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Super 60

Recognition Program Marks 30 Years with Oct. 25 Event

Now in its 30th year, the Springfield Regional Chamber’s Super 60 program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately-owned businesses in the region. Businesses on the Total Revenue and Revenue Growth categories for 2019 represent all sectors of the economy, including nonprofits, transportation, healthcare, technology, manufacturing, retail, and hospitality. Some have been named to the Super 60 once or many times before, and some are brand-new to the list.

This year’s Super 60 Celebration event will take place on Friday, Oct. 25 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam. Sheila Coon, founder of Hot Oven Cookies, will be the keynote speaker at the event, which is presented by Health New England and sponsored by People’s United Bank, Wells Fargo Bank, the Republican, MassHire Hampden County Workforce Board, and Zasco Productions.

Hot Oven Cookies began in 2015, when Coon started baking cookies for her children while she was in culinary school. She started her business as a cookie-delivery service. With business education from Valley Venture Mentors and SPARK EforAll in Holyoke, the delivery business expanded to a food truck, from which Coon began selling cookies from her repertoire of more than 100 recipes, inspired by her children, at farmers’ markets and other events. When her food truck constantly sold out of cookies, Coon knew there was potential for more.

Coon is also a graduate of the first cohort of RiseUp Springfield, a seven-month, intensive, hands-on program for established and small business owners, powered by Interise’s StreetWise ‘MBA’ curriculum in collaboration with the city of Springfield, the Assoc. of Black Business & Professionals, and the Springfield Regional Chamber.

In just four short years, Coon has found sweet success with Hot Oven Cookies. In 2018, she and her husband, David, opened the brand’s first retail location at 1597 Main St. in Springfield. She has plans to open a production facility in Agawam to accommodate her current business as well as plans for a wholesale business and an online store with national shipping of Hot Oven’s uncooked frozen cookie dough.

“Hot Oven Cookies is an example of a true entrepreneurial story about how an idea, a passion, or a hobby can become a thriving business with dedication and taking advantage of the small-business resources available in Western Massachusetts,” said Nancy Creed, president of the Springfield Regional Chamber. “We are thrilled to have a graduate of the first cohort of RiseUp Springfield take the stage at Super 60 to share her success story.”

The event costs $60 for chamber members and $75 for general admission. Reservations may be made for tables of eight or 10. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday, Oct. 16. No cancellations are accepted after that date, and no walk-ins will be allowed. Reservations must be made online at www.springfieldregionalchamber.com or by e-mailing [email protected]

Total Revenue:

1. Whalley Computer Associates Inc.*
2. Marcotte Ford Sales Inc.
3. Tighe & Bond*
Arrow Security Co. Inc.
Baltazar Contractors
Bob Pion Buick GMC Inc.
Center Square Grill (Fun Dining Inc.)
Charter Oak Financial
Commercial Distributing Co. Inc.
Con-Test Analytical Laboratory (Filli, LLC)
Court Square Group Inc.
David R. Northup Electrical Contractors Inc.
The Dowd Agencies, LLC
E.F. Corcoran Plumbing & Heating Co. Inc.*
Freedom Credit Union
Governors America Corp. / GAC Management Co.*
Haluch Water Contracting Inc.
Holyoke Pediatrics Associates, LLP
JET Industries Inc.
Kittredge Equipment Co. Inc.
Lancer Transportation / Sulco Warehousing & Logistics
Louis and Clark Drug Inc.
Maybury Associates Inc.*
Paragus Strategic IT
Rediker Software Inc.
Rock Valley Tool, LLC
Skip’s Outdoor Accents Inc.
Tiger Press (Shafii’s Inc.)
Troy Industries Inc.
United Personnel Services Inc.

Revenue Growth:

1. The Nunes Companies Inc.
2. Brewmasters Brewing Services, LLC
3. Christopher Heights of Northampton
A.G. Miller Co. Inc.
Adam Quenneville Roofing & Siding Inc.*
American Pest Solutions Inc.
Baystate Crushing and Recycling Inc.
Burgess, Schultz & Robb, P.C.
City Enterprise Inc.*
Courier Express Inc.
EOS Approach, LLC / Proshred Security International
Gallagher Real Estate
GMH Fence Company Inc.
Goss & McLain Insurance Agency Inc.
Greenough Packaging & Maintenance Supplies Inc.
Kenney Masonry, LLC
Knight Machine Tool Company Inc.
L & L Property Service, LLC
Ludlow Heating and Cooling Inc.
Michael’s Party Rentals Inc.
Oasis Shower Doors (EG Partners, LLC)*
Pioneer Valley Financial Group, LLC
R.R. Leduc Corp.*
Sanderson MacLeod Inc.
Springfield Thunderbirds (Springfield Hockey, LLC)
Summit Careers Inc.
United Industrial Textile Products Inc.
Villa Rose Restaurant (Tavares and Branco Enterprises Inc.)
Webber & Grinnell Insurance Agency Inc.*
Westside Finishing Co. Inc.*

*Qualified in both categories

Total Revenue​

1. Whalley Computer Associates Inc.*
One Whalley Way, Southwick
(413) 569-4200
www.wca.com
John Whalley, President
WCA is a locally owned family business that has evolved from a hardware resale and service group in the ’70s and ’80s into a company that now focuses on lowering the total cost of technology and productivity enhancement for its customers.

