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Banking and Financial Services

Going for the Green

One of the more challenging aspects of running a cannabis business is the inability to access banking services because banks are federally regulated, and cannabis is illegal on the federal level. However, change could be coming after the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass legislation that would legalize cannabis banking. If the Senate agrees, proponents of the effort say, cannabis operations will become easier, less costly, more transparent, and accessible to a wider range of investors.

Want to start a cannabis business? You’d better have a lot of cash on hand.

However, that equation could be changing after the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass legislation that would allow the cannabis industry to access banking and financial services, even as the substance remains illegal under federal law.

The Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act passed the House by a vote of 321 to 103, with nearly half of Republicans joining all Democrats but one in voting in favor of the bill.

Now the bill will move to the U.S. Senate and, eventually, to the president’s desk. Proponents are confident in their chances of passage.

“It would be great for the cannabis industry and great for the banking industry,” said Peter Gallagher, chief financial officer at INSA, a cannabis dispensary in Easthampton. “A lot of banks we’ve talked to are very interested in getting into it, but don’t want the risks associated with it, so they’ve steered clear of it.”

Banks providing services to state-approved cannabis businesses could, in theory, face criminal and civil liability under federal statutes. In fact, only two financial institutions in Massachusetts have taken on the risk, both of them located in the eastern part of the state. So most cannabis companies operate as cash-only businesses.

“The implications of having to handle a lot of cash are pretty profound,” Gallagher told BusinessWest. “A lot of effort goes into counting and transporting it. To the extent that we can move some of this to credit, it would make our operations a lot easier.”

Momentum to legalize cannabis has made the banking issue impossible to ignore at the federal level. Currently, 33 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico have all legalized the use of marijuana to some degree. Yet the possession, distribution, or sale of marijuana remains illegal under federal law, which means any contact with money that can be traced back to state marijuana operations could be considered money laundering and expose a bank to significant legal, operational, and regulatory risk, notes the American Banking Assoc. (ABA).

“The rift between federal and state law has left banks trapped between their mission to serve the financial needs of their local communities and the threat of federal enforcement action,” the association wrote recently. “ABA believes the time has come for Congress and the regulatory agencies to provide greater legal clarity to banks operating in states where marijuana has been legalized for medical or adult use. Those banks, including institutions that have no interest in directly banking marijuana-related businesses, face rising legal and regulatory risks as the marijuana industry grows.”

Gallagher said legalizing cannabis banking across the board makes sense on many levels.

“From a business perspective, it would make banking more accessible and less costly, and it would eliminate the risk of enforcement and regulatory action that banks are worried about, which is what’s leading them to abandon the market.”

Most think they would gladly jump in — making the cannabis industry more accessible to a wider range of entrepreneurs, while bringing down costs — if the SAFE Banking Act becomes law. And that’s what the Senate will have to consider as it begins its review.

Dollars and Sense

Scott Foster, a partner with the law firm Bulkley Richardson who helped establish its cannabis practice, said the law, if passed, would open up the ability of cannabis businesses to use local branches of local banks essentially overnight — if the banks decide to get involved, which seems likely, given the ABA’s advocacy on the issue.

“This is driven not by the cannabis industry, but by the banking industry,” Foster said. “We need clarity in this issue, considering all the non-cannabis businesses affected by this.”

“A lot of banks we’ve talked to are very interested in getting into it, but don’t want the risks associated with it, so they’ve steered clear of it.”

Indeed, in addition to growers and retailers, there are plenty of vendors and suppliers, landlords, and employees indirectly tied to the cannabis industry, thus posing legal risks for banks serving those individuals.

Rob Nichols, ABA president, recently wrote about two such examples: a bank in Ohio was forced to turn down a loan to a fencing company hired to build a fence around a marijuana growing facility, and a bank in Washington had to close an account when a law firm took on a marijuana business as a client.

“If either of these banks looked the other way, they risked violating federal law and facing criminal prosecution,” Nichols said, noting that these examples are far from isolated. An ABA survey found that 75% of banks have had to close an account, terminate a client relationship, or turn away a customer because there was some connection to cannabis.

“What we’re seeing is employees of cannabis companies being turned down for mortgages, and checking accounts closed down because they’re being paid by cannabis companies. That’s the biggest impact that’s actually driving the law,” Foster told BusinessWest. “Senators in states where it’s legal are saying, ‘time out.’ This isn’t about cannabis companies, it’s about the people selling stuff to them, landlords, even W.B. Mason delivering supplies. They’re getting caught up because they’re being paid by cannabis companies, and banks are saying they can’t accept the money. It’s an unintended ripple effect that’s causing a shift in thinking in Congress.”

Furthermore, reconciling the legal divide between state and federal laws would bring benefits to the communities banks serve, Nichols argues.

“The estimated $24 billion in cannabis sales by 2025 in states where marijuana has been legalized could be deposited safely with federally regulated financial institutions, enhancing transparency, public safety, and tax revenue,” he said.

And it’s not just banks asking for lawmakers to take action, he noted. A bipartisan group of 19 state attorneys general last year wrote a letter to lawmakers, arguing that bringing cannabis businesses into the banking system would improve accountability and increase public safety.

“This isn’t about cannabis companies, it’s about the people selling stuff to them, landlords, even W.B. Mason delivering supplies. They’re getting caught up because they’re being paid by cannabis companies, and banks are saying they can’t accept the money. It’s an unintended ripple effect that’s causing a shift in thinking in Congress.”

“Without relief from Congress, even banks that have decided not to serve cannabis businesses will find themselves caught in the financial web created by this booming industry,” Nichols said. “The money from cannabis businesses often goes to vendors, landlords, and employees, while the federal criminal association follows that cash.”

Gallagher agreed, and said it shouldn’t be difficult to build consensus around the need to bring clarity to cannabis finances through the well-regulated banking system.

“If, at the end of the day, what we’re worried about is diversion, or being able to track all that money, it’s easier to do that with electronic payments rather than having people carry large cash balances,” he said. “It’s easier for regulators and everyone else to make sure the industry is healthy and operating compliantly.”

Indeed, that very argument became part of the House debate. Colorado state Rep. Ed Perlmutter argued that keeping cannabis banking illegal is “an invitation to theft, it’s an invitation to money-laundering, it’s an invitation to tax evasion, and it stifles the opportunities of this business.”

Joint Resolutions

Foster said the immediate impact of the SAFE Banking Act would be significant on current cannabis businesses, which would now be able to access local branches of local banks, instead of running a ponderous all-cash operation — and requiring the security that entails — or seeking services from an institution across the state.

“We can’t apply for loans — working capital, construction loans, any lending right now,” Gallagher noted, adding that the handful of banks nationwide that are currently risking the cannabis business are passing on exorbitant costs to customers to do so.

“You’ve had some companies that have been willing to shoulder the risk associated with servicing an operation that’s federally illegal,” he told BusinessWest. “They’ve been able to charge excessive rates for that. As [legalization] happens in this industry, the fees will come down and start to normalize.”

Nichols expects that competition to emerge quickly, saying banks typically respect the decisions made by voters in the states where they operate. “Those voters had weighed the societal and cultural issues that come with legalization, and they made their decision. Instead, the industry is focused on the impact of the gap between state and federal laws on banks and their ability to serve those in their communities.”

The other major impact of a change in the law, Foster said, has to do with the concept of social equity. Massachusetts’ Cannabis Control Commission launched what it calls its Social Equity Program to expedite business applications and provide technical assistance, mentoring, and other resources for individuals from communities that have been disproportionately harmed by marijuana prohibition — typically poverty-stricken areas.

“Even though Massachusetts law has a social-equity component to it, giving expedited processing to social-equity candidates, the practical reality is, most of the investors are still wealthy, white gentlemen who have disposable income invested in cannabis,” he noted.

By allowing entrepreneurs to finance these operations instead of needing all the money up front, Foster explained, “you’ll have more players at the table, and be able to leverage smaller sums into larger companies. I haven’t heard a lot of talk about the social-equity piece, but to me, that’s a big piece, to help more people be able to engage in this business and apply for a loan if they qualify. That, to me, is a potential game changer.”

