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Dramatic Effect

the Colonial Theatre was reopened in 2006

Following a $21 million renovation, the Colonial Theatre was reopened in 2006 after more than 50 years of inactivity.

Kate Maguire was out shopping recently, wearing a shirt that proudly celebrated the 90th anniversary of the Berkshire Playhouse in Stockbridge.

“The young girl at the register — she was probably 18 — was stunned. She said, ‘that theater is 90 years old? I had no idea!’ For her, it was ancient history. But she made me realize that, yes, 90 years of theater is a long time.”

As artistic director and CEO of the Berkshire Theatre Group, which puts on performances at venues in Stockbridge and Pittsfield, Maguire has witnessed quite a bit of that history first-hand since joining the organization 25 years ago.

“The facilities represent two iconic sites,” she said. “The Colonial Theatre is the center of Pittsfield — the center of the county.” As for the playhouse in Stockbridge, also known as the Fitzpatrick Main Stage, “considering that culture is the heart of the community in the Berkshires, that is as iconic a structure as any in Berkshire County.”

But while the buildings themselves are iconic, more importantly, each campus has brought countless people to see some of the most remarkable names in the history of American theater, as well as up-and-coming talent, Maguire noted. “It has created a sort of cultural destination for artists and audiences. That’s what the buildings represent.”

They’re also an economic driver, she added, currently drawing about 75,000 visitors a year and contributing almost $4 million to the local economy annually — as well as employing some 600 people in some capacity each year.

Berkshire Theatre Group (BTG) was created in 2010 by the merger of the Berkshire Theatre Festival, housed at the main stage in Stockbridge, and the Colonial Theatre, built in 1903 in Pittsfield. One of the largest arts organizations in the region, BTG oversees the development, production, and presentation of theatre, music, and various other performing arts.

Kate Maguire says involving hundreds of children in productions each year is key to securing BTG’s future.

Kate Maguire says involving hundreds of children in productions each year is key to securing BTG’s future.

The Stockbridge campus presents work at two venues. The 314-seat Fitzpatrick Main Stage, designed by famed architect Stanford White, is a summer-only venue where classical theatre and world premieres are produced. Meanwhile, the 122-seat Unicorn Theatre, open year-round, is home for new and emerging artists, and a space where more experimental, provocative works often finds a receptive audience.

Meanwhile, in Pittsfield, the 780-seat Colonial Theatre — built in 1903 and re-opened in 2006 following a $21 million restoration — hosts family entertainment, comedy, live music, and other events year-round.

Located in the lobby of the Colonial is the Garage, a name that pays homage to its former owner, Berkshire Auto Co. This newest BTG venue, complete with a stage, lights, and sound system, is a dedicated space for local and regional music, comedy performers, and more.

In short, Maguire said, there’s something for everyone.

“I want people to know they’re welcome here,” she told BusinessWest. “They can listen to acoustic musicians or hear a really funny comedian in the Garage, sit with friends, have a drink, then go into the majestic Colonial Theatre and have a completely different experience. Or they might see a rock band on stage, and the following week see an opera performed. It’s a space where people come together from all strata and all walks of life.”

Rich History

The Colonial Theatre opened its doors on Sept. 28, 1903. Built in five and a half months, it boasted pristine acoustics and classic Gilded Age architecture. As was sometimes the custom in that day, the exterior of the theater was designed by a respected local architect, Joseph McArthur Vance, who also designed Pittsfield’s Masonic Temple, the Christian Science building, the superstructure of the Wahconah Park Stadium, Mount Greylock’s Bascom Lodge, and the Mahaiwe Theatre in Great Barrington.

“I want people to know they’re welcome here. They can listen to acoustic musicians or hear a really funny comedian in the Garage, sit with friends, have a drink, then go into the majestic Colonial Theatre and have a completely different experience. Or they might see a rock band on stage, and the following week see an opera performed. It’s a space where people come together from all strata and all walks of life.”

From its early days, the space played host to some of the most notable lights in theater, including Maude Adams, Ethel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Sarah Bernhardt, Eubie Blake, Billie Burke, George Cohan, Irene Dunne, Grace George, William Gillette, Walter Hampden, Helen Hayes, Al Jolson, Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, Julia Marlow and E.H. Sothern, Will Rogers, Lillian Russell, Ted Shawn, Noble Sissell, Ruth St. Denis, Laurette Taylor, and Ed Wynn.

the Colonial Theatre

Following a $21 million renovation, the Colonial Theatre was reopened in 2006 after more than 50 years of inactivity.

To the south in Stockbridge, the Berkshire Playhouse was founded in 1928 when Mabel Choate sold the Stockbridge Casino to financier Walter Clark. An organization called the Three Arts Society remodeled the casino’s interior by adding a stage and seating for 450 people, and christened the new theatre the Berkshire Playhouse.

In 1937, the Colonial was renovated with a new marquee, projection room, and two retail stores added to the front of the building. With cinema on the rise, the venue operated primarily for the next decade and a half as a movie theater, although some community performances continued. In 1951, the Colonial closed due to the rise of TV and the decline of touring theatrical companies — and would remain closed for more than a half-century.

Down in Stockbridge, the Berkshire Playhouse was reorganized as a nonprofit organization in 1964 and renamed the Berkshire Theatre Festival. In 1976, the playhouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places. In 1996, the Unicorn Theatre was reopened after a lengthy renovation and became BTG’s official second stage.

To the north, meanwhile, efforts to restore and reopen the Colonial were picking up in the 1990s. And organization called Friends of the Colonial Theatre Restoration was formed in 1994, and public tours in 1997 led to increased community awareness of the venue’s potential. A $2.5 million appropriation in state funding followed, and designation of the facility in 1998 as a National Historic Treasure by the Save America’s Treasures Program of the National Park Service only increased the momentum.

After years of design, planning, and community fundraising, the rehabilitation of the historic theater — and the extensive renovation of the adjacent Berkshire Auto Garage — were undertaken. In 2006, the $21 million restoration was complete, and the theater reopened. The 22-month construction process preserved and reinstalled all historically significant architectural and design features — from the vaulted, gilded entrance to the elaborately decorated boxes and balcony to the custom plasterwork — while creating a modern performance center.

“I feel it’s very important to make sure that the community recognizes the theater as their own,” Maguire told BusinessWest. “The doors were closed for 50 years, and the community got together and put in a lot of hard work and money renovate that theater.”

In a year when the Berkshire Theatre Festival marked its 90th summer season and the Colonial Theatre celebrated its 115th birthday, the community continues to show its support, she added. “We’ve been successful in fund-raising, and certainly a lot of people coming to our shows — we’re very grateful for the attendance.”

Kid Stuff

Maguire might be even more proud, though, of the way BTG engages with children, reaching about 13,000 students with cultural programs each year and putting many of them on stage in any given year; this past summer, about 100 Berkshire-area youth performed in Tarzan of the Apes at the Colonial.

