Donna M. Shea
Date: 12/30/20

17 Highland Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: Edward A. Leonard
Seller: Peloquin Jeanne M., (Estate)
Date: 01/08/21

34 Hildreth Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Deborah Archambault
Seller: Skrok, Casimir J., (Estate)
Date: 12/29/20

26 Joffre Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $439,900
Buyer: 26 Joffre Avenue RET
Seller: Edward J. Lavallee
Date: 01/07/21

5 Lexington Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $189,998
Buyer: Kyle R. Brunault
Seller: Kyle R. Brunault
Date: 12/31/20

10 Prospect St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Coralia Melendez
Seller: Charles T. Koske
Date: 12/29/20

22 Saybrook Circle
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Leslie R. Foster
Seller: Matthew F. McArdle
Date: 12/28/20

SOUTHAMPTON

170 Pomeroy Meadow Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Nicholas Cyr
Seller: Leakhena Som
Date: 12/30/20

WARE

11 Beaver Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Raymond J. Mackenzie
Seller: Randy L. Humphries
Date: 12/31/20

28-30 North St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $1,025,000
Buyer: CV Ware Opportunity Zone
Seller: Vision Investment Rental Prop.
Date: 12/30/20

38 North St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $1,025,000
Buyer: CV Ware Opportunity Zone
Seller: Vision Inv Rental Prop
Date: 12/30/20

75 Old Belchertown Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Wesley J. Leblanc
Seller: Wendell R. Pipkin
Date: 12/31/20

333 Palmer Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $161,000
Buyer: Stephen Fellers
Seller: Helen G. Bowen
Date: 01/08/21

27 Parker St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $1,025,000
Buyer: CV Ware Opportunity Zone
Seller: Vision Investment Rental Prop.
Date: 12/30/20

164 Upper Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Daniel D. Osborn
Seller: Tamara A. Audette
Date: 01/07/21

23 Walnut St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Megan Pascale
Seller: Betsy A. Pascale
Date: 12/30/20

34 Warebrook Village
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $127,000
Buyer: Angelia M. White
Seller: Kenneth E. Fortin
Date: 12/30/20

139 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $2,125,000
Buyer: Alexandria T. LLC
Seller: Net Acquisitions LLC
Date: 01/05/21

WESTHAMPTON

271 Northwest Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $302,000
Buyer: Sarah T. Rosehill
Seller: Conz, James A., (Estate)
Date: 01/05/21

18 South Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Leah Stanton
Seller: Deborah J. Burkhalter
Date: 12/31/20

WILLIAMSBURG

58 Nash Hill Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $665,000
Buyer: Tariq F. Abu-Jaber
Seller: Cathy H. Reid
Date: 01/05/21

WORTHINGTON

967 Huntington Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Jonathan W. Servello
Seller: Susan E. Paulovich
Date: 01/08/21

Building Permits

The following building permits were issued during the month of December 2020. (Filings are limited due to closures or reduced staffing hours at municipal offices due to COVID-19 restrictions).

AMHERST

Central Amherst Realty Trust
33-37 East Pleasant St.
$27,500 — Extend sprinkler system, renovate bathroom to create two bathrooms, build physical bar and back room for storage

Central Amherst Realty Trust
33-37 East Pleasant St.
$5,000 — Extend sprinkler system to 37 East Pleasant St.

CHICOPEE

CWP Real Estate, LLC
1146 Sheridan St.
$30,250 — Roofing

LEE

LB Corp.
210 Columbia St.
$175,000 — Construct garage

Paul Face, Dawn Face
85 Main St.
$19,730 — Roofing

LENOX

Serge Paccaud
71 Church St.
$8,000 — Install indoor fireplace

NORTHAMPTON

Atwood Drive, LLC
8 Atwood Dr.
$3,000 — Non-illuminated wall sign for Atwood Professional Campus

Bowles Enterprises
235 Main St.
$1,200 — Replace existing basement door

Ernest Booth Trust
72 King St.
$20,000 — Window and door replacement at Ernie’s

Jordi Herold
190 Main St.
$5,680 — Install skylights

Jordi Herold, Elizabeth Dunaway
7 Pleasant St.
$19,000 — Replace water-damaged drywall ceiling

Tandem Bagel
1 North Main St.
$10,000 — Remove wall and add wall

PITTSFIELD

Berkshire Museum
39 South St.
$1,326,333 — Renovate first-floor office space and second-floor galleries, including flooring, wall finishes, insulation upgrades, new classroom and offices, electrical-outlet upgrades, minimal lighting and HVAC modifications

Country Club of Pittsfield
639 South St.
$29,150 — Repair metal roofing and siding damage caused by storm

Passardi Family Holding, LLC
160 North St.
$1,916,500 — Alter and expand Massachusetts Juvenile Court system

SPRINGFIELD

Chestnut Acquisitions, LLC
151 Chestnut St.
$57,000 — Install fire-alarm system for mixed-use property

Cooley Street Associates, LLC
415 Cooley St.
$64,800 — Alter interior bank-branch space to digital ATM kiosk in Stop & Shop

CSL Springfield MA, LLC
936 Grayson Dr.
$40,000 — Repair decks at the Wellington at Springfield

WILBRAHAM

Sandalwood Stables, LLC
188 Monson Road
$2,000 — Construct greenhouse