A companion bill in the U.S. Senate has yet to be voted on by the Senate Banking Committee, which held a hearing in late July on the issue. While that debate is coming, some lawmakers believe it’s only the start. For instance, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said he doesn’t believe the SAFE Banking Act goes far enough.

“This must be a first step toward the decriminalization of marijuana, which has led to the prosecution and incarceration of far too many of our fellow Americans for possession,” he argued.

For now, people like Gallagher are happy the banking issue may finally be resolved.

“We’ve been following this, so it’s not a surprise,” he said. “It’s something that makes a lot of sense from an operations and compliance perspective. We weren’t sure of the timing of it in terms of the evolution of the industry, but it’s something we expected to happen.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Banking and Financial Services

The Business of Selling a Business

By Brendan Mitchell

For business owners looking to sell soon, there is still plenty to be optimistic about.

Capital for purchasing businesses continues to flow thanks to low interest rates from banks and investment portfolios lingering near high-water marks.

Meanwhile, the Massachusetts economy has pushed to new highs from Boston to Springfield. Most recent reports show unemployment rates at historic lows, with both sides of the state making improvements. MGM Springfield and Encore Boston Harbor have attracted out-of-state plates. Private equity and public companies, both flush with cash, continue to show confidence in the state through investments in their workforce and current business as well as construction and new business acquisitions. We’ve seen national tax reform increase cash flows to businesses across the country.

These factors have helped to keep buyers engaged as retiring Baby Boomers head for the exits. The timing has been great for some business owners cashing out recently, but buyers have become more selective in some industries. While some businesses are snagged as soon as they go to market, many are aging on the shelf with buyers and sellers unwilling to bridge pricing gaps.

When figuring the value of their business, owners can fall into the trap of including sentimental value in their estimation. Some are relying on what a similar business sold for in a different market or, worse, have a target number they drew up without any real anchor to reality.

For business owners who have dedicated their lives to a business, it can be hard to take a step back and objectively consider what their business is worth. Business owners who are willing to take an objective look at the value of their business can be proactive now instead of reactive when they are ready to retire and list their business for the first time.

The value of a business is dynamic. While there is no way to get a buyer to price sentimental value into a purchase price, there is a potential to make changes to the business that will increase the value over time.

There are three approaches to valuing a business — asset, income, and market approaches. For most privately held companies, valuators rely on either the income approach, market approach, or a combination of the two. The basic formulas for these calculations are widely available online, but what owners can do with this information may be less obvious.

First, it’s important to know that the years leading up to the valuation or sale are the most important. A long history of profits can show stability for a small business; however, only the most recent three to five years are going to be considered in a calculation. Small-business owners with eyes on an exit have a tendency to disconnect from the business during this most important period when they should be pushing in the opposite direction.

Flat revenues or increases in expenses during this period have the potential to erase even decades of growth and profitability. Owners should resist the temptation to ‘pull the parachute’ as they get closer to the finish line. Continue to push for revenue growth and pay close attention to expense control. This is the time to let the numbers showcase the full potential of the business.

Nobody knows the ins and outs of a small business like the owner. Buyers and valuators weigh heavily on the impact the seller’s exit will have on the future of the business. Owners should focus on replacing themselves in the areas in which they are most intertwined in the business to lessen the impact. To identify these high-dependency areas, owners can interview managers and employees, noting issues that cannot be resolved without them.

Key areas of focus generally depend on the industry or business model but usually include sales generation, relationship management, product development, strategic decision making, or day-to-day business management. If continuity can be achieved through process improvement or process documentation, it should be a key focus. Some results can be found through training current employees and empowering them. Consider restructuring tasks and delegating the current owner’s duties to rising managers.

Revisit labor costs. Business owners with family members at above-market wages face a double expense. While they may overpay weekly on purpose, it will cost them a multiple of that annual salary when it’s time to cash out. For hourly workers, be ready to field questions about how the rising minimum wages will impact more labor-intensive businesses.

Finally, clean up the financial statements. For various reasons, including tax motivations, small-business owners have a tendency to let their personal and business lives collide on their company financial statements. Documentation is important for any personal expenses being charged to the business. Owners should be ready to prove which expenses were not necessary for the business so that buyers and valuators exclude the expenses to calculate the value — buyers will not report findings to the IRS.

Performing a financial analysis can also help owners understand how their business compares to the rest of the industry, making them ready to articulate strengths and defend or improve weaknesses.

Overall, the current market remains friendly to someone looking to sell their business. It’s also a great time to be proactive in managing an exit strategy, whether it lies around the corner or several years out. Getting realistic about the value of their business enables owners to take steps to improve it and make informed decisions.

Brandon Mitchell is a certified valuation analyst and supervisor in auditing and consulting for Blumshapiro, the largest regional accounting, tax, and business-advisory firm based in New England, and winner of the Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly Reader Rankings for Best Appraisal Service and Best Accounting Firm.

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]


 

They Shoot, They Score

In celebration of its 30th anniversary, Lexington Group hosted an Aeron Chair Hockey Tournament on Oct. 2. Lexington Group invited players and administrative staff from American International College and UMass Amherst to battle it out in a friendly competition (pictured at top left). AIC won and advanced to a match against the Springfield Thunderbirds, with the AHL squad prevailing. The event, which raised $18,000 for the Foundation of TJO Animals, was incorporated into an After-5 networking event co-hosted by BusinessWest, the West of the River Chamber of Commerce, and the East of the River Five Town Chamber of Commerce. West Springfield Mayor William Reichelt served as referee, Pat Kelley of Lazer 99.3 emceed and provided entertainment, and complimentary refreshments were provided by Log Rolling.

Two squads with Boomer, the Thunderbirds mascot

Lexington Group owner Mark Proshan (far left), Reichelt, and some of the players present the $18,000 check to the Foundation for TJO Animals

The cake created by Cerrato’s Bakery to commemorate Lexington’s 30th anniversary

 


 

 

Square One Tea Party

Square One held its 14th annual Tea Party on Oct. 4 at the Starting Gate at GreatHorse in Hampden. Proceeds will benefit the children and families served by Square One.  (Michael Epaul photography)

event sponsors Jenny Mackay and Maureen Gaudreau of USI Insurance

Keynote speaker Tasheena Davis, attorney and Springfield city clerk

Dawn DiStefano of Square One with event sponsors Peter Miniati and Jeff Ligori of Napatree Capital

 


 

New Home for Williamstown Police

Caolo & Bieniek Associates Inc., the Chicopee-based architectural firm, has completed construction at the new Williamstown Police Station. Built at the Turner House, formerly a center for veterans, the new station provides improved accessibility and safety, as well as the most current technologies in law enforcement.

Pictured, from left: Chris Kluchman, Housing Choice Program director, Department of Housing and Community Development; Jim Kolesar, assistant to the president for Community and Government Affairs, Williams College; Williamstown Selectwoman Anne O’Connor; state Sen. Adam Hinds; Williamstown Selectman Andrew Hogeland; Williamstown Town Manager Jason Hoch; Williamstown Police Chief Kyle Johnson; state Rep. John Barrett III; and James Hanifan, architect, Caolo & Bieniek Associates.

 

 


 

Grand Opening

The Sisters of Providence celebrated the grand opening of Hillside Residence, 36 units of elder affordable housing, on Sept. 27. The $9,250,000 housing development is located on the Hillside at Providence campus, formerly known as Brightside, at 100 Hillside Circle, West Springfield. This innovative facility’s objectives will demonstrate a nonprofit model of affordable elder housing and be integrated with Mercy LIFE, a Program for All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) offering health and care management services, with both organizations co-located on the same 27-acre campus devoted to elder programs.

 


 

Cooking Up Support

bankESB recently donated $10,000 to the Holyoke Community College Foundation to support students preparing for careers in the culinary-arts and hospitality industries.

Pictured, from left: Amanda Sbriscia, HCC vice president of Institutional Advancement and executive director of the HCC Foundation; Harry Montalvo, Community Development specialist at bankESB; Tiffany Raines, assistant vice president of the bank’s Holyoke branch; HCC president Christina Royal; and John Driscoll, board chair of the HCC Foundation, hold a ceremonial check for $10,000 at the HCC MGM Culinary Arts Institute.