“Imagine how many other kids are coming to these productions,” she said. “We are ensuring the vitality of the future of these buildings. Those 100 kids in Tarzan in the summertime — those kids are going to remember that experience, and make sure that building is here for the next generation.”

She believes that because it’s her own story. Growing up in Lowell, she used to attend performances of Boston Children’s Theatre.

“I was amazed at the quality of work, and it looked like an army of kids were working on these produtions,” she recalled. “Little did I know that, many years later, I’d have the opportunity to create such programming in the community I live in now. Every single doorway I’m walked through has been opened because of theater.”

Maguire wants to open those doors for others today — not just children who might feel a spark to follow a passion for theater, but area residents and Berkshires visitors who become part of a long, rich history every time they buy a ticket.

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Court Dockets

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
Lisa Cupillo v. The Home Depot Inc.
Allegation: Negligence; poorly stacked tile causing personal injury: $1,367
Filed: 8/22/18

HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COURT
Zoe Zeichner v. Steve Lewis Subaru Inc. and Subaru of America Inc.
Allegation: Breach of implied warranty, breach of express warranty, negligence
Filed: 8/7/18

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Francois Haba v. ServiceNet Inc.
Allegation: Employment discrimination
Filed: 7/27/18

Erin Menard individually and as guardian for Zachary Menard v. Town of Southampton and Eversource Energy
Allegation: Negligence; falling tree limbs causing personal injury: $9,611.33
Filed: 8/2/18

Tammy Lequillo v. Staples the Office Superstore East Inc., Dennis Gaspie, Carl Rohrberg, Ron Lindhorst, Michael DeSantos, and Bruce Christian
Allegation: Age discrimination: $1,000,000
Filed: 8/2/18

Mi-Hyun Park v. University of Massachusetts Amherst and Richard Palmer
Allegation: Tenure denied for unlawful, discriminatory reasons: $100,000+
Filed: 8/10/18

Michael Kneurr v. Qionglong USBoston, LLC
Allegation: Negligence at Cold Spring Country Club causing personal injury: $363,050
Filed: 8/16/18

Joseph Whalen v. Walter J. Gazda, D.M.D.
Allegation: Dental malpractice: $26,200
Filed: 8/20/18

David R. Knightly v. Town of Amherst and Amherst Police Department
Allegation: Employment discrimination: $25,000+
Filed: 8/20/18

Features

Jim Barrett was talking about the future of work, market disrupters, and, more specifically, the skills that employees will need in the future. And to get his points across, he repeatedly referenced the F-35 stealth fighter jet recently introduced into service by the Air Force, Navy, and Marines.

“The pilot has a helmet that is custom-sculpted to their head,” Barrett, managing partner of the Holyoke-based accounting firm Meyers Brothers Kalicka, explained. “They put the visor down, and they see, through cameras, 360 degrees around the plane. They’re not really using their vision anymore; they’re looking straight ahead and seeing the screen in front of them.

“Years ago, when these planes touched down, people would run out to the tarmac and say, ‘how much fuel do you need? How much ammunition do you need? Is there anything wrong?’ And they’d do all the tests,” he went on. “This new jet actually has the ability to send back information to the base about how much fuel it’s used, how much ammunition it’s used; it does a self-diagnosis of what it needs such that, when the pilot touches down on the deck, there are people already lined up with the exact parts it needs and the exact amount of ammunition. They eliminated all the time and people it took to gather all that information.”

The moral to that story? Essentially, the same thing is happening in the workplace, said Barrett, adding that, in the future — and even now, for that matter — people will need a different set of skills to succeed in the workplace.

Using his sector, financial services, as an example, he said that, years ago, people would spend large chunks of time gathering and analyzing data. “Now, machines are going to do that for you,” he went on. “So you’ll need people who can make determinations about what data is relevant, because the data is already going to gathered and analyzed.”

Barrett will get into much greater detail about all this at the third installment of BusinessWest’s Future Tense series, created to help business owners understand the future and be better prepared for it, on Sept. 20.

Fast Facts:

What: Future Tense lecture series, the third installment
When: Sept. 20, starting at 8 a.m.
Where: Tech Foundry, 1391 Main St., Springfield, 9th floor
For More Information: Call (413) 781-8600
To Register: Visit businesswest.com/lecture-series

He will be joined by Mark Borsari, president of wire-brush manufacturing firm Sanderson MacLeod, who will discuss change and innovation through lean concepts and focus on resulting cultural considerations and the broad impact on competitiveness.

Barrett and Borsari will wrap up the series, which has drawn a wide range of business owners and managers to Tech Foundry’s facilities to hear about arguably the most vexing topic in business — the future.

In the first installment, Delcie Bean, founder of Paragus Strategic IT, talked about how technology — in such forms as artificial intelligence, driverless cars, and 3-D printing, will change not only the workplace, but society as a whole. In the second installment, wealth-management advisor Amy Jamrog presented a program titled “What Got You Here Might Not Get You There: Mistakes Business Owners Make Before and After Retirement.”

The third installment will have many focus points, said Barrett, but especially the market forces and market disrupters that will shape his sector, but also all industries.

And, as noted earlier, to succeed, people will need a different skill set.

“It’s not analyzing the data as much as determining what to do with it,” he explained. “It’s about making better decisions with the date you have, as opposed to gathering and analyzing it.”

The program will begin at 8 a.m. with registration and a continental breakfast. There will be then be remarks from sponsors — Paragus and the Jamrog Group — followed by the presentation and a discussion. Tickets are $25 each, with the proceeds going to Tech Foundry.

For more information, call (413) 781-8600. To register, visit businesswest.com/lecture-series.

Court Dockets

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

HAMPDEN DISTRICT COURT
Bottling Group, LLC d/b/a Pepsi Beverages Co. v. Silon Corp. d/b/a Little Caesar’s and Khalid Drihmi
Allegation: Breach of contract: $5,285.62
Filed: 8/6/18

Matthew Katz, D.M.D. v. Richard T. Miller
Allegation: Breach of contract, unfair and deceptive act: $5,000
Filed: 8/21/18

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
Joseph Vass v. Fuel Services Inc.
Allegation: Negligence, breach of warranty: $73,691
Filed: 7/24/18

Custom Eco Friendly, LLC d/b/a Direct Green Bags v. Definery, LLC
Allegation: Money owed for goods sold and delivered: $33,659
Filed: 7/31/18

Harry Mills v. McDonald’s Corp.
Allegation: Negligence; slip and fall causing personal injury: $152,099.25
Filed: 8/2/18

John A. Crafts v. CSX Transportation Inc.
Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury: $71,024
Filed: 8/2/18