2. Marcotte Ford Sales Inc.
1025 Main St., Holyoke
(413) 536-1900
www.marcotteford.com
Bryan Marcotte, President
The dealership sells new Ford vehicles as well as pre-owned cars, trucks, and SUVs, and features a full service department. Marcotte has achieved Ford’s President’s Award multiple occasions over the past decade. It also operates the Marcotte Commercial Truck Center.

3. Tighe & Bond*
53 Southampton Road, Westfield
(413) 562-1600
www.tighebond.com
Robert Belitz, President and CEO
Tighe & Bond is a full-service engineering and environmental consulting firm offering myriad services, including building engineering, coastal and waterfront solutions, environmental consulting, GIS and asset management, site planning and design, transportation engineering, and water and wastewater engineering.

Arrow Security Co. Inc
124 Progress Ave., Springfield
(413) 732-6787
www.arrowsecurity.com
John Debarge Jr., President
This company provides security for all types of clients and issues, including industrial plant security, patrol services with security checks for homeowners, free security surveys, and more provided by a management team that consists of a diverse group of professionals with law enforcement, private-sector security, and military backgrounds.

Baltazar Contractors
83 Carmelinas Circle, Ludlow
(413) 583-6160
www.baltazarcontractors.com
Frank Baltazar, President
Baltazar Contractors is a family-owned construction firm specializing in roadway construction and reconstruction; all aspects of site-development work; sewer, water, storm, and utilities; and streetscape improvements in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Bob Pion Buick GMC Inc.
333 Memorial Dr., Chicopee
(413) 206-9251
www.bobpionbuickgmc.com
Rob Pion, General Manager
Bob Pion Buick GMC carries a wide selection of new and pre-owned cars, crossovers, and SUVs, and also offers competitive lease specials and a full service department.

Center Square Grill (Fun Dining Inc.)
84 Center Square, East Longmeadow
(413) 525-0055
www.centersquaregrill.com
Michael Sakey, Bill Collins, Proprietors
Center Square Grill serves traditional American food, with hints of classically prepared French sauces, Latin-inspired fish dishes, and standard Italian repertoire. The facility also has a catering service and hosts events of all kinds.

Charter Oak Financial
330 Whitney Ave., Holyoke
(413) 539-2000
www.charteroakfinancial.com
brendan naughton, general agent
Charter Oak’s services include risk management (including life insurance, disability income insurance, and long-term-care insurance), business planning and protection, retirement planning and investments, and fee-based financial planning.

Commercial Distributing Co. Inc.
46 South Broad St., Westfield
(413) 562-9691
www.commercialdist.com
Richard Placek, Chairman
Commercial Distributing Co. is a family-owned business servicing more than 1,000 bars, restaurants, and clubs, as well as more than 400 package and liquor stores. Now in its third generation, the company continues to grow by building brands and offering new products as the market changes.

Con-Test Analytical Laboratory (Filli, LLC)
39 Spruce St., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-2332
www.contestlabs.com
Tom Veratti, Founder and Consultant
Con-Test Inc. provides industrial-hygiene and analytical services to a broad range of clients. Originally focused on industrial-hygiene analysis, the laboratory-testing division has expanded its capabilities to include numerous techniques in air analysis, classical (wet) chemistry, metals, and organics.

Court Square Group Inc.
1350 Main St., Springfield
(413) 746-0054
www.courtsquaregroup.com
Keith Parent, President
Court Square is a leading managed-services company that provides an audit-ready, compliant cloud (ARCC) infrastructure for its clients and partners in the life-sciences industry.

David R. Northup Electrical Contractors Inc.
73 Bowles Road, Agawam
(413) 786-8930
www.northupelectric.com
David Northup, President
This is a family-owned, full-service electrical, HVAC, and plumbing contractor that specializes in everything from installation and replacement to preventive maintenance, indoor air-quality work, and sheet-metal fabrication.

The Dowd Agencies, LLC
14 Bobola Road, Holyoke
(413) 538-7444
www.dowd.com
John Dowd, President and CEO
The Dowd Agencies is the oldest insurance agency under continuous family ownership, and one of the most long-standing, experienced insurance agencies in Massachusetts.