 


 

Bridging the Gap

On Sept. 24, Elms College launched the Center for Equity in Urban Education (CEUE). The CEUE will help bridge the 800-teacher annual gap across K-12 schools in the area, especially in specific roles such as special education, English-language learners, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) programs. The center was made possible through the foundational support of the Irene E. & George A. Davis Foundation of Springfield and Cynthia and William Lyons III of Wilbraham. The launch ceremony included the signing of memorandums of understanding with leaders from schools in Chicopee, Holyoke, and Springfield.

Pictured, from left: John Davis, senior director, Davis Foundation; Modesto Montero, head of school, Libertas Academy Charter School in Springfield; Cynthia Lyons, chair, Elms College board of trustees; Elms College President Harry Dumay; William Lyons III; Daniel Baillargeon, superintendent, Catholic Schools Office, Diocese of Springfield; Stephen Zrike Jr., receiver/superintendent, Holyoke Public Schools; Daniel Warwick, superintendent, Springfield Public Schools; Rachel Romano, executive director, Veritas Preparatory Charter School in Springfield; and Paul Stelzer, vice chair, Elms College board of trustees.

 


 

Supporting Veteran Families

Revitalize Community Development Corp. and its JoinedForces initiative announced they were awarded a $730,000 grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to continue their mission to support military veteran families. This statewide grant will be used to modify and rehabilitate the homes of more than 51 military veterans. The funds will be used to remedy safety hazards in the home; install energy-efficient features such as insulation, heating system repairs, and Energy Star appliances; and make age-in-place modifications, including the installation of grab bars and ramps. The announcement took place at the home of Lonnie Chappell, a U.S. Marine veteran who served in Vietnam, and his wife, Mary (pictured with U.S. Rep. Richard Neal and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno).

 

 

 

Chamber Corners

AMHERST AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700

• Oct. 18: Launching Women Luncheon, Session 2, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., hosted by Courtyard by Marriott.

• Oct. 24: Legislative Breakfast, 8-10 a.m., hosted by the Inn on Boltwood.

• Oct. 30: Supplier Diversity Programs Community Day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., hosted by the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce.

• Nov. 5: 50th Anniversary Celebration, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Amherst Insurance Agency.

• Nov. 7: “Marijuana: Opportunities & Challenges,” 4-6 p.m., hosted by Jones Library.

• Nov. 13: Working Across Generations Workshop, 5-6:30 p.m., hosted by Look Park Garden House.

• Nov. 15: Launching Women Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., hosted by Courtyard by Marriott.

• Nov. 18: Talk on Housing and Employment, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Amherst Survival Center.

• Nov. 21: Diversity and Inclusion Workshop, 8 a.m. to noon, hosted by Hadley Farms Meeting House.

GREATER EASTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

• Oct. 23: Cybersecurity Chamber Breakfast, 8:30-10 a.m., hosted by the Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce, 33 Union St., Easthampton. Suite 3 President Dave DelVecchio will guide attendees through a security-awareness training review in three easy steps: identify the cybersecurity problem, create a security framework, and define what you as a user can do to help. This session is loaded with content and many actionable takeaways to improve the security awareness level within the attendee’s organization. Cost: $15, which includes a light breakfast. Pre-registration is required, and no tickets will be sold at the door. For more information and to register, visit www.easthamptonchamber.org or call the chamber at (413) 527-9414.

GREATER NORTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.northamptonchamber.com
(413) 584-1900

• Oct. 22: “Sync Up with the Chamber and the Downtown Northampton Assoc. – A Conversation with Health, Wellness, and Beauty Businesses,” 8-9:30 a.m., 33 Hawley St., Northampton. Join us for a conversation among professionals and business owners within the health, wellness, and beauty sector. This event is part of the Greater Northampton Chamber 2019 Connect Campaign Event Series. Cost: free. RSVP at northamptonchamber.com/connect-campaign-2019.

• Oct. 22: “Social Media in the Workplace” with Daniel Carr of Royal, P.C., 8:30-9:30 a.m., hosted by Greater Northampton Chamber, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Join us for a workshop in the Greater Northampton Chamber 2019 Connect Campaign Event Series. Cost: free. RSVP at northamptonchamber.com/connect-campaign-2019.

• Oct. 24: “Marketing and Advertising: What Works and What Doesn’t?” 8-9 a.m., hosted by Greater Northampton Chamber, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Join Joe O’Rourke of Northampton Radio Group for an informative talk on what works and what doesn’t in marketing and advertising. This event is part of the Greater Northampton Chamber 2019 Connect Campaign Event Series. Cost: free. RSVP at northamptonchamber.com/connect-campaign-2019.

• Oct. 28: “Nonprofit Resource Roundtable with Jenny Ladd: Fundraising as Program, Program as Fundraising,” noon to 1:30 p.m., hosted by the Garden House at Look Memorial Park. How can our fundraising be a form of our programming, and how can programming be part of fundraising? All too often, the person, people, or department doing fundraising are off in a corner separate from the programmatic workings of a nonprofit. Cost: free. RSVP at northamptonchamber.com/connect-campaign-2019.

• Oct. 29: “Health Connector for Small Business,” noon to 1 p.m., hosted by Greater Northampton Chamber, 33 Hawley St., Northampton. Join us for an informative session with Rich Cahillane of American Benefits Group and Chaitra Sanders, account manager for the Health Connector for Business Distribution Channel. This event is part of the Greater Northampton Chamber 2019 Connect Campaign Event Series. Cost: free. RSVP at northamptonchamber.com/connect-campaign-2019.

GREATER WESTFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• Oct. 17: Lunch & Learn: Hemp CBD Educational Seminar, 11:30 a.m to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Western Massachusetts Hospital, 91 East Mountain Road, Westfield. Presented by Kathleen Angco-Vieweg of Rehab Resolutions. This workshop is for everyone interested in learning basic information regarding CBD oil, the difference between hemp and marijuana, benefits of CBD oil, and what CBD oil can help with. Lunch provided by Peppermill Catering. Cost: free for members, $40 for non-members. For more information and to register, visit westfieldbiz.org/events or call (413) 568-1618.

• Oct. 21: After 5 Connections, 5-7 p.m., hosted by East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield. The event will include a cash bar, refreshments, and a 50/50 raffle to benefit the chamber scholarship fund. Bring your business cards and make connections. Cost: free for members. For more information and to register, visit westfieldbiz.org/events or call (413) 568-1618.

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S CHAMBER
www.springfieldregionalchamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• Oct. 17: Renaissance of Springfield Leadership Forum, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., hosted by Springfield Museums. Panelists will include female leaders in Springfield who will share their visions and contributions to the current Springfield renaissance. Kay Simpson, president of Springfield Museums, will moderate the panel. Cost: $35 for members, $40 for non-members. To register, e-mail [email protected]

SOUTH HADLEY & GRANBY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.shgchamber.com
(413) 532-6451

• Oct. 17: Business After 5, 5-7 p.m., hosted by TD Bank, Newton Street, South Hadley. Network with area businesses and business people. The event will include cider tastings, a cash bar, and light refreshments. Cost: $10 in advance, $15 at the door. Register online at shgchamber.com.

SPRINGFIELD REGIONAL CHAMBER
www.springfieldregionalchamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• Oct. 25: Super 60, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Chez Josef, 176 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam. Cost: $60 for members, $75 general admission. To register, visit www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, e-mail [email protected], or call (413) 755-1310.

WEST OF THE RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.ourwrc.com
(413) 426-3880

• Oct. 23: Mingle with the Mayors VIP Luncheon, noon to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Carrabba’s Italian Grill, West Springfield. Join us for an update from the mayors of Agawam and West Springfield over lunch, and mingle with the mayors afterward during this private, VIP event. Seating is limited. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880 or [email protected]

• Nov. 7: Food Fest West, 5:30-8 p.m., hosted by Springfield Country Club, West Springfield. Local restaurants and eateries show off their cuisine at this well-attended event. Vote for your favorite restaurant. A DJ, raffle, and entertainment will round out this event. Proceeds raised by Food Fest West will go toward the Partnership for Education and the WRC Educational Fund, which provides grants to businesses for on-the-job training and continuing-education needs. Tickets may be purchased online at www.westoftheriverchamber.com. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880 or [email protected]

People on the Move

Jeff Daley

Westmass Area Development Corp. named Jeff Daley CEO of the private, nonprofit development entity. Daley, who was chosen as the result of a search process conducted by the Westmass board, has more than 15 years of experience in the real-estate development arena. Daley is the former executive director of the Westfield Redevelopment Authority and most recently served as the principal of CJC Development Advisors LLC, which he founded in 2016. Daley’s portfolio includes overseeing $60 million in commercial and industrial development and managing $34 million in public development projects. As CEO, Daley will be responsible for management of Westmass, including negotiating corporate acquisitions, land sales, leases, and incentive proposals; grant applications; and marketing resources and development services to organizations and businesses considering investment in the region. Daley will also enhance Westmass offerings regarding development services to communities throughout the region to assist with economic development and real-estate development opportunities. Daley will also evaluate opportunities for new industrial-park development and land acquisition and coordinate federal, state, and local economic-development grants and resources. Daley replaces interim CEO Bryan Nicholas, who served after the sudden passing of former CEO Eric Nelson, who was appointed in 2016.