Charlaine and Robert Howlick v. Mohamed Hamdani, M.D. and New England Surgical Group, LLP
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $982,000
Filed: 8/6/18

Karla Garcia v. Habit Opco Inc., Habit Opco LLC, Acadia Healthcare Co. Inc., Jessica Fortier-Goss, and Gary Frankoski
Allegation: Employment discrimination: $25,000+
Filed: 8/11/18

Maria Rogers v. Old Dominion Freight Line Inc. and Alija Guster
Allegation: Motor-vehicle negligence causing personal injury: $34,522.62
Filed: 8/14/18

Donna M. Robichaud, personal representative of the estate of Carlo L. Russo v. Loomis Senior Living d/b/a Loomis Lakeside at Reed’s Landing, Loomis Communities Inc. d/b/a Loomis Corporate Management, and Mary Meffen
Allegation: Wrongful death: $500,000+
Filed: 8/14/18

Carol Chapdelaine v. Aspen Dental and Patrick Dermesropian, DDS/Patrick Dermesropian, LLC
Allegation: Dental malpractice: $45,030+
Filed: 8/15/18

Noreen Mazza Plourd v. Walmart Inc. and Wal-Mart Stores East, LP
Allegation: Negligence; slip and fall causing injury: $50,000
Filed: 8/16/18

Agenda

Family Business Center Dinner Forum

Sept. 12: The next dinner forum of the Family Business Center of Pioneer Valley will be held at the Delaney House in Holyoke, and the main presenter is Robert Frank, professor of Management and Economics at Cornell University. Frank will discuss how the field of behavioral economics helps business owners (and all humans) understand our irrational decisions, behaviors that run counter to our own interests, and what we can do about it. Owners and managers who are members or interested in a closer look may contact Ira Bryck at (413) 835-0810, or learn more at fambizpv.com.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Sept. 13: The abundance of recent high-profile sexual-harassment complaints has completely changed the public perception of this persistent problem. Sexual harassment is no longer a silent epidemic which is by and large being ignored. Posts stating the phrase ‘#metoo’ have created camaraderie among individuals who are choosing to speak up and stand up. However, despite the nation’s growing awareness about the prevalence of sexual harassment, as business owners and human-resources professionals, the problem probably isn’t all that surprising. Clearly, the perfunctory sexual-harassment policies and bland pro forma sexual-harassment trainings are not working. As business leaders, we need to approach sexual harassment in the workplace from a new perspective. You’re invited to join a roundtable discussion on how we can profoundly change our approach to sexual harassment in the workplace. The event will take place from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Royal, P.C., 270 Pleasant St., Northampton. Advance registration is required, and seating will be limited. The cost is $30 per person. Mail your payment and make your check payable to Royal, P.C., 270 Pleasant St., Northampton, MA 01060. 
E-mail Heather Loges at [email protected] to register or if you have any questions about this workshop.

‘The Basics of Starting a Business’

Sept. 17: The Mass. Small Business Development Center Network’s Western regional office will offer a free workshop, “The Basics of Starting a Business,” four times this fall. Presented by Allen Kronick, senior business advisor with the MSBDCN’s Western Mass. office, will focus on business fundamentals, from startup considerations to business-plan development to funding sources. It is designed for owners of existing businesses as well as those who are planning to start one. Oresta Varela, Springfield brand manager of the U.S. Small Business Administration, will also present “SBA Advantage,” an overview of the SBA’s programs and services. The program will be presented on Sept. 17, Oct. 1, Nov. 5, and Dec. 3 in the STCC Technology Park, Scibelli Enterprise Center, Building 101, third floor. Pre-registration is required; register at www.msbdc.org/wmass/training.

No Kid Hungry Golf Tournament

Sept. 17: The sad reality is that one in six kids in the U.S. goes hungry every day. No Kid Hungry is a national nonprofit organization created to alter that reality. Through its fundraising efforts, No Kid Hungry supports school breakfast programs, after-school meal programs, summer meal programs, and food-skills education programs to help parents sustain nutrition efforts. Each dollar raised by No Kid Hungry provides 10 meals to at-risk children and supports education programs for parents. No Kid Hungry Golf, a local affiliate, will sponsor a golf tournament at Longmeadow Country Club to raise money to help feed these hungry kids. A number of businesses and organizations have already joined the effort as sponsors. Participants can register to golf, be a sponsor or donor, or come to the cocktail hour/dinner and auction. For more information or to register, visit www.nokidhungrygolf.com or contact Dr. Fred Kadushin at [email protected] or (413) 893-9677.

Future Tense Lecture

Sept. 20: The third installment of the BusinessWest lecture series Future Tense, titled “Change Considerations: An Examination of Lean Process, Market Disruption, and the Future of Your Business,” will take place on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Tech Foundry, 1391 Main St., ninth floor, Springfield. The lecture, open exclusively to CEOs and business owners, will be delivered by Mark Borsari, president of Sanderson MacLeod. The cost is a $25 donation to Tech Foundry. Event sponsors include Paragus IT, the Jamrog Group, and Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. See story on page 9 for more information about the program. To register, visit businesswest.com/lecture-series.

‘Hacks for Your Hindrances’

Sept. 21: The Family Business Center of Pioneer Valley (FBCPV) will present a workshop by business coach Julia Mines, called “Mindset: Hacks for Your Hindrances.” Attendees will learn how to gain some control over their amygdala, set better boundaries, be more courageous, stop procrastinating, and increase their self-esteem and happiness. Attendance is free for members and strategic partners of the FBCPV and $30 per person for others, who are owners and key managers of Western Mass. closely held and family owned companies. Contact Ira Bryck at [email protected] to register or for more information.

Source to Sea Cleanup

Sept. 28-29: Registration is now open for the Connecticut River Conservancy’s (CRC) Source to Sea Cleanup. This annual event, now in its 22nd year, has grown into New England’s largest river cleanup, winning an American Rivers award for most miles cleaned in 2017. There are three ways for volunteers to get involved in the Source to Sea Cleanup this year: report a trash site in need of cleaning, find a cleanup group near you to join, or organize and register your own local cleanup group. For more information or to register for the event, visit www.ctriver.org/cleanup. The annual Source to Sea Cleanup is a two-day river cleanup coordinated by CRC in all four states of the 410-mile Connecticut River basin. Volunteers remove trash along rivers, streams, parks, boat launches, trails, and more. If your group wants to get involved but needs a cleanup site, if you have questions, or if you know of a trash site in need of cleaning, contact CRC Cleanup Coordinator Stacey Lennard at [email protected] Learn more about the event at www.ctriver.org/cleanup.