E.F. Corcoran Plumbing & Heating Co. Inc.*
5 Rose Place, Springfield
(413) 732-1462
www.efcorcoran.com
Charles Edwards and Brian Toomey, Co-owners
E.F. Corcoran is a full-service plumbing and HVAC contractor. Services include 24-hour plumbing service, HVAC system installs, design-build services, energy retrofits, system replacements and modifications, gas piping, boilers, and more.
Freedom Credit Union
1976 Main St., Springfield
(800) 831-0160
www.freedom.coop
Glenn Welch, President and CEO
Freedom is a full-service credit union serving a wide range of business and consumer clients. Freedom has its main office on Main Street in Springfield, with other offices in Sixteen Acres, Feeding Hills, Ludlow, Chicopee, Easthampton, Northampton, Turners Falls, Greenfield, and Roger L. Putnam Vocational Technical Academy.

Governors America Corp. / GAC Management Co.*
720 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 786-5600
www.governors-america.com
Sean Collins, President
GAC is a leading provider of engine-governing and system controls to a worldwide list of equipment manufacturers and power providers. The engine-control products are used in a wide range of industries, including generator set, material handling, marine propulsion, mining, locomotive, and off-highway applications.

Haluch Water Contracting Inc.
399 Fuller St., Ludlow
(413) 589-1254
Thomas Haluch, President
Haluch Water Contracting’s main lines of business include sewer contracting, underground utilities, and water-main construction.

Holyoke Pediatrics Associates, LLP
150 Lower Westfield Road, Holyoke
(413) 536-2393
www.holyokepediatrics.com
Kathy Tremble, Adair Medina, Care Coordinators
HPA is the largest pediatric practice in Western Mass., providing primary-care services as well as lactation counseling, behavioral-health services, and patient education. HPA has a medical laboratory drawing site and also provides in-hospital support for new mothers.

JET Industries Inc.
307 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 786-2010
Michael Turrini, President
Jet Industries manufactures aircraft engines, parts, and equipment, as well as turbines and turbine generator sets and parts, aircraft power systems, flight instrumentation, and aircraft landing and braking systems.

Kittredge Equipment Co. Inc.
100 Bowles Road, Agawam
(413) 304-4100
www.kittredgeequipment.com
Wendy Webber, President
Kittridge Equipment is a $57 million equipment and supply giant. It boasts 70,000 square feet of inventory and warehouse, handles design services, and has designed everything from small restaurants to country clubs to in-plant cafeterias.

Lancer Transportation & Logistics / Sulco Warehousing & Logistics
311 Industry Ave., Springfield
(413) 739-4880
www.sulco-lancer.com
Todd Goodrich, President
Sulco Warehousing & Logistics operates a network of distribution centers. Lancer Transportation & Logistics is a DOT-registered contract motor carrier providing regional, national, and international truckload and LTL delivery services.

Louis and Clark Drug Inc.
309 East St. Springfield
(413) 737-2996
www.lcdrug.com
Skip Matthews, President
Louis & Clark provides prescriptions for individuals and institutions and helps those who need home medical equipment and supplies. The company also provides professional pharmacy and compounding services, medical equipment, independent-living services, and healthcare programs.
Maybury Associates Inc.*
90 Denslow Road, East Longmeadow
(888) 629-2879
www.maybury.com
John Maybury, President
Maybury Associates has more than 80 employees and is a distributor for about 1,300 manufacturers. The company designs, supplies, and services a wide variety of handling equipment throughout New England, and provides customers in a wide range of industries with solutions to move, lift, and store their parts and products.
Paragus Strategic IT*
112 Russell St., Hadley
(413) 587-2666
www.paragusit.com
Delcie Bean IV, President
Paragus has grown dramatically as an outsourced IT solution, providing business computer service, computer consulting, information-technology support, and other services to businesses of all sizes.

Rediker Software Inc.
2 Wilbraham Road, Hampden
(800) 213-9860
www.rediker.com
Andrew Anderlonis, President
Rediker Software has been providing school administrative software solutions for more than 35 years. Rediker Software is used by school administrators across the U.S. and in more than 100 countries, and is designed to meet the student-information-management needs of all types of schools and districts.

Rock Valley Tool, LLC
54 O’Neil St., Easthampton
(413) 527-2350
www.rockvalleytool.com
Elizabeth Paquette, President
Rock Valley Tool is a precision-machining facility housing both CNC and conventional machining equipment, along with a state-of-the-art inspection lab. With more than 40 years of experience, the company provides manufactured parts to customers in the aerospace, commercial/industrial, and plastic blow-molding industries.

Skip’s Outdoor Accents Inc.
1265 Suffield St., Agawam
(413) 786-0990
www.skipsonline.com
John and Scott Ansart, Owners
Skip’s Outdoor Accents specializes in a wide range of outdoor products, including storage sheds, gazebos, swingsets, and outdoor furniture, offering installation and delivery to sites with limited or no access. Skip’s shed and gazebo delivery is free to most of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Tiger Press (Shafii’s Inc.)
50 Industrial Ave., East Longmeadow
(413) 224-2100
www.tigerpress.com
Reza Shafii, Jennifer Shafii, Owners
TigerPress is a sustainable, eco-friendly printer, using green technology and operating in a 100,000-square-foot manufacturing plant. The company offers digital printing, commercial printing, and custom package printing all under one roof.

