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COVID Lawsuits

By John Gannon, Esq.

Businesses across the globe are in the midst of planning, preparing, and executing their reopening strategies. While this news is encouraging, employers face novel and complicated legal questions about their potential liability to employees who either get sick at work or cannot return due to medical or childcare-related reasons.

Searching for answers, businesses leaders are confronted with an array of local, state, federal, and industry-specific protocols for operating safely. Charting a course in the face of this uncertainty is no small task. Unfortunately, one thing remains clear: there will be a wave of lawsuits triggered by the difficult business decisions made during this challenging time.

The COVID-19 crisis will send shockwaves through the courts and fair-employment agencies (such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) for years to come. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell remarked that an “epidemic” of these lawsuits will lead to “a trial-lawyer bonanza.” While likely overstated, the concern for employers should be real. Numerous COVID-19-related lawsuits have been filed, with many more on the way. Here are a sampling of those legal theories, with prevention tips and tactics at the end.

Negligence and/or Wrongful Death

One of the scariest claims for businesses will be negligence and wrongful-death lawsuits. In short, these actions may be lodged by employees (and even customers) who are harmed by COVID-19 because the employer failed to keep the work environment safe.

How might this look? Imagine that employees in a manufacturing plant return to work as the business reopens (or perhaps they have been working all along if the workers are deemed ‘essential’). Joe, who works on the factory floor in close proximity with others, tests positive for COVID-19. Mike, who works near Joe, also tests positive. Mike in turn infects members of his household, including an aging, immune-compromised parent. Can any of them sue the business?

John S. Gannon

John S. Gannon

“Our workers’ compensation system typically prevents employees from suing their employers for injuries that result from working. Instead of suing, employees with occupational injuries get paid through workers’ comp. But is a COVID-19 infection ‘occupational?’”

Our workers’ compensation system typically prevents employees from suing their employers for injuries that result from working. Instead of suing, employees with occupational injuries get paid through workers’ comp. But is a COVID-19 infection ‘occupational?’ Proving the root cause of a COVID infection is very difficult, as the virus spreads easily and can be contracted nearly anywhere.

In the above example, would Joe have a workers’ comp claim? Probably not, unless he can show others he was working in close proximity with someone who had the virus before him. What about Mike? He has a better claim, but still no sure thing. And certainly the family member would not be filing a comp claim. Instead, a negligence or wrongful-death suit might follow.

Recently, the relative of a retail-store employee in Illinois who died from COVID-19 sued the retailer for negligence and wrongful death. The lawsuit claims that the employee contracted COVID-19 in the store, and the business did not do enough to protect employees from the virus. All businesses that are open or reopening should have this case on their radar.

FFCRA Violations

By now, everyone should know that the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) allows employees to take paid leave for a number of COVID-19-related reasons, including the need to care for children who are unable to go to school or daycare. Employees who are denied FFCRA rights or retaliated against for taking FFCRA leave can sue you in court. Successful employees may be entitled to reinstatement, lost wages, attorney’s fees, and double damages.

The first FFCRA-related lawsuit was filed last month. In the case, a female employee (and single mom) claimed she was fired because she requested FFCRA leave due to her son’s school closing. The employee allegedly discussed her need for leave to care for her son, and was told that the FFCRA was not meant to be “a hammer to force management into making decisions which may not be in the interest of the company or yourself.” She was fired a few days later and then filed what might be the first FFCRA lawsuit. Many more are certain to follow.

Discriminatory Layoffs

At the time of this article, the unemployment rate in the U.S. stands at almost 15%, and more than 30 million Americans have filed for unemployment since mid-March. Each layoff decision comes with the risk that someone will claim the reason they were selected was discriminatory.

Suppose Jane, who is 60, gets laid off, while many younger workers were retained for employment. Jane may claim that the reason was at least partially motivated by her age. If she was right, it would be would be textbook age discrimination.

Whistleblower/Retaliation Lawsuits

Employees who raise complaints or concerns about workplace safety are protected against retaliation by the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Similarly, Massachusetts has a law that protects healthcare workers who complain about practices that pose a risk to public health. We expect an increase in these lawsuits during this pandemic.

Prevention Strategies

These novel COVID-19-related lawsuits generally fall into one of two buckets: claims related to worker health and safety, and discriminatory or retaliatory adverse employment actions.

To protect against the first batch, businesses need to rigorously follow federal, state, and local guidance on maintaining a safe workplace. Agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission have issued guidance on topics like maintaining safe business operations, temperature checks for employees, and personal protective equipment. Check with your risk-management advisors to see if they have developed checklists or other tools you can use to aid in your business reopening.

Avoiding the second type of lawsuit (discrimination, retaliation, etc.) involves the same tried and true principles that were critical before COVID-19. Make sure you have reasonable, business-based justifications for your decisions that are not motivated by characteristics like race, age, gender, or use of FFCRA leave. These business-based reasons should be well-documented and understandable to laypeople, who may be reviewing your justification in a jury room. Finally, when in doubt, consult with your labor and employment-law specialists.

John Gannon is a partner with Springfield-based Skoler, Abbott & Presser. He specializes in employment law and regularly counsels employers on compliance with state and federal laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and the Occupational Health and Safety Act. He is a frequent speaker on employment-related legal topics for a wide variety of associations and organizations; [email protected]

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]


Celebrating Carol Leary

On May 17, what would have been Bay Path University’s 123rd commencement celebrating the class of 2020, President Carol Leary and her husband, Noel, were treated to a surprise drive-by parade commemorating Carol’s retirement after 25 years. For 20 minutes, more than 200 cars snaked down Route 5 in Longmeadow blasting their horns. Headed by Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno, the decorated cars featured a giant teddy bear, an inflated flamingo raft tied to a car roof, numerous signs expressing ‘carpe diem’— the official school motto — and, of course, balloons. While maintaining their social distance, the parade of alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends shouted their thanks and well wishes to the Learys. (Photos by Leah Martin)

 


 

Election Protection

Scott Rote, president of Wheeler & Taylor Insurance, recently called Charles Burger, director of the Southern Berkshire Regional Emergency Planning Committee, wanting to donate 2,000 surgical masks. Then the agency went a step further, procuring foam, elastic strapping material, and 200 sheets of polycarbonate plastic and constructing face shields to be used by poll workers in upcoming elections. Burger will allocate the personal protective equipment to the 12 towns in Southern Berkshire County. After the face shields are used for elections, they will be cleaned and repurposed.

 

 


 

Project Toybox

The United Way of Pioneer Valley recently partnered with numerous community organizations to deliver more than 1,000 educational, age-appropriate to families hit hard by COVID-19. Thanks to its partnership with Good360, the toys arrived at the United Way’s office on May 13 and are being distributed to the following organizations who will pass them along to children in need: Boys & Girls Clubs of West Springfield, Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Westfield, Boys & Girls Clubs of Springfield, Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Holyoke, YMCA of Greater Springfield, and Holyoke Housing Authority. Pictured: the United Way’s Joe Mina moves a pallet of donated toys.

 


Sign and Drive

Bulkley Richardson trusts and estates attorneys have been coordinating parking-lot and driveway signings for higher-risk clients in need of executing legal documents. Keeping the health and wellness of clients a top priority, these arrangements, and others, are made so that an office visit is not required.

 


 

People on the Move
Elisa Speranza

Elisa Speranza

Daniel Rukakoski

Daniel Rukakoski

Tighe & Bond Inc. recently appointed two new members — Elisa Speranza and Daniel Rukakoski — to its board of directors for three-year terms. “Both Elisa and Dan bring substantial industry experience and leadership to Tighe & Bond that will be an asset to our strategic and growth initiatives,” said Robert Belitz, president and CEO. “Elisa’s fresh external perspective and Dan’s professional successes at our firm will complement our existing board of directors.” Speranza brings many years of industry experience from her various leadership roles. As a business-line president and senior executive and corporate director at global project-management firm CH2M (acquired by Jacobs in 2017), she led the implementation of transformative policies regarding corporate social responsibility and award-winning global-sustainability programs. Prior to her career in the private sector, she served in project manager and director roles at the Boston Water and Sewer Commission and the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. She has been an active board member, volunteer, and officer with industry organizations such as the U.S. Water Alliance, the American Water Works Assoc., the New England Water Works Assoc., and the Water Environment Federation, and is a past president of the Massachusetts Water Works Assoc. Speranza has helped guide strategy, brand, communications, and governance decisions for several companies, water utilities, and nonprofit organizations, including for the global, non-governmental organization Water for People, where she served as board chair. She is also a university instructor and has authored water-industry reference works on sustainable financing, communications, asset management, and leadership. Rukakoski has more than 24 years of experience in environmental consulting, including environmental and energy permitting, wetland delineation, sediment evaluations, regulatory negotiations, site assessment, and environmental construction observation. As a project director and client services manager, he regularly leads the environmental permitting efforts for municipal, commercial, and public utility projects throughout the Northeast. He often provides senior technical guidance on dam removal, dam repair, and dredging projects. Most recently, Rukakoski has served as a technical director in Tighe & Bond’s Environmental Business line and serves on numerous corporate committees. Speranza and Rukakoski join five other Tighe & Bond board members: Belitz, Peter Grabowski, Tiffany Labrie, Bradlee Mezquita, and Patrick McCann.

•••••

Darcey Kemp

Darcey Kemp

Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) has named a higher-education administrator from New York as vice president of Student Affairs. Darcey Kemp began her new post on April 27. She had served as the assistant vice president for Student Development, Leadership, and Completion Initiatives at the College of Saint Rose in Albany, N.Y. since 2015. In her leadership role, Kemp will oversee the division at STCC charged with providing support that extends the classroom experience, including student governance and clubs, athletics, tutoring, advising, and student health and wellness. From admissions to graduation, Students Affairs enhances opportunities for student development, involvement, and transformation at an institution known for degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), signature health programs, and a highly diverse student body. STCC President John Cook called Kemp an outstanding leader who made an impression on the search committee. “Throughout the search process, Ms. Kemp demonstrated she has the qualities we were looking for in a vice president of Student Affairs,” he said. “I look forward to her serving as part of our team at STCC.” Kemp said she was honored to accept the new role at STCC. “I am committed to fostering an inclusive and engaged community that puts students first. I look forward to getting to know the faculty and staff and building strong relationships with students to help them achieve success.” Prior to serving at the College of Saint Rose, Kemp spent nearly a decade at Mercyhurst University in Pennsylvania. She served, respectively, as dean of students for the North East campus and as director of the Center for Student Engagement & Leadership Development at the Erie campus. Kemp holds a bachelor’s degree and an MBA from Canisius College in Buffalo, N.Y.

•••••

Anthony (Tony) Franco

Anthony (Tony) Franco

Arrha Credit Union President and CEO Michael Ostrowski recently welcomed Anthony (Tony) Franco as the new vice president of Commercial Lending. Franco has more than 25 years of banking experience and been recognized throughout his banking-industry career for outstanding member service. Recently he was the vice president of Special Assets at United Bank. “It is with great excitement that we welcome Tony to the Arrha team and begin offering commercial products and services. Arrha now has a complete array of all commercial deposit products and lending services,” Ostrowski said. “Tony is known for helping area businesses achieve their goals and direct them to what works best for them. He lives local and believes in the power of local business.” Added Franco, “I am excited to be part of the Arrha Credit Union family and launch the Commercial Lending area to serve local businesses and its members. I look forward to providing caring service, offering rewarding business-membership benefits to existing and new members, and growing these relationships.”

•••••

PeoplesBank announced the appointment of Jennifer DeBarge as assistant vice president of Marketing. She has more than 22 years of financial-services and marketing experience. In her new position, she will provide strategic direction and execution for various marketing projects, supporting the lines of business and brand. “Jennifer is an asset to our team and brings a tremendous depth of bank marketing experience,” said Matthew Bannister, first vice president, Marketing and Corporate Responsibility at PeoplesBank. “We are looking forward to her contributions as she will be helping us communicate and connect with our customers and communities.” DeBarge earned an MBA in entrepreneurial and innovative thinking from Bay Path University and a bachelor’s degree from Westfield State University. She also received a certificate from the ABA School of Marketing & Management. She has a history of community service and currently serves on the board of directors for the Westfield Boys & Girls Club.

•••••

Matthew Pittenger

Matthew Pittenger

Florence Bank announced that Matthew Pittenger was recently selected as a recipient of its President’s Award. The President’s Award was established by the bank in 1995, affording employees the annual opportunity to nominate their peers for this prestigious honor that recognizes outstanding performance, customer service, and overall contribution to Florence Bank. Pittenger was nominated by numerous colleagues. Pittenger is the senior information technology specialist at the main headquarters in Florence and has worked at Florence Bank for six years. He holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from UMass Amherst. Pittenger also holds a Comptia A+ certification, which is the industry standard for establishing careers in information technology and the preferred qualifying credential for technical support and operational roles. “Matt is a perfect example of how hard work and determination truly pays off,” said Kevin Day, president and CEO of Florence Bank. “His peers have praised his dedication, enthusiasm, and the impressive skill set that he brings to the job each day. We’re happy to have Matt as part of our team, and the President’s Award is the perfect milestone to showcase his service to the bank.”

•••••

Gina Maroni

Gina Maroni

Alexis Miarecki

Alexis Miarecki

UMassFive College Federal Credit Union announced the recent promotion of two employees. Gina Maroni has been promoted to vice president of Finance and chief financial officer. She has taken on the responsibility of financial oversight, strategizing, and budgeting for the credit union, and previously served as UMassFive’s assistant vice president of Finance and controller for 18 months. Prior to joining UMassFive, she was the senior vice president of Finance and chief financial officer at Athol Credit Union. Alexis Miarecki has been promoted to manager of Marketing. Transitioning from her former role as graphic designer, she is now responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of the Marketing department, including oversight of the marketing team, creative direction, and developing and executing all marketing and promotional plans for UMassFive in collaboration with the vice president of Marketing.

•••••

Jennifer Beineke has been named the recipient of the Excellence in Teaching Award at Western New England University (WNEU). She is a professor of Mathematics in the university’s College of Arts and Sciences. Winners of this prestigious award are nominated by students, faculty, and administrators for outstanding contributions as educators and advisors. During the review process, current and former students praised Beineke as somebody who “made me see the beauty of mathematics” and “always pushed us to be our best.” Another added, “when I walked out of her classroom for the final time, I knew I was a different student and person than the one who had walked in.” Faculty members describe Beineke as having “a natural gift for explaining challenging concepts,” and “using a variety of methods to engage students in thinking about and solving problems.” Beineke, who has been teaching at WNEU since 2001, received undergraduate degrees in mathematics and French from Purdue University, and earned her master’s and Ph.D. degrees from UCLA. Her research is in the area of analytic number theory. In conjunction with the National Museum of Mathematics, she recently co-edited the three-volume series The Mathematics of Various Entertaining Subjects.

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

Bailey Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: 3 Peaks Land Stewardship
Seller: Edward Myles-Davis
Date: 04/30/20

1280 Hawley Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $301,000
Buyer: Georgiana Greenough
Seller: Cari Pazmino
Date: 05/01/20

CONWAY

80 Baptist Hill Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $258,000
Buyer: Dennis Anderson
Seller: Benneth G. Phelps
Date: 04/30/20

DEERFIELD

38 Pleasant St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Ralph J. Gould
Seller: Francis J. Naida
Date: 04/30/20

365 River Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Dana Schwab
Seller: Joseph W. Bysiewski
Date: 04/22/20

GILL

74 Mountain Road
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $307,500
Buyer: Justin D. Simpson
Seller: John J. Zywna
Date: 04/30/20

GREENFIELD

64 Adams Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $14,163,000
Buyer: Derossi Commercial Greenfield
Seller: G&I 9 Apollo SWM LLC
Date: 04/24/20

109 Beacon St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $317,000
Buyer: 109 Beacon Street TR
Seller: Carla A. Bernier
Date: 05/01/20

62 Burnham Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Michael A. Koncal
Seller: Hawkins, Richard M., (Estate)
Date: 04/28/20

11 East Cleveland St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Megan L. Parker
Seller: Andrea G. McGeoghan
Date: 04/23/20

46 Greenfield St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $14,163,000
Buyer: Derossi Commercial Greenfield
Seller: G&I 9 Apollo SWM LLC
Date: 04/24/20

49 Greenfield St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $14,163,000
Buyer: Derossi Commercial Greenfield
Seller: G&I 9 Apollo SWM LLC
Date: 04/24/20

10 Harrison Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Sokhang B. Dong
Seller: Glenn W. Johnson
Date: 05/05/20

54 James St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Anna Webber
Seller: Sefton Codling
Date: 05/01/20

711 Lampblack Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $483,000
Buyer: Robert Herrick
Seller: William Vranos
Date: 05/01/20

42 Linden Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $231,500
Buyer: Edith M. Pullen
Seller: PDV Inc.
Date: 04/27/20

28-B Old Albany Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $164,500
Buyer: Sara J. Schofield
Seller: Alexander M. Gilbert
Date: 05/01/20

253 Shelburne Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Joshua A. Levin
Seller: John M. Shanahan
Date: 04/30/20

53 Silvio O. Conte Dr.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $14,163,000
Buyer: Derossi Commercial Greenfield
Seller: G&I 9 Apollo SWM LLC
Date: 04/24/20

MONTAGUE

6 Chester St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $231,950
Buyer: Cecile Celotto
Seller: Karl R. Lapan
Date: 04/24/20

6 Henry Ave.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $187,500
Buyer: Alexander N. Iverson
Seller: Grimard, Paul N., (Estate)
Date: 04/24/20

NEW SALEM

193 Neilson Road
New Salem, MA 01355
Amount: $123,000
Buyer: Alex Acosta
Seller: Rudolph, Nathan H., (Estate)
Date: 04/30/20

NORTHFIELD

68 East St.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $246,000
Buyer: Tyler Mankowsky
Seller: Paula B. Johnson
Date: 05/01/20

ORANGE

13 Dewey Conrad Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $179,805
Buyer: Frances Deluca-Hadsel
Seller: Eric N. Druzbicki
Date: 04/27/20

145 Fryeville Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Robert H. Heigh
Date: 04/29/20

210 Oxbow Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Robert D. Bergquist
Seller: BHR Properties LLC
Date: 04/24/20

550 South Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $299,450
Buyer: Andrew J. Smith
Seller: Lee M. Rowe
Date: 04/24/20

SHELBURNE

441 Mohawk Trail
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $422,000
Buyer: Amie M. Redeker
Seller: Butler INT
Date: 04/27/20

SHUTESBURY

81 January Hills Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $390,400
Buyer: 10 Pine NT
Seller: Beth Goldberg-Shaine
Date: 05/01/20

379 Leverett Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Serge Fedorovsky
Seller: Thomas R. Zeller
Date: 04/22/20

174 Locks Pond Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Courtney A. Kinney
Seller: Mark T. Olszewski
Date: 04/29/20

12 Merrill Dr.
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $286,000
Buyer: Susan L. Goldberg
Seller: Frederic P. Hartwell
Date: 05/04/20

12 West Pelham Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $378,000
Buyer: Ian T. Burr
Seller: D. Joseph Jerry
Date: 05/01/20

SUNDERLAND

45 Amherst Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $570,000
Buyer: KDD Properties LLC
Seller: Jeffrey C. Mish
Date: 04/30/20

Cross Mountain Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Kestrel Land TR
Seller: Raymond R. Samson
Date: 04/27/20

158 North Main St.
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $346,000
Buyer: Benneth Phelps
Seller: Martha E. Lorantos
Date: 04/30/20

17 North Plain Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $399,000
Buyer: Ronald W. Ward
Seller: Robert H. Adair
Date: 04/28/20

154 North Silver Lane
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $229,500
Buyer: Anthony F. Ciak
Seller: Courtney A. Kinney
Date: 04/29/20

22 South Silver Lane
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $263,000
Buyer: Ernest Washington
Seller: Strycharz, R. W. Sr., (Estate)
Date: 05/05/20