Drone Pilot Certification Course at HCC

Sept. 29 to Oct. 20: Holyoke Community College (HCC) will again offer a hands-on program for individuals who want to become FAA-licensed drone pilots. “Flying Drones for Profit, Public Safety, and Commercial Applications” will run on four consecutive Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the main campus of HCC, 303 Homestead Ave., Holyoke. The course will prepare individuals to take the Federal Aviation Administration Remote Pilot in Charge exam, which they must pass to become licensed drone operators. All classes will be taught by Larry Harmon, co-director of the GeoGraphics Laboratory at Bridgewater State University and an industry consultant on small, unmanned aircraft systems. The lecture portion of the course will meet in the HCC Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development on the main campus. Students will fly drones outside on the college sports fields. The course focuses on all content required to pass the FAA test, including regulations, national airspace system rules, weather, aircraft loading, aircraft performance, and flight operations. The cost for the four-week, non-credit course is $315. Space is limited. Drones will be provided for use in class. Participants can bring their own, but that is not necessary.

Luncheon Program on ‘Grand Bargain’

Oct. 2: Nancy Creed, president of the Springfield Regional Chamber, and John Regan, executive vice president for Government Affairs for Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM), were part of a team, including the state’s other major business groups, that worked for months to negotiate a legislative compromise on minimum wage, sales tax, and paid family and medical leave to avoid the ballot box on these three issues. At a luncheon event from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Log Cabin in Holyoke, Creed and Regan will discuss how the comprehensive legislative compromise on paid family and medical leave, sales tax, and minimum wage (the ‘grand bargain’) came to be and the impact it will have on the business community. The program will explain the process and what it could mean for future hot-button issues. Creed and Regan had two of just seven seats at the table, and Creed was the single voice representing the Western Mass. business community. The Springfield Regional Chamber program is presented in partnership with 1Berkshire, AIM, and the Greater Easthampton and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce, and sponsored by Sullivan, Hayes & Quinn. Reservations cost $30 for members of the Springfield Regional Chamber, the Greater Easthampton and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce, and 1Berkshire, and $40 for general admission, and may be made online at www.springfieldregionalchamberchamber.com.

Healthcare Heroes

Oct. 25: The second annual class of Healthcare Heroes will be honored at the Starting Gate at GreatHorse in Hampden. Healthcare Heroes, a recognition program involving the Western Mass. healthcare sector, was launched last spring by HCN and BusinessWest. The program was created to shed a bright light on the outstanding work being done across the broad spectrum of health and wellness services, and the institutions and people providing that care. The winners, in seven distinct categories, are profiled in this issue of BusinessWest and the September issue of HCN, and will be feted at the Oct. 25 gala. Healthcare Heroes sponsors include American International College (presenting sponsor), Baystate Health/Health New England (presenting sponsor), National Grid (partner), and supporting sponsors Renew.Calm, the Elms College MBA program, Bay Path University, and Mercy Medical Center and Trinity Health Of New England.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of August 2018.

BELCHERTOWN

ATI Physical Therapy of Western Massachusetts
25 Bridge St.
Robert McKenzie

Oasis Senior Advisors, Unit 91
121 Barton Ave.
Eric Aasheim

DEERFIELD

Cumberland Farms
31 Elm St.
Cumberland Farms Inc.

Oddfellow Coffee Co.
31 South Main St.
David Nielsen

HADLEY

Household Solutions
64 North Maple St.
Lynn Nester

Wildaness Woods
10 Hadley Place
Frank Wilda Jr.

SPRINGFIELD

A to Z Construction
33 Luden St.
Gregory Preston

A.C. Painting
33 Fresno St.
William Carter

Algarin Trucking
118 Carnavon Circke
Omar Algarin

The Braider’s Touch
186 State St.
Charlie Santiago

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts
104 Brookdale Dr.
Baystate Gas Co.

D & F Food Service Inc.
355 Belmont Ave.
Aleandro Mirabal

Guac This Way
One MGM Way
Blue Tarp Redevelopment, LLC

The Hair Connection
1142 State St.
Nicole Sanders

Hernandez Pavers
131 Larkspur St.
Ermie Hernandez

Home Metro Realty
208 Belmont St.
Metro Apartments, LLC

Lux Permanent Cosmetics
888 Sumner Ave.
Rebeca Ruiz

Magnetiq Convenience Store
178 Oakland St.
Benjamin Blake

Magnifica T
1245 Dwight St.
Valerie Gonzalez

Paulino Jewels
81 Robert Dyer Circle
Joel Paulino

Perez Landscaping & Snow Removal
1157 Sumner Ave.
Edwin Perez

R-K Historic Homes
1090 Worthington St.
R-K Historic Homes

Sublime Plus Inc.
152 Belmont Ave.
Usman Malik

Tropical African Market
810 Main St.
Nana Lawrence

Tubac Miguelitois Construction
31 Spruce St.
Miguel Tubac

VisionMerge Productions
32 Fairfield St.
Bridgette Baldwin

WESTFIELD

A & D Homes
126 Old Stage Road
David Okhrimenko

Absolute Mechanical
47 Jeremy Dr.
Vitaliy Kazimirov

Germaine’s K-9 Kuties
22 Church St.
Germaine Ruffo

Kismet Brewing Co., LLC
66 South Broad St.
Richard DeSousa

MBB Professional Services
592 Loomis St.
Maryann Burke

Purdy Property Management
8 Brentwood Dr.
Craig Purdy

River Song Farm
2 Delancey St.
Ann Barone

Shoe Repair & Alterations
4 School St.
Sergey Klimenko

Ski’s Landscaping
708 North Road
Mike Szewczynski

T & T Cleaning Service
6 Crestwood Circle
Therese Trottier

WSULiving, LLC
127 West Silver St.
WSULiving, LLC

WEST SPRINGFIELD

413 Seal Coating
1353 Riverdale St.
George Armani

Amedisys Personal Care
138 Memorial Ave.
Associated Home Care

Bowlen’s Carpentry
19 Overlook Dr.
Thomas Bowlen

Century 21 A-1 Nolan Realty, LLC
776 Westfield St.
Patrick Nolan

Express Brows & Beauty Style
520 Main St.
Pam Mehta

Frank’s Auto Repair
25 Sumner St.
Agostino Frank Demaio

Gargun Apartments Co.
33 Birnie Ave.
Vladimur Gargun

Imperial Barber Shop
715 Main St.
Eric Ruiz Adorno

K.M. Curran Co.
201 Park Ave.
Kenneth Curran

Red Light Lounge
125 Capital Dr.
Barry Tabb

Shallot Thai Cuisine
1455 Riverdale St.
Jirawat Ninsri

Shtarker Moving & Storage, LLC
203 Circuit Ave.
Robert Kushner

A Taste of Lebanon, LLC
553 Main St.
Maher Awkal

Women of Impact

The Inaugural Women of Impact Awards

BusinessWest has consistently recognized the contributions of women within the business community and has now created the Women of Impact awards to honor women who have the authority and power to move the needle in their business; are respected for accomplishments within their industries; give back to the community; and are sought out as respected advisors and mentors within the field of influence.  Nominees can be high-level executives, entrepreneurs, leaders of a non-profit organization, business owners, volunteers, or mentors: any inspirational woman, at any level in her career, who is doing remarkable things.