Troy Industries Inc.
151 Capital Dr., West Springfield
(866) 788-6412
www.troyind.com
Steve Troy, CEO
Troy Industries is an industry leader that designs and manufactures innovative, top-quality small arms components and accessories and complete weapon upgrades. All products are American-made and designed to perform flawlessly under intense battle conditions.

United Personnel Services Inc.
289 Bridge St., Springfield
(413) 736-0800
www.unitedpersonnel.com
Tricia Canavan, President
United provides a full range of staffing services, including temporary staffing and full-time placement, on-site project management, and strategic recruitment in the Springfield, Hartford, and Northampton areas, specializing in administrative, professional, medical, and light-industrial staff.

Revenue Growth

1. The Nunes Companies Inc.
658 Center St., Ludlow
(413) 308-4940
www.nunescompanies.com
Armando Nunes, President
The Nunes Companies offers services such as sitework, road construction, and roll-off dumpster rentals, relying on leadership, quality, and cutting-edge technology to get the job done.

2. Brewmasters
Brewing Services, LLC
4 Main St., Williamsburg
(413) 268-2199
Dennis Bates, Michael Charpentier, Owners
Brewmasters Brewing Services is a small craft brewery offering a wide variety of services, including contract brewing and distilling.

3. Christopher Heights
of Northampton
50 Village Hill Road, Northampton
(413) 584-0701
www.christopherheights.com
michael taylor, executive director
Christopher Heights is a mixed-use community located in a natural setting that features scenic mountain views and walking paths. Residents and staff each bring their own experiences and talents, which are recognized and often incorporated into social activities and programs.

A.G. Miller Co. Inc.
53 Batavia St., Springfield
(413) 732-9297
www.agmiller.com
Rick Miller, President
A leader in the metal-fabricating industry, the company’s services include precision metal fabrication; design and engineering; assembly; forming, rolling, and bending; laser cutting; punching; precision saw cutting; welding; powder coating; and liquid painting.

Adam Quenneville Roofing & Siding Inc.*
160 Old Lyman Road, South Hadley
(413) 536-5955
www.1800newroof.net
Adam Quenneville, CEO
Adam Quenneville offers a wide range of residential and commercial services, including new roofs, retrofitting, roof repair, roof cleaning, vinyl siding, replacement windows, and the no-clog Gutter Shutter system. The company has earned the BBB Torch Award for trust, performance, and integrity.

American Pest Solutions Inc.
169 William St., Springfield
(413) 781-0044
www.413pestfree.com
Bob Russell, President
American Pest Solutions is a full-service pest-solutions company founded in 1913. With two locations, the company serves residential and commercial customers, offering inspection, treatment, and ongoing protection.

Baystate Crushing and Recycling Inc.
36 Carmelinas Circle, Ludlow
(413) 583-4440
www.baystateblasting.com
Paul Baltazar, President
Baystate Blasting Inc. is a family-owned drilling and blasting firm that provides a full range of rock-blasting and rock-crushing services, including sitework, heavy highway construction, residential work, quarry, and portable crushing and recycling. An ATF-licensed dealer of explosives, it offers rental of individual magazines.

Burgess, Schultz & Robb, P.C.
200 North Main St., South Building,
Suite 1, East Longmeadow
(413) 525-0025
www.bsrcpa.com
Andrew Robb, Managing Partner
Burgess, Schultz & Robb, P.C. is a professional certified public accounting firm providing audit, tax, business-advisory, and business-management services to private businesses, trusts, tax-exempt organizations, and individuals.
City Enterprise Inc.*
52-60 Berkshire Ave., Springfield
(413) 726-9549
www.cityenterpriseinc.com
Wonderlyn Murphy, President
City Enterprises Inc. is a general contractor with a diverse portfolio of clients, including the Groton Naval submarine base, Westover Air Reserve Base, the Federal Aviation Administration, the National Park Service, the Army Corps of Engineers, and many others.

Courier Express Inc.
111 Carando Dr., Springfield
(413) 730-6620
www.courierexp.com
Eric Devine, President
Courier Express is committed to providing custom, same-day delivery solutions for any shipment and a courteous, prompt, and professional delivery agent. The company ships everything from a single envelope to multiple pallets.