WHATELY

129 Christian Lane
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $689,000
Buyer: Sarah T. Xiques
Seller: Richard Pedersen
Date: 04/28/20

23 Conway Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Nicholas M. Wojcik
Seller: Duda, Robert M., (Estate)
Date: 04/30/20

24 Grey Oak Lane
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Jeffrey P. Zilch
Seller: Gregory W. Payeur
Date: 05/01/20

219 River Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Keith R. Bohonowicz
Seller: Joanne Pliska
Date: 04/24/20

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

97 Brien St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Richard M. Askew
Seller: Theresa N. Ciarmatori
Date: 04/24/20

35 Colonial Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Derek J. Lottermoser
Seller: Eric W. Lottermoser
Date: 05/01/20

40 Hearthstone Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $364,900
Buyer: Nikolay Zhupikov
Seller: Mark A. Sullivan
Date: 05/05/20

15 High Meadow Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Sigmund C. Barnes
Seller: Yuriy Sarkisyan
Date: 04/24/20

96 Moore St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Gary E. Traver
Seller: Lawrence S. Phelps
Date: 04/24/20

North Westfield St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Claire M. Conway
Seller: Charles J. Sienkiewicz
Date: 05/01/20

352 Poplar St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Matthew Foley
Seller: Poplar Development LLC
Date: 04/30/20

24 Portland St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Mathew-Ryan M. Simpson
Seller: Eggleston, Raymond L., (Estate)
Date: 04/22/20

267 Rowley St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Manuel T. Reyes
Seller: Haynes, Patricia A., (Estate)
Date: 05/01/20

73 Stony Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $254,900
Buyer: Shawn P. Haubner
Seller: Daniel P. Tobias
Date: 04/23/20

30 Washington Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: James B. Burgos
Seller: Timothy R. Kendrick
Date: 04/24/20

25 Westford Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Carrie Mayer
Seller: Vladmi Ivanovich-Duducal
Date: 05/05/20

39 Wilbert Ter.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Patrick Denault
Seller: Tracey Daniels-Pullen
Date: 04/30/20

BRIMFIELD

97 Brookfield Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $164,120
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Roy H. King
Date: 05/05/20

50 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $429,500
Buyer: Neil B. Glazebrook
Seller: Timothy D. O’Brien
Date: 05/04/20

CHICOPEE

58 Ames Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $303,000
Buyer: Jordyn M. Conway
Seller: Fallah Razzak
Date: 05/01/20

7 Ann St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Evelis Gonzalez
Seller: Kyle E. Mrozinski
Date: 05/05/20

38 Basil Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $349,902
Buyer: Jennifer E. Carr
Seller: Jonathan P. Damours
Date: 04/24/20

1073 Burnett Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Adam F. Rice
Seller: Nico Facchini
Date: 04/22/20

6 Captain Mac St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Solimar R. Cruz
Seller: Michael W. Radomski
Date: 04/22/20

77 Debra Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Debbie Griggs
Seller: Deshaies, Lawrence, (Estate)
Date: 05/04/20

58 Edbert St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $258,400
Buyer: Sonia I. Soto
Seller: Premier Home Builders Inc.
Date: 04/24/20

95 Edgewood Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $175,100
Buyer: Oswald Grajales
Seller: Gary P. Picard
Date: 04/27/20

Highland Ave. #103
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Kelnate Realty LLC
Seller: Partyka Partners LP
Date: 04/30/20

Highland Ave. #104
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Kelnate Realty LLC
Seller: Partyka Partners LP
Date: 04/30/20

Highland Ave. #105
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Kelnate Realty LLC
Seller: Partyka Partners LP
Date: 04/30/20

145 Jacob St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Cristobal Ortiz
Seller: Donna J. Wiley
Date: 04/30/20

45 Linden St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $217,400
Buyer: Adriana Vazquez
Seller: Brian P. Leduc
Date: 05/01/20

79 McKinstry Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $191,200
Buyer: Muhammad J. Akbar
Seller: Maslak, Ruth M., (Estate)
Date: 05/01/20

50 Mount Carmel Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Valley Opportunity Council
Seller: Barbara M. Dorval
Date: 04/28/20

54 Olko Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $173,079
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Brian K. Connors
Date: 05/01/20

164 Rimmon Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Jonathan R. Wilson
Seller: Donna Mason
Date: 05/04/20

43 Saint Anthony St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $168,500
Buyer: James Fitzgerald
Seller: Kristin Newell
Date: 04/24/20

68 Van Horn St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Alexander N. Theroux
Seller: Jeffrey Janik
Date: 04/24/20

26 Wintworth St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Katherine Paul
Seller: Laura A. Paul
Date: 05/01/20

51 Woodcrest Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $277,000
Buyer: Benjamyn M. Poli
Seller: Daryl R. Kirby
Date: 04/30/20

140 Woodlawn St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $237,000
Buyer: Tynisa Mateo
Seller: Melinda Barnes
Date: 05/01/20

EAST LONGMEADOW

259 Chestnut St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $212,200
Buyer: Shanna L. Morin
Seller: Mary E. Fish
Date: 04/24/20

157 Dwight Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Taylor M. Durost
Seller: Shanna L. Morin
Date: 04/24/20

100 Franconia Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Paul Fydenkevez
Seller: Ryan T. Morton
Date: 04/29/20

10 Judy Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Ashley Cava
Seller: Tyler Donnelly
Date: 05/01/20

7 Odion St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $181,740
Buyer: Lakeview Loan Servicing
Seller: Ronette Garcia
Date: 04/28/20

434 Prospect St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $314,000
Buyer: Kimberly A. Chaisson
Seller: Dennis M. Goldrick
Date: 05/01/20

20 Redstone Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Jonathan R. Nash
Seller: Stephen T. Varelas
Date: 04/30/20

76 Scantic Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Antonio Fonseca
Seller: Govin, Karen A., (Estate)
Date: 05/05/20

214 Shaker Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Hong T. Le
Seller: Garrett E. Goguen
Date: 04/24/20

141 Tanglewood Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $426,000
Buyer: Kelly M. Cieboter
Seller: Bruce O. Desilets
Date: 04/30/20

HAMPDEN

33 Raymond Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Stephen T. Varelas
Seller: Robert T. Olejarz
Date: 04/30/20

80 Rock A. Dundee Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Andrii Tverdokhlib
Seller: Olesya Cherkashin
Date: 04/27/20

150 Rock A. Dundee Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Garrett E. Goguen
Seller: Country Bank For Savings
Date: 04/24/20

86 Somers Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Steven Barthen
Seller: Conor M. Berry
Date: 04/30/20

408 South Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Jennifer Johnston
Seller: Brian D. Dussault
Date: 04/24/20

HOLLAND

64 Leno Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Brian W. Healey
Seller: Michael C. Lifson
Date: 04/29/20

HOLYOKE

71 Berkshire St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $119,900
Buyer: Westmass Apartments LLC
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 05/01/20

62 Brown Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Amber Lavallee
Seller: Mark D. Trial
Date: 04/30/20

57 Calumet Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
mount: $217,000
Buyer: Shae B. Blaisdell
Seller: Amy E. Verla
Date: 04/24/20

35-37 Columbus Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Kevin Dansereau
Seller: Alan R. Huff
Date: 04/23/20

4 Crestwood St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $254,900
Buyer: Jose A. Morales
Seller: Julie M. Kleszczynski
Date: 04/24/20

122 Jarvis Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $145,999
Buyer: Barh RET
Seller: NRZ REO 10 LLC
Date: 04/29/20

6 Jeane Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Marisol Cartagena
Seller: Antonio Ferreira
Date: 04/22/20

69 Lexington Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Marvin Thang
Seller: Michael Cavanaugh
Date: 05/01/20

Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Jillian Strycharz
Seller: Christina M. Grass
Date: 04/28/20

124 Vermont St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $293,500
Buyer: Thomas Reynolds
Seller: Veasna Pok
Date: 04/30/20

149 Whiting Farms Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $193,000
Buyer: Jacquelin Calderon
Seller: FM Financial Services Inc.
Date: 04/28/20

LONGMEADOW

226 Converse St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Jeffrey Schlemmer
Seller: David B. Appleman
Date: 05/01/20

498 Converse St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Daniel S. Regan
Seller: Stephen Geanacopoulos
Date: 04/30/20

34 Cooley Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Steven W. Groccia
Seller: Steven L. Groccia
Date: 04/27/20

5 Crescent Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Benjamin Jakubowski
Seller: Ryan R. Whitney
Date: 05/04/20

21 Homecrest St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $321,000
Buyer: Morgan J. Spencer
Seller: Donna B. McMahon
Date: 04/24/20

249 Lynnwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Roy FT
Seller: Jennifer D. Santos
Date: 05/01/20

117 Pleasantview Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $319,900
Buyer: Jon W. Gronbach
Seller: Christopher M. Carr
Date: 04/24/20

LUDLOW

136 Cedar St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Anthony J. Bertolasio
Seller: Sandra Fidalgo
Date: 04/27/20

236 Center St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Ludlow Housing Authority
Seller: Adelino D. Palatino
Date: 04/30/20

33 Center St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $1,355,000
Buyer: Elmogys LLC
Seller: SPP Citizens NLREF 5 LLC
Date: 04/30/20

Cottage Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $2,066,500
Buyer: Dichotomy Collins Hydro
Seller: Ampersand Collins Hydro
Date: 05/01/20

43 Elaine Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $119,000
Buyer: Mark D. Miller
Seller: Maria J. Holley
Date: 04/30/20

23 Helena St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: Dwain P. Devine
Seller: Carol C. Heath
Date: 05/05/20

242 Kendall St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $385,900
Buyer: Nico A. Facchini
Seller: David A. Watts
Date: 04/22/20

85 Lakeview Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Nina M. Leclerc
Seller: Todd A. Santos
Date: 04/22/20

Miller St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $2,066,500
Buyer: Dichotomy Collins Hydro
Seller: Ampersand Collins Hydro
Date: 05/01/20

233 Munsing St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Denise M. Pascale
Seller: Carlos A. Bastos
Date: 05/01/20

138 Piney Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $270,500
Buyer: Francisco J. Najera
Seller: William E. Peacey
Date: 05/04/20

620 West St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $245,999
Buyer: Robert B. Cunningham
Seller: Hines, Lorraine, (Estate)
Date: 04/30/20

234 Winsor St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $299,900
Buyer: Xiaoqin Zhou
Seller: Elsa D. Barros
Date: 05/04/20

124 Yale St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Cari A. Breault
Seller: Ryan Gagne
Date: 04/29/20

MONSON

Boston Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $2,000,000
Buyer: Palmer Wilbraham St. RET
Seller: Transform Operating Stores
Date: 04/24/20

102 Lakeside Dr.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: Angelique Peloquin
Seller: John H. Dunn
Date: 04/24/20

PALMER

Baptist Hill Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $2,000,000
Buyer: Palmer Wilbraham St RET
Seller: Transform Operating Stores
Date: 04/24/20

Boston Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $2,000,000
Buyer: Palmer Wilbraham St. RET
Seller: Transform Operating Stores
Date: 04/24/20

100 Flynt St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Gerald G. Beliveau
Seller: Dnepro Properties LLC
Date: 05/04/20

29 Gay St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $154,965
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Justin D. Torrey
Date: 04/23/20

17 Homestead St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Tomasz Marszalek
Seller: David E. Petit
Date: 05/04/20

2018 Oak St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $227,500
Buyer: Patrick R. Jessop
Seller: Bernice A. Fusco
Date: 05/01/20

68 Rondeau St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jerod R. Laflamme
Seller: Shawn P. Haubner
Date: 04/23/20

156 Shearer St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Kyle T. Meyer
Seller: Michelle M. Dunfield
Date: 05/04/20

150-A Wilbraham St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $2,000,000
Buyer: Palmer Wilbraham St RET
Seller: Transform Operating Stores
Date: 04/24/20

159 Wilbraham St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $2,000,000
Buyer: Palmer Wilbraham St RET
Seller: Transform Operating Stores
Date: 04/24/20

230 Wilbraham St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $2,000,000
Buyer: Palmer Wilbraham St. RET
Seller: Transform Operating Stores
Date: 04/24/20

SPRINGFIELD

191 Albemarle St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $189,900
Buyer: Donovan Huggett
Seller: Ferdinand Gonzalez
Date: 04/24/20

146 Ambrose St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $265,400
Buyer: Alan Rosario
Seller: Campagnari Construction
Date: 04/24/20

152 Ambrose St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $258,900
Buyer: Carolyne R. Flowers
Seller: Campagnari Construction
Date: 04/29/20

19 Ashbrook St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Jesse W. Chasteen
Seller: Kelly M. Cieboter
Date: 04/30/20

167 Atherton St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Moises Maldonado-Medina
Seller: FNMA
Date: 05/01/20

40 Ballard Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Godswill T. Andrew-Jaja
Seller: Carl D. Prairie
Date: 04/24/20

136 Barrington Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $423,000
Buyer: Anthony T. Torres
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 05/01/20

81 Berkshire St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Ronald G. Hokanson
Seller: Wallace F. Ebner
Date: 04/28/20

1525 Boston Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $4,400,000
Buyer: Springfield Boston Road RET
Seller: TF Springfield MA LLC
Date: 04/24/20

236 Breckwood Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Fransheska D. Robles
Seller: Pszczyna RT
Date: 05/05/20

4 Brittany Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $204,000
Buyer: Keysta L. Vanasse
Seller: CIG 4 LLC
Date: 05/01/20

44 Campechi St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Errol S. Green
Seller: Devonne T. Johnson
Date: 04/30/20

731 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Cig 4 LLC
Seller: Roberto Serrano
Date: 04/27/20

28-30 Carlisle St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: Stephan Maldonado
Seller: Do Duong Family LLC
Date: 04/24/20

73 Catalina Dr.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Revampit LLC
Seller: Joseph F. Miazga
Date: 05/01/20

180 Cherokee Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $181,000
Buyer: Kaila Rodriguez
Seller: Caroline L. Ellison
Date: 04/29/20

546 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Osvaldo A. Martir-Solano
Seller: Freya G. Baez
Date: 04/29/20

151 Cooper St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $168,000
Buyer: John Govoni
Seller: Ingram, Harry E., (Estate)
Date: 04/30/20

297 Dickinson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Basil Henry
Seller: Alex Cowley
Date: 04/29/20

662-664 Dickinson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Dominga Pujols
Seller: Sarno, Alfonso, (Estate)
Date: 04/30/20

232 East St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Bailey Brunelle
Seller: Wolfpack Realty Corp.
Date: 04/29/20

195 El Paso St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Bianca I. Gardner
Seller: Debra L. Cauley
Date: 04/30/20

18 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Adela Colon
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 04/27/20

42 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Rodolfo Arismendy-Parra
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 04/27/20

66 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $329,900
Buyer: Corey Connaughton
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 04/30/20

285 Ellendale Circle
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $214,900
Buyer: David C. Coburn
Seller: Andrea M. Strom
Date: 04/23/20

20 Fallston St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Nicole D. Vezina
Seller: Catherine A. Hartley
Date: 04/29/20

68 Feltham Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Jacob Grant
Seller: Tarra M. Devine
Date: 05/01/20

17 Gertrude St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Roberto Soto
Seller: Emmanuel Pena
Date: 04/27/20

463 Gifford St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $156,500
Buyer: Michael W. Belmarce
Seller: Elizabeth Mortenson
Date: 04/30/20

70 Grenada Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $1,130,000
Buyer: Grenada Property LLC
Seller: Grenada LLC
Date: 04/24/20

74 Grenada Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $1,130,000
Buyer: Grenada Property LLC
Seller: Grenada LLC
Date: 04/24/20

8 Healey St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Samuel R. Shaw
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 04/24/20

92 Johnson St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Maralaisy Gil
Seller: Leonard A. Cowles
Date: 05/01/20

99 Jonquil Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Ryan S. Patrick
Seller: Richard F. Bedard
Date: 04/24/20

4-6 Joseph St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Eric L. Allen
Seller: T. L. Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 04/30/20

56 Kathleen St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Patricia N. Rosemond
Seller: Eric D. Rohan
Date: 04/30/20

41 Kipling St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Tyler Donnelly
Seller: Pedro Martinez
Date: 05/01/20

79 Knox St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: SLC Associates LLC
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 05/01/20

170 Laurelton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $117,000
Buyer: John Martin
Seller: Andie Gedeon
Date: 04/29/20

35-37 Longfellow Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $165,769
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Julio C. Feliciano
Date: 04/28/20

146 Lumae St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Equity T. Co.
Seller: MTGLQ Investors LP
Date: 04/28/20

97 Marion St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Melvin Otero-Davila
Seller: Daniel Carthon
Date: 05/01/20

139-141 Maynard St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Camilla J. Miller
Seller: Manfred Karori
Date: 05/01/20

40-42 Mazarin St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Bria L. Brantley
Seller: KEC Properties LLC
Date: 05/01/20

19 Meredith St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Edwin J. Figueroa
Seller: JJJ 17 LLC
Date: 04/24/20

45 Meredith St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Jose G. Pagan-Ortiz
Seller: Minh T. Chau
Date: 04/24/20

190 Mildred Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Winnarath Son
Seller: Justin T. Tomasini
Date: 04/29/20

62 Miller St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Omaris Gonzalez
Seller: Alex O. Owusu
Date: 04/28/20

12 Montclair St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Viverston Gallimore
Seller: Amarilis Rodriguez
Date: 04/24/20

99 Monticello Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Omayra L. Figueroa-Gomez
Seller: LE & Associates LLC
Date: 05/05/20

188 Naismith St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $351,000
Buyer: Amarilis Rodriguez
Seller: Chiang H. Swei
Date: 04/24/20

40 Old Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: Luis Rodriguez
Seller: Christopher D. Foley
Date: 04/30/20

155 Old Farm Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Leonard Geshan
Seller: Melro Associates Inc.
Date: 04/28/20

1715 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Champion Mortgage Co.
Date: 04/23/20

1715 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: Monika Lipert
Seller: FNMA
Date: 04/30/20

83 Parkerview St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $196,500
Buyer: Jason D. Choiniere
Seller: Craig S. Gohn
Date: 04/30/20

74 Perkins St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Alicia L. Gapen
Seller: Sarah J. Szczebak
Date: 05/01/20

27 Pidgeon Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $201,000
Buyer: Darren C. Duke
Seller: James A. Lapierre
Date: 04/30/20

60 Pinecrest Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Hoang N. Le
Seller: Luis Nevarez
Date: 04/24/20

199 Powell Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Luis A. Rivera
Seller: John P. Cadigan
Date: 04/22/20

154 Prouty St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Marsha Ivey
Seller: Ann S. Ward
Date: 04/22/20

61-63 Quebec St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Patrick A. Roach
Seller: Alejandro H. Rodriguez
Date: 04/30/20

69 Ramblewood Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Latisha A. Williams
Seller: Olmsted Realty LLC
Date: 05/01/20

132 Regal St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Tawiah A. Buor
Seller: Nicholas A. Malafronte
Date: 04/28/20

82 Rosemary Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $184,900
Buyer: Juan J. Lopez
Seller: Hilda Greene
Date: 04/30/20

104-106 Samuel St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Fernando Rosa
Seller: Louis W. Rimondi
Date: 04/29/20

47 Spikenard Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Meghan Bull
Seller: Anthony M. Santaniello
Date: 04/23/20

73 Talmadge Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Erica A. Batalha
Seller: Rosa I. Torres
Date: 05/04/20

269 Union St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $157,500
Buyer: John S. Robinson-Woodgett
Seller: Pete M. Decuir
Date: 04/29/20

20 West Canton Circle
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: Julie Sanchez
Seller: Kaine K. Compton
Date: 04/27/20

1412 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $169,320
Buyer: Daniel Jaracz
Seller: Marsha M. Ivey
Date: 04/22/20

107-109 Wolcott St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Bjorn R. Miller
Seller: Lydia Miringu
Date: 04/28/20

143 Woodlawn St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Angel Peroza
Seller: Alan Rosario
Date: 04/24/20

71 Yale St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Home Equity Assets Realty
Seller: Home Equity Assets Realty
Date: 04/28/20