Nominations are now closed for 2018, but you may submit a nomination for 2019 consideration.

The 2018 Women of Impact honorees  will be announced and profiled in the October 29 issue of BusinessWest and  will be honored at the Women of Impact Luncheon Awards on Thursday, December 6, 2018 at the Springfield Sheraton Monarch Place Hotel.

Click here to view nomination information, requirement, and to submit your online nomination form.

For sponsorship information contact:
Kate Campiti 413.781.8600 (ext. 104) [email protected]
Kathleen Plante 413.781.8600 (ext. 108) [email protected]

Event Information
Date: Thursday, December 6, 2018
Time: 11 a.m.-1:45 p.m.
Location: Sheraton Springfield, One, Monarch Place, Springfield, MA 01144
Tickets on Sale: October 1, 2018; Price $65/person; $650/table of 10
For more information: Call (413) 781-8600 x100 or email at [email protected]

Sponsored by:

 

Agenda

SSO Percussion Trio

Aug. 30: As part of its 75th-anniversary season, the Springfield Symphony Orchestra (SSO) is scheduling a series of free chamber-music concerts throughout the Pioneer Valley. The first, slated for 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Springfield Armory, will debut a percussion trio. Guests are invited to arrive early to enjoy canapes and a cash bar before the concert begins promptly at 6:15 p.m. The SSO percussion trio will feature SSO principal percussionist Nathan Lassell, principal timpanist Marty Kluger, and percussionist Doug Perry. The trio will present a mixed program featuring snare drumming, marimba music, and multi-percussion pieces with humorous musical commentary thrown in. Guests are also invited to stay after the concert for a wrap-up cocktail hour to socialize with SSO musicians and further peruse the Springfield Armory National Historic Site collection.

Walk for Love

Sept. 8: Are you ready to walk for love? Join the fun at Shriners Hospitals for Children – Springfield for the eighth annual Walk for Love Walkathon and Barbecue. The Walkathon begins at the hospital and continues through Van Horn Park and back to the hospital for a barbecue. It is an easy, three-mile walk and will be held rain or shine. Registration begins at 9 a.m., followed by the walk at 10 a.m., and the barbecue from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The $25 cost ($5 for children 10 and under, and $40 for families) benefits Shriners Hospitals for Children – Springfield. Register online by visiting lovetotherescue.org/events/walk-for-love-springfield-ma, or register the day of the walk.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Sept. 13: The abundance of recent high-profile sexual-harassment complaints has completely changed the public perception of this persistent problem. Sexual harassment is no longer a silent epidemic which is by and large being ignored. Posts stating the phrase ‘#metoo’ have created camaraderie among individuals who are choosing to speak up and stand up. However, despite the nation’s growing awareness about the prevalence of sexual harassment, as business owners and human-resources professionals, the problem probably isn’t all that surprising. Clearly, the perfunctory sexual-harassment policies and bland pro forma sexual-harassment trainings are not working. It’s no longer adequate to take the same tired approach. As business leaders, we need to approach sexual harassment in the workplace from a new perspective. You’re invited to join a roundtable discussion on how we can profoundly change our approach to sexual harassment in the workplace. Discussion topics will answer questions like, if we’re already training employees, why does sexual harassment keep happening? How do we change workplace cultures that are conducive to prevalent sexual harassment? How do we deal with essential employees who engage in sexual harassment? Why aren’t our current efforts effective? And what do we do now? The event will take place from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Royal, P.C., 270 Pleasant St., Northampton. Advance registration is required, and seating will be limited. The cost is $30 per person. Mail your payment and make your check payable to Royal, P.C., 270 Pleasant St., Northampton, MA 01060. 
E-mail Heather Loges at [email protected] to register or if you have any questions about this workshop.

River Valley Counseling Center Golf Tournament

Sept. 14: River Valley Counseling Center (RVCC) will hold its third annual golf tournament fundraiser at East Mountain Country Club in Westfield. The funds raised will help RVCC to continue providing mental health and other supportive services to thousands of individuals, families, and groups throughout the Pioneer Valley. The cost per golfer is $100 and includes greens fees, a golf cart, gift bag, lunch, and dinner. Golfers will also be able to participate in a raffle and silent auction. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. with a 10:30 a.m. shotgun start. There will also be contests on the course which include prizes donated by Marcotte Ford and Teddy Bear Pools. For more information on sponsorships, donations, and registration, contact Angela Callahan, RVCC’s Marketing and Development specialist, at (413) 841-3546 or [email protected]. Information is also available at www.rvcc-inc.org or by visiting River Valley Counseling Center’s Facebook page.

United Arc Gala & Auction

Sept. 15: The United Arc 2018 Annual Gala & Auction, to be held at Hadley Farms Meeting House in Hadley, will offer collections of packages from local businesses and individuals that support the United Arc’s mission. The Priceless Collection showcases the works of local artists, including those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Through being featured at past auctions, some of these artists are increasingly finding opportunities to share their artistic talents. Leading up to the event throughout the summer, select packages are up for bid online in a web-based catalog. Hosted at www.theunitedarc.org/auction, this catalog also provides previews of raffle prizes and packages for the silent and live auctions available at the gala. The online auction will run Monday, Sept. 3. Tickets are on sale now. Additional package donations and sponsorships are welcome. To become a sponsor or donate an auction package, contact Development Coordinator Saera Hanlon at (413) 774-5558, ext. 1058, or [email protected]. All proceeds go to support the United Arc’s programs for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The organization provides services to individuals and their families in Franklin, Hampshire, Hampden, and Worcester counties.

No Kid Hungry Golf Tournament

Sept. 17: The sad reality is that one in six kids in the U.S. goes hungry every day. No Kid Hungry is a national nonprofit organization created to alter that reality. Through its fundraising efforts, No Kid Hungry supports school breakfast programs, after-school meal programs, summer meal programs, and food-skills education programs to help parents sustain nutrition efforts. Each dollar raised by No Kid Hungry provides 10 meals to at-risk children and supports education programs for parents. No Kid Hungry Golf, a local affiliate, will sponsor a golf tournament at Longmeadow Country Club to raise money to help feed these hungry kids. A number of businesses and organizations have already joined the effort as sponsors. Participants can register to golf, be a sponsor or donor, or come to the cocktail hour/dinner and auction. For more information or to register, visit www.nokidhungrygolf.com or contact Dr. Fred Kadushin at [email protected] or (413) 893-9677.