EOS Approach, LLC / Proshred Security International
75 Post Office Park, Wilbraham
(413) 596-5479
www.proshred.com
Joe Kelly, Owner
Proshred specializes in the secure, on-site information destruction of confidential and sensitive documents, computer hard drives, and electronic media. It is an ISO 9001:2008 certified and NAID AAA certified mobile shredding company.
Gallagher Real Estate
1763 Northampton St., Holyoke
(413) 536-7232
www.gogallagher.com
Paul Gallagher, Owner
Gallagher Real Estate is an independent brokerage that operates in Hampshire and Hampden counties in Massachusetts and Hartford County in Connecticut. The company specializes in both residential and commercial properties and has offices in Holyoke, South Hadley, East Longmeadow, and Springfield.

GMH Fence Co. Inc.
15 Benton Dr., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-3361
www.gmhfence.com
Glenn Hastie, Owner
GMH Fence Co. is one of the largest fence companies in the region, offering fence installations from a selection of wood, aluminum, steel, and vinyl fencing for residential and commercial customers.

Goss & McLain Insurance Agency Inc.
1767 Northampton St., Holyoke
(413) 534-7355
www.gossmclain.com
Deborah Buckley, President
Goss & McLain is an independent insurance agency offering a diverse portfolio of personal and business property and liability insurance, as well as life and health insurance. It also insures homes, cars, and businesses and protects against personal and business liabilities.
Greenough Packaging & Maintenance Supplies Inc.
54 Heywood Ave., West Springfield
(800) 273-2308
www.greenosupply.com
Craig Cassanelli, President
Greenough is a distributor of shipping, packaging, safety, breakroom, janitorial, cleaning, and facility-maintenance supplies. It also offers custom solutions to customers, such as printed bags, cups, and napkins, as well as custom packaging, including printed tape, boxes, stretch wrap, and strapping.

Kenney Masonry, LLC
P.O. Box 2506, Amherst
(413) 256-0400
www.kenneymasonry.com
Sarahbeth Kenney, Owner
Kenney Masonry is a family-owned company with more than 150 years of combined construction experience working with brick, block, stone, and concrete on commercial, institutional, public, and residential projects.

Knight Machine Tool Company Inc.
11 Industrial Dr., South Hadley
(413) 532-2507
Gary O’Brien, Owner
Knight Machine & Tool Co. is a metalworking and welding company that offers blacksmithing, metal roofing, and other services from its 11,000-square-foot facility.

L & L Property Service, LLC
582 Amostown Road, West Springfield
(413) 732-2739
Richard Lapinski, Owner
L & L Property Services is a locally owned company providing an array of property services, including lawn care, snow removal, sanding, excavations, patios and stone walls, hydroseeding, and more.

Ludlow Heating and Cooling Inc.
1056 Center St., Ludlow
(413) 583-6923
www.ludlowheatingandcooling.com
Karen Sheehan, President
Ludlow Heating & Cooling is a full-service energy company dedicated to providing quality heating and cooling product services including new system installation, oil heat delivery, and maintenance to an existing system.

Michael’s Party Rentals Inc.
1221 South Main St., Palmer
(413) 589-7368
www.michaelspartyrentals.com
Michael Linton, Owner
Michael’s Party Rentals operates year-round, seven days a week. Its 9,000-square-foot warehouse holds more than 100 tents of all sizes, tables, chairs, dance flooring, staging, lighting, and an extensive array of rental equipment for any type of party.

Oasis Shower Doors
(EG Partners, LLC)*
646 Springfield St., Feeding Hills
(800) 876-8420
www.oasisshowerdoors.com
Thomas Daly, Owner
Oasis is New England’s largest designer, fabricator, and installer of custom frameless glass shower enclosures and specialty glass, offering a wide array of interior glass entry systems and storefronts, sliding and fixed glass partition walls, back-painted glass, and switchable privacy glass for bedrooms, offices, and conference rooms.

Pioneer Valley
Financial Group, LLC
1252 Elm St., Suite 28, West Springfield
(413) 363-9265
www.pvfinancial.com
Joseph Leonczyk, Charles Myers, Senior Partners
PV Financial helps clients pursue their goals through careful financial planning and sound investment strategy. Services include retirement planning, asset growth, business planning, college funding, estate planning, and risk management.

R.R. Leduc Corp.*
100 Bobala Road, Holyoke
(413) 536-4329
www.rrleduc.com
Robert LeDuc, President
Since its inception in 1967, the R.R. Leduc Corp. has been a family-owned business that specializes in precision sheet metal and custom powder coatings. The company produces a variety of products for the communication, military, medical, electronics, and commercial industries.

Sanderson MacLeod Inc.
1199 South Main St., Palmer
(413) 283-3481
www.sandersonmacleod.com
Mark Borsari, President
From breakthrough brush innovation projects to supply-chain integration, Sanderson MacLeod leverages its experience and know-how in ways that produce high-quality twisted-wire brushes for its customers.