•••••

Sheila Stamm

Sheila Stamm has joined American International College (AIC) as dean of the School of Education. Stamm is the president of S. Wright & Associates, providing consulting support to academic leaders and faculty in higher education and community sectors. She has an extensive background in higher education, including serving as dean of the School of Education for Cambridge College and Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn. Stamm previously served as commissioner of Higher Education for the state of Minnesota. Prior to transitioning to administrative roles in higher education, Stamm was a tenured professor at Hamline University and an associate professor at Saint Xavier University in Chicago. Throughout her career, Stamm has been dedicated to community service, with affiliations including the Ramsey County Blue Ribbon Commission on Economic Disparities, the Minnesota Chicano Latino Affairs Council Committee on Educational Disparities, the education workgroup of the African American Leadership Forum, the West Suburban College of Nursing board of trustees, the leadership council of Chicago-Area Deans, and the Urban Teacher Education Program, among numerous other affiliations. Stamm has served on dozens of committees at the colleges where she was a member of the administration or faculty and has extensive publications and presentations to her credit, with a focus on higher education, diversity, inclusion, hiring, teaching, innovation, leadership, and learning.

•••••

Patrick Fortunato

Azaya Inc. named Patrick Fortunato its Business Development manager. In this role, he will lead the sales of IT managed-services support, digital and VoIP business telephone systems, and future security surveillance technologies to serve businesses, the government sector, as well as educational institutions within the state of Massachusetts. Fortunato has more than 20 years of executive management leadership experience, while developing strategic business units in financial services and digital-imaging solutions, for mid-size to large enterprise companies and organizations. He served as national Sales manager for Sharp USA and vice president of Sales while working at Konica Minolta, with U.S. national responsibilities and oversight. Fortunato most recently served as managing director for Global Financial NetworX, LLC with the task of increasing customer acquisition for the company’s lending, insurance, annuities, and investment portfolios.

•••••

Rebecca Mercieri Rivaux

Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Rebecca Mercieri Rivaux has joined the firm. Mercieri Rivaux is an associate and a member of Bacon Wilson’s bankruptcy and business/corporate practice groups. Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Mercieri Rivaux attended Western New England University School of Law, graduating magna cum laude in 2019. She also obtained her bachelor’s degree from Western New England University, graduating summa cum laude in 2015.

•••••

In the wake of a record number of new homes being built, Greater Springfield Habitat for Humanity (GSHFH) recently welcomed new staff to assist with furthering the agency’s mission. Jason Montgomery joins GSHFH as its Donor Relations manager. He comes to GSHFH with more than 10 years of experience in nonprofit/human-services work and has strong ties in the local community. He has previously served with Habitat for Humanity in Hartford and locally with Way Finders. Also joining the team, Sarah Tanner is now on board for a short term as interim executive director. Tanner is a principal with Financial Development Agency and brings more than 20 years of local nonprofit experience to the affiliate. GSHFH also announced internal promotions and realignments to maximize the agency’s resources. In response to a capacity grant received by Habitat for Humanity International, Jeff Lomma has been named Marketing & Communications manager, with an emphasis on promoting the value of Habitat programming throughout the community. Meanwhile, Mary Olmsted has transitioned from serving as an Americorps volunteer to full-time staff as Volunteer Services coordinator.

•••••

Adrienne Smith

Holyoke Community College (HCC) recently welcomed Adrienne Smith as interim dean of its division of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Smith brings 13 years of community-college experience to HCC, most recently as the dean of the School of Engineering, Technologies, and Mathematics at Springfield Technical Community College. Prior to that, she served as associate professor and coordinator of Electronics Technology at Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester. Her professional accomplishments span many areas of academic program development and enhancement, enrollment management and retention, diversity responsiveness, and regional and community partnership coordination. Smith holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and a master’s degree in science, engineering, and math from Western New England University, where she was the first African-American woman to graduate with a degree in engineering, and she earned a doctorate in education from UMass Amherst with competencies in community-college leadership, educational polices, and administration. A graduate of Springfield Technical High School, Smith started her professional life as an electrical engineer (and the first female engineer) at Digital Equipment Corp. in Springfield.

•••••

Alyssa Arnell

Alyssa Arnell, chair of the History Department at Greenfield Community College (GCC), was awarded the African American Female Professor Award by the African American Female Professor Award Assoc. (AAFPAA) in a ceremony at Bay Path University on Sept. 26. Formerly a history teacher at Dillard University and educational-outreach coordinator and historical interpreter for the National Park Service, Arnell joined the faculty at GCC in 2017. In just two years, she has modernized GCC’s history curriculum, infusing it with a social-justice focus and adding courses such as “The Legal History of American Civil Rights” and “North American Indigenous History.” For many of Arnell’s classes, she has integrated a public history component that brings her classes out of the classroom and to the lobby of the main building, where her students give presentations on their projects throughout the day — a way to let other faculty, staff, and students see the kinds of work her students are engaged in, and see the kinds of research that can happen in a history course. In addition to teaching, Arnell has created programming that reaches beyond the classroom with talks on the removal of confederate statues, a lecture on the life Frederick Douglass, a panel discussion with students about the movie Black Panther, and a conversation on immigrant rights. She also adapted a format of Facilitated Dialogues used by the National Park Service to launch a series of conversations about race and ethnicity at GCC. Arnell is also a core member of Greenfield Community College’s Racial Equity and Justice Institute Team, a part of the Leading for Change Higher Education Diversity Consortium. As part of the Racial Equity and Justice Team, she has worked to learn best practices to support students of color, helped the college identify specific areas where achievement gaps exist, and will continue in the coming year to work to identify specific action steps to try to address those achievement gaps.

•••••

Amy Royal

Amy Royal, owner of Royal, P.C., has been selected as a Super Lawyer for 2019. Providing legal representation in Massachusetts for a variety of different issues, Royal was also selected to Super Lawyers in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The selection process includes independent research, peer nominations, and peer evaluations. Royal represents employers with employment and labor issues. Additional legal issues represented include employment litigation: defense, cannabis law, and alternative dispute resolution.

Company Notebook

Big E Breaks Attendance Record with 1.63 Million Guests

WEST SPRINGFIELD — A record number of visitors attended the 2019 Big E, breaking the Fair’s all-time high attendance figure, with a final tally of 1,629,527. The previous record, of 1,543,470, was set in 2018. During the fair’s run, the all-time ingle-day attendance record was also broken when 176,544 visitors attended on Saturday, Sept. 21. Five additional daily attendance records were set: Sept. 19, 85,698; Sept. 21, 176,544; Sept. 25, 89,124; Sept. 27, 112,988 and Sept. 28, 173,112. “As our event continues to grow, I am overwhelmed by the outpouring of support we receive, and I want to thank everyone in this region who supports us by attending the Big E,” said Eugene Cassidy, president and CEO of the Eastern States Exposition. “Your support allows our mission of agriculture and education to thrive, to grow, and to have a national impact.”