Future Tense Lecture

Sept. 20: The third installment of the BusinessWest lecture series Future Tense, titled “Change Considerations: An Examination of Lean Process, Market Disruption, and the Future of Your Business,” will take place on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Tech Foundry, 1391 Main St., ninth floor, Springfield. The lecture, open exclusively to CEOs and business owners, will be delivered by Mark Borsari, president of Sanderson MacLeod. The cost is a $25 donation to Tech Foundry. Event sponsors include Paragus IT, the Jamrog Group, and Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. With increasingly automated business processes, AI, and machine manufacturing, lean concepts are becoming more important than ever in terms of staying competitive. Borsari will discuss change and innovation through lean concepts and focus on resulting cultural considerations. The presentation will also address already-active market disrupters that will affect business processes in various industries. Metered street parking is available near the venue, and there are several parking-garage options nearby as well. To register, visit BusinessWest.com/lecture-series.

Source to Sea Cleanup

Sept. 28-29: Registration is now open for the Connecticut River Conservancy’s (CRC) Source to Sea Cleanup. This annual event, now in its 22nd year, has grown into New England’s largest river cleanup, winning an American Rivers award for most miles cleaned in 2017. There are three ways for volunteers to get involved in the Source to Sea Cleanup this year: report a trash site in need of cleaning, find a cleanup group near you to join, or organize and register your own local cleanup group. For more information or to register for the event, visit www.ctriver.org/cleanup. The annual Source to Sea Cleanup is a two-day river cleanup coordinated by CRC in all four states of the 410-mile Connecticut River basin. Each fall, thousands of volunteers of all ages and abilities clean the Connecticut River and its tributaries on foot or by boat. Volunteers remove trash along rivers, streams, parks, boat launches, trails, and more. In 2017, more than 2,500 volunteers hauled more than 46 tons of trash from riverbanks and waterways in the four river states. Volunteers remove everything from recyclables, fishing equipment, and food waste to tires, televisions, and refrigerators. To date, volunteers have removed more than 1,043 tons of trash from our rivers. If your group wants to get involved but needs a cleanup site, if you have questions, or if you know of a trash site in need of cleaning, contact CRC Cleanup Coordinator Stacey Lennard at [email protected] Learn more about the event at www.ctriver.org/cleanup.

Drone Pilot Certification

Sept. 29 to Oct. 20: Holyoke Community College (HCC) will again offer a hands-on program for individuals who want to become FAA-licensed drone pilots. “Flying Drones for Profit, Public Safety, and Commercial Applications” will run on four consecutive Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the main campus of HCC, 303 Homestead Ave., Holyoke. The course will prepare individuals to take the Federal Aviation Administration Remote Pilot in Charge exam, which they must pass to become licensed drone operators. All classes will be taught by Larry Harmon, co-director of the GeoGraphics Laboratory at Bridgewater State University and an industry consultant on small, unmanned aircraft systems. The lecture portion of the course will meet in the HCC Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development on the main campus. Students will fly drones outside on the college sports fields. The course focuses on all content required to pass the FAA test, including regulations, national airspace system rules, weather, aircraft loading, aircraft performance, and flight operations. The cost for the four-week, non-credit course is $315. Space is limited. Drones will be provided for use in class. Participants can bring their own, but that is not necessary.

Healthcare Heroes

Oct. 25: The second annual class of Healthcare Heroes will be honored at the Starting Gate at GreatHorse in Hampden. Healthcare Heroes, a recognition program involving the Western Mass. healthcare sector, was launched last spring by HCN and BusinessWest. The program was created to shed a bright light on the outstanding work being done across the broad spectrum of health and wellness services, and the institutions and people providing that care. Individuals and organizations were nominated in categories including ‘Lifetime Achievement,’ ‘Emerging Leader,’ ‘Patient/Resident/Client Care Provider,’ ‘Innovation in Health/Wellness,’ ‘Health/Wellness Administrator,’ and ‘Collaboration in Healthcare.’ They will be profiled in both magazines in September and feted at the Oct. 25 gala. Healthcare Heroes sponsors include American International College (presenting sponsor), National Grid (partner), and supporting sponsors Renew.Calm, the Elms College MBA program, and Mercy Medical Center and Trinity Health Of New England.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of July 2018.

AMHERST

A. Smith Builders
53 Salem St.
Adam Smith

The Flashlight Company
6 University Dr., Suite 206
Chris O’Keefe

Planet 10 Productions
35 The Hollow
Schuyler Bush

Positive Connections, Positive Strategy
11 Dennis Dr.
Linda Meccouri

BELCHERTOWN

Preserve History
667 South Washington St.
Richard Dzialo

Soundscape Imaging, LLC
40 Front St.
Brian Giggey

Stonebrook Construction
600 Daniel Shays Highway
Wayne Mahall

Touch Needed Animal Massage Therapy
376 Stebbins St.
Jennifer Matos

Valley Earth Lawn & Garden Service
270 Amherst Road
Robert Erbeck

CHICOPEE

Andrey’s Family Chiropractic
53 Springfield St.
Andrey Okhrimenko

McKenna Heavy Equipment
61 South Winthrop St.
Joshua McKenna, Michael McKenna

PC Supply Co.
13 Sherman Ave.
John Syler

DEERFIELD
Bolton Crest Farm
641 River Road
Donald Bolton

O’Bryan Enterprises
385 Upper Road
Patrick O’Bryan

Sunderland Roof Specialists
112 Sunderland Road
Michael Killeen

EASTHAMPTON

Union Street Bistro & Bakery
35 Union St.
Kimberly Scribner

Women of Rock Oral History Project
17 Adams St., Apt. 1
Tanya Pearson

EAST LONGMEADOW

AJS Appraisal Group
137 Allen St.
Anthony Santaniello

Boyajian Remodeling
10 Crane Ave.
David Boyajian

Michelle Murray, LMHC
143C Shaker Road
Michelle Murray

Midwifery Education Design & Development
87 Pease Road
Susan DeJoy

New Beginnings Hair Salon
10 Crane Ave.
Maria Koutroubila

Revolution Hair and Makeup
10 Center Square
Caitlin Howland

GREENFIELD

Carquest of Greenfield
369 Federal St.
Kathy McCrory

Ciak Enterprises
726 Colrain Road
Anthony Ciak

Country Club Enterprises, LLC
1173 Bernardston Road
Ross Spencer

Crown Lawn Care
344 Davis St.
Patrick Crowningshield

It’s a Dootie Business
80 Lunt Dr.
Tony Thurston

ZMuff Guitars
2 Mead St.
Zachary Muffoletto

HADLEY

James J. Pipczynski Farm
151 River Dr.
James Pipczynski

Precision Dental Associates
190 Russell St.
Precision Dental, LLC

Pride Subway
25 Russell St.
Marsha Del Monte

R. Christopher & Associates
245 Russell St., 19B
Robert Stevens

relaks.
108B Russell St.
Samantha Winning

HOLYOKE

Bankiewicz Originals
11 School St., Apt. 2
Brittany Ankiewicz

Chelsi Construction
2 St. James Ave.
Paul Reynolds

Heart Beats Music Therapy
43 Taylor St., #1
Michael Russell

Indigo Painters
322 Pine St.
Raquel Figueroa

Jizays Global Tech
101 High St.
Eddie Rivera

Paul’s Custom Carpentry
1104 Hampton St.
Paul Pennell Sr.