Springfield Thunderbirds (Springfield Hockey, LLC)
45 Bruce Landon Way, Springfield
(413) 739-4625
www.springfieldthunderbirds.com
Nathan Costa, President
The Springfield Thunderbirds are a professional ice hockey team and the AHL affiliate of the NHL’s Florida Panthers. Since the team began to play in the area in 2016, it has formed the T-Birds Foundation, a 501(c)(3) public charity that benefits causes in Springfield and surrounding Pioneer Valley communities.
Summit Careers Inc.
85 Mill St., Suite B, Springfield
(413) 733-9506
www.summitcareers.inc
Bryan Picard, Owner
Summit Careers is a full-service staffing and recruiting firm that provides temporary, temp-to-hire, and direct-hire services for clients in a variety of sectors, including light industrial, warehouse, professional trades, administrative, accounting, and executive.

United Industrial Textile Products Inc.
321 Main St., West Springfield
(413) 737-0095
www.uitprod.com
Wayne Perry, President
UIT is a family-owned manufacturer that has been making high-quality covers for commercial, military, and industrial applications for more than 60 years. Craftsmen at the company specialize in the creation of custom covers that are manufactured to each client’s unique specifications.

Villa Rose Restaurant (Tavares and Branco Enterprises Inc.)
1428 Center St., Ludlow
(413) 547-6667
www.villaroserestaurant.com
Tony Tavares, Owner
Nestled across from the Ludlow reservoir, the Villa Rose offers fine dining in a relaxed and intimate atmosphere. The restaurant offers a private room with availability for weddings, receptions, showers, anniversaries, and any other banquet function from 30 to 175 people.

Webber & Grinnell
Insurance Agency Inc.*
8 North King St., Northampton
(413) 586-0111
www.webberandgrinnell.com
Bill Grinnell, President
Webber and Grinnell has provided insurance protection for thousands of individuals and businesses throughout the Pioneer Valley for more than 150 years. The agency is balanced between business insurance, personal insurance, and employee benefits.

Westside Finishing Co. Inc.*
15 Samosett St., Holyoke
(413) 533-4909
www.wsfinish.com
Brian Bell, President
Westside Finishing is a family-owned business specializing in a wide array of services, including pre-treatment/cleaning, conveyorized powder coating, batch powder coating, silk screening, pad printing, masking, packaging, and trucking.

Cover Story

29th Annual Compilation Celebrates the Depth, Diversity of Business Community

Launched nearly three decades ago, the Springfield Regional Chamber’s Super 60 program (originally the Fabulous 50 before it was expanded) has always acted like a giant telescope, bringing the breadth and depth of the region’s business community clearly into focus. And the 2108 lists are no exception. Businesses on the Total Revenue and Revenue Growth categories represent nearly every business sector — from healthcare to financial services, from marketing to dentistry, from construction to retail. There are some who have been hearing their names called at the Super 60 lunch for decades now, and others who will hear it for the first time. Overall, the lists put the region’s many strengths and immense diversity clearly on display. The Super 60 will be celebrated at the annual lunch on Oct. 26 at Chez Josef, starting at 11:30 a.m. The Super 60 awards are presented by Health New England and sponsored by Farmington Bank, Wells Fargo Bank, the Republican, and Zasco Productions.

Total Revenue

1. WHALLEY COMPUTER
ASSOCIATES Inc.
One Whalley Way, Southwick
(413) 569-4200
www.wca.com
John Whalley, president
WCA is a locally owned family business that has evolved from a hardware resale and service group in the ’70s and ’80s into a company that now focuses on lowering the total cost of technology and productivity enhancement for its customers. Boasting nearly 150 employees, Whalley carries name-brand computers as well as low-cost compatibles.

2. MARCOTTE FORD SALES INC.
1025 Main St., Holyoke
(800) 923-9810
www.marcotteford.com
Bryan Marcotte, president
The dealership sells new Ford vehicles as well as pre-owned cars, trucks, and SUVs, and features a full service department. Marcotte has achieved the President’s Award, one of the most prestigious honors given to dealerships by Ford Motor Co., on multiple occasions over the past decade. It also operates the Marcotte Commercial Truck Center.

3. TIGHE & BOND INC. *
53 Southampton Road, Westfield
(413) 562-1600
www.tighebond.com
DAVID PINSKY, PRESIDENT & CEO
Tighe & Bond is a full-service engineering and environmental consulting firm that provides a wide array of services, including building engineering, coastal and waterfront solutions, environmental consulting, GIS and asset management, site planning and design, transportation engineering, and water and wastewater engineering.

A.G. MILLER CO. Inc.
57 Batavia St., Springfield
(413) 732-9297
www.agmiller.com
Rick Miller, president
Early in its history, A.G. Miller made a name in automobile enameling. More than 100 years after its founding in 1914, the company now offers precision metal fabrication; design and engineering; assembly; forming, rolling, and bending; laser cutting; punching; precision saw cutting; welding; powder coating and liquid painting; and more.