SOUTHWICK

15 Crystal Dr.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $288,000
Buyer: Lawrence N. Fuller
Seller: Bailey, Joseph J., (Estate)
Date: 04/30/20

99 Davis Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $496,250
Buyer: Brenda M. Leduc
Seller: Anna Frazier
Date: 05/01/20

18 Ferrin Dr.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Aminda I. Scott
Seller: Dean C. Miller
Date: 04/30/20

8 Field St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Kenneth S. Nielsen
Seller: Kim A. Phillips
Date: 04/30/20

26 Lakeview St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Michelle M. Duncan
Seller: Kelly Duncan-Smith
Date: 04/30/20

399 North Loomis St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $176,000
Buyer: Zachary I. Kuzon
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 04/30/20

13 Ridgeview Ter.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $635,000
Buyer: Julie Hyde
Seller: Brenda M. Leduc
Date: 05/01/20

WALES

91 Main St.
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $149,000
Buyer: Brandon J. Kroll
Seller: John T. Lussier
Date: 04/24/20

WESTFIELD

98 Berkshire Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Kayla J. Reno
Seller: Donald J. McClellan
Date: 05/01/20

137 Cabot Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Witold J. Urban
Seller: Andrew T. Oleksak
Date: 04/22/20

12 Cross St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Shane Coakley
Seller: Pavel Kulyak
Date: 05/05/20

40 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $316,500
Buyer: Kathryn M. Weglarz
Seller: Bruce Scott
Date: 04/30/20

949 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $599,900
Buyer: Thomas F. Daly
Seller: Mark S. Santangelo
Date: 05/01/20

36 Janelle Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Paul E. Ancelli
Seller: Thomas F. Daly
Date: 05/01/20

6 Maria Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Carlin Tabb
Seller: Andrew K. Hall
Date: 04/27/20

20 Pheasant Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Anthony M. Delugan
Seller: Tyler G. Moore
Date: 05/01/20

170 Prospect St., Ext.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $206,000
Buyer: Peter A. Negosanti
Seller: Tammie B. Waversak
Date: 04/29/20

21 Ridgecrest Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $322,500
Buyer: Henry M. Koegel
Seller: Freddy Roy
Date: 05/01/20

242 Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $271,900
Buyer: Michael J. McFadden
Seller: Jeffrey R. McNamara
Date: 05/05/20

WILBRAHAM

6 Apple Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: David E. Petit
Seller: Nancy B. Piecuch
Date: 05/01/20

13 Colonial Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Andrew Donermeyer
Seller: Ronald G. Hokanson
Date: 04/28/20

Devonshire Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Nicholas D. Rau
Seller: Christopher V. Bovino
Date: 04/30/20

5 Jewell Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: Blake A. McCoy
Seller: Lavelle, Edward J., (Estate)
Date: 04/27/20

33 Stonegate Circle
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $416,000
Buyer: Kyle C. Abrahamson
Seller: Jeffrey P. Zilch
Date: 05/01/20

4 Wildwood Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $422,775
Buyer: Matthew S. Matroni
Seller: AC Homebuilding LLC
Date: 04/22/20

WEST SPRINGFIELD

79-81 Baldwin St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Lachenauer LLC
Seller: Mlaguzi Inc.
Date: 04/29/20

111 Forest Ridge Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $455,000
Buyer: Dominic N. Hannoush
Seller: Carmen D. Ortiz
Date: 04/30/20

102 Garden St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $143,000
Buyer: Mindy N. Phan
Seller: David W. Ostrander
Date: 04/22/20

291 Morgan Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Angel L. Feliciano-Cruz
Seller: Kumar Sunchuri
Date: 04/24/20

42 Murray Place
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Janais E. Faust
Seller: Cindy S. White
Date: 04/27/20

22 Prospect St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Luke Battista
Seller: Battista & Sons Property Mgmt.
Date: 04/23/20

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

244 Amity St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $501,000
Buyer: Jonathan R. Friedman
Seller: Matthew Mone
Date: 05/05/20

763 Bay Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $389,900
Buyer: Hannah E. Hunter-Parker
Seller: Alison B. Ellis
Date: 04/30/20

228 Grantwood Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $244,500
Buyer: Maple Leaf Capital Reserve
Seller: Mark A. Snow
Date: 05/05/20

29 Hartman Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Aaron E. James
Seller: Aaron Arcello
Date: 05/01/20

16 Heatherstone Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Melisa Bok
Seller: Alexandria A. Price
Date: 04/27/20

214 Iduna Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $596,000
Buyer: W. Bruce Croft
Seller: Trinity Construction Group
Date: 04/30/20

143 Lincoln Ave.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $605,000
Buyer: Thomas L. Bernardin
Seller: William P. Wear
Date: 04/29/20

212 North East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Julius Menn & D. Sagner TR
Seller: Brian J. Berling
Date: 04/27/20

27 Palley Village Place
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $449,900
Buyer: Justin H. Smith
Seller: Woo FT
Date: 04/30/20

715 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Spenser C. Lanier
Seller: Julius Menn & D. Sagner TR
Date: 04/30/20

205 South Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $505,000
Buyer: Amherst College
Seller: Jonathan R. Friedman
Date: 05/01/20

35 Station Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Emily Stout
Seller: Ampar Heritage RT
Date: 05/01/20

38 Trillium Way
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $675,000
Buyer: Diane C. McNamara
Seller: Niels Christiansen
Date: 05/01/20

BELCHERTOWN

46 Allen Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $295,250
Buyer: Nicholas A. Friscia
Seller: Ashley Sheffield
Date: 04/24/20

62 Allen Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $329,000
Buyer: Ian Albert
Seller: Chocorua Realty Investments
Date: 04/30/20

631 North Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $366,000
Buyer: Anne O’Connor
Seller: Lenox Homes LLC
Date: 05/01/20

8 Old Farm Circle
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $264,900
Buyer: Megan E. Millette
Seller: Mark D. Watson
Date: 04/22/20

101 Pine St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $549,900
Buyer: Jennifer L. Dupuis-Krause
Seller: James Stanczak
Date: 04/29/20

152 Sargent St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Kyle Mrozinski
Seller: Sabrina Caballero
Date: 05/05/20

297 Stebbins St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $424,900
Buyer: Lauren Paschall
Seller: Kimberly A. Chaisson
Date: 05/01/20

150 Warner St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Ryan Gagne
Seller: Michael G. Aliberti
Date: 04/29/20

CHESTERFIELD

24 Bisbee Road
Chesterfield, MA 01012
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Thea M. Post
Seller: Wayne A. Hennemann
Date: 04/30/20

CUMMINGTON

525 Berkshire Trail
Cummington, MA 01026
Amount: $392,500
Buyer: Thomas Kane
Seller: Keith A. Jenkins
Date: 05/04/20

1 Honey Hill Road
Cummington, MA 01026
Amount: $164,000
Buyer: Bonnie A. Hunt
Seller: Edward S. Konieczny
Date: 05/01/20

EASTHAMPTON

112 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Richard Pedersen
Seller: Crossroads Property Investors
Date: 04/28/20

172 Ferry St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Jacob Burnstein
Seller: Spear, Frank A., (Estate)
Date: 05/01/20

2-6 Hisgen Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $1,500,000
Buyer: Betty L. Duprey
Seller: D&H Property Management
Date: 05/01/20

10 Howard Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $415,500
Buyer: Peter Dwight-Sax
Seller: Paul A. Donah
Date: 05/05/20

22 Lawler Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Karen M. Roberts
Seller: Peter D. Sax
Date: 05/05/20

1 Mayher St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $1,500,000
Buyer: Betty L. Duprey
Seller: D&H Property Management
Date: 05/01/20

22 Monska Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Robert E. Ross
Seller: Doris C. Ducharme
Date: 04/30/20

13 Oliver St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $244,540
Buyer: Jonathan A. Santiago
Seller: Ted J. Pietraszkiewicz
Date: 04/27/20

106 Parsons St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $1,500,000
Buyer: Betty L. Duprey
Seller: D&H Property Management
Date: 05/01/20

89 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Gene P. Ethier
Seller: William C. Ethier
Date: 04/29/20

21 Plaza Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $220,900
Buyer: Zachary T. Birmingham
Seller: William J. Halford
Date: 04/29/20

30 Sandra Road
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $361,500
Buyer: Terry S. Hersey
Seller: Richard & Sandra Tufts LT
Date: 04/30/20

GRANBY

545 Amherst Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Joseph L. Delbove
Seller: Leanne A. Becker
Date: 04/23/20

241 Chicopee St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $184,280
Buyer: Pamela Elvira Cox TR
Seller: Joseph C. Cox
Date: 04/30/20

21 Lyn Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $207,000
Buyer: Roxana Alequin
Seller: Robert D. Butler
Date: 05/05/20

106 Maximilian Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: Laurence J. Vincent
Seller: Michael Novak
Date: 04/30/20

HADLEY

6 Shattuck Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Andrew D. Stephens
Seller: Jeffrey Wood RET
Date: 05/01/20

HATFIELD

118 Old Stage Road
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $447,000
Buyer: Sherri J. Wehr
Seller: Janet Nuccio
Date: 04/24/20

72 West St.
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Joseph S. Barker
Seller: Adam J. Barker
Date: 04/28/20

HUNTINGTON

23 Goss Hill Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Christopher M. Krason
Seller: John J. Montesi
Date: 04/22/20

14 Stanton Ave.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $215,500
Buyer: Lindsey L. Bellamy
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 04/30/20

MIDDLEFIELD

142 W. Hill Road
Middlefield, MA 01243
Amount: $338,000
Buyer: Deborah A. O’Brien
Seller: E. Roberts NT
Date: 05/04/20

NORTHAMPTON

257 Bridge Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Ryan P. Flynn
Seller: Norwich Properties LLC
Date: 04/24/20

78 Coles Meadow Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $610,000
Buyer: Gerald A. Hinkle
Seller: Joan E. Dalin RET
Date: 05/01/20

235 Coles Meadow Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Alex C. Petith
Seller: Joseph S. Barker
Date: 04/28/20

19 Ellington Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Matthew Motamedi
Seller: Wilmington Savings
Date: 04/27/20

184 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $127,500
Buyer: Elizabeth A. Renuart LT
Seller: Emerson Way LLC
Date: 04/24/20

31 Loudville Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Hillary M. Sackett-Taylor
Seller: Julie E. Steiner
Date: 04/30/20

11 Verona St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $282,000
Buyer: Augustus H. Muller
Seller: Jason Mark
Date: 04/23/20

PELHAM

53 Harkness Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Roberley A. Bell
Seller: Judith Pierce
Date: 04/30/20

SOUTH HADLEY

545 Granby Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: South Hadley Electric Light
Seller: Holyoke Hospital Inc.
Date: 05/05/20

35 Hillside Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Christopher M. Shea
Seller: Catherine M. Vieira
Date: 04/30/20

16 Lorraine Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Mark T. Yost
Seller: Gail C. Bekier
Date: 04/29/20

211 Mosier St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Derek P. Swistak
Seller: Susan K. Narey
Date: 04/24/20

10 Plainville Circle
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $477,000
Buyer: Candice E. Demers
Seller: Michael Lucchesi
Date: 05/01/20

3 Pleasant St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $239,000
Buyer: Deborah A. Lambert
Seller: Sheila D. Pennell
Date: 04/24/20

33 Tampa St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Pecia
Seller: John T. Pecia
Date: 04/29/20

SOUTHAMPTON

3 Beccari Lane
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $520,000
Buyer: Marica J. Misiorski
Seller: Alphonse Venskus
Date: 04/28/20

80 Crooked Ledge Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $535,000
Buyer: Jason Lavallee
Seller: Denise L. Dupelle
Date: 04/29/20

6 Hillside Meadows Dr.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Scott R. VanderVeen
Seller: Christopher J. Abbott
Date: 05/01/20

54 Line St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $310,500
Buyer: Samuel J. Verla
Seller: Robert F. Zemba
Date: 04/24/20

7 Noreen Dr.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Philip J. Corbeil
Seller: Norma C. Gosselin
Date: 04/24/20

6 Parsons Way
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Benoit J. Lamontagne
Seller: Rosemarie Osmers LT
Date: 04/30/20

117 Russellville Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Andrea L. Looney
Seller: Jacob J. Belanger
Date: 04/30/20

74 Valley Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Tobias K. Davis
Seller: Wade Loud
Date: 05/05/20

110 Valley Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $455,900
Buyer: Veasna Pok
Seller: Jill Thurman
Date: 04/30/20

WARE

10 Coldbrook Dr.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: David L. Bassett
Seller: Benchmark Custom Homes
Date: 05/05/20

WILLIAMSBURG

19 Valley View Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $454,000
Buyer: Ryan L. Clark
Seller: Jeffrey Gillis
Date: 04/24/20

WESTHAMPTON

9 Tipping Rock Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: David M. St.John
Seller: Shirley K. Smith
Date: 04/28/20

Class of 2020 Cover Story

40 Under Forty Class of 2020

‘The class of 2020.’

That phrase will forever have special meaning at colleges, high schools, and even grammar schools across this country. Indeed, 2020 has been a different year in every way imaginable.

And the same is true of BusinessWest’s 40 Under Forty class of rising stars. When the JUDGES received their six-inch-thick packets of nominations — which detailed the credentials of more than 200 candidates — in February, COVID-19 hadn’t yet arrived in Western Mass. By the time the scores were tabulated and the winners were sent their letters of congratulations, the world had changed in a profound way.

These changes are reflected in this special edition of BusinessWest, and also in the scheduling of the gala to celebrate this year’s class. Traditionally slated for late June, it is now to be held Aug. 27 at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke.

As for this section, the biggest difference is the photographs. In past years, they were taken in the studio of photographer Leah Martin. With social-distancing guidelines in place and non-essential businesses (like photo studios) closed, that wasn’t possible.

So we improvised. Many members of the class of 2020 took their own photos, while Martin took to the road and photographed several honorees on their front porches and in their backyards — from a safe distance. Collectively, these photos speak not only to how different these times are, but to how people have used their imaginations and creativity to cope.

Overall, while the class of 2020 has had, and will continue to have, a different experience than those who preceded it, it is like those other classes in how it reflects the high levels of young talent now emerging in this region. And it paints an impressive picture of leadership for decades to come.

Let’s salute the class of 2020!

2020 Presenting Sponsors

2020 Sponsors

2020 Partner

2020 Exclusive Media Sponsor

Coronavirus Special Coverage

Climbing Out

It’s not easy for a business to be shut down — seriously curtailing or even eliminating all revenue — for any period of time. But it’s much more frustrating not to know how long that period of time will actually be. That’s where Massachusetts businesses deemed non-essential during the COVID-19 pandemic stand right now — in a limbo of treading water and being as flexible, creative, and patient as they can while they await word on when the state will reopen its economy, and what form that re-emergence will take.

At some point in early March, Ashley Batlle knew what was coming. And she knew what it meant for her health and wellness spa, Beauty Batlles Lounge, that she opened in Chicopee about a year ago.

“This is a personal, physical-contact business. You’re definitely in close proximity with the client, giving them a service that everyone looks forward to — something they’re accustomed to making part of their schedule,” Batlle said. Yet, the rumblings were that, at some point, the rising threat of COVID-19 was going to force businesses to shut their doors. “So we tried to get as many clients in as we could.”

And then, suddenly, those appointments that clients look forward to were cancelled, postponed until — well, nobody knows yet. And that’s the problem for businesses the state deemed non-essential: the unknown.

Toward the end of April, the Baker-Polito administration extended the statewide essential-services emergency order by two weeks, from May 4 to May 18. Businesses and organizations not on the list of essential services can only continue operations through remote means — if at all possible.

For Batlle, well … she can’t offer facials, waxing, microblading, and other treatments remotely. And she was unable to access benefits through the CARES Act and other government relief measures.

“My anxiety level has been very, very high. It hasn’t been fun, not knowing when we’ll begin to open and what kind of measures will be asked of us by the state and city to be able to reopen,” she said, noting that, as a one-woman operation, it will be easy to comply with social-distancing regulations sure to accompany any sort of reopening.

What’s less certain is how customers will respond — to all types of interactions, not just her services.

“I’m going to be able to open up my doors and get everyone in as quick as possible — that’s what I would love to do, but I think it’s going to be a soft situation, where, little by little, we’re getting back to business,” she explained, noting that some people will be leery of close contact at first, especially since the virus doesn’t tend to show symptoms for a while.

Still, most business owners shuttered by the pandemic would love an opportunity to at least try to get back to normal, even if they understand why the governor put the stay-at-home mandate in place.

Rick Sullivan

Rick Sullivan

“We may be seeing the number of cases plateauing, but [development of] a vaccine, or treatment medication, is still in its infancy, so the data still says go slow. I do think some businesses previously deemed non-essential could have protocols put in place to allow partial reopening. However, nobody wants to reopen prematurely and see worse spikes later in the year.”

“While we expected and understand Governor Baker’s decision to extend the stay-at-home advisory, that tough decision underscores the challenging circumstances we find ourselves in as a business community,” said Nancy Creed, president of the Springfield Regional Chamber. “We’re doing a balancing act between wanting to get back to work and getting back to work in a safe manner.”

Many of her members supported the two-week extension; a late-April chamber poll, right before the non-essential closures were extended by two weeks, asked what worried them more: the spread of the virus if restrictions were loosened too soon, or the negative economic impact of not reopening quickly enough. It also asked if Massachusetts was ready for a May 4 reopening.

“Seventy-seven percent responded that the spread of the virus was more worrisome, and an overwhelming number — 91% — responded that Massachusetts was not ready for a May 4 reopening,” Creed said, “clearly revealing that much of the business community is concerned about protecting those most vulnerable and stopping the spread of the disease, and demonstrating the commitment our business community has to the community as a whole.”

Rick Sullivan, president of the Economic Development Council of Western Massachusetts, took a similar outlook.

“I do not think that anyone is surprised that the shutdown has been extended, as the governor has been clear he will follow the data as to when to begin reopening the economy,” Sullivan said. “We may be seeing the number of cases plateauing, but [development of] a vaccine, or treatment medication, is still in its infancy, so the data still says go slow. I do think some businesses previously deemed non-essential could have protocols put in place to allow partial reopening. However, nobody wants to reopen prematurely and see worse spikes later in the year.”

All that may be true, but it’s still difficult — and, for many businesses, exceptionally concerning — to stay closed this long, and possibly longer. Businesses are doing what they can to be creative, in many cases opening doors of commerce they will continue to pursue after the COVID-19 threat passes, or even using the time to support other community members in need (more on that later).

But no one likes the uncertainty of not knowing whether May 18 is the real target for reopening, or just another can to be kicked down the road.

Waiting Game

Paul DiGrigoli would like to reopen, too.

“This has impacted us tremendously,” said the owner of DiGrigoli Salon and DiGrigoli School of Cosmetology in West Springfield. “We haven’t had a chance to reach out to all our clients; some we have. But we just have to wait until Charlie Baker gives us the green light, which hopefully will be May 18.”

He was able to secure a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan, succeeding in the second round of that program’s disbursements after missing on the first round. That will help cover costs like utilities and mortgage interest while keeping his employees paid for eight weeks as well. “We went through Community Bank, and they were phenomenal,” he said.

And he’s getting ready for some anticipated changes when the salon does reopen.

“We bought a lot of hand sanitizer to put at the front desk in the school and the salon, we’ve gotten gloves and masks, and what we’re going to do initially is get the clients’ cell phone numbers and call them from the reception desk to let them know when their appointment is available. And we’ll stick with staying six feet apart, spreading out the stations. Both the stylist and the client will have to wear a mask until further notice. It’s going to be uncomfortable at first.”

As for the school, online training has been effective for theory, but students haven’t been able to practice what they learn.

In general, he told BusinessWest, “we’re really trying our hardest to get back to normal, but we’ve really been handcuffed. There has been frustration and anxiety because we don’t know what to expect.”