Bay Path Receives $5M Bequest, Largest in University’s History

LONGMEADOW — Allison Gearing-Kalill, vice president for Development and Planned Giving at Bay Path University, announced that an anonymous donor has made a transformational gift of $5 million through planned giving. The bequest is the largest individual contribution to Bay Path in its history, and honors the donor’s unwavering commitment to the education and advancement of women. Under the terms of the bequest, a fund will be established to support scholarships, endowed faculty chairs, science and technology equipment, and development programs. “I speak on behalf of the entire Bay Path community that we are grateful for this generous bequest given in support of our mission,” said President Carol Leary. “Our benefactor has a strong belief in higher education and is an inspiration for all. Over the years, this person has also contributed to our annual One America trip for students, underwritten Labster — the online virtual laboratory program integrated within the science curriculum at the American Women’s College — and has supported many other initiatives. Our patron has been a champion for women.” A passionate advocate for women’s education, the donor believes strongly that education is the key to creating opportunities and providing career pathways for women at all ages and stages of their lives, and is particularly supportive of the American Women’s College, the first all-women online bachelor’s degree program in the country, Leary added.

Eversource Donates $2,500 to Fund MHA Support Groups for Veterans, LGBTQ Community

SPRINGFIELD — Eversource, New England’s largest energy-delivery company, presented a check for $2,500 to the Mental Health Assoc. (MHA) to fund access for military veterans and members of the LGBTQ community to support groups at MHA’s BestLife Emotional Health & Wellness Center. According to Sara Kendall, vice president of Clinical Operations for MHA, community members and friends can help individuals in a number of ways, but the support provided by a group of people who have had similar experiences is even more powerful. “Through shared experience, a veteran support group helps its members build a healthy, positive lifestyle through participating and understanding,” she said. “Being part of a clinician-facilitated group can help veterans work to overcome obstacles, build working relationships, and support individuals as they learn to self-navigate in the community. The benefits of support groups for individuals who identify as LGBTQ include feeling less lonely, isolated, or judged; gaining a sense of empowerment and control; improving coping skills and sense of adjustment; talking openly and honestly about their feelings; and reducing distress, depression, or anxiety.” For more information on these new support groups, call (844) MHA-WELL.

STCC Awarded $500,000 to Enhance Two Programs

SPRINGFIELD — Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) will apply $500,000 in state funding to enhance programs in health science and electrical engineering technology and better prepare students who are planning careers in these growing industries. Called the Skills Capital Grant, the funding allows STCC to acquire the newest technologies to educate students and expand career education opportunities. STCC will use the grant to boost the two programs by acquiring new medical patient-simulation training equipment, which allows a larger number of students to enroll in the health science program; and robotic arms for the electrical engineering technology program, which will provide hands-on experience on equipment students will encounter in advanced manufacturing facilities. STCC President John Cook said the investment in the programs will help fill a regional demand for trained workers in the fields of healthcare and electrical engineering technology. Christopher Scott, dean of the School of Health & Patient Simulation, noted that the grant will be used for equipment that directly helps students prepare for careers in the healthcare field. Rick Jagodowski, chair of the electrical engineering technology program at STCC, added that the grant will allow his department to provide students experience and training with robots commonly found in the fields of advanced and automated manufacturing.

PeoplesBank Named a ‘Top Corporate Charitable Contributor’

HOLYOKE — The Boston Business Journal has announced the region’s Top Corporate Charitable Contributors, and, for the 12th year in a row, PeoplesBank is among the companies included. Also this month, the bank has been named Best Local Bank for the seventh year and Best Mortgage Lender for the eighth year in the annual Reader Raves survey conducted by the Republican and MassLive. Through the bank’s Community Care Program, it has contributed millions of dollars to local nonprofit organizations that provide services to the residents of Hampden and Hampshire counties. In addition, associates devote an average of 10,000 hours to volunteer work each year to help local schools, teach financial-education classes, clean up parks, plant trees, and help revitalize neighborhoods. The Boston Business Journal’s Top Corporate Charitable Contributors list is composed of companies that gave at least $100,000 to Massachusetts-based charities and social-service nonprofits last year. PeoplesBank will be honored at the annual Reader Raves banquet presented by the Republican and MassLive at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House in Holyoke on Wednesday, Oct. 16.

CDC Designates UMass Amherst a Flu Forecasting Center Of Excellence

AMHERST — A UMass Amherst biostatistician will receive up to $3 million in funding over the next five years from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to operate a UMass-based CDC Influenza Forecasting Center of Excellence, one of two in the nation. Nicholas Reich, associate professor in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences, whose flu-forecasting collaborative has produced some of the world’s most accurate models in recent years, leads a team that will work closely with the CDC, identifying new methods and data sources to sharpen the accuracy and improve communication of seasonal and pandemic flu forecasts. “We know there are a lot of groups that have done trailblazing work in this field, so it’s really a great honor to be selected,” Reich said. A research group from Carnegie Mellon University, led by Roni Rosenfeld, was chosen as the other CDC Influenza Forecasting Center of Excellence. Rosenfeld’s group has collaborated closely with the Reich Lab at UMass Amherst as part of the FluSight Network, a multi-disciplinary consortium of flu-forecasting teams. Improving the precision of infectious disease forecasting is life-saving work. These new predictive tools could more effectively target the public-health response to a potential flu outbreak, helping to determine the timing for flu-vaccine campaigns, potential school closures, and travel restrictions, as well as the allocation of medical supplies and antiviral medications. They could also help hospitals make the most efficient staffing decisions. Reich is aiming to communicate more accessible and user-friendly information to the public, perhaps via a smartphone app. The UMass Amherst Center of Excellence includes collaborators Evan Ray, assistant professor of Mathematics and Statistics at Mount Holyoke College, who completed postdoctoral research at the Reich Lab; Caitlin Rivers, senior associate at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security; Anna Thorner, an infectious-disease specialist and the leader of the biosurveillance research team at UpToDate, an online clinical decision support resource; and BioFire and Quidel, two industry companies that run diagnostic tests for respiratory viruses. The companies serve as data providers for the UMass Center of Excellence, sharing anonymized test results from across the nation. In recent years, flu forecasters have been spreading a wide net for their models, using Google search trends, HealthTweets, and other non-traditional sources of information. Reich’s group uses ensemble methodology, incorporating 21 models in an open platform that shares data and coding to maximize forecasting capabilities. “Pooling the strength of many models together, collaboratively with multiple teams, results in a more consistent and more accurate forecast,” he explained.

Palm Beach Capital Invests in J. Polep Distribution Services

CHICOPEE — Palm Beach Capital Fund III, LP, through one of its investment entities, announced it has made an investment in Consumer Products Distributors, LLC (d/b/a J. Polep Distribution Services) and Rachael’s Food, LLC, collectively one of the nation’s largest full-line wholesale distributors to the convenience- and grocery-store industry. Financial terms were not disclosed. J. Polep has been in the distribution business for more than 120 year, and over the past several years, the company has expanded product lines to include fresh sandwiches, salads, and grocery items and has added programs and value-added services to better service the convenience-store retailer. The success of the company can be attributed to product diversification, dedicated employees, a loyal customer base, and a commitment to superior customer service, said Eric Polep, president and CEO. Mike Schmickle, partner at Palm Beach Capital, noted that his company’s strategy is to invest in solid management teams and assist them in their long-term strategic growth plans.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of September 2019.