BALTAZAR CONTRACTORS
83 Carmelinas Circle, Ludlow
(413) 583-6160
www.baltazarcontractors.com
Frank Baltazar, president
Baltazar Contractors has been a family-owned and operated construction firm for more than 20 years, specializing in roadway construction and reconstruction in Massachusetts and Connecticut; all aspects of site-development work; sewer, water, storm, and utilities; and streetscape improvements.

CHARTER OAK INSURANCE & FINANCIAL SERVICES CO. *
330 Whitney Ave., Holyoke
(413) 374-5430
www.charteroakfinancial.com
Peter Novak, General Agent
A member of the MassMutual Financial Group, Charter Oak been servicing clients for more than 125 years. The team of professionals serves individuals, families, and businesses with risk-management products, business planning and protection, retirement planning and investment services, and fee-based financial planning.

CITY ENTERPRISE INC.
52-60 Berkshire Ave., Springfield
(413) 726-9549
www.cityenterpriseinc.com
WONDERLYN MURPHY, PRESIDENT & CEO
City Enterprise Inc. is a general contractor with a diverse portfolio of clients, including the Groton Naval submarine base, Westover Air Reserve Base, the Federal Aviation Administration, the National Park Service, the Army Corps of Engineers, and many others.

COMMERCIAL DISTRIBUTING CO. INC.
46 South Broad St., Westfield
(413) 562-9691
www.commercialdist.com
Richard Placek, Chairman
Founded in 1935 by Joseph Placek, Commercial Distributing Co. is a family-owned, family-operated business servicing more than 1,000 bars, restaurants, and clubs, as well as more than 400 package and liquor stores. Now in its third generation, the company continues to grow by building brands and offering new products as the market changes.

CON-TEST ANALYTICAL LABORATORY (Filli LLC)
39 Spruce St., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-2332
www.contestlabs.com
TOM VERATTI, FOUNDER, CONSULTANT
Established in 1987 and founded by Thomas and Kathleen Veratti, Con-Test Inc. provides industrial hygiene and analytical services to a broad range of clients. Originally focused on industrial hygiene analysis, the laboratory testing division has expanded its capabilities to include numerous techniches in air analysis, classical (wet) chemistry, metals, and organics.

DAVID R. NORTHUP ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS INC.
73 Bowles Road, Agawam
(413) 786-8930
www.northupelectric.com
DAVID NORTHUP, PRESIDENT
David R. Northup Electrical Contractors Inc. is a family-owned and operated, full-service electrical, HVAC, and plumbing contractor. The company specializes in everything from installation and replacement to preventative maintenance; indoor air-quality work to sheet-metal fabrication.

FREEDOM CREDIT UNION
1976 Main St., Springfield
(800) 831-0160
www.freedom.coop
GLENN WELCH, PRESIDENT & CEO
Freedom is a full-service credit union based in Springfield serving a wide range of business and consumer clients. Freedom has its main office on Main Street, with other offices in Sixteen Acres (Springfield), Feeding Hills, Ludlow, Chicopee, Easthampton, Northampton, Turners Falls, Greenfield, and the Roger L. Putnam Vocational Technical Academy.

THE FUTURES HEALTH GROUP, LLC
136 William St., Springfield
(800) 218-9280
www.discoverfutures.com
Brian Edwards, CEO
Futures provides occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language therapy, special education, nursing, mental health, and other related services to schools and healthcare facilities across the U.S. Founded in 1998, it continues to be managed by expert practitioners in their fields.

GARY ROME HYUNDAI INC. *
150 Whiting Farms Road, Holyoke
(877) 830-4792
www.garyromehyundai.com
GARY ROME, President
Gary Rome is the largest Hyundai dealership in the nation after a new, much larger facility opened in 2017. The company’s mission statement is to “provide our customers with a consistent sale and service experience that satisfies each person’s needs and exceeds their expectation in a clean and comfortable environment.”

GOVERNORS AMERICA CORP. – GAC MGMT. Co.
720 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 786-5600
www.governors-america.com
Governors America Corp. is a privately held engine-control company that provides complete design, development, production, and marketing capabilities for electro-mechanical and electronic devices that are used for engine control. The engine-control products are used in a wide range of industries, including generator set, material handling, marine propulsion, mining, locomotive, and off-highway applications. Governors America has developed an advanced line of electronic governing and fuel-control systems with accessories.

HOLYOKE PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES, LLP
150 Lower Westfield Road, Holyoke
(413) 536-2393
www.holyokepediatrics.com
KATHY TREMBLE, Care Coordinator
Holyoke Pediatric Associates is the largest pediatric practice in Western Mass., serving patients from the Pioneer Valley at offices in Holyoke and South Hadley. The group medical practice comprises board-certified pediatricians, certified nurse practitioners, and more than 75 clinical, nutritional, and clerical support staff, and has served the healthcare needs of infants, children, and adolescents since 1971.