Or when to expect it, he added. “We don’t know when it will happen. They’re saying May 18, but who the heck knows? We’re hoping it doesn’t go beyond that, but thank God for the relief funds — that really saved us.”

Claudia Pazmany, executive director of the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce, polled her members at the end of April and put some of that anxiety into raw numbers. For example, responding businesses are losing an average of $55,837 per month in revenue during the shutdown, and 61% have had to lay off or furlough employees. More than 20% have serious concerns about being able to reopen if the state of emergency extends beyond June 1.

“They’re worried,” she said. “Rent, utilities, and payroll are three areas that continue to be a struggle.”

Amherst is also in an unusual situation, as it’s a small town that loses more than half its population when UMass Amherst and Amherst College aren’t in session. The downtown businesses in particular rely heavily on students — and now there’s talk across the region that colleges might start the fall with distance learning only.

Claudia Pazmany

Claudia Pazmany

“On the flip side, this has stirred a lot of innovation from businesses who have been deemed non-essential or limited; they’ve pivoted or gone online. The creativity and innovation we’ve seen have been really exciting.”

“Initially, there hasn’t been a lot of grumbling, but they’re generally frustrated and just sad. Everything is unknown,” Pazmany told BusinessWest. “They’re fearful — so much is unknown, and delays keep coming. We don’t have a deadline or guidelines; they just keep pushing back the date, and that causes more fear and anxiety.”

Driving Innovation

And also a good deal of invention, driven by necessity.

“On the flip side, this has stirred a lot of innovation from businesses who have been deemed non-essential or limited; they’ve pivoted or gone online,” Pazmany said. “The creativity and innovation we’ve seen have been really exciting.”

Take Zanna, a clothing shop that has been a staple of Amherst’s downtown for decades, but has never had an online store. Until now.

“You have to look at the good in this crisis,” owner Amy Benson said. “In my case, it moved me — encouraged me — to get an online store open. I’ve only owned the store a year, so I didn’t have time to even think about an online store before. Now I did, so I took the time to get it up and going.

“Do I think it’s the wave of Zanna’s future? No, but I think it’s an extension. We’ll probably keep it going once we’re open,” she added, noting that it opens more opportunities. “We’re in a transient community. We see people from all over the country, between the university and Amherst College. We all want things to be the way they were, but we know we’ll have to adapt. Some of these new trends, like my online store, I’m not going to shut that off.”

Benson has been creative in other ways as well, from curbside pickup — with everyone wearing masks — to ‘virtual shopping,’ where she walks a customer around the store using an iPad and FaceTime, showing them tops and bottoms and coordinating outfits.

“We want customers to be engaged, and they want to hear from us because we form those kinds of relationships,” she said. “When we’re FaceTiming, we’re FaceTiming with a friend and shopping with a friend. It’s a really important way to stay connected.

“You have to do something,” she went on. “You can’t just close your doors and do nothing. Our customers are women who have supported us for over 40 years; we’re not going to just shut our doors and not communicate. I do whatever I can to stay engaged with our customers, they’re the lifeline of our business.”

In other words, Zanna has come a long way since last month, when Benson was in “full panic mode” and offering nothing but a gift-certificate promotion. “We’re not bringing in nearly the revenue we would normally, but we’re supporting what we’re able to do right now.”

She’s not alone, Pazmany noted, citing examples like restaurants revamping their online presence with expanded takeout menus to Amherst Books shipping and delivering items to customers, to the Amherst Area Chamber itself, which has been connecting with the business community through marketing seminars.

Doing Some Good

Or taking advantage of an unusual time to do some good in the community.

Dean’s Beans, based in Orange, has seen a surge in web sales as coffee drinkers are brewing more at home due to social distancing and telecommuting. With COVID-19 causing great economic hardship, the company has chosen to share the money from these web sales with the community by helping to fund school food programs — a total of $26,000, in fact, divided among seven Western Mass. school districts.

“Making sure children have access to food throughout this pandemic is crucial, and we are proud to support these essential programs in Springfield, Amherst, and Orange,” said Dean Cycon, founder and CEO of Dean’s Beans. “Part of a company’s profitability is the positivity it generates for others, and we are committed to helping our communities ease the pain of this crisis.”

Amy Benson

Amy Benson

“You have to look at the good in this crisis. In my case, it moved me — encouraged me — to get an online store open. I’ve only owned the store a year, so I didn’t have time to even think about an online store before. Now I did, so I took the time to get it up and going.”

Meanwhile, Batlle has launched the Hero Project, a virtual fundraiser designed to give back to those on the front lines fighting the pandemic. Funds raised will be set aside to provide complimentary self-care services at Beauty Batlles Lounge for healthcare professionals, police officers, firefighters, EMTs, and employees of sheriffs’ departments, once she can open her doors again. Visit beautybatlles.com to donate.

Considering the masks they’re wearing all day long, “they’re going to need facials when this is done,” Batlle joked, before getting serious.

“I reached out to my nurse friends and heard their stories, about the trauma they’re going through. One friend works in the ICU at a COVID unit — she goes into work one day and has four patients, and when it’s time to leave, she only has one. That has to do something to you. How can I give back to them? That’s where the idea for the Hero Project came in.”

It’s a way to pay it forward while anticipating the light at the end of the tunnel, she told BusinessWest. “This isn’t easy on anybody.”

It would be easier with some clarity from Beacon Hill, but that’s not coming right now. Instead, Baker convened a Reopening Advisory Board of public-health officials, representatives from the business community, and municipal leaders from across the Commonwealth. They are charged with advising the administration on strategies to reopen the economy in phases based on health and safety metrics, and are expected to develop a report by May 18.

That’s just the report date. So it’s easy to see why businesses might not suddenly be reopening on that date.

“Personally, every time Governor Baker gives us a date when we’re going to open, I think, ‘hmm, I don’t know if that’s going to happen,’” Benson said. “I’m always thinking, ‘what’s the worst-case scenario? June 1? They keep pushing it back.”

That’s why it bothers Batlle that some proprietors of businesses like hers continue to offer services from their home.

“We should all just be staying stationary; we’re all in the same boat,” she said. “That just puts more stress on business owners who are actually following the rules, and it’s could extend the time we’re going to be out of work.”

Which, for too many business owners and employees across Western Mass., already feels like too long.

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Coronavirus Special Coverage

For Many Impacted by the Pandemic, It Might Be a Viable Option

By Michael B. Katz, Esq.

One thing I’ve learned in my 45 years practicing bankruptcy law is that most individuals who wind up taking this course of action are good people who have found themselves in bad and unexpected circumstances, most often caused by things that were beyond their control.

People get sick, get divorced, lose employment, and have accidents. Likewise, businesses can be adversely affected by events over which they have no meaningful control. Outbreaks of disease, oil shortages, breaks in the supply chain, changing technology, interruption of their workforce, and many other factors can all cause a business or individual to be unable to stay financially afloat.

Which brings us the COVID-19 pandemic. It represents the epitome of unexpected circumstances and matters beyond our control. Indeed, in an effort to slow the spread the spread of the virus, the state has shuttered all non-essential businesses, leading to unemployment levels not seen since the Great Depression.

In these precarious times, individuals and businesses are finding themselves in dire financial circumstances they could not have foreseen, nor done anything to prevent. Given their predicament, some might be looking at bankruptcy as a possible recourse.

In order to help honest but financially burdened individuals make a fresh financial start, Congress has passed a number of bankruptcy laws. Here are the key types:

 

Chapter 7

This is the type of bankruptcy proceeding that allows certain qualifying individuals to eliminate most of their unsecured debts (those without mortgages) and to make a fresh financial start.

In order to qualify for Chapter 7, a person cannot have filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy within the prior eight years. The person filing, known as a debtor, must also pass a test which limits how much earned income the debtor had earned in the prior year. This is called the means test, and it varies based on the state in which the debtor resides, the number of dependents in the family, and whether there is any earned income generated by the debtor’s spouse.

For example, for a Massachusetts resident, the limitation is $67,119 for a single person, $84,125 for a couple (combined gross income), and then increases in different amounts for additional dependents. These limitations became effective as of April 1, 2020 and are subject to periodic adjustment. Similarly, in Connecticut, the individual cutoff is $66,689, and $88,594 for a couple.

Michael B. Katz

Michael B. Katz

In these precarious times, individuals and businesses are finding themselves in dire financial circumstances they could not have foreseen, nor done anything to prevent. Given their predicament, some might be looking at bankruptcy as a possible recourse.

While most unsecured debts can be eliminated in Chapter 7, there are some types of debts that cannot, including income taxes owed from the past three years, alimony and child support, student loans, and debts incurred due to an accident while driving under the influence. 

One of the major benefits of Chapter 7 for an individual obtaining a discharge is that not only are the debts — such as most credit cards, personal loans, foreclosure and repossession deficiency balances, and medical bills — totally wiped out, they are eliminated without incurring any phantom income, on which both federal and state income taxes would be owed.

Compare this to either making a direct settlement with a lender or credit-card company, or going through a non-judicial, multi-year debt-settlement plan, where anything that is settled with the creditors results in the person receiving a 1099 from the creditor and having to pay taxes on the forgiven portion of the debts. In Chapter 7, Congress has decreed that all discharged debts are tax-free, and therefore no hidden taxes are incurred.

The key aspect of Chapter 7 is that the Bankruptcy Court is trying to help an honest debtor make a fresh financial start. In regard to secured debts — for example, those debts that are secured by a lien or mortgage, most often vehicle loans or a home mortgage — in Chapter 7, the debtor gets to select whether they wish to keep the item and continue making the payments, or to surrender the item and wipe out any shortfall amount that might exist after the secured party sells the item after repossession or foreclosure sale.

While a corporate entity can also elect to file Chapter 7 and have the Bankruptcy Court liquidate its assets and distribute the proceeds to its creditors, it does not get to carry on its business affairs after filing. Only an individual qualifies for a discharge, so a corporate entity must cease all business after it files Chapter 7.

 

Chapter 13

In this type of proceeding, an individual is given an option to repay all or a portion of the debt, if approved by the Bankruptcy Court and Chapter 13 trustee, through a plan of reorganization that generally lasts for a period of three to no more than five years. There is no need to pass the means test to qualify for Chapter 13, and, unlike the restrictions in Chapter 7 that allow it to include only unsecured debts, Chapter 13 can also affect secured debts.

The most common application in Chapter 13 is to use it to stop a foreclosure sale of a debtor’s home or automobile, and it allows the debtor to pay the outstanding past-due amounts over the life of the plan, in addition to requiring the debtor to make the full current payment each month. 

For example, if a lender is owed $60,000 in back mortgage payments, requiring the borrower to pay it in full in order to prevent a foreclosure sale, in a Chapter 13, the debtor could propose to pay $1,000 per month for the 60 months of its Chapter 13 plan, plus pay the current mortgage amount each month so that debtor does not fall further behind. 

These are simplified examples, and the details of a Chapter 13 plan are more complex and would require you to consult with a qualified attorney for more specific advice.

 

Chapter 11

A Chapter 11 reorganization can be filed by an individual who owns a business and operates as a ‘DBA,’ but due to its complexity and expense, it is most often filed by a corporate entity.

The idea of a Chapter 11 is to grant the business a ‘time out’ and give it some element of time to figure out a plan of reorganization to allow it to continue in business. Under 11 USC 362(d), all lawsuits and claims against the debtor’s business are enjoined from proceeding, and the debtor gets time to meet with its creditors and to seek to formulate a formal plan of reorganization.

That plan may propose to pay unsecured creditors a percentage on the dollar, which must be found to be a greater percentage than the creditors would receive in an immediate liquidation of the business and its assets. In some cases, mortgage debts can be reduced to the actual value of the assets that secure the mortgage, so that if the debtor owes a lender $750,000 on a building that can be proven to be worth only $500,000, the debtor can seek to ‘cram down’ the mortgage to a reduced amount of $500,000, and the additional $250,000 gets treated as an unsecured debt, and paid at the same percentage on the dollar as the other unsecured debts.

This is a very simplified version of a Chapter 11, as there are many other requirements that must be fulfilled by a Chapter 11 debtor, and the cases are necessarily complex and sometimes expensive. However, the overall savings to the debtor can be substantial, and they are often the key to a business’ survival.

The court in a Chapter 11 is seeking to be fair to both the debtor and its creditors, as well as preserving the jobs of the employees of a business.

 

Non-bankruptcy Alternatives

There are sometimes options for a business to consider without the need to file a formal insolvency proceeding. They require a skilled and knowledgeable attorney to know how to handle these matters, and they include utilization under Massachusetts state law of an assignment for the benefit of creditors, trust mortgage, or sometimes just using a skilled negotiator to try to convince creditors to accept an informal settlement of their debt, rather than forcing the debtor to use funds to pay for a formal bankruptcy proceeding, when those same funds could be paid toward a voluntary settlement with the creditors. 

In reality, these voluntary settlements are often difficult to finalize because you need to negotiate with multiple parties, who sometimes will not agree to the same terms. In a Chapter 11, the creditors are legally required to accept whatever settlement is approved by the bankruptcy judge, after a plan is voted on and approved by the Bankruptcy Court.

It is important that you not let your pride prevent you from finding the best and most effective solution for your personal or business cash-flow problems. You cannot make an informed decision until you know and understand all of your options, as well as the positives and negatives of each option.

During this pandemic, many fraudulent parties are preying on people, so make sure to do your homework to get the name of a qualified person to advise you or your business. Contact the Hampden County Bar Assoc. Lawyer Referral Service, call your accountant, or do a Google search to find an experienced person to help you or your business. 

Working together, we can all find ways get through these uncharted waters.

 

Michael Katz is the chairperson of the Bankruptcy & Creditors Rights department of the law firm Bacon Wilson, P.C., with offices in Springfield, Northampton, Amherst, Hadley, and Westfield; (413) 781-0560.

Coronavirus

Analysis

By George O’Brien

As the Commonwealth begins the arduous task of turning its economy back on, the complicated situation conjures images from a scene in the movie Apollo 13.

That movie chronicled what became known as the ‘successful failure’ of that ill-fated flight to the moon almost exactly 50 years ago. Those familiar with the story know that, just over halfway to the moon, an explosion damaged the Odyssey spacecraft’s service module. Long story short, the crew had to abandon the Odyssey for the lunar landing vehicle Aquarius, and subsisted there while those at NASA figured out a way to get the crew home.

To get back to Earth safely, those at NASA had to eventually figure out a way to somehow start up the command module, which had been sitting idle for days, without power, in temperatures far below zero. If you’ve seen the movie, you remember a scene where one of the crew members, frustrated by the slow movement on a firm plan to restart the spacecraft, muttered ‘they don’t know how to do it’ to his colleagues.

At this precarious moment in history, many in the Commonwealth are tempted to say the same thing. Like the Odyssey, the state’s economy has been essentially frozen for several weeks now. Unthawing and restarting it will be a complicated process, and, just as with Apollo 13, there is no shortage of Ph.D.s working on the problem and trying to find a solution.

And, just as with that flight, there is obviously a lot at stake. With Apollo 13, it was three lives. With this pandemic … well, according to a report from the Massachusetts High Technology Council, the jobs of at least 40% of workers making less than $40,000 a year are at risk. Already, nearly 25% of the state’s workers have filed for unemployment benefits over the past six weeks. That’s right — close to one worker in four has sought relief. And the numbers could go higher still.

“It will be different, and it will be different for quite some time. Anyone who still believes a switch can be flipped and we can go back to where we were is sadly mistaken.”

Suffice it to say this will be an extremely complicated process, and those undertaking it have to get it right. If they go too fast or move improperly, a setback will likely prove even more devastating for the state’s economy — an economy that was, as we all know, humming right along.

Indeed, just a few short months ago, the Boston-area economy was absolutely bursting at the seams. Cranes were everywhere, major corporations were moving to the city, and people were looking to high-speed rail as a way to somehow possibly relieve the congestion, sky-high prices, and intolerable commutes that were defining life inside Route 128.

It seems like those public hearings in downtown Springfield on high-speed rail options were years ago, not several weeks ago.

And the same can be said of the employment picture across the state and even here in Western Mass. It was only a few months ago that we were all talking about the skills gap and how companies with vacancies couldn’t fill them. The word ‘ghosting’ became part of the vocabulary, a term used, in some instances, to describe someone who, between the time they were offered a job and was scheduled to start, found something better. Every employer had a ghosting story — or several of them.

Not to carry the Apollo 13 analogy too far (too late), but the state’s economy was absolutely soaring, a rocket ship bound for new heights. And then … the explosion.

Now, the task at hand is to restart the economy and get people back home, to where they were. But that’s where the analogy ends. Home is much different than it was when we left, and there’s no just going back to it.

The return to something approaching normal, or a new normal, will be slow, as in painfully slow, and gradual. It will be to workplaces where people wear masks, work at least six feet apart, and get tested for the virus regularly. It will be to a casino where the slot machines are spaced widely, one might use a long, plastic stick to press buttons on those slots, and where thermal cameras monitor the temperature of patrons. It might well be a phased-in return where those who are older and most vulnerable, as well as those most able to work remotely, return last. It will be to a business community where the vast majority of ventures are simply fighting for their lives.

It will be different, and it will be different for quite some time. Anyone who still believes a switch can be flipped and we can go back to where we were is sadly mistaken. This is made clear by the stubbornly high numbers concerning cases and deaths in Massachusetts, and the fact that, just a few days ago, the governor ordered people to wear masks in public.

The state has to find a way to reopen the economy — it can’t stay closed much longer — and also keep people safe, not overwhelm the healthcare system, and not present a scenario where we take one step forward and two or three back.

Apollo 13 had a happy ending — even if the crew didn’t get to moon. But this isn’t a movie, and we don’t know how it’s going to end.