AMHERST

All Around Handyman, LLC
278 Strong St.
Yosef Nimni

Debcor Homecare Inc.
19 Forestedge Road
Deborah Patulak

Made: Cozy
146 Shays St.
Haviland Justice, Oliver Reams

Touchpoints
409 Main St., #256
Katarina Hallonblad

BELCHERTOWN

New England Veterans’ Chamber of Commerce
219 Federal St.
Lisa Ann Ducharme

Relentless Towing & Recovery, LLC
111 Sargent St.
Travis Watts

Station 5 Salon Inc.
5 Jabish St.
Deborah Lowe

Tabs
69 Gold St.
Timothy Banks

TMD Automotive
147 Bay Road
Todd Diederich

CHICOPEE

Dance Party Productions
109 Jean Circle
David Klinkowski

Eric B. LaChapelle
94 Marion St.
Eric LaChapelle

Grid North Outdoors
54 Helen St.
Stephen Gallant

N.J. Sweeney Co.
340B Dale St.
Richard Sweeney

Sazón Latino
129 Broadway
Leonarda Mosquea

EASTHAMPTON

Attack Bear Press
107 Ferry St.
Jason Montgomery, Alexandra Woolner

EmbodyMind Therapeutics
89 Northampton St.
Danielle Martineau

EAST LONGMEADOW

Letourneau and Sons
57 Edmund St.
James Letourneau

O’Neil Baseball
10 Lessard Circle
Matthew O’Neil

PeoplesBank
201 North Main St.
PeoplesBank

White’s
41 Maple St.
Lewis White

GREENFIELD

Adhikara Yoga School
16 Federal St.
Molly Kitchen

Baystate Medical Practices Inc.
48 Sanderson St.
Kristin Delaney

D & D Ventures
161 High St.
Donna Mowry

Franklin Chiropractic Center
77 Mohawk Trail
Jeffrey Denny

JL Martial Arts, LLC
531 Country Club Road
Jeffrey Chaisson

Lawn Service, Etc.
24 Plantation Circle
Michael Terounzo

My Mary Way
44 Chapman St.
Mary Murphy

Smoke Heaven
239 Main St.
SS Dudes, LLC

Sojee Raymond
28 Federal St., Suite 3
Sojeong Raymond

Wicked Good Cleaning
10 Euclid Ave.
Fawn Kuzontkoski

HOLYOKE

Amedeo’s Pizza & Restaurant
8 North Bridge St.
Antonio DiBenedetto

MoBeauty Supply
50 Holyoke St.
Maureen Washington

Subway
330 Main St.
Daisy Florek

Walgreens #04967
1588 Northampton St.
Walgreen Eastern Co. Inc.

LONGMEADOW

Abracadabra Painting
189 Englewood Road
Bryan Kennedy

Armata’s
901 Shaker Road
Good Food People Inc.

Dandelion Counseling, PLLC
734 Longmeadow St.
Bonnie Connell

Gianna Brassill
945 Shaker Road
Gianna Brassill

LUDLOW

Lavoie Family Chiropractic
733 Chapin St., Suite 200C
Christopher Lavoie

Marta Law Offices
77 Winsor St.
Paulo Marta, Lori Marta

NORTHAMPTON

ARK Dental, LLC
41 Locust St.
Ali Kasemkhani

Bang Bang Body Arts
7 Armory St.
Tiffany Matrone

H2H
260 Main St.
Thomas Rozene

The Hempest
2 Conz St.
Northampton Enterprises Inc.

Hiffman National, LLC
766 North King St.
Hiffman Asset Management, LLC

Life Law Publishing
92 Laurel Park
Matthew Herschler

Lilly’s Restoration, LLC
11 Cedar St.
Dri Klibansky

New England Community for Emotionally Focused Therapy
53 Center St.
Nancy Knudsen

NGK Designs
206 South St.
Nanut Kaye

Symbols & Cymbals
415 Prospect St.
Nerissa Nields-Duffy

PALMER

Palmer Pro Bike Corp.
1438 North Main St.
Jeffrey Soja

Reflexology Inc.
1026 Central St.
Zhanhua Wu

Thorndike Mills and Martin Importing
25 Ware St.
Mitchell Garabedian, Edward Garabedian, Anna Garabedian

SOUTHWICK

ACO Masonry, Heating & Air Conditioning
14 Hillside Road
Adam Quimette

Alison Marie Photography
208 College Highway, Suite H
Alison Alger

William Russell Photography
105 Coes Hill Road
William Gorman Jr.

SPRINGFIELD

Bossibella
112 Victoria St.
Anita Sorrell

Bravo’s Painting & Power Washing
38 Brookline Ave., Apt. 2
Osman Gabino Bravo

Bumpy’s Natural and Organic Foods
908-914 Allen St.
Derryl Gibbs

Cantina Curbside Grill
1242 Main St., Suite 211
Rashad Ali

Casino Island Bar
One MGM Way
Blue Tarp Redevelopment, LLC

Dewdney Enterprises
36 Kimberly Ave.
Anthony Dewdney

Erica’s Tax Services
26 Weymouth St.
Erica Floyd

Four Seasons Buffet
1714 Boston Road
Liyu Qui

Franklin Market
412 Franklin St.
Zahoor Haq

Good Karma Eco-Cleaning
93 West Canton Circle
Holly Paquette

The Greenhouse
170 Lucerne Road
Shavonne Lewis

J & D Polishing & Deburring
33 Mohawk Dr.
Dennis Nelson

Legend TV Co.
34 Front St.
James Cummings

Likkle Jamaican Cuisine
664 Page Blvd.
Caroll Cohen

Liranzo Mini Market
544 Worthington St.
Andrea Liranzo

The Markens Group Inc.
1350 Main St.
Bennett Markens

OneDigital Health and Benefits
1500 Main St.
Digital Insurance, LLC

Plaza Bar
One MGM Way
Blue Tarp Redevelopment, LLC

Raven’s Loft
115 Sumner Ave.
Stephanie Erbe

Savmore Auto Repair
351 East Columbis Ave.
Vladimir Krokhmalyuk

Springfield Diocesan Cemeteries
421 Tinkham Road
Joseph Kostek

WESTFIELD

B-Ton Construction Inc.
120 Mullen Ave.
Olessya Kondrotyev

CBD413
13 Dubois St.
Andrew Carmel

Chris’ Lawncare & More
54 Rosedell Dr.
Christopher Fay

J. Cruz Consulting
137 Whitaker Road
Jose Cruz

J. Goss Construction
12 Glenwood Dr.
Jarrod Goss

L.J. Avionics
1430 Russell Road, Apt. 14
Pablo Marquez

State of Art HVAC
20 Pauline Lane
Dustin Cupak

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Metro by T-Mobile
935 Riverdale St.
Brian Conway

Rite Aid #10061
99 Westfield St.
Michelle Mazzenga

Royal Nails
935 Riverdale St.
Hoang Vo

Speedway #2496
341 Memorial Ave.
Speedway, LLC

Verizon Wireless
1123 Riverdale St.
Karen Shipman

WILBRAHAM

Murray Financial Group
2341 Boston Road, Unit A120A
Kevin Murray

The Scented Garden Gift Shop
2341 Boston Road, Unit A110
Sandra Polom

Agenda

White Lion Harvest Nights

Through Oct. 30: White Lion Brewing’s summer beer garden officially ended on Aug. 31. During the summer months, the downtown beer garden, which occupies a private park in downtown Springfield, offered an eclectic lineup of events and community collaborations, hosting local musicians, food trucks, restaurants, special events, and nonprofit and private companies. Because of continuing demand for such events, White Lion will present Harvest Nights at 1477 Main St. each Wednesday and Friday from 5 to 10 p.m. through Oct. 30. Events will include White Lion Wednesdays, street food Fridays, local musicians and DJs, special evening hookah nights, and a Hop Headz home-brewer collaboration. Follow White Lion Brewing on all social-media platforms for ongoing updates.

Author Talk with Lesléa Newman

Sept. 19: Jewish Family Services will host a presentation by author Lesléa Newman on Thursday, Sept. 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. Newman will talk about her journey to become a children’s book writer and present and discuss some of her Jewish children’s books, including Gittel’s Journey: An Ellis Island Story. She will also show a short film titled We Are a Country of Immigrants in which she interviews Phyllis Rubin, her godmother and daughter of the real Gittel. The program is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served, and books by the author will be available for purchase. Jewish Family Services’ Community Room is located at 1160 Dickinson St., Springfield (the parking lot is on the Converse Street side).

AAFPAA Awards

Sept. 26: The African American Female Professors Award Assoc. (AAFPAA) will host its third annual awards ceremony at 5:30 p.m. at Bay Path University, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow. The association will salute three professors, as well as present an Alumnae Award and Legacy Award. The keynote speaker is Yves Salomon-Fernandez, president of Greenfield Community College and a staunch advocate for reinventing higher education in the age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. She has been recognized as a thought leader, writing and speaking on issues related to rural innovation, workforce development, and women’s leadership. With her passion for access and equity, she was named one of the “Top 25 Women in Higher Education” by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education in March 2018. Tickets are $20 per person, with half the proceeds going toward the AAFPAA Scholarship Fund.