JET INDUSTRIES INC.
307 Silver St., Agawam
(413) 786-2010
www.jet.industries
Michael Turrini, president
Jet Industries Inc. is a leading design-build electrical, mechanical, communications, and fire-sprinkler contractor. What began as a small, family-run oil company founded by Aaron Zeeb in 1977 has grown into one of the nation’s largest companies of its type, with more than 500 employees servicing projects all across the country.

KITTREDGE EQUIPMENT CO. INC.
100 Bowles Road, Agawam
(413) 304-4100
www.kittredgeequipment.com
Wendy Webber, president
Founded in 1921, Kittredge Equipment Co. is one of the nation’s leading food-service equipment and supply businesses. It boasts 70,000 square feet of showroom in three locations. The company also handles design services, and has designed everything from small restaurants to country clubs to in-plant cafeterias.

LANCER TRANSPORTATION & SULCO WAREHOUSING & LOGISTICS *
311 Industry Ave., Springfield
(413) 739-4880
www.sulco-lancer.com
Todd Goodrich, president
In business since 1979, Sulco Warehousing & Logistics specializes in public, contract, and dedicated warehousing. Lancer Transportation & Logistics is a licensed third-party freight-brokerage company that provides full-service transportation-brokerage services throughout North America.

LOUIS & CLARK DRUG INC.
309 East St., Springfield
(413) 737-7456
www.lcdrug.com
Skip Matthews, president
Since 1965, Louis & Clark has been a recognized name in Western Mass., first as a pharmacy and later as a resource for people who need home medical equipment and supplies. Today, the company provides professional pharmacy and compounding services, medical equipment, independent-living services, and healthcare programs.

MAYBURY ASSOCIATES INC.
90 Denslow Road, East Longmeadow
(413) 525-4216
www.maybury.com
John Maybury, president
Since 1976, Maybury Associates Inc. has been designing, supplying, and servicing all types of material-handling equipment throughout New England. Maybury provides customers in a wide range of industries with solutions to move, lift, and store their parts and products.

NOTCH WELDING & MECHanICAL CONTRACTORS INC. *
85 Lemay St., Chicopee
(413) 534-3440
www.notch.com
Steven Neveu, president
A family-owned business since 1972, Notch Mechanical Constructors provides piping installation and repair services to facilities throughout Southern New England. Its team has the capacity to address process and utility piping challenges at any business within 100 miles of its locations in Chicopee and Hudson, Mass.

O’REILLY, TALBOT & OKUN ASSOCIATES INC.
293 Bridge St., Suite 500, Springfield
(413) 788-6222
www.oto-env.com
JIM OKUN, KEVIN O’REILLY, MIKE TALBOT, principals
O’Reilly Talbot & Okun is a specialty geo-environmental engineering firm, specializing in asbestos management, brownfields redevelopment, environmental site assessment, indoor air quality and industrial hygiene, MCP compliance, vapor intrusion, geotechnical engineering, lead inspection, PCB assessment and management, and other services.

P.C. ENTERPRISES INC. d/b/a ENTRE COMPUTER
138 Memorial Ave., West Springfield
(413) 736-2112
www.pc-enterprises.com
Norman Fiedler, CEO
PC Enterprises, d/b/a Entre Computer, assists organizations with procuring, installing, troubleshooting, servicing, and maximizing the value of technology. In business since 1983, it continues to evolve and grow as a lead provider for many businesses, healthcare providers, retailers, and state, local, and education entities.

PARAGUS STRATEGIC IT
112 Russell St., Hadley
(413) 587-2666
www.paragusit.com
Delcie Bean IV, president
While still in high school, Delcie Bean founded Paragus IT in 1999, first under the name Vertical Horizons and then Valley Computer Works. Under the Paragus name, it has grown dramatically as an outsourced IT solution, providing business computer service, computer consulting, information-technology support, and other services to businesses of all sizes. 

REDIKER SOFTWARE INC.
2 Wilbraham Road, Hampden
(800) 213-9860
www.rediker.com
Andrew Anderlonis, president
Rediker software is used by school administrators across the U.S. and in more than 100 countries, and is designed to meet the student-information-management needs of all types of schools and districts. For example, 100,000 teachers use the TeacherPlus web gradebook, and the ParentPlus and StudentPlus web portals boast 2 million users.

SANDERSON MacLEOD INC.
1199 South Main St. Palmer
(413) 283-3481
www.sandersonmacleod.com
MARK BORSARI, PRESIDENT
Launched in 1958 by Ken Sanderson and Bruce MacLeod, Sanderson MacLeod invented the first twisted-wire mascara brush. Today, it is an industry leader in the making of twisted wire brushes for the cosmetics industry, the healthcare sector, the OEM-cleaning brush market, the firearm-cleaning brush market, and