George O’Brien is the editor of BusinessWest

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

 

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

770 Watson Spruce Corner Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $560,000
Buyer: Carter J. Carter
Seller: Ronald Gorevic
Date: 04/10/20

BERNARDSTON

425 Fox Hill Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $283,000
Buyer: Matthew E. Eaton-Earl
Seller: Kevin J. Rowell
Date: 04/17/20

24 Harwood Dr.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Karen A. Kelly
Seller: Christal L. Cutler
Date: 04/10/20

COLRAIN

499 Jacksonville Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Lukas Anderson-Booker
Seller: Scott A. Anderson
Date: 04/21/20

DEERFIELD

15 Beaver Dr.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $233,140
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Hope F. Jones
Date: 04/21/20

84 S. Mill River Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $151,000
Buyer: Stephen Debruyn-Kops
Seller: MTGLQ Investors LP
Date: 04/16/20

GREENFIELD

37-39 Abbott St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Dana E. Duval
Seller: Jeremy Ober
Date: 04/16/20

743 Bernardston Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Greenfield Center School
Seller: Susan E. Peck
Date: 04/15/20

28-32 Conway St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Ovidiu Nikita
Seller: Petru Balan
Date: 04/15/20

296 High St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Christina Clark
Seller: Daniel D. Garant
Date: 04/08/20

106 Meridian St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Samuel L. Engleman
Seller: Lea D. Appel
Date: 04/17/20

109 Oakland St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $203,500
Buyer: Thomas Hoad
Seller: Matthew E. Earl
Date: 04/17/20

29 Woodleigh Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Emily Hildebrand
Seller: Luna L. Greenwood
Date: 04/10/20

HAWLEY

26 Dodge Corner Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Ronald Gorevic
Seller: William R. Harris
Date: 04/10/20

MONTAGUE

Meadow Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Falls Farm LLC
Seller: Whitmore, William R., (Estate)
Date: 04/21/20

7 Ripley Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $344,900
Buyer: Francoise D. Ellis
Seller: Katherine E. Smith
Date: 04/17/20

NORTHFIELD

60 Ashuelot Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Steven C. Wiggin
Seller: Peter M. Holloway
Date: 04/17/20

ORANGE

112 Cheney St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Kelly M. Melanson
Seller: Scott Savoy
Date: 04/10/20

252-258 East Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Nicholas J. Chandler
Seller: Roy P. Piragis
Date: 04/15/20

SHELBURNE

121 Bridge St.
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Andrew Quient
Seller: Timothy J. Richardson
Date: 04/17/20

105 Main St.
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $362,500
Buyer: Martin N. Espada
Seller: Christopher J. Macek
Date: 04/21/20

SUNDERLAND

336 Falls Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Falls Farm LLC
Seller: Whitmore, William R., (Estate)
Date: 04/21/20

WHATELY

41 Egypt Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $396,000
Buyer: Jason C. Dizek
Seller: Jeffrey M. Griswold
Date: 04/21/20

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

48 Anvil St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $347,000
Buyer: Jessica Calabrese
Seller: Scott E. Skolnick
Date: 04/17/20

57 Bessbrook St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Edward E. Rodriguez
Seller: Thelma A. Gardner
Date: 04/10/20

14 Briarcliff Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $229,000
Buyer: Jie Chen
Seller: Daniel Hickok
Date: 04/10/20

32 Columbia Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $326,000
Buyer: Lloyd C. Sutton
Seller: Nicole A. Ward
Date: 04/10/20

16 Cosgrove Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $218,400
Buyer: Jessica P. Vinci
Seller: Katherine R. Whitehead
Date: 04/21/20

70 Elmar Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Adrienn Sibrizzi-O’Connor
Seller: J. Craig White
Date: 04/14/20

33 Forest Ridge Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $368,000
Buyer: Brian P. McCabe
Seller: Scott E. Stuckenbruck
Date: 04/16/20

82 Kensington St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $189,900
Buyer: Joseph Bouila
Seller: Labun, Mary K., (Estate)
Date: 04/17/20

89 Kensington St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $207,000
Buyer: James D. Newsome
Seller: Eric Stevens
Date: 04/10/20

126 Lancaster Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Jason R. Fiore
Seller: Ronald E. Benoit
Date: 04/10/20

25 Kosciusko Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $379,900
Buyer: Mark A. Berman
Seller: John W. Schnepp
Date: 04/17/20

21 Lincoln St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $180,100
Buyer: Aleksandr Kiforishin
Seller: FNMA
Date: 04/17/20

87 Meadowbrook Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $219,900
Buyer: Abdelaziz Ngadi
Seller: Muriel C. Adelman
Date: 04/21/20

37 Nile Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Lindsay E. Strole
Seller: Peter J. Tilden
Date: 04/10/20

51 Reed St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Shane Dearborn
Seller: Dacey, Thomas F., (Estate)
Date: 04/17/20

57 Windermere Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $612,500
Buyer: Thomas J. Jendrysik
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 04/10/20

BLANDFORD

1 Nye Brook Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Melanie Bilodeau
Seller: Patricia M. Hebert
Date: 04/17/20

CHICOPEE

79 Acrebrook Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $150,150
Buyer: Jerod J. Howell
Seller: MTGLQ Investors LP
Date: 04/17/20

51 Bay State Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $144,900
Buyer: Glen Gladstone-White
Seller: Mathew Bean
Date: 04/14/20

87 Beaudry Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Amani A. Alhajjo
Seller: Scott Ewing
Date: 04/21/20

126 Blanchwood Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Orlando E. Morales
Seller: Allen G. Croteau
Date: 04/16/20

88 Cora Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $127,200
Buyer: Freedom Mortgage Corp.
Seller: Steven J. Morin
Date: 04/09/20

106 Crestwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $239,000
Buyer: Husam Jaber
Seller: Ann J. Mierzwa
Date: 04/10/20

53 Davenport St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Samantha Gingras
Seller: Kiersten N. Korona-Moreau
Date: 04/09/20

1246 Granby Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $2,125,000
Buyer: Westover MHP LLC
Seller: Whaling Properties LLC
Date: 04/16/20

386 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Frank N. Laflamme
Seller: Amand, Donald W. S., (Estate)
Date: 04/16/20

525 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $475,000
Buyer: 525 Grattan Street LLC
Seller: Roger E. Fournier
Date: 04/14/20

853 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Barry W. Humphrey
Seller: Huguette A. Fecteau
Date: 04/17/20

101 Huntington Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $144,000
Buyer: Shane D. Beswick
Seller: Steven Weiss
Date: 04/16/20

18 Laurel St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: Luissonel Velez
Seller: Shirley Alvira
Date: 04/09/20

Riveredge Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $254,900
Buyer: Narong Sieng
Seller: Aileen Sullivan-Pacella
Date: 04/17/20

37 Spring St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Lianetzy Diaz
Seller: Orange Park Management
Date: 04/10/20

33 Stockbridge St.
Chicopee, MA 01103
Amount: $353,000
Buyer: Ronald H. Boulanger
Seller: Waycon Inc.
Date: 04/17/20

43 Stockbridge St.
Chicopee, MA 01103
Amount: $333,000
Buyer: Scott A. Ewing
Seller: Waycon Inc.
Date: 04/21/20

95 Ward St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Michael J. Gibson
Date: 04/09/20

EAST LONGMEADOW

32 Baymor Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $319,000
Buyer: John W. Nolen
Seller: Kevin Sullivan
Date: 04/15/20

37 Frankwyn St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Sarah E. Dansereau
Seller: Emily Link
Date: 04/15/20

38 Garland Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $221,000
Buyer: Terry Peckham
Seller: Anthony M. Ferrero
Date: 04/13/20

156 Hampden Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $347,000
Buyer: Cody A. Titus
Seller: Christian I. Perez
Date: 04/17/20

340 Kibbe Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $142,500
Buyer: Quercus Properties LLC
Seller: White, Lorraine M., (Estate)
Date: 04/09/20

7 Melody Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $155,511
Buyer: Emtay Inc.
Seller: DLJ Mortgage Capital Inc.
Date: 04/10/20

139 Melwood Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Justin P. Wilson-Gabor
Seller: Everly L. Trabucco
Date: 04/17/20

GRANVILLE

564 South Lane
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Thomas J. Damato
Seller: Donald E. Demarais
Date: 04/17/20

HAMPDEN

45 Circleview Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Adger L. Smith
Seller: AEM Property Investments
Date: 04/21/20

105 Woodland Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $255,500
Buyer: Leigh Myers
Seller: David W. Ashe
Date: 04/15/20

HOLLAND

5 Collette Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: Claire May
Seller: David D. Charbonneau
Date: 04/16/20

1 Leisure Court
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $176,000
Buyer: Timothy M. Gerry
Seller: John L. Bosacker
Date: 04/17/20

64 Leno Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Michael C. Lifson
Seller: Paul Newsham
Date: 04/17/20

HOLYOKE

5 Acorn Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Elizabeth E. Lempke
Seller: Ann T. Warwick
Date: 04/09/20

10 Clinton Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $193,000
Buyer: Dennis M. Benoit
Seller: Marisol Cartagena
Date: 04/21/20

29 Mayer Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: David Lucey
Seller: Maureen Lucey
Date: 04/15/20

5 Merkel Ter.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $194,500
Buyer: James B. Farrell
Seller: Mark Lauer
Date: 04/10/20

12 Roosevelt Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $139,400
Buyer: Bank Of America
Seller: Jovanny Feliciano
Date: 04/08/20

51-53 Samosett St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Miguel A. Perez
Seller: Kdomain LLC
Date: 04/08/20

5 Shawmut Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $144,127
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Joan M. Koszela
Date: 04/13/20

LONGMEADOW

90 Bliss Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $285,500
Buyer: Christina L. Parziale
Seller: Beth E. Palmer
Date: 04/09/20

7 Briarcliff Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $449,000
Buyer: Marissa Cuff
Seller: Maria Ingani
Date: 04/14/20

130 Edgewood Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $283,000
Buyer: Brendan Bailey
Seller: Justin G. Savage
Date: 04/21/20

137 Greenacre Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Nicole L. Dalto
Seller: Gary R. Hall
Date: 04/21/20

45 Kenmore Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $331,500
Buyer: Michael Robare
Seller: Amy L. Cairy
Date: 04/14/20

32 Morningside Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $422,000
Buyer: Ryan R. Whitney
Seller: Eric P. Rubenstein
Date: 04/16/20

251 Park Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $875,000
Buyer: Vanessa A. Fish
Seller: Randolph P. Davis
Date: 04/17/20

7 Quinnehtuk Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $542,000
Buyer: Justin G. Savage
Seller: Meadows RE LLC
Date: 04/17/20

LUDLOW

57 Emma Way
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Kiersten Korona-Moreau
Seller: K. Bonanno-Sotiropoulos
Date: 04/09/20

252 Miller St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Miguel A. Martinez
Seller: Lila Pardo
Date: 04/09/20

62 Pond St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $168,500
Buyer: Ariana E. Quesnel
Seller: Smokowicz, Donald S., (Estate)
Date: 04/16/20

32 Wilno Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Haley A. McGinnis
Seller: Tammie A. Black
Date: 04/08/20

MONSON

58 Crest Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Kristina M. Hawley
Seller: Theresa S. Martin
Date: 04/14/20

13 Green St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $127,603
Buyer: Ruby Realty LLC
Seller: Edward A. Maia
Date: 04/15/20

114 Maxwell Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Ibrahim Knidel
Seller: Richard H. Degnan
Date: 04/09/20

163 Town Farm Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $426,164
Buyer: Jeffrey T. Cairy
Seller: Theresa Thompson
Date: 04/08/20

PALMER

226 Boston Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Ronald J. Allain
Seller: Kristi K. Atkinson-Haley
Date: 04/17/20

1 Pioneer Dr.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: B. A. Bassilakis-Wegrzynek
Seller: Laurence Vincent
Date: 04/09/20

SPRINGFIELD

53 Abbott St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $142,456
Buyer: Golden Gates Realty
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 04/09/20

38-40 Ainsworth St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Pedro Villafana
Seller: Jeanne M. Des-Rosiers
Date: 04/08/20

24 Ansara St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Esequiel Gerena-Lopez
Seller: Victor M. Coronado
Date: 04/10/20

616 Armory St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Hanati Lubega
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 04/16/20

297 Arnold Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $308,625
Buyer: Ricardo Santiago
Seller: Veronica L. Zaler
Date: 04/13/20

31 Arthur St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $122,690
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Kim M. Kilmer
Date: 04/09/20

138 Bay St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Luis Rodriguez
Seller: New Vision Realty LLC
Date: 04/14/20

11 Biltmore St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Sabrina Watson
Seller: Jose E. Martinez
Date: 04/17/20

73-75 Blanding St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $299,900
Buyer: Maria D. Rivera
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 04/14/20

11-15 Braddock St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $195,413
Buyer: Brendaliz Hernandez
Seller: BP LLC
Date: 04/16/20

145 Breckwood Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Jaydee Mercado
Seller: CIG 4 LLC
Date: 04/08/20

15 Brown St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Taniesha C. Serrano
Seller: Real Estate Investments NE
Date: 04/08/20

199 Cambria St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Beth E. Palmer
Seller: Angelo Deguglielmo
Date: 04/09/20

34 Carew Ter.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Adelzo Lantigua
Seller: Juan Santana
Date: 04/17/20

37 Chase Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Adolfo Serrano-Torres
Seller: London Realty LLC
Date: 04/21/20

14 Chesterfield Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Devon E. Shaw
Seller: Patrick J. Denault
Date: 04/10/20

850-852 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Adam J. Bourque
Seller: Carlos Aguasvivas
Date: 04/08/20

281 Cottage St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: 1626 Bay Street LLC
Seller: Local Union 2324
Date: 04/17/20

134-136 Darling St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Carlos M. Ortiz
Seller: Thomas K. Reen
Date: 04/10/20

90 Darling St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Patricia Bothwell
Seller: Abraxas RT
Date: 04/08/20

9 Dayton St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $159,285
Buyer: Santander Bank
Seller: Gai T. Vo
Date: 04/10/20

272 Denver St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $142,700
Buyer: Brandon Blaine
Seller: Rolando Torres
Date: 04/16/20

318 Dwight Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Tiffany L. O’Donnell
Seller: Ricardo Santiago
Date: 04/13/20

20 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Miguel Roldan
Seller: Brital 1987 LLC
Date: 04/14/20

36 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $129,250
Buyer: Benjamin Heacock
Seller: Nancy Ramos
Date: 04/16/20

80 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Meredith E. Ballista
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 04/21/20

61-63 Eloise St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Samuel Diaz
Seller: Jad Mourad
Date: 04/10/20

53-55 Farnham Ave.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Darian Felix
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 04/15/20

119 Feltham Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $179,900
Buyer: Desiree Y. Brown
Seller: Colello, Catherine, (Estate)
Date: 04/21/20

108 Fenway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Eliana M. Pabon
Seller: Revampit LLC
Date: 04/10/20

176 Florida St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Edwin P. Rivera
Seller: Three Palms LLC
Date: 04/13/20

398-400 Franklin St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Igor F. Santos
Seller: Meg Realty LLC
Date: 04/17/20

156 Gardens Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Terry-Lee A. McCarthy
Seller: Alliance Real Estate Investment
Date: 04/08/20

109 Harmon Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Robert N. Lussier
Seller: Joanne G. Costello
Date: 04/17/20

140 Hermitage Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $278,294
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Preston J. Briggs
Date: 04/09/20

57 Hollywood St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Joel Rojas
Seller: Milagro Rivera
Date: 04/14/20

47-49 Howes St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $255,500
Buyer: Tionna L. Downie
Seller: Hedge Hog Industries Corp.
Date: 04/09/20

30 Kay St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $181,000
Buyer: Joansellah K. Maak
Seller: Jane W. Muthua
Date: 04/10/20

46-48 Kent Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Edwin Ramos-Perez
Seller: TL Bretta Realty LLC
Date: 04/09/20

15 Kingsley St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Juan Santana
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 04/15/20

80-82 Leyfred Ter.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $144,000
Buyer: Madison Property Investors
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 04/16/20

146 Lumae St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $137,280
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: George W. Cobleigh
Date: 04/08/20

166 Marsden St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $195,054
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Jose M. Soto-Garcia
Date: 04/10/20

62 Melba St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $150,500
Buyer: Dawn Waskiewicz
Seller: FNMA
Date: 04/17/20

129-131 Moxon St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $238,000
Buyer: Farai Hatidani
Seller: Gyasi Sellers
Date: 04/16/20

60 Nelson Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Magdalena Medina
Seller: Glenn E. Shippy
Date: 04/16/20

79 Newhouse St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Joseph E. Luna-Torres
Seller: CIG 4 LLC
Date: 04/10/20

21 Norwood St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Bar South Land Holdings
Seller: Chicoine, Cecile M., (Estate)
Date: 04/08/20

28 Notre Dame St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Debra Babowicz
Seller: Moises Ballista
Date: 04/21/20

202-204 Oak St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Stephen L. Saxon
Seller: Rodrigues, Mario D. C., (Estate)
Date: 04/17/20

27-29 Oakwood Ter.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Edwin Perez
Seller: Victor M. Lopez-Garcia
Date: 04/17/20

56 Orlando St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $141,400
Buyer: Ikia D. Brown
Seller: Glendon Grant
Date: 04/16/20

86 Pendleton Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Ana Zunilda-Jerez
Seller: FNMA
Date: 04/13/20

48 Pine Acre Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $227,400
Buyer: Joseph T. Ruiz
Seller: Miguel A. Martinez
Date: 04/09/20

75 Regal St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $185,500
Buyer: Nicole L. Levine
Seller: Janine M. Prokop
Date: 04/10/20

78 Sonia St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Ron Moore
Seller: William D. Powers
Date: 04/09/20

639 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Joan Prince
Seller: Global Homes Properties
Date: 04/13/20

593 South Branch Pkwy.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Antonio Jimenez
Seller: Asia M. Stewart
Date: 04/17/20

658 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Karina Curl
Seller: Chad T. Lynch
Date: 04/08/20

11 Timothy Circle
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Douglas A. Desaulnier
Seller: Nicholas F. Fiorentino
Date: 04/10/20

130-132 Washington Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $139,000
Buyer: Nhung Nguyen
Seller: US Bank
Date: 04/21/20

870 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Maria F. Alban
Seller: US Bank
Date: 04/17/20

2175 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Caitlin E. Foster
Seller: Lancaster, Elizabeth P., (Estate)
Date: 04/15/20

61 Winterset Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $227,500
Buyer: James M. Lagodich
Seller: Frank J. Liberti
Date: 04/17/20

SOUTHWICK

8 Partridge Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $357,900
Buyer: Daniel F. Lucia
Seller: Emily A. Moccio
Date: 04/17/20

56 Sunnyside Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $172,300
Buyer: Ruby Realty LLC
Seller: David W. Mitchell
Date: 04/17/20

TOLLAND

1259 East Otis Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Daniel Getman
Seller: James Deming
Date: 04/15/20

WALES

4 Church St.
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $133,750
Buyer: Kevin M. Pascale
Seller: Worth, Kaye S., (Estate)
Date: 04/17/20

6 Church St.
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $133,750
Buyer: Kevin M. Pascale
Seller: Worth, Kaye S., (Estate)
Date: 04/17/20

41 Lake George Road
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Barbara A. Stearns
Date: 04/08/20

206 Stafford Road
Wales, MA 01081
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Benjamin D. Bangs
Seller: Patrick D. Soucy
Date: 04/10/20

WESTFIELD

30 Country Club Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Eugenie S. Kang
Seller: William S. Babinski
Date: 04/10/20

110 Court St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $244,900
Buyer: Christy T. Kyriacou
Seller: Kenneth Ward
Date: 04/10/20

55 Deborah Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Kyle B. Young
Seller: Laurie B. Kincaid
Date: 04/10/20

68 Hagan Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Christopher Paquette
Seller: Dean T. Couture
Date: 04/13/20

55 Jefferson St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Trevor Larson
Seller: William J. Cronin
Date: 04/13/20

59 Lindbergh Blvd.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Patrick O’Keeffe
Seller: Daniel F. Lucia
Date: 04/17/20

87 Llewellyn Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: John P. Cadigan
Seller: Paula J. Ceglowski
Date: 04/15/20

18-1/2 Malone Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Rodney Rosario
Seller: Joseph F. Beaton
Date: 04/21/20

28 Ponders Hollow Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $550,000
Buyer: DHMD Realty LLC
Seller: Ponders Hollow Properties
Date: 04/13/20

190 Western Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Rebecca L. Granholm
Seller: Hawg Aviation LLC
Date: 04/09/20

29 Whispering Wind Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Sarah L. Bashiruddin
Seller: Christopher M. Sarat
Date: 04/10/20

75 Wilson Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Emily M. Nowell
Seller: Jeffrey K. Fox
Date: 04/17/20

59 Zephyr Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Jonathan J. Adams
Seller: Rebecca L. Granholm
Date: 04/09/20

WILBRAHAM

33 Oakland St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $255,900
Buyer: Michelle R. Stallworth
Seller: Charles D. Spurlock
Date: 04/08/20

WEST SPRINGFIELD

6 Arbor Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Frederick Kudla
Seller: Shelia M. Bolduc
Date: 04/17/20

36 Beauregard Ter.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Denise Vasconcellos
Seller: Anthony G. Collins
Date: 04/08/20

2205 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Robert T. Olejarz
Seller: Ambro Development LLC
Date: 04/17/20

36 Braintree Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Susie Sousa-Chapin
Seller: Robert McCaffrey
Date: 04/10/20

101 Heywood Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $1,165,000
Buyer: Palpum Raw LLC
Seller: D&H Property Management
Date: 04/09/20

88 Janet St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Jorge Ramos
Seller: Auri M. Gibbons
Date: 04/10/20

43 Lennys Way
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Catie M. Laraway
Seller: Tandon, Ann, (Estate)
Date: 04/10/20

540 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $442,500
Buyer: Jeffrey K. Fox
Seller: Custom Homes Development Group LLC
Date: 04/17/20

501 Morgan Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $352,000
Buyer: Krishna L. Kharel
Seller: Judith Powers
Date: 04/10/20