Source to Sea Cleanup

Sept. 27-28: Registration is now open for the Connecticut River Conservancy’s (CRC) Source to Sea Cleanup. This annual event, now in its 23rd year, has grown into one of the largest river cleanups in the country. There are three ways for volunteers to get involved in the Source to Sea Cleanup this year: report a trash site in need of cleaning, find a nearby cleanup group to join, or organize and register a local cleanup group. For more information or to register, visit www.ctriver.org/cleanup. If your group wants to get involved but needs a cleanup site, if you have questions, or if you know of a trash site in need of cleaning, e-mail Lennard at [email protected] Learn more about the event at www.ctriver.org/cleanup.

Run for the Bar

Sept. 29: The Hampden County Bar Assoc. will hold its sixth annual 5K Run/Walk Race Judicata – A Run for the Bar at Ashley Reservoir in Holyoke. Registration begins at 9 a.m., followed by the start of the event at 11 a.m. Proceeds raised from this year’s event will benefit the Children’s Law Project and the Colonel Archer B. Battista Veterans Scholarship fund. For more information, call the Hampden County Bar Assoc. at (413) 732-4660.

Aeron Chair Hockey Tournament

Oct. 2: In celebration of its 30th anniversary, Lexington Group will host an Aeron chair hockey tournament from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at its showroom located at 380 Union St., West Springfield. For this first-of-its-kind event in New England, Lexington Group has invited players, and their administrative staff, from elite area hockey teams — American International College and UMass Amherst — to battle it out in a friendly competition on the ‘ice.’ The winning team from the first round will play against members of the Springfield Thunderbirds. The tournament will be incorporated into an After 5 networking event, with about 300 business and community professionals expected to attend. The event will help raise funds and awareness for the Foundation for TJO Animals. Admission to the event is complimentary, but registration is required and can be made at lexington-aeronhockey.eventbrite.com. Donations to the Foundation for TJO Animals are appreciated and can be made in advance directly through the foundation’s website, www.tjofoundation.org, or may be made at the event. Sponsors include MP CPAs, St. Germain Investments, Sitterly Movers, and Sheraton Springfield Monarch Place Hotel (cup sponsors); bankESB, Behavioral Health Network, Complete Payroll Solutions, Dietz & Co. Architects, Fire Service Group, HUB International New England, Massachusetts Fire Technologies, Mercier Carpet, Morgan Stanley Wealth Management, and New England Promotional Marketing (chair sponsors); AIS, Baystate Ob/Gyn, Contract Sources, Excel Dryer, KI, Lexington Group, Paragus IT, People’s United Bank, the Republican, and Westfield Bank (rink sponsors); Go Graphix and Herman Miller (goods sponsors); BusinessWest, ERC5, and West of the River Chamber of Commerce (event partners).

Jazz Brunch

Oct. 6: Tickets are now on sale for the 2019 Northampton Jazz Festival Brunch, a fundraiser to benefit the Jazz Artists in the Schools Program at John F. Kennedy Middle School, which exposes Northampton’s student musicians to the valuable mentorship of professional jazz artists. The DeChamplain Quartet, based out of Hartford, Conn., will perform their gypsy-style music from noon to 2 p.m. with Atla DeChamplain on vocals, Matt DeChamplain on piano, Chris Morrison on guitar, and Matt Dwonszyk on bass. Thanks to donations from the Davis Financial Group of Hadley, the program has been able to offer unique workshops with professional jazz artists to the jazz-band students at JFK and Northampton High School. The jazz brunch will be held at the Delaney House, 3 Country Club Road in Holyoke, starting at 11 a.m. Tickets to the brunch cost $40, and $10 from each purchase will benefit the Davis Financial Group Jazz Artists in the Schools Program at JFK Middle School for the 2019-20 school year. The brunch will wrap up the 2019 Northampton Jazz Festival, set for Friday, Oct. 4 through Sunday, Oct. 6. The event features three days of live music at various venues in downtown Northampton, including the main-stage act, the Kurt Elling Quintet, which will perform on Oct. 5 at 7:30 p.m. at the Academy of Music. For more information, to purchase tickets, or to donate to the Jazz Artists in the Schools Program, visit northamptonjazzfest.org.

Healthcare Heroes Gala

Oct. 17: The third annual class of Healthcare Heroes will be honored at the Sheraton Springfield from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Healthcare Heroes, a recognition program involving the Western Mass. healthcare sector, was launched in 2017 by HCN and BusinessWest. The program was created to shed a bright light on the outstanding work being done across the broad spectrum of health and wellness services, and the institutions and people providing that care. The class of 2019 was profiled in the Sept. 2 issue of BusinessWest and on businesswest.com. Tickets cost $90 or $900 for a table of 10. To reserve a spot, visit www.businesswest.com/healthcare-heroes-2 or e-mail [email protected] Healthcare Heroes is sponsored by American International College and Baystate Health/Health New England (presenting sponsors), Behavioral Health Network, Comcast Business, and Development Associates (partner sponsors), and Bulkley Richardson, Design to Finish, Elms College, and Keiter Builders (supporting sponsors).

Women of Impact Luncheon

Dec. 4: The keynote speaker for the 2019 Women of Impact luncheon will be Lisa Tanzer, president of Life Is Good. Tanzer has more than 25 years of consumer brand experience. Prior to becoming president, she served as the company’s head of Marketing after spending more than 20 years on the board of directors of the Life is Good Kids Foundation. She’s held executive positions in the entertainment, e-commerce, and education sectors. Earlier in her career, she held marketing and strategy roles at Hasbro, Staples, Gillette, and PricewaterhouseCoopers. The 2019 Women of Impact honorees will be announced in the Oct. 14 issue of BusinessWest and feted at a celebration on Dec. 4 from 11 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. at Sheraton Springfield. Tickets cost $65 per person, or $650 for a table of 10. To purchase tickets, visit www.businesswest.com/women-of-impact or e-mail [email protected] The Women of Impact program is sponsored by Country Bank and TommyCar Auto Group (presenting sponsors), Comcast Business (supporting sponsor), New Valley Bank & Trust (speaker sponsor), and WWLP 22 News/CW Springfield (media sponsor).

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AMHERST

New England RV Rentals Inc., 463 Bay Road, Amherst, MA 01002. Julie Printy, same. RV rental.

CHICOPEE

New England Express Logistics Inc., 172 Prospect St., Chicopee, MA 01013. Lyudmila Kudrya, same. Transportation.

EAST LONGMEADOW

Meadows Health Center, P.C., 40 Crane Ave., East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Muhammad Gul, 53 Williamsburg Dr., Longmeadow, MA 01028. Medical office.

HADLEY

New England West Skating Club Inc., 7 Frallo Dr., Hadley, MA 01035. Linda Taylor, 860 Cape St., Ashfield, MA 01330. Providing education, training, and competitive figure-skating opportunities at all levels in order to foster and develop the sport and art of figure skating.

INDIAN ORCHARD

Mass.Scalp Inc., 202 Essex St., Indian Orchard, MA 01151. Lordi Smith, same. Micropigmentation.

LEE

Nejaime’s Enterprises Inc., 245 East Center St., Lee, MA 01238. Fadi Nejaime, same. Food services.

PITTSFIELD

Meadowview Consulting Inc., 216 Eleanor Road, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Kathleen Phillips, same. Community-based consulting.

SHEFFIELD

Meridian Learning Corp., 674 Rannapo Road, Sheffield, MA 01257. Matt Mervis, same. Education, training, and learning design.

SHELBURNE FALLS

Mohawk Athletic Assoc. Inc., 24 Ashfield Road, c/o Mohawk Trail Regional High School, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370. Brandon Boucias, 51 Upper St., Buckland, MA 01338. Provide financial support for student athletic programs in the Mohawk Regional school district.

SOUTH DEERFIELD

Medicaid Crossing Inc., 158 North Main St., P.O. Box 143, South Deerfield, MA 01373. Patricia Friedman, same. Health-insurance application assistance.

SPRINGFIELD

LOX Foundation Inc., 180 King St., Springfield, MA 01109. Tyra Downie, 195 Hickory St., Springfield, MA 01109. Empowering and engaging youth and community through charity, scholarship, and mentorship.

Master Wireless – JM Inc., 1228 Main St., Springfield, MA 01103. David Kim, 3900 City Ave., Unit A522, Phildelphia, PA 19131. Wireless phones.