LONGMEADOW

Embroidered on Ardsley
172 Ardsley Road
Embroidered on Ardsley

Hair Studio One Inc.
20 Cross St.
Hair Studio One Inc.

LUDLOW

Cluett’s
433 Center St., Suite 29
Mark Swett

Gillespie Car Care
407 West St.
Brian Gillespie, Edward McGrew, Meghan Hewitt

MM Burring
146 Vienna Ave.
Manuel Moreno

Steppin Out II
200 Center St., Suite 5
Sarah Lewison

NORTHAMPTON

Deniz Romano, LLC Tailor Shop
123 Hawley St.
Ibraham Deniz

Lucy’s Nail
284 Ryan Road
Sovannary Chea

Northampton Institute of Intersubjective Psychotherapy
16 Center St.
Rebecca Tew, Cara Segal

Quality Cars
345 Damon Road
Ronald Gardner Sr.

Styles by Lisa
99 Market St.
Lisa Simoneaux

Tom’s Service
28 Pencasal Dr.
Thomas Venne

PALMER

AJC Mechanical, LLC
1008 Baptist Hill St.
Lawrence Caputo Jr.

Apple Automotive, LLC
1205-1207 South Main St.
Raymond Labonte Jr.

The Computer Wiz
1605 North Main St.
Glen Whitney

David A. Farnum Productions
106 Pleasant St.
David Farnum

DeSousa Trucking
97 Water St.
Ruy DeSousa

Essentials
1005 Church St.
Erica Enos

Palmer Coin-op Laundry and Dry Cleaner
1331 Main St.
Vi Hung Nguyen, Huong Thi Nguyen

Palmer Recycling Corp.
2 Fenton St.
Pamela Douthwright, Mary Douthwright

Pitt Stop
1618 North Main St.
Damien Pittola

Primo Wildlife Control, LLC
260 Flynt St.
Edward Hageman, Debra Hageman

Sunny Nails & Spa
1331 Main St.
Khoa Nguyen

SOUTHWICK

Redline Labs
22 South Longyard Road
Robert Slate Jr.

Southwick Computer Services
4 Island Pond Road
Robert Cranston

Stone Crow Painting
17 Sheep Pasture Road
Kevin Stark

Tomahawk Restoration
13 Fred Jackson Road
Thomas Larkin

Wendy’s Place Hair Salon
183 South Loomis St.
Wendy Sylvester

SPRINGFIELD

Antonio Rodriguez Jr. Auto
308 Abbott St.
Antonio Rodriguez

Anushcare Home Health
78 Chauncey Dr.
Paulette Dunkelly

Aroma Café
1160 Dickinson St.
Milana Gesin

Atlantico Designs
1221 Carew St.
Peter Zurlino

C. Liquori & Sons Auto Sales
279 Locust St.
Christopher Liquori

Dollar Tree #05573
1060 Wilbraham Road
Deborah Miller

E.J.’s Home Improvement
30 Quincy St.
Eliezer Jimenez Perez

Fortune Cookie
907B Carew St.
Mei Ru Wang

The Happy Weaver Studio
34 Front St.
Nancy Evans

JRC Landscaping
380 Nothingham St.
Jose Calderon

Kenison Consulting
8 Fordham St.
Guy Kenison

McDow Properties, LLC
16 Prince St.
Sakinah Allard

Michael’s Auto Body
7-9 Worcester St.
Michael Partynski

Stetson’s Interiors and Exteriors
45 Lyndale St.
Robert Stetson

Tredee Web Solutions
201 Morton St.
Robert Carter

True Blue Car Wash Corp.
739 Boston Road
New True Blue Car

Words of Wisdom Art Studio
117-119 Chestnut St.
Chris Franklyn Agyei

WARE

Bev’s This n That Shop
1 Ashley St.
Beverly Adamsky

Hans Craft Beer & Convenience Mart
30 West Main St.
Satnam Hans

Tropical Tanning & Beach Emporium
180 West St., Suite D
Lisa Kingston

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Cellular Sales of Massachusetts
175 Memorial Ave.
Pamela Kimball

Cheap Tees Screen Printing
150 Front St.
Allen Warren

The Flying Locksmiths
425 Union St.
Emari Enterprises Inc.

Imereli Construction
1155 Elm St.
Shalva Enukidze

Law Office of Mary A. Samberg
93 Van Deene Ave.
Mary Samberg

Over the Moon
206 Norman St.
Pauline Delton

Pride
757 Riverdale St.
Pride Limited

U.S. Trucking Express
56 Lathrop St.
Andrei Mineev

VA Trans
105 River St.
Andrii Fedosh

Verizon Wireless Cellular
175 Memorial Ave.
Pamela Kimball

WILBRAHAM

Tax Rocks Global and Financial Solutions
447 Stony Hill Road
Arnold Kange

Company Notebook

PeoplesBank Again Named Among Top Corporate Charitable Contributors

HOLYOKE — The Boston Business Journal has announced the region’s Top Corporate Charitable Contributors, and, for the 11th year in a row, PeoplesBank is among the companies included. The region’s top charitable companies, which include, in many instances, the companies’ corporate foundations, will be honored at the Boston Business Journal’s 13th annual Corporate Citizenship Awards on the evening of Thursday, Sept. 6 at Fenway Park in Boston. “We have a unique ability to help the communities we serve through the considerable volunteer efforts of our associates and the millions of dollars in donations to charitable and civic causes we have made over recent years,” said Matthew Bannister, first vice president, Marketing & Innovation at PeoplesBank. The Boston Business Journal’s Top Corporate Charitable Contributors list is composed of companies that gave at least $100,000 to Massachusetts-based charities in 2017. 

PV Squared Recognized as a Top Solar Contractor

GREENFIELD — Solar Power World, a publication covering solar technology, development, and installation, published its annual Top Solar Contractors list in July. Local solar-installation company and worker-owned cooperative PV Squared was listed prominently among other top solar contractors and developers across the country.

“It’s always an honor to be recognized for what we do on a national scale, putting Western Massachusetts solar companies on the map,” said PV Squared General Manager Stacy Metzger. “While our focus remains local, the national ranking offers more insight into how we’re performing on a broader scale. It’s deeply rewarding to know that our business and installation practices are leading by example.”