165 Nelson St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Dean F. Finnie
Seller: Paul F. Finnie
Date: 04/08/20

268 Park St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $630,000
Buyer: ATRH West Springfield LLC
Seller: O’Connell Family Realty
Date: 04/17/20

437 Riverdale St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $1,300,000
Buyer: 83 Worthen Street Inc.
Seller: Aum Sai Ram LLC
Date: 04/21/20

351 Springfield St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $378,000
Buyer: Steven G. Otto
Seller: William E. Dyke
Date: 04/15/20

74 Winona Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Ruth Villar
Seller: Michael Werman
Date: 04/09/20

47 Worcester St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Suleiman Iddrisu
Seller: John E. Prenosil
Date: 04/10/20

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

32 Jenks St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Jennifer Goodheart
Seller: Richard Scott
Date: 04/17/20

1522 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $512,000
Buyer: Susan F. Havranek
Seller: Stephen J. Cavanagh
Date: 04/17/20

BELCHERTOWN

671 Franklin St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $373,000
Buyer: Michael J. McMahan
Seller: Erika Jacobovis-Grael
Date: 04/15/20

45 Magnolia Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $434,900
Buyer: Michael Novak
Seller: J. N. Duquette & Son Construction
Date: 04/21/20

419 Mill Valley Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $297,550
Buyer: Lawrence L. Pope
Seller: Robert L. Andrews
Date: 04/17/20

25 Mountain View Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $336,000
Buyer: Benjamin N. Farrell
Seller: Weifeng Liu
Date: 04/16/20

35 Nathaniel Way
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $377,000
Buyer: Nathan J. Lubas
Seller: David Lucey
Date: 04/15/20

33 Willow Lane
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Erika Grael
Seller: Robert S. Rodrigue
Date: 04/15/20

EASTHAMPTON

39 Clark St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Maura Morin-Stevens
Seller: Mary-Eileen Burgielewicz
Date: 04/16/20

165 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Jessie E. Beland
Seller: Jesse D. Bemben
Date: 04/08/20

401 East St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $279,000
Buyer: Ryan P. Ward
Seller: Laliberte, Paul J., (Estate)
Date: 04/13/20

31 Rabideau Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Kyla M. Korytoski
Seller: Norwich Properties LLC
Date: 04/17/20

GOSHEN

59 Main St.
Goshen, MA 01032
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Lily M. Fariborz
Seller: Frank R. Bertrand
Date: 04/15/20

GRANBY

16 Parish Hill Road
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $288,405
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Robert Woodson
Date: 04/21/20

35 Pleasant St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Ruby Realty LLC
Seller: Charles E. Moller
Date: 04/08/20

HADLEY

11 Isabel Court
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $229,500
Buyer: David J. Fill
Seller: Robert J. Lafleur
Date: 04/21/20

HUNTINGTON

3 Mill St.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $194,500
Buyer: Brian Lizotte
Seller: Avery, Jennifer E., (Estate)
Date: 04/16/20

NORTHAMPTON

6 Austin Circle
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Christopher R. Blais
Seller: AJ Capital RT
Date: 04/09/20

137 Barrett St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $373,000
Buyer: Victoria Elson
Seller: Mark Esposito
Date: 04/09/20

8 Dunphy Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $243,300
Buyer: Rowan Lupton
Seller: Daniel Breen
Date: 04/09/20

104 Dunphy Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Caitlin S. Martin
Seller: Angeline C. Chereski
Date: 04/09/20

167 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Amy Church-McDonough
Seller: Emerson Way LLC
Date: 04/15/20

435 Florence Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $382,000
Buyer: Jason C. Bolton
Seller: Roland Barbeito
Date: 04/08/20

204 North Maple St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jason A. Richmond
Seller: Charles E. McCarthy
Date: 04/14/20

68 Ridgewood Ter.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $530,000
Buyer: Peter M. Levy
Seller: Stephanie J. Arvai
Date: 04/10/20

203 State St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $415,000
Buyer: Rachel J. Currie-Rubin
Seller: Richard J. Rubin
Date: 04/10/20

SOUTH HADLEY

62 Hadley St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Megan Burton
Seller: Jamroth LLC
Date: 04/13/20

32 Hillside Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Julio C. Ruiz
Seller: Jane F. Sakiewicz
Date: 04/21/20

62 Old Lyman Road
South Hadley, MA 01020
Amount: $359,900
Buyer: Stephen P. Malanaphy
Seller: Premier Home Builders Inc.
Date: 04/10/20

SOUTHAMPTON

1 Birchwood Dr.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Daniel R. Breen
Seller: Elizabeth E. Lempke
Date: 04/09/20

16 Bluemer Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Albert E. Paone
Seller: Karen M. Pasquini
Date: 04/21/20

120 Strong Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Reilly S. Forance
Seller: Alex Trombley
Date: 04/15/20

WARE

179 Babcock Tavern Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Sawyer Sullivan
Seller: Trombley, Wilfred A. Jr., (Estate)
Date: 04/21/20

15 Chestnut St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Luke Toussaint
Seller: April A. Camuso
Date: 04/21/20

140 Eagle St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $116,440
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Jason Ellithorpe
Date: 04/09/20

35-37 High St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Lissette Figueroa
Seller: CEP Real Estate LLC
Date: 04/09/20

11 Pine St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: Lizbeth DeJesus
Seller: JNB Property Investment
Date: 04/08/20

11 Malboeuf Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Jennifer M. Toelken
Seller: Ciejka, Edmund J., (Estate)
Date: 04/17/20

WILLIAMSBURG

66 Nash Hill Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $438,700
Buyer: Andrew J. Mathers
Seller: Christine Ratzel
Date: 04/17/20

WESTHAMPTON

124 Southampton Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $373,955
Buyer: Rhonda J. Venne
Seller: William Metzger
Date: 04/21/20

WORTHINGTON

248 Patterson Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $605,000
Buyer: Kimberly A. TR
Seller: John P. Welch
Date: 04/17/20

Home Improvement Uncategorized

Advice — on the House

Andrew Crane holds up a prototype of one of the reusable bags attendees will receive at the 2020 Home and Garden Show.

By Mark Morris

Sometimes the online approach isn’t the most efficient way to tackle a project.

“If you’re looking to hire a landscaper, for example, you could look all over the internet and be dissatisfied,” said Andrew Crane, executive director of the Home Builders and Remodelers Assoc. of Western Massachusetts (HBRAWM).

Instead, he suggests conducting a search at the Western Mass Home and Garden Show, where consumers can speak directly with local landscapers and myriad other professionals.

Crane’s organization sponsors the annual event, which is now in its 66th year. Held at the beginning of spring, this year’s edition is scheduled for March 26-29 at the Eastern States Exposition grounds in West Springfield.

Originally, the event served as a venue for tradesmen in the association to familiarize each other with their craft. Over time, the show evolved, putting more emphasis on consumers, and has grown to the point where more than 350 exhibitors reserve space every year.

Exhibitors at the show can help consumers with everything from replacing a faucet to building an entire home — and everything in between. Innovations in building products, as well as home-related services such as Realtors and insurance agents, all have a presence at the home show.

Todd Hickman, Steve Sgroi, and John Collins will use the show to introduce a new segment of their business, Home Service Electrical.

Regarding that landscaper search, at press time, four landscapers had reserved booths at this year’s home show. For landscape projects that involve ‘hardscape’ (incorporating stone work into a landscape design), 14 different vendors of this specialty have signed on.

BusinessWest caught up with several different exhibitors to this year’s show, representing a wide range of industries. Their home-show experience varies from nearly two decades to a couple of first-time exhibitors, but they all share an enthusiasm about the opportunity to connect with people during the event.

Room to Grow

Stuart Fearn, president of Safeco Foam Insulation, marks his 17th home show this year. “Since day one, the home show has proven to be a home run for my business,” he said, adding that he sees his main job at the show as educating people about spray-foam insulation, and it’s a worthwhile effort.

“We get a lot of business and awareness from the home show,” he noted. “It helps people know we exist, and we will often get calls up to six to nine months after the show when they need insulation.”

For nearly two decades now, remodeling has remained a strong trend in home projects. Whether someone is updating their current home or purchasing an older home to modernize, Crane said demand remains strong for windows, siding, and many other products that will fit into existing homes.

Scott Fleury, business development director for Kelly-Fradet Lumber in East Longmeadow, sees the home show as an opportunity to put consumers in touch with the best people for their remodeling projects. The current president of HBRAWM, Fleury has been a part of the home show for 10 years. Kelly-Fradet often displays kitchen, bath, and outdoor deck products it sells primarily through contractors.

Painters Christopher Grenier and Jillian Forcier inspect the results of their recent work in a Northampton home.

“Often a homeowner will come to our booth with a project, and we are able to walk them right to a contractor who is also at the show,” he said. “On the flip side, contractors will bring people to our booth to show them the products we carry that apply to their project.”

Lori Loughlin, showroom manager for Frank Webb Home in Springfield, has taken part in the show for the past five years. Loughlin, vice chair of the organizing committee for the event, said her company sees an almost immediate return on its investment.

“Initially we see a big spike in sales right after the home show,” she said adding that the impact of the event often continues throughout the year. “People will come in as late as Christmas time and tell me they saw us at the home show.”

Christopher Grenier, owner of Grenier Painting and Finishing, reserved a booth at the home show last year for the first time. He enjoyed the experience so much, he is now on the event’s organizing committee.

Grenier noted that customers who need painting services often ask him for referrals about flooring, plumbing, and other services. He gladly recommends other members of the association to help customers find the right person for the job.

“I’ve recommended other painters when a customer needs someone who specializes in painting cabinets, for example,” he said. “We’re not in competition; it’s more of a camaraderie.”

One of the key benefits he sees to having a booth at the show is the ability to give people individual attention for their projects.

“When I’m asked why people should go to the home show, my response is, you’re going to find local people you can trust,” he noted.

Loughlin agreed and said that, because people can touch the products in her company’s booth, it helps them recognize quality kitchen and bath fixtures. When products like these are researched and then bought online, there’s no tactile experience, and service after the purchase is often lacking.

“Our customers know they can call us if there is ever a problem,” she said.
“There’s no sending things in the mail; we’ll just take care of it right here.”

As in past years, most booths will be located in the Better Living Center and the adjacent Young Building. New this year, the space between the two buildings will be used as a “contractor’s village” for products that exhibit better outside.

Scott Fleury helps Kelly-Fradet Lumber get all decked out for the show.

PV Squared Solar, a residential solar-energy installer, will forego the traditional booth setup indoors and will instead set up a solar-powered trailer in the contractor’s village to run electrical devices off the grid.

Anna Mannello, marketing coordinator for PV Squared, said that, as a first-time exhibitor, the home show presents a great way to connect with people in the community.

“PV Squared Solar is based in Greenfield, so we’ve done most of our business in Franklin and Hampshire counties,” she said. “While we’ve done a few installations in Hampden County, this will be an opportunity to increase our exposure to lots of new people.”

Mannello hasn’t yet finalized what appliances they plan to demonstrate, but during the four days of the show, attendees will be able to connect to PV Squared’s trailer to charge their phones using solar power.

It’s one thing to be a first-time exhibitor, and it’s quite something else to launch a new business at the home show. That’s how Todd Hickman, president of Hickman and Sgroi Electric, is approaching his inaugural exhibit.

While his company is an established residential, commercial, and industrial contractor, he and his partner, Steve Sgroi, are introducing Home Service Electrical, a membership-based, comprehensive approach to homeowner electrical needs. Instead of waiting for an emergency, Hickman said the service starts with a full inspection of the home’s electrical system to prevent familiar problems, such as losing power while cooking Thanksgiving dinner.

When a service call is needed, a professional technician in a fully stocked van will be expected to solve most problems in one visit. Each service has a standard price, so the consumer knows upfront what the job will cost. The home show represents an opportunity to introduce this different concept for electrical service.

“We’re creating a brand, so it’s important to educate the public on who we are, the image we present, and to assure people that we plan to be here for generations to come,” Hickman said.

Sgroi, vice president of Hickman and Sgroi, said their goal for the home show is simple, and it’s one shared by many, on one level or another.

“We hope to schedule inspections and grow the business until we are overwhelmed,” he said, while Hickman quickly added, if that happens, the business will gladly expand to meet the demand.

The Finish Line

For many years, HBRAWM provided plastic bags for show attendees to collect information from exhibitors. Crane proudly noted that the plastic bags are gone and have been replaced this year with reusable cloth bags, similar to those found in supermarkets.

“It’s one small way our members can be part of the solution to improving our environment,” he said. The bag will include a map showing all booth locations and a guide with contact information on all the HBRWM members.

“If you have a specific project, the map and guide will help you navigate the show to get the information you need,” Crane said. “If you don’t have any projects and you want a social experience, then you can just walk around, and you’ll have a great time.”

He concluded that other home shows have come and gone in the area, but ‘the original’ home show is here to stay. “After 66 years, it’s now a piece of Western Mass. history.”

The Western Mass Home and Garden show will be open Thursday and Friday, March 26-27, from 1 to 9 p.m.; Saturday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, March 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 for adults. Children under 12 are admitted free. Veterans and active military with ID are admitted free on Thursday only. Discount coupons for every day of the show are available at www.westernmasshomeshow.com.

Construction

Doors to Success

Invigorated.

That’s not the word many people would use to describe themselves after being in the same business, with the same company, for 34 years. But that’s precisely how Al Herringshaw feels about his most recent career move.

Specifically, he purchased Pella Windows & Doors of Western Massachusetts, a window and door sales and installation business headquartered in Greenfield, which he first joined as a teenager in 1985. It’s been a long and challenging road to ownership, one that required decades of experience in the field and lots of “homework,” as Herringshaw called it, to be ready to take that leap.

Despite the challenges, he would be the first to say he’s glad he decided to take the reins. The second would be Gary Sherman, former owner of Pella Windows & Doors, whom Herringshaw credits with not only showing him the ropes, but also providing support throughout the transition process.

“As succession occurred from Gary Sherman to me. I wouldn’t have done it without his support and without the support from all the employees,” said Herringshaw. “It wasn’t a one-man show. Gary wanted it to happen, I wanted it to happen, and it allowed Gary and I to provide a fairly seamless experience for the employees.”

Herringshaw said making this an easy transition for staff members topped his priority list — not only out of respect for them, but because he knows how it feels to be an employee. In fact, he held several positions in the company before ascending to ownership this past July.

“It feels really good that they’re, in my opinion, back to promoting innovation and coming up with unique things within the window and door industry that set us apart. They’ve really come up with some neat products over the last couple years.””

Herringshaw was only 19 when he started at Pella in the summer of 1985 as a sliding-door builder. He worked in the shop for two years before moving to commercial coordinator, as recommended by his shop supervisor. He spent two years there, then moved into an outside sales rep position in West Springfield for 10 years — all positions he says he enjoyed greatly.

“It’s good to spend time in the field,” he said. “You certainly learn a lot about a business in a sales position.”

In 2000, he came back to Greenfield as Sherman’s general manager and spent 20 years in this position before purchasing the business last year. He said the company had a great back end to 2019, and he’s excited to tap into his extensive experience to bring even more success to an already thriving business.

Opportunity Knocks

Herringshaw believes his experience within the company will help him bring many skills to the table in order to take Pella to a new level.

“I think it helps me garner some respect from the employees because I have seen a lot of the business,” he said. “I also think it gives me perspective on how to look at certain things when people come to me with issues, or even when a customer comes to me.”

Herringshaw said minimal changes were made to staff or location of employees during the transition, and he hopes to fill seven to 10 open positions in the near future.

And that’s only the beginning.

He says he has several ideas and goals he would like to implement to take Pella Windows & Doors to the forefront of the construction field.

“I think we need to add new talent to our business, and I think we need to grow our social-media profile,” he said. “I think those are two key things for our business to get us to the next level.”

Perhaps one of his biggest goals is to raise the Pella profile in the architect community.

“I think we do well there. I’d like to be awesome there,” he told BusinessWest. “I would like Pella products to be the number-one thought-of brand in an architect’s office.”

Al Herringshaw says his many years and layers of experience in the company will help him garner respect from his employees.

As for how to accomplish this, he said he’s excited about some new products that the Pella corporation is introducing to help stand out from the competition.

“It feels really good that they’re, in my opinion, back to promoting innovation and coming up with unique things within the window and door industry that set us apart,” Herringshaw said, adding that he is on a product board where he gets to give input to the company. “They’ve really come up with some neat products over the last couple years.”

For example, he hopes to become a business that is very focused on the ability to supply replacement windows, noting that this will be in high demand in the future.

“When you look at the inventory of homes we have in New England, there are a lot of old homes,” he said. “I think energy-efficient replacement is a big deal, and a good experience for customers is something that we have to focus on and be ready to supply.”

“My folks are very available, I’m very available, and we want to make sure people are happy with the end result. I think that’s a big deal for any company today — to be conscientious and to understand that that’s probably the one way you can truly make yourself unique.”

Standing out is difficult in this industry marked by stiff competition and often vulnerable to economic tides. But Herringshaw is confident that, by diversifying the business and continuing to provide excellent service to customers, Pella will be able to stand out.

“I think the innovation makes a big difference in standing out,” he said. “I truly believe that the overall quality of our products, the fit and finish, really is superior to anyone else’s. But I’ll also tell you, at the end of the day, I believe our customers would say that they do business with us because of the way we respond and take care of them.”

Looking Ahead

Installed sales manager Dan Wells is enthusiastic about the new ownership, noting that “Al has a way of keeping everyone engaged and focused on priorities. One of those priorities is supporting the communities where we live and work.”

A fixture in Western Mass. and Vermont since 1962, Pella has long been known for its customer-centric approach to business, Herringshaw noted, and he expects that to continue. “I have one goal — to make Pella of Greenfield the number-one place to purchase windows and doors, and the number one place to work.”

In short, with plenty of experience in the field, a mind full of ideas and goals, and a hardworking team ready to make it happen, Herringshaw is ready to take Pella Windows & Doors to the next level.

“My folks are very available, I’m very available, and we want to make sure people are happy with the end result,” he said. “I think that’s a big deal for any company today — to be conscientious and to understand that that’s probably the one way you can truly make yourself unique.”

Kayla Ebner can be reached at [email protected]

Hampshire County

A Shopping Evolution

General Manager Lynn Gray

General Manager Lynn Gray

Hampshire Mall has seen its share of changes over the decades, particularly in recent years with the onslaught of online retail that has severely challenged brick-and-mortar shopping centers across the country. But this complex on busy Route 9, in a largely affluent, college-dominated region, has recrafted itself as an entertainment destination, where people can do some shopping, yes, but also enjoy go-karts, bowling, laser tag, a movie, and more. The takeaway? Malls may be challenged, but they’re not obsolete yet.

When Bill Hoefler purchased Interskate 91 at the Hampshire Mall 19 years ago, the rollerskating destination had been open for several years, and the mall itself had been thriving, more or less, for two decades.

He wondered how that could be. “Hadley’s population was only about 3,800.”

But the commercial corridor on Russell Street had been growing for some time, he went on, serving as a bridge between Amherst and Northampton, two communities with eclectic, college-centric populations where it could sometimes be difficult to build.

“Walmart had just been built in ’98,” he noted, “and we knew the mall had plans to demolish the theaters and build new ones. Then you had Chili’s and Applebees just a half-mile away. Those companies usually will not build where there’s not a 100,000 population density within a five-mile radius. So why are they in Hadley?”

Fast-forward almost 20 years, and Route 9 is even more built out than before. Interskate continues to draw a loyal clientele, and Hoefler has expanded his adjoining laser-tag operation from 2,100 square feet to 4,500. And Hampshire Mall — at a time when malls, especially those not bordering major highways, have been rocked by the online retail revolution — is not just surviving in tiny Hadley, but bringing in new tenants, many of them entertainment-oriented.