Migs Youth Development Inc., 97 Wachusett St., Springfield, MA 01108. Jose Feliciano, same. Help improve quality of life for the youth of Springfield by fostering individual and social health and responsibility, character development, and athletic and academic achievement.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

MN Home Renovation Inc., 101 River St., Apt. 5, West Springfield, MA 01089. Dumitru Moroianu, same. Construction.

WILBRAHAM

Mercieri Inc., 220 Monson Road, Wilbraham, MA 01095. Leonard Mercieri, same. Aerospace quality management system auditor.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of August 2019.

AMHERST

Amherst Lockworks
145 University Dr., #2455
Derek Lauder

The Cottage Garden
135 Cottage St.
Celia Riahi

Gen10 Associates
1193 South East St.
Michael Wright

Wheelhouse Farm, LLC
383 Main St.
William Van Heuvelen, Jake Mazar

BELCHERTOWN

Another Pair of Eyes
340 Warren Wright Road
Erin Martineau

Arcpoint Brewing Co.
207 Warner St.
Christopher Peterson, Christopher Eldridge

Belchertown Kidz Club, LLC
4 Stadler St.
Daryl Anne Peck

Dragonfly Services
410 Amherst Road
Margaret Adamson-Gour

Gray Craig Farm
11 Jeffrey Lane
Barbara Hastings, Thomas Hastings

CHICOPEE

Elara Caring
450 Memorial Dr.
Medical Resources Home Health Corp.

Fiona’s Spa
1888 Memorial Dr.
Meijuan Zhou, Xinli Quaw

G.G. Grace Delivery
21 Woodland Ave.
Gnobo Gnopo, Ahou Kouakou Gnopo

Kalele Daycare
15 Edgewood Ave.
Nelitza Martinez

OrnANDmeants
80 Billings St.
Amber Deshaies

DEERFIELD

Harvest Health & Recreation
198 Mill Village Road
Suns Mass II, LLC

EASTHAMPTON

Forever Poe
15 Cottage St.
Jeffrey Dahlberg

Z Worker Bees, LLC
14 Russell Lane
Michelle Zimora

EAST LONGMEADOW

Agility Equine Massage
35 Rockingham Circle
Laura Peteros

Dr. Robert Caprile, Chiropractor
181 Maple St.
Robert Caprile

Fashion Warehouz, LLC
95 Somers Road
Olevia Wilson

Hampden County Property Services, LLC
674 North Main St.
Steven Rovithis

Red Falcon Realty Management, LLC
674 North Main St.
Steven Rovithis

Rovithis Realty, LLC
674 North Main St.
Steven Rovithis

Seven Roads Media
674 North Main St.
Steven Rovithis

SR Commercial Realty
674 North Main St.
Steven Rovithis

GREENFIELD

Abramson’s Renovations
111 Beacon St.
Brian Abramson

Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar
141 Mohawk Trail
Apple New England, LLC

Auto Trim and Sign
24 Place Terrace
Fred Wheeler

BC Redesign, LLC
59 Meridian St.
Rebecca Crapo

Cohn & Co. Real Estate
117 Main St.
Robert Cohn

Cook Restoration & Construction
908 Bernardston Road
Benton Cook

D’Angelo Grilled Sandwiches
68 Mohawk Trail
Landd Corp.

Dollar General Store #14956
369 Federal St.
DG Retail, LLC

Franklin First Federal Credit Union
57 Newton St.
Michelle Dwyer

Greenfield Bicycles Unlimited Inc.
322 High St.
Mary Ellen Perry

Home Body
231 Main St.
Haley Morgan, Eric Hnatow

Marina Pyro
100 Elm St.
Marina Pirozhkov

Sarah M. Frye Mind and Bodywork
246 Davis St., Apt. 2
Sarah Frye

Western Mass. Organic Supply
12 Kenwood St.
Josh Lagreze

HOLYOKE

DeRoy-Olivero, LICSW
37 Myrtle Ave.
Kristi Olivero

Finn’s Ice Cream
2 Fini Road
Dianne Sutherland Fini

My Car
177 High St.
Miguel Carrasco

Quick Stop Food Mart
171 Sargeant St.
Fouzia Nahid Raheel

LUDLOW

Fatima Afonso-Mendes
116 Sewall St.
Fatima Afonso-Mendes

Hub International New England, LLC
564 Center St.
Timothy Marini

NORTHAMPTON

Couple and Family Institute of New England
53 Center St.
Nancy Knudsen

Hampshire Theater Co.
8 Nonotuck St.
Stan Freeman

Institute of Healing Journeys
2 Strong Ave.
Peter Corbett

Kidstuff
90 Maple St.
Stacy Buhl

L & T Respess Books
136 West St.
Linwood Respess

My Virtual Bankruptcy Paralegal
244 Damon Road
Candace Clarke

NewsForKids.net
45 Jackson St.
William Adams

POE Light US
88 King St.
Rob Chambers

Washut & Ware Inc.
17 King St.
Christopher Ware, Alexander Washut

PALMER

Benoit’s Auto
346 Boston Road
Josh Benoit

Enisde Salt Therapy, LLC
1372 Main St.
Denise Pelletier

Finesse Garage
21 Wilbraham St.
Jason Methe

SOUTHWICK

KeenKut Landscaping
146 Vining Hill Road
Lailonnie Keene

Really Cool Electronics
117 Sheep Pasture Road
Jacob Howe

Salon Amici
515 College Highway
Susan D’Amours

Yellow Bear
642 College Highway
Vicki Benford

SPRINGFIELD

AC Consulting and Media
7 Schley St.
Ayanna Crawford

Alicsia O the Salon Inc.
1199 Sumner Ave.
Alicsia O’Connor

Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar
1359 Boston Road
Apple New England, LLC

B’s Towing & Recovery
11 Front St.
Branden Stanek

Chuchazo
233 Seymour Ave.
Jose Brito

Court of Bliss
47 Michigan St.
Courtney Sanders

CozyBzzz
2000 Parker St.
Stephanie Burgess

Cummings Remodeling & Floor Covering
34 Front St.
James Cummings

GRP Funding
1350 Main St.
GRP Funding Holdings

Hair Comes the Bride
116 Champlain Ave.
Rachel Newton

Halloween City
356 Cooley St.
Party City

Hiffman International, LLC
55 St. George St.
Hiffman Asset

Human to Human
37 Chestnut St.
Episcopal Diocese of Western Mass.

Luxury Tax Solutions
118 Commonwealth Ave.
Kyara Wiggins

Man Buns
1 MGM Way
Blue Tarp Redevelopment, LLC

Mass Home Remodeling Service
185 Dwight St.
Javier Rosario

NeatCREW Home Services
27 Ames St.
Paul Dyricacz

No Stigma
46 Melha Ave.
Johanna Maldonado

A Touch of Class Barbershop
8 Kendell St.
David Diaz

York Street
1 Federal St.
Michael Mastriani

WESTFIELD

A & Z Auto Repair
23A Orange St.
Farzaan Mufeed

ATG Westfield
910 Southampton Road
ATG Patriot, LLC

Bruce H. Bonsall, LLC
12 Salvatore Dr.
Bruce Bonsall

Eastern Touch Bodywork
83B Main St.
Liyin Zhen

FinishWorks
21 Union St.
RPM Wood Finishes Group Inc.

Gorilla Vapes
121 North Elm St.
Ape Vape Inc.

Island of Flowers
127 Springdale Road
Marina Kostenko

Karen’s Hair Salon
338 Springdale Road
Karen Croteau

MedExpress Urgent Care – Westfield
311 East Main St.
MedExpress Urgent Care, P.C.

Roberts Construction
31 Valley View Dr.
Jeffrey Roberts

Skyline Beer Co.
98 Southwick Road
Skyline Beer Co., LLC

Timothy M. Nalepinski
74 Plantation Circle
Timothy Nalepinski

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Anderson Cleaning Inc.
103 Wayside Ave.
Gomes Anderson

Baystate Family Chiropractic
346 Main St.
Roy Rojas Correa

Debrons Salon
242 Westfield St.
Deborah Scharmann

Manchester Home Improvement
209 Rogers Ave.
Barry Manchester

WILBRAHAM

3D Biomedical
8 Addison Road
Paul Pelletier Jr.

Artsong, LLC
21 Merrill Road
Amy Porchelli

JFI Tile
2 Mohawk St.
John Ingalls