United Financial Bancorp Announces Q2 Earnings

HARTFORD, Conn. — United Financial Bancorp Inc., the holding company for United Bank, announced results for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. The company reported net income of $15.6 million, or $0.31 per diluted share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2018, compared to net income for the linked quarter of $15.8 million, or $0.31 per diluted share. The company reported net income of $16.2 million, or $0.32 per diluted share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2017. “In the second quarter of 2018, United Financial Bancorp, Inc.’s earnings results reflected solid linked quarter net interest margin expansion and net interest income growth. Our company continues to grow loans, deposits, particularly checking accounts, and tangible book value while maintaining strong asset quality, capital, and liquidity,” said William Crawford IV, CEO and president of the company and the bank. “I want to thank our United Bank employees for their steadfast support of our customers and communities.” Assets totaled $7.21 billion at June 30, 2018 and increased $139.9 million, or 2.0%, from $7.07 billion at March 31, 2018. At June 30, 2018, total loans were $5.48 billion, representing an increase of $93.2 million, or 1.7%, from the linked quarter. Deposits totaled $5.39 billion at June 30, 2018 and increased by $110.9 million, or 2.1%, from $5.28 billion at March 31, 2018.

Berkshire Hills Bancorp Reports Increase in Earnings

BOSTON — Berkshire Hills Bancorp Inc. reported 2018 second-quarter net income of $34 million, which was a 73% increase over 2017 second-quarter net income of $20 million. This primarily reflected the benefit of Berkshire’s Greater Boston expansion through acquisition and business development, resulting in higher market share, increased efficiency, and record profitability. “We achieved record quarterly return on assets, with income increasing by 35% over the prior quarter,” said CEO Michael Daly. “Commercial loans grew strongly, and our new Boston corporate headquarters teams are receiving good response to our expanded presence in Greater Boston. Our revenue growth and disciplined expense management produced record quarterly earnings per share, positive operating leverage, and improved returns on equity.” Meanwhile, Daly added, “the integration of acquired operations was completed within plan in the second quarter, and several company-wide initiatives have been accelerated to support the expansion of our deposit product set and delivery channels. Our annual Xtraordinary Day of Service in June tackled 74 community projects across our markets, totaling nearly 7,000 volunteer hours and 92% of our workforce. Our foundation announced the appointment of a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) officer to expand our multiple community-engagement activities and implement an all-encompassing CSR strategy.”

First Connecticut Bancorp Reports Net-income Increase

FARMINGTON, Conn. — First Connecticut Bancorp Inc. (FCB), the holding company for Farmington Bank, reported a 35% increase in net income of $6.7 million, or $0.42 diluted earnings per share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2018, compared to net income of $5.0 million, or $0.32 diluted earnings per share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2017. Net income on a core earnings basis was $7.4 million, or $0.46 diluted core earnings per share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2018, compared to $5.0 million, or $0.31 diluted core earnings per share, for the quarter ended June 30, 2017. Core earnings exclude non-recurring items. On June 19, 2018, First Connecticut Bancorp Inc. announced its entry into a definitive agreement and plan of merger with People’s United Financial Inc., pursuant to which FCB will merge with and into People’s United. “I am pleased to report solid core second-quarter earnings for the company,” said John Patrick Jr., chairman, president, and CEO of First Connecticut Bancorp. “As indicated, earnings were impacted by certain one-time charges related to our acquisition by Peoples United Financial Inc. The board of directors and senior management have always focused on shareholder value, and we believe this acquisition maximized shareholder value at a time when, we believe, the operating paradigm is changing for smaller community banks. I would also like to thank our dedicated employees who executed our strategy, which maximized our results for shareholders.”

Work Opportunity Center Receives Grant from Westfield Bank Foundation

SPRINGFIELD — Work Opportunity Center Inc. announced it is a recipient of a $5,000 grant donation from the Westfield Bank Foundation. The money will be put toward the purchase of a vehicle for the Community Based Day Services (CBDS) program. The CBDS program of supports enables individuals with developmental disabilities to enrich their life and enjoy a full range of community activities by providing opportunities for developing, enhancing, and maintaining competency in personal, social, and community activities. The program has been set up with five core fundamentals: education, social and recreational, health and wellness, life skills, and employment and volunteerism. Options that are given to individuals who participate in CBDS include career exploration, community-integration experiences to support fuller participation in community life, skills development and training, volunteer opportunities with local nonprofits, health and fitness classes, socialization experiences, and support to enhance interpersonal skills, as well as the pursuit of personal interests and hobbies. The program currently serves 84 individuals.

Thornes Refurbishes Window Assemblage

NORTHAMPTON — In late July, Thornes Marketplace refurbished and expanded an historic window assemblage, installing six new stained-glass window panels designed by a local artist on the Chestnut Staircase behind Share coffee shop. Heather McLean, owner of Dragonfly Stained Glass Studio in Easthampton, was commissioned to design the panels, which are part of an elaborate, two-and-a-half-story window grouping. Each new arts-and-crafts-style panel created by McLean is identical, measuring four feet high by two feet wide. They combine bold orange squares with deep blue edging and long, vertical, pale-yellow highlights, and all six windows together will fill a space that is roughly eight feet high by six feet wide. Above McLean’s stained-glass windows, three tiers of windows original to the building — one overarching transom window and two tiers of oblong windows — were cleaned, painted, and reinstalled to further refresh the entire collection. McLean’s panels replace three original stained-glass windows that could not be restored; they will be cleaned, refurbished, and hung in the building at a later date as an art sculpture, said Jon McGee, Thornes facilities manager. Over the past 10 years, Thornes has taken on a series of major renovations to improve and enhance the eclectic shopping center.

Mediware Acquires Fazzi Associates

LENEXA, Kan. — Mediware Information Systems Inc., a portfolio company of TPG Capital and a leading supplier of software solutions for healthcare and human-service providers and payers, recently acquired Northampton-based Fazzi Associates, one of the largest companies serving home health and hospice. The acquisition creates a unique alignment between two healthcare industry leaders — one in innovative software, the other in outsourced services, consultation, and education. The combined company will have a greater capacity to help post-acute and community-based providers increase efficiency and improve clinical, financial, and operational performance to advance patient care. The addition of Fazzi Associates enables Mediware to offer new, comprehensive, and best-in-class services and solutions — including medical coding, revenue-cycle management, education, CAHPS, consulting, and ancillary solutions that address key challenges and evolving complexities affecting the post-acute care sectors. Mediware plans to maintain Fazzi Associates’ brand and Western Mass. headquarters; the firm’s leadership team will continue to lead Fazzi Associates’ lines of business. Dr. Bob Fazzi will serve in a strategic advisory role with Mediware, consulting on industry relations, home-health advocacy, growth opportunities, and innovation.