“It’s a hotbed,” Hoefler said. “People in Western Massachusetts will drive 45 minutes to do what they want, but why not just go to Holyoke? Well, a lot of people north of Holyoke just won’t go that far; they stop here. Or they come in from the west. We even have people from Westfield who would rather come here than mess with the perception of the ‘city mall’ in Holyoke.”

Lynn Gray has a lot of experience at Hampshire Mall as well, starting her career in marketing there about two decades ago, when Kmart was still a thriving anchor, and Cinemark was turning the old six-screen movie theater into a 12-screen megaplex. After leaving to work at another Pyramid Management Group property a decade ago, she returned around the start of 2016 and now serves as the mall’s general manager.

“So I got to see where the center was 20 years ago and where it is today, and the changes in between have been really exciting,” she said, rejecting the idea that brick-and-mortar retail is in permanent decline.

“The word I like to use is evolution, because shopping behavior changes constantly,” she told BusinessWest. “What consumers want, how they want it, when they want it, how they want it delivered to them, or how they want to see, touch, and feel it has constantly changed.”

Many still desire that hands-on, instant-gratification shopping experience, she added, which explains why Hampshire has brought in new retail tenants in recent years, from chains like PetSmart to service-oriented shops like T-Mobile and Nail Pro & Spa to local favorites like Faces, which previously spent decades in downtown Northampton.

But it has also morphed into an entertainment destination, complementing long-time tenants Interskate and Cinemark with newer arrivals like Autobahn Indoor Speedway and PiNZ.

“Twenty years ago, there was a theater here, which is entertainment. We had rollerskating and laser tag, which is entertainment,” Gray said. “Over the last several years, as a lot of developers and shopping centers have moved away from big boxes and wondered what to do with some of the changes in retail, they’ve been introducing more and more entertainment. We’ve followed suit, but Pyramid has always been at the forefront of that anyway. Having a rollerskating rink at a shopping mall is not traditional.”

Not much has been traditional about successful malls in recent years, Hoefler agreed, but the business model is working in Hadley.

“When we got here, we saw it was the beginning of an upswing, and we made it our home,” he said. “We’ve been big cheerleaders for the property, and we love being here.”

Gaining Speed

Jake Savageau, general manager of Autobahn, feels the same way. The karting chain boasts 12 locations across the country and attracts a broad clientele, from parents bringing young children during the day to a college and adult crowd at night, racing electric karts that can reach 50 mph. The center’s oldest racer to date was a 95-year-old.

“So much entertainment is coming into malls,” he said, “so when people come in expecting to buy clothing and other items, they see us making a lot of noise, and it attracts their attention — ‘what’s going on here?’ It makes them stay in the mall longer and spend more money and have a good time at the end of the day.”

PiNZ, a small, Massachusetts-based chain, is another recent addition, bringing bowling, arcade games, and a full restaurant and bar to the mall — plus the most recent attraction, axe throwing. General Manager Jessica Ruiz said PiNZ attracts the same kind of crowd flow Autobahn does — younger kids during the day, college students and adults at night.

Jake Savageau says shoppers sometimes discover the entertainment options, like Autobahn Indoor Speedway, when they arrive — and then return to spend more time and money in the mall.

Jake Savageau says shoppers sometimes discover the entertainment options, like Autobahn Indoor Speedway, when they arrive — and then return to spend more time and money in the mall.

“They love it,” she said of the axe-throwing room. “For the most part, people are surprised they like it as much as they do. Everyone’s looking for an experience now. And that’s what we give them, with all the activities we offer here.”

The mall has begun installing ‘patios’ outside the PiNZ eatery and nearby Arizona Pizza, offering a sort of sidewalk-café experience that connects diners to the mall as a whole. Speaking of connecting to the mall, neither PiNZ nor Autobahn has an exterior entrance — the idea is to bring people into the mall to see what else catches their interest.

The Cinemark theaters still do well, Gray said, and continue to invest in the space, including new seating last year and updates to the HVAC system to become more energy-efficient. “They’re making a lot of changes and reinvesting because this is a great, desirable location for them, too.”

Pyramid has made capital investments as well, she added, not only in space improvements to attract new dining, shopping, and entertainment options, but efforts over the past decade to install new lighting, new flooring, restroom updates, and seating modifications to make the center more attractive to both customers and retailers.

“The food court was redone, we have new digital display directories … it’s been really nice to see,” she said. “Fifteen or 20 years ago when I came here, it was the cobblestone and a sort of ’80s-’90s vibe, and today, it’s fresh, it’s exciting, it’s bright.”

With new retail and entertainment tenants in the fold, she would like to see more dining options come on board — perhaps some locally owned eateries, or even a brewery. The idea is to constantly evolve the mix to transform what was once retail-dominant into a center where people can have a diverse experience and spend plenty of time — and money.

“Twenty years ago, people wouldn’t have thought they’d see a Target in a shopping center, and the next evolution is that people wouldn’t have thought a gym would be in a mall,” she said, noting the presence of Planet Fitness. “But that’s here, and go-kart racing is here. So it constantly changes.”

Blurring Lines

Malls aren’t done evolving, Gray said, noting that even online retailers, like Warby Parker, are showing up in malls.

“Even Amazon is doing pop-ups inside shopping centers. The online world and the e-commerce world does still look to brick and mortar to enhance their brands as well. While you can buy things on Target.com, people still want that experience and that instant gratification, while other people can wait for their product. A lot of people still want to come into a mall, into a setting where there’s more than one option, to see, touch, and feel their products before they make their purchase.”

That said, no one managing malls today is downplaying the impact of online retail.

“Your online presence is always going to be there — that’s the wave of the future,” Gray told BusinessWest. “But by introducing an entertainment component, it’s about the experience — and we’ve taken that experience to a new level. With the collection of all these experiences all under one roof, the goal for us is to make sure we’re all things to all people and we provide the customer with what they want, when they want it.”

Faces built its name for 33 years in downtown Northampton, but now it’s one of the newest retail options a few miles to the east at Hampshire Mall.

Faces built its name for 33 years in downtown Northampton, but now it’s one of the newest retail options a few miles to the east at Hampshire Mall.

Hampshire Mall is well-positioned to roll with changes in shopping habits, Gray added, because of its community demographics and the economic vitality of Route 9 in general.

“Retailers are looking for population density, but they’re also looking for household income thresholds, and this area offers so much. It’s a very affluent community, the crossroads between Northampton and Amherst,” she explained. “But we’re also in great proximity to a wealth of the college student population, which definitely is a driver for this area.

“Twenty years ago, this section of Route 9 was completely different than what it looks like today,” she went on. “There wasn’t a Lowe’s, a Home Depot, a Starbucks. Now all these things exist here, and this becomes a very desirable area for a lot of different uses. LL Bean is moving across the street; Autobahn is open here. A lot of people see this as valuable real estate because of its access to the affluent community and the college students.”

Bill Hoefler

Bill Hoefler says he enjoys being part of the “funky and eclectic” mix of tenants at Hampshire Mall.

Faces is a good example, she said. “It’s traditional retail, if you will, but with a non-traditional flair,” she said of the quirky store that opened in downtown Amherst in 1971 but recently ended a 33-year run as a downtown Northampton mainstay.

“They relocated to Hampshire Mall because they saw the collection of entertainment and dining and all the uses they wanted to be around to support their business for the long term,” Gray noted. “I think that’s a testament to how, when you put the right people under the same roof, people are more drawn to come in, and businesses are more drawn to open new locations.”

Rolling Along

Hoefler has certainly seen his share of mall evolution, but continues to draw families to the uniquely shaped skating rink above the food court and his new, cutting-edge laser-tag center downstairs. “We didn’t just want to move; we wanted to do it bigger, better, with the latest technology.”

The skating business ebbs and flows, he added, but in perhaps unexpected ways; when the economy is good, he sees new faces, but he typically does best when the economy is flat, because he has a loyal clientele, largely middle to lower-middle class, that appreciates an affordable entertainment option. “Even when times are tough, they still come skating.”

Now that those entertainment options have expanded, Hampshire Mall’s target audience — a mix of college students, factory workers, agricultural families, and more — have additional reasons to make their way to the mall.

“We’re proud of our history,” Hoefler said. “We’re proud to be in the mall. We’re glad to be part of the mix that keeps this funky and eclectic. It’s a good time.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Picture This

A photo essay of recent business events in Western Massachusetts / May 2019

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

Meeting the Class of 2019

Mercedes-Benz of Springfield, one of the sponsors of BusinessWest’s 40 Under Forty program for 2019, recently staged a cocktail party for the class of 2019 and their guests, providing an opportunity for the soon-to-be members of an exclusive club to meet and get to know one another. Here, honorees gather for a class photo. They’ll be together again on June 20 for the 40 Under Forty Gala at the Log Cabin in Holyoke.



Trees into Cartons, Cartons into Trees

Fourth- and fifth-graders from the Ludlow Community Center/Randall Boys and Girls Club recently gathered to learn about the environmental benefits of trees, paper, and recycling from staff members of the Paperboard Packaging Council (PPC), a national trade association, headquartered in Springfield, for the manufacturers of paperboard boxes. The presentation was part of PPC’s educational outreach program, TICCIT (Trees into Cartons, Cartons into Trees), which teaches students that trees are a sustainable crop, highlights the many uses for trees and paper, and underscores the importance of recycling. The students also planted tree saplings in paperboard cartons to take home. The carton, when planted directly in the ground, provides protection and a natural water funnel for the new tree. As the tree grows, the carton will break down and complete the TICCIT cycle. PPC also donated a young weeping cherry tree that was planted near the front entrance of the community center.



Investment in the Future

Aerospace Components Manufacturers (ACM), a nonprofit regional network of independent aerospace companies, recently announced a four-year, $180,632 pledge to Asnuntuck Community College’s Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center. The center’s CNC machine-technology lab was also named in honor of ACM. “By ensuring that more students gain access to careers in this exciting industry, these funds will aid in both the realization of individual educational and career goals as well as helping to satisfy a dramatically increasing demand for a technologically skilled workforce,” said Asnuntuck President Frank Lombella, pictured at right with ACM President Pedro Soto (left) and ACM Executive Director Paul Murphy. See story on page 21 for an broader look at the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center.



Marking a Milestone

The Edward P. Boland VA Medical Center in Leeds is marking its 95th anniversary this year. It is marking this milestone in a number of ways, including a ceremony, complete with a large birthday cake, at the facility on May 15.

CEO John Collins, FACHE, addresses those gathered, offering both a look back and a glance to the future

CEO John Collins, FACHE, addresses those gathered, offering both a look back and a glance to the future

Audience members listened to a number of different speakers

Audience members listened to a number of different speakers

Gordon Tatro, a retired employee (Engineering) and the VA’s unofficial historian, references an old photo of the facility to highlight changes that have taken place in recent years

Gordon Tatro, a retired employee (Engineering) and the VA’s unofficial historian, references an old photo of the facility to highlight changes that have taken place in recent years

Collins joins recently hired employees to cut the cake

Collins joins recently hired employees to cut the cake

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]
A photo essay of recent business events in Western Massachusetts April 2019


Common Threads

Dress for Success staged its annual Common Threads gala on April 25 at the Sheraton in Springfield. The event, described as a ‘celebration of women,’ inspires supporters with stories of success and empowerment as recent program participants speak of their achievements and successes.

Wilhelmina Humphries is ushered to the stage by Werner Maiwald, president of Renaissance Insurance Benefits

Wilhelmina Humphries is ushered to the stage by Werner Maiwald, president of Renaissance Insurance Benefits

Maria Pelletier is ushered to the stage by Dr. Mark Keroack, president and CEO of Baystate Health

Maria Pelletier is ushered to the stage by Dr. Mark Keroack, president and CEO of Baystate Health

Carla Cosenzi, president of Tommy Car Auto, Margaret Tantillo, executive director of Dress for Success Western Massachusetts, and Jessica Dupont of Health New England, chair of the board of Dress for Success Western Massachusetts

Carla Cosenzi, president of Tommy Car Auto, Margaret Tantillo, executive director of Dress for Success Western Massachusetts, and Jessica Dupont of Health New England, chair of the board of Dress for Success Western Massachusetts

 


President’s Gala

Bay Path University staged its third annual President’s Gala on April 27 at the Sheraton in Springfield. The gala, which raises money for scholarships, again featured a Dancing with the Stars format that had a team of judges — and the audience — struggling to determine who should take home the coveted President’s cup. After audience voting, that honor eventually went to Julian Jusko, a community partner and long-time supporter of the gala, who earned three perfect 10s from the judges, as did fellow competitors Erin Hornyak.

Gala chairs Tim and Carrie Burr, Drew and Lauren Davis

Gala chairs Tim and Carrie Burr, Drew and Lauren Davis, Tiffany and Ted Madru, and Carol and Rick Steele Jr.

Jusko finishes off her routine in style

Jusko finishes off her routine in style

U.S. Rep. Richard Neal addresses the audience

U.S. Rep. Richard Neal addresses the audience

Bay Path President Carol Leary offers a few remarks

Bay Path President Carol Leary offers a few remarks

the judges for the dance competition, from left, Lindsay Arnold, Wayne Hooker, and Kara Wolters

the judges for the dance competition, from left, Lindsay Arnold, Wayne Hooker, and Kara Wolters

from left, instructor Gunnar Sverrisson, Hornyak, Jusko, Clemons, and instructor Daryll & Sverrisson gather for a final round of applause

from left, instructor Gunnar Sverrisson, Hornyak, Jusko, Clemons, and instructor Daryll & Sverrisson gather for a final round of applause


Celebrating Entrepreneurship

The Grinspoon Entrepreneurship Initiative (GEI) staged its annual awards banquet on April 24 at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. The well-attended gathering featured an Entrepreneur Showcase featuring students attending 14 area colleges and universities, an elevator-pitch competition, the presentation of awards, and keynote speaker Wombi Rose, CEO and co-founder of Lovepop.

GEI Founder Harold Grinspoon visits with Julia Baker, Springfield Technical Community College student and founder of Media Journeys

Jarrod Coletta, Western New England University student and co-founder of Bimiitech, chats with guests about his venture

Jarrod Coletta, Western New England University student and co-founder of Bimiitech, chats with guests about his venture

the crowded ballroom floor during the Entrepreneur Showcase

the crowded ballroom floor during the Entrepreneur Showcase

Anna Aron (left), a Hampshire College student and founder of Anna Leigh Pottery, shows some of her works to Katie Allan Zobel, president and CEO of the Community Foundation

Anna Aron (left), a Hampshire College student and founder of Anna Leigh Pottery, shows some of her works to Katie Allan Zobel, president and CEO of the Community Foundation

Hampshire College student Adil Sarwar shows off his venture, the Cupcake Factory

Hampshire College student Adil Sarwar shows off his venture, the Cupcake Factory

 


Derby Day

Square One staged its fourth annual Kentucky Derby fundraising gala on race day at Mercedes-Benz of Springfield. More than 210 guests turned out to watch the Running of the Roses, do some networking, and raise nearly $30,000 for early-education provider Square One.

attendees watch as the horses head for the finish line

attendees watch as the horses head for the finish line

from left, Carrie and BJ Calvi, Kelli Moriarty Finn, David Finn, and Ryan McCollum

from left, Carrie and BJ Calvi, Kelli Moriarty Finn, David Finn, and Ryan McCollum

from left, Jeff and Laura Lomma, Andrew and Megan Hersman, and Dawn DiStefano

from left, Jeff and Laura Lomma, Andrew and Megan Hersman, and Dawn DiStefano

Square One President and CEO Joan Kagan addresses the crowd of race watchers

Square One President and CEO Joan Kagan addresses the crowd of race watchers

from left, Lakisha Coppedge, Margaret Tantoillo, and James Coppedge do some networking

from left, Lakisha Coppedge, Margaret Tantoillo, and James Coppedge do some networking

 


Nonprofit Management

In Good Company

Jennifer Connelly, left, and Dawn Creighton

Jennifer Connelly, left, and Dawn Creighton display promotional materials for the JA Inspire program’s career-exploration fair set for May 28.

The 100th Anniversary Gala for Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts will have a decidedly ’20s flair — as in the 1920s. In fact, the theme is “The Roaring ’20s are Back.”

Attendees are encouraged, but not required, to come in period dress, a challenge that Jennifer Connelly, executive director of the local JA chapter, met (with considerable help from her daughter) by doing a hard search online that yielded the appropriate dress as well as a headband with a feather.

“I’ll have the long gloves and the long cigarette holder — a full outfit; it will be very interesting to see what people come up with to mark the ’20s,” she said with a trace of understatement in her voice.

But while the gala will amount to an effort to turn back the clock in many respects, Junior Achievement, and especially its Western Mass. chapter, have been turning the clock forward, focusing on the 2020s — and the decades to follow — with a host of programs that are seemingly far removed from the organization’s original mission to introduce young people to the principles of business — but then again, not very far removed at all.

Programs like JA Inspire.

Created by a coalition of education and industry leaders led by JA of Western Mass., this endeavor is designed to introduce young people to industry sectors and careers, and also provide awareness of what skills will be needed to thrive in those settings.

At the heart of the initiative is a massive career fair set for May 28 at the MassMutual Center that won’t follow the typical model for such events.

Actually, it will, but the audience will be decidedly different. Instead of people looking for jobs they can enter in a few weeks or even a few days, those roaming the aisles will be middle- and high-school students gaining information on jobs they might fill sometime in the next decade.

“We’re going to have representatives of a number of industry clusters, and we’ll also have representatives of the post-secondary schools in this area,” said Connelly, “so students can understand that there is a pathway to a career that they might be interested in.”

In many respects, JA has always been about identifying and illuminating pathways, and JA Inspire is just one example of how this nonprofit has stayed true to its original mission while also evolving over the years and expanding into programs, 23 of them in all, for students in grades K-12, said Connelly.

These programs provide lessons in everything from how government works to how large a slice of one’s paycheck the IRS takes; from how global the global economy truly is to the all-important difference between a ‘want’ and a ‘need’ when it comes to how one spends their money, she said, adding that, to get these messages across, JA relies (as it has throughout its history) on volunteers.

“We try to make that match between what they’re learning and why it’s important, and it’s very rewarding work.”

People like Sharon Dufour, chief financial officer at Ludlow-based LUSO Federal Credit Union and a JA volunteer for more than 30 years, 20 of them in this market. She has been instrumental in bringing JA programs into schools in the Wilbraham/Ludlow area, and also in moving beyond traditional school-banking initiatives — where students learn the basics of banking — and into financial literacy.

She’s taught at all levels, including seventh grade and a program called “JA is My Future,” which helps students understand the value of what they’re learning.

“It helps them understand the skills they’ll need for specific jobs,” she explained,” adding that, in the last full school year, LUSO helped coordinate 130 classes for Junior Achievement, reaching 2,810 students. “We try to make that match between what they’re learning and why it’s important, and it’s very rewarding work.”

Julie Ann Pelletier agreed. A retired transplant to the Berkshires just over a decade ago, she was looking for volunteer work to take on and certainly found it with JA — she now coordinates the agency’s programs across the Berkshires.

One of them is an initiative to promote entrepreneurship in high-school students, for which they needed a product that students could design, make, market, and sell. Pelletier helped inspire one — crocheted hats (she teaches that art).

Fast-forwarding, she said she wound up teaching a number of Putnam Vocational Academy students that skill, and a few of them went on to start their own businesses and eventually win business competitions as they moved their ventures forward.

“I’m 72, and they’re 17, so they called it ‘Twisting the Generations,’ — it was the old school teaching the new school,” she said, summing up quickly and efficiently what JA, and its volunteers, have been doing for the past century.

For this issue and its focus on nonprofits, BusinessWest examines all that JA is celebrating as its marks an important milestone — 100 years of not only teaching young people about business, but preparing them for all that life can throw at them.

Getting Down to Business

Connelly told BusinessWest that JA’s 100th birthday bash will be a year-long celebration, one that has a number of goals, from honoring the past to raising awareness of its many programs and initiatives in an effort to ensure sustainability.

It will be capped, in most respects, by a series of events on Sept. 28, when JA National, as it’s called, which is based in Colorado, will stage JA Day at the Big E, home to the first Junior Achievement building ever erected — funded by Horace Moses, president of Strathmore Paper Co., and one of three men who founded JA in 1919. There will be a parade, speeches, and a dinner, and Connelly is expecting representatives from many of the 107 JA chapters nationwide to be in attendance.

Jennifer Connelly says JA has evolved considerably

Jennifer Connelly says JA has evolved considerably over the past century, but remains true to its original mission.

Locally, the immediate focus is on the May 4 gala, to be staged at MGM Springfield, an event expected to draw more than 300 people. The list of attendees includes two descendants of U.S. Sen. Murray Crane of Massachusetts, another of the founders (the third was Theodore Vail, president of AT&T), as well as a representative of Strathmore Paper.

So there will be significant ties to the past, said Connelly, adding that the gala will honor the agency’s founders, but also all the change and evolution that has come over the past century, and there has been quite a bit of both, as her quick history lesson shows.

“When they founded JA 100 years ago, it started off with what they called the company program,” she explained. “Students came together, formed a company, and sold a product; they envisioned a way to help young people transitioning from an agrarian-based economy to a manufacturing-based economy.”

A glass display case in the front lobby of the JA’s offices on the second floor of Tower Square holds artifacts that speak to those early days of the company program, everything from ribbons awarded at a competition in the mid-1920s to a wooden lamp built by area high-school students to later sell. (Connelly isn’t sure of the date on that item, but guesses it’s from the mid-’70s.

The student-company initiative continues to this day, she said proudly, noting that a number of area high schools run the program after school, during the summer, and as part of the regular school day.

Pathfinder Regional High School, for example, has expanded its program to includes a Facebook page, she said, adding that one class is enjoying success with selling a brush designed for pets called Brush It Off.

But over the past 30 years or so, JA has taken on a broader role, one certainly in keeping with the founders’ intent, especially within the realm of financial literacy. And that role will likely become deeper still following the passage of a bill in January that allows state education officials to establish standards around financial literacy, which schools could incorporate into their existing curricula in subjects like math, business, and social sciences.

The standards will be guidelines, not a mandate, said Connelly, adding that, for those schools who wish to adopt these guidelines, JA could become a partner in helping to bring those lessons home.

The agency already provides a wide array of financial-literacy programs to students in grades K-12, she noted, citing, as one example, something called the Credit for Life Fair, staged recently at Elms College, a program created for high-school students.

Students essentially choose a field, are given a budget, and are presented a number of options on how to spend their money — from investments to essentials like housing, a car, and groceries, as well as ‘fun’ items. They then visit with a credit counselor to review their choices and discuss the consequences of each one.

“These are great learning experiences,” Connelly said of the fair, several of which are conducted each year. “They actually get to see that, even if they get a good job and make a lot of money, that money doesn’t go too far. And they learn about the importance of having a good credit score; they can be a doctor and make a lot of money, but if they have a bad credit score, that’s going to hurt them down the road.”

The Job at Hand

While JA is providing young people with a look at life in a chosen profession through these Credit for Life programs — well, sort of — it is also introducing them to industry sectors, career paths, and specific jobs through initiatives like the JA Inspire program and the aforementioned event at the MassMutual Center.

The formal name of that gathering is the Inspire Career Exploration Fair, and that’s appropriate, because that’s what the attendees will be doing — exploring. And while they’re doing that, area employers might be getting some help with the biggest problem they face these days — securing a workforce for the future.

“Every employer in every industry sector is experiencing workforce shortages,” said Dawn Creighton, Western Mass. director for Associated Industries of Massachuetts, which came on board as a sponsor of the initiative early on and has been encouraging its members to take part. “People are not ready for the workforce, whether it’s vocational skills, technical skills, soft skills — they’re not ready.”

The career-exploration fair was conceived to help ensure that the next generation of workers is more ready, she went on, by not just introducing young people to career possibilities they may or may not have known about, but also spell out for them what it will take to land such a position in terms of skills and education.

And that’s why the event has caught the attention of businesses in several sectors, from manufacturing to healthcare to financial services, and from every corner of the 413, said Creighton, adding that all see a chance to open some eyes.

“All too often, these types of career days come during the spring of senior year, and by then it’s often too late,” she told BusinessWest. “We need to introduce young people to all the career opportunities out there, and we need to do it earlier.”

Sharon Dufour, long-time volunteer with JA

Sharon Dufour, long-time volunteer with JA, is seen here with third-graders as she provides lessons about zoning and building a city.

Thus, the fair, as noted, is an example of how JA’s mission has evolved and the agency has moved beyond the classroom in many respects. But area schools are where most of JA’s life lessons are delivered, a tradition that began a century ago and continues today through the work of teachers and especially volunteers.

Dufour has worked to recruit them for years and said more are always needed to help JA reach more young people.

“I tell every volunteer I know that it’s the most rewarding experience you can imagine,” she said. “The kids see you; they remember you. I once had a kid come flying across the Stop & Shop to give me a big hug. Her mother said, ‘my daughter does not stop talking about you.’”

Pelletier agreed, and said the rewards from volunteering come in many flavors, especially the satisfaction that comes from seeing a light go on in a young person’s eyes as they realize their potential to take an idea or a skill (like crocheting) and run with it.

“Once people get the basics, they fly,” she said, referring specifically to crocheting, but also to the many principles of business in general. “And it’s incredibly exciting to watch it happen.”

Past Is Prologue

“The future of our country depends upon making every individual fully realize the obligations and responsibilities belonging to citizenship. Habits are formed in youth. What we need in this country now is to teach the growing generations to realize that thrift and economy, coupled with industry, are as necessary now as they were in past generations.”

Theodore Vail spoke those words a century or so ago when JA was in its infancy. But they certainly ring true today, especially that part about habits being formed in youth.

Helping young people develop the right habits has been JA’s informal mission for 100 years now. There are now more ways in which in that mission is being carried out, but it’s still about pathways and putting people on the right ones.

And that’s a proud history worth celebrating.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Picture This

A photo essay of recent business events in Western Massachusetts April 15, 2019

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

Women’s Leadership Conference

Bay Path University staged its annual Women’s Leadership Conference on March 29. The theme for the day was “Why Not Me,” and a number of keynote speakers and focus sessions addressed that broad topic.

More than 1,700 people attended the day-long conference

More than 1,700 people attended the day-long conference

luncheon keynote speaker Mel Robbins shares the ‘five-second rule’ with the audience

luncheon keynote speaker Mel Robbins shares the ‘five-second rule’ with the audience

Rita Moreno, winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony, and Golden Globe, was the closing keynote speaker at the conference

Rita Moreno, winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony, and Golden Globe, was the closing keynote speaker at the conference

he sizable contingent from MassMutual poses for a photo

he sizable contingent from MassMutual poses for a photo

Dr. Ann Errichetti, chief operations and academic officer at Presence Health

Dr. Ann Errichetti, chief operations and academic officer at Presence Health

Kate Kane, managing director and wealth-management advisor for Northwestern Mutual, were both inducted into the Women Business Leaders Hall of Fame

Kate Kane, managing director and wealth-management advisor for Northwestern Mutual, were both inducted into the Women Business Leaders Hall of Fame




Cutting the Ribbon

Ribbon-cutting ceremonies were conducted on April 5 for a new medical/professional building at 15 Atwood Dr. in Northampton, a project led by Development Associates and Northwood Development, LLC.

Ken Vincunas, right, president of Development Associates, with Ronald Waskiewicz, assistant chief probation officer, and Michael Carey, Hampshire County register of Probate, both tenants in the building

Ken Vincunas, right, president of Development Associates, with Ronald Waskiewicz, assistant chief probation officer, and Michael Carey, Hampshire County register of Probate, both tenants in the building

from left, Vincunas, Susan O’Leary Mulhern of Northwood Development, Eileen O’Leary Sullivan of Northwood Development, Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz, and Travis Ward of Development Associates

from left, Vincunas, Susan O’Leary Mulhern of Northwood Development, Eileen O’Leary Sullivan of Northwood Development, Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz, and Travis Ward of Development Associates

officials cut the ceremonial ribbon

officials cut the ceremonial ribbon

O’Leary Sullivan addresses those gathered at the ceremony

O’Leary Sullivan addresses those gathered at the ceremony




Partnering with the Sox

As part of its ongoing Worcester expansion, Country Bank is teaming up with the Worcester Red Sox as one of the team’s 21 founding partners in anticipation of its move to Worcester in 2021. The bank’s recent annual annual meeting in Worcester featured a keynote address that included a video of the site of Polar Park narrated by Worcester Red Sox President Charles Steinberg, along with remarks regarding the team’s decision to relocate to Worcester.

Pictured, from left, are Rob Crain, senior vice president of Marketing for the Worcester Red Sox; Shelley Regin, senior vice president of Marketing for Country Bank; Paul Scully, President and CEO of Country Bank, and Jack Verducci, vice president of Corporate Partnerships for the Worcester Red Sox.

Pictured, from left, are Rob Crain, senior vice president of Marketing for the Worcester Red Sox; Shelley Regin, senior vice president of Marketing for Country Bank; Paul Scully, President and CEO of Country Bank, and Jack Verducci, vice president of Corporate Partnerships for the Worcester Red Sox.




Show of Support

The YWCA of Greater Springfield recently hosted a somewhat unusual, but important gathering — a show of support for Cheryl Claprood, the recently named acting police commissioner in Springfield, a role she assumes at a time of considerable controversy within the department.

Claprood, center, with Hampden County Sheriff Nick Cocchi and YWCA Executive Director Elizabeth Dineen, a former prosecutor in Hampden County. Behind them are some of the more than 30 women who attended the event

Claprood, center, with Hampden County Sheriff Nick Cocchi and YWCA Executive Director Elizabeth Dineen, a former prosecutor in Hampden County. Behind them are some of the more than 30 women who attended the event

Dineen addresses the gathering

Dineen addresses the gathering




Visit from the Earl of St. Andrews

Elms College recently received a visit from the Earl of St. Andrews, a senior member of the House of Windsor, the reigning royal house of the United Kingdom.

George Philip Nicholas Windsor, Earl of St. Andrews, is the elder son of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, and his wife Katharine, Duchess of Kent. He holds the title Earl of St Andrews as heir apparent to the Dukedom of Kent. The earl stopped by Elms College on his way through Springfield to attend a conference on the Middle East in Washington, D.C., later this week. The conference was co-sponsored by the Next Century Foundation, where he serves as a trustee with retired ambassador Mark Hambley, who is also a trustee of Elms College.

George Philip Nicholas Windsor, Earl of St. Andrews, is the elder son of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, and his wife Katharine, Duchess of Kent. He holds the title Earl of St Andrews as heir apparent to the Dukedom of Kent. The earl stopped by Elms College on his way through Springfield to attend a conference on the Middle East in Washington, D.C., later this week. The conference was co-sponsored by the Next Century Foundation, where he serves as a trustee with retired ambassador Mark Hambley, who is also a trustee of Elms College.




Degrees of Progress

Elms College President Harry Dumay, left, and Springfield Technical Community College President John Cook shake hands after signing a partnership agreement to offer accelerated online degree-completion programs in Computer Science and Computer Information Technology and Security. The bachelor’s degree programs are completely online and accelerated, which means students can earn their degree in 14 months after obtaining an associate degree from STCC.

Elms College President Harry Dumay, left, and Springfield Technical Community College President John Cook

Elms College President Harry Dumay, left, and Springfield Technical Community College President John Cook




Berkshire Blueprint 2.0

1Berkshire recently launched the implementation phase of the Berkshire Blueprint 2.0 at ceremonies at the Colonial Theatre in downtown Pittsfield. The event was the culmination of more than 100 interviews, thousands of hours of work, and more than 20 months of planning and design. 1Berkshire President and CEO Jonathan Butler kicked off the primary outline during the launch by recognizing that $1 billion in regional investments have been made in the Berkshires in just the last three years, noting that investment in the Berkshires is “a good bet.” (Photos by Kara Thornton)

John Bissell, President and CEO of Greylock Federal Credit Union, addresses the large crowd

John Bissell, President and CEO of Greylock Federal Credit Union, addresses the large crowd

Butler, left, with Ben Lamb, director of Economic Development for 1Bershire

Butler, left, with Ben Lamb, director of Economic Development for 1Bershire

from left, Betsy Strickler, chief communications officer for Community Health Programs Inc.

from left, Betsy Strickler, chief communications officer for Community Health Programs Inc.Kevin Pink, Economic Development coordinator for 1Berkshire; and Pittsfield Mayor Linda Tyer




Safety Awards

Peter Pan Bus Lines recently hosted its annual Safety Awards presentation at the Student Prince and the Fort. A total of 175 drivers were recognized for completing 2018 with no accidents, and the company also recognized drivers, operations, and maintenance departments for outstanding customer service and performance.

Michael Drozd was honored as a 2 million-mile driver

Michael Drozd was honored as a 2 million-mile driver

Siyana Abdulbasir received the company’s Customer Excellence Award for outstanding customer service

Siyana Abdulbasir received the company’s Customer Excellence Award for outstanding customer service

Home Improvement

Foundation to Roof

The Western Massachusetts Home & Garden Show may last only four days each March, but Lori Loughlin says vendors reap the benefits all year long.

“The exposure at the show is tremendous,” said Loughlin, manager of Frank Webb Home in Springfield. “It pays for itself within the first week after the show closes. In May, June, July, people are coming in saying, ‘I was at the home show, and I saw this showerhead.’ They come back six months after and want to buy something they saw there. It’s nice.”

Loughlin, who serves as the event’s deputy chair for 2019, said her company, the showroom division of F.W. Webb, offers such a wide variety of products and services that it’s a no-brainer to participate in the show, which, in its 65th year, will feature more than 350 vendors displaying at more than 700 booths.

“You’ll find landscaping, appliances, hot tubs, bathrooms … you can go from foundation to roof and everything in between,” she said.

The Home & Garden Show, slated for March 28-31, is produced by the Home Builders & Remodelers Assoc. of Western Massachusetts (HBRAWM), whose 500-strong membership reflects the variety on the show floor, with roughly 90 categories on display from builders, remodelers, kitchen and bath specialists, landscapers, painters, roofers, financial institutions, pool companies, and more.

“We can give you a snapshot of what’s out there, of what’s new,” said Andy Crane, HBRAWM president. “The key word is local. Almost every business in there is local; these are the people who managed to stay in business through the ups and downs of the economy, and they’re there to show their wares.”

“The key word is local. Almost every business in there is local; these are the people who managed to stay in business through the ups and downs of the economy, and they’re there to show their wares.”

Crane said 2019 has been one of the show’s better years, with fewer than a dozen booths left to sell two weeks before the event was set to begin. In short, it remains the association’s signature showcase.

“People are going to see companies and meet owners that they probably wouldn’t be exposed to by word of mouth,” Loughlin said. “I can’t believe how many companies are involved in this home show. It’s huge. And we get such a rebound on this.”

While recognizing the show’s potential to connect businesses with homeowners, she said the cross-promotion that goes on is just as valuable as the visitors who walk through the door.

Andy Crane

Andy Crane says the 2019 Home & Garden Show is shaping up to be one of the strongest, if vendor commitments are any indication.

“The networking between companies has been great for our company,” she told BusinessWest. “We tie in with the tile people and kitchen-design people, who send people here to find sinks. It’s nice to create relationships with other vendors.”

Something for Everyone

The home show started as a way to generate revenue to support the association, but it also provides member companies with a chance to market to an audience — and a big one, with around 20,000 visitors over the four days in a typical year — that might not otherwise see their name. Conversely, it gives attendees, many of whom simply come to the show for fun, a host of concrete (or hardwood, or tile, or whatever) ideas for home improvement.

The exhibitors run the gamut from inspection services to security and alarm systems; Internet and communications to moving and storage; duct cleaning to pianos and organs. Meanwhile, show attendees fall into one of several categories, the association notes, including:

• People planning to buy or build a new home, who may visit with builders, real-estate agents, financial institutions, and sellers of component products, such as hardwood flooring, tile, and appliances;

• People planning to remodel or renovate, who may want to check in with all of the above, plus vendors of replacement components such as windows and doors, as well as appliances, wall treatments, and home furnishings;

• Yard and garden enthusiasts, who tend to be interested in lawn and landscaping services; wall, walk, and edging components and materials; and trees, shrubs, flowers, and seeds;

• Lifestyle-conscious individuals, who like to check out trendy, high-tech, or time-saving products; home furnishings; and products focused on self-improvement, fitness, and health;

• Committed renters, who have no plans to own a house, but may be interested in space-conservation and space-utilization products, as well as home furnishings;

• Impulse buyers, who flock to vendors of home décor, arts and crafts, cooking and baking products, jewelry, and personal goods; and

• Those who attend the show purely for fun, who may arrive without an agenda but often develop ideas for future purchases and home products. “More than any other group,” according to the association, “these people are the ones who have come to rely upon our show on an annual basis and who perhaps have the greatest impact upon our vendors.”

Indeed, Crane told BusinessWest, “it’s not just about coming to the show and spending money with the vendors, even though we hope that’s the case. It really is a social event. That’s the mindset — it’s a nice evening out, and people walk out of the show with ideas of their home.”

Once again, visitors will see the LIXIL Beauty in Motion 49-foot mobile showroom in the Young Building, showcasing an array of American Standard, DXV, and Grohe kitchen and bath products.

“We have a mobile showcase with active and working plumbing fixtures, the newest and greatest features in plumbing, from toilets to water-saving showerheads,” Crane noted.

Also in the Young Building, chefs from across the Pioneer Valley will create some of the signature dishes they serve at their restaurants. Visitors can see how they prepare some of their favorite dishes and perhaps ask how to tailor those dishes to fit their own family’s taste. This popular area, hosted by WMAS Radio, will also include cooking seminars every day of the show.

“It’s not just about coming to the show and spending money with the vendors, even though we hope that’s the case. It really is a social event.”

The Young Building will also be home to several kids’ and family activities, from the Melha Shriners clowns to Thousand Cranes Studio, which will be on hand to show off the creative talent of their students, as well as conduct hands-on activities with show attendees. Other attractions will include live butterflies from Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory & Gardens, taking pictures on one of the go-karts from Pioneer Valley Indoor Karting, science experiments at the Rolling Acres Outdoor & Science Summer Camp, a Springfield Thunderbirds booth, face painting, and Looney Tunes characters from Six Flags New England. On Saturday and Sunday, the West Springfield Police Department will be on hand to fingerprint children and offer safety tips, and the Chesterfield Fire Department will give out hats and coloring books.

“There are a lot of different things to do, so you don’t have to come only for a siding or roofing job,” Crane said. “You can go have a nice, inexpensive time in a warm, dry facility.”

Business and Pleasure

In addition to Loughlin, Gisele Gilpatrick of Pro-Tech Waterproofing in Chicopee will serve as Home Show chair, while other committee members include Lisa Grenier of Market Mentors, Joe Mole’ of C.J. Carpentry, Josh Nolan of Fuel Services, Tom Silva of Triple S Construction, and Brian Zippin of Contractors Home Appliances. All are ramping up for what most in the home-improvement world say looks to be a strong year (see related story, page 24).

“This year, as every other year, the home show is a spring kickoff to the building season,” Crane said. “It’s the perfect time of year when people are thinking about projects both inside and outside the house. The show gets their minds moving a little bit.”

Again, though, he stressed that show organizers also want people to have fun.

“Take your wife out to dinner and swing by the home show, or call your brother or your neighbor. You can get out of the house and look at 700-something booths with different products — maybe something you’ve dreamed about.”

This year’s show hours are Thursday and Friday, March 28-29, 1-9 p.m.; Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, March 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 for adults, and children under 12 are admitted free. Discount coupons are available at www.westernmasshomeshow.com. Veterans and active military with ID receive free admission on Thursday only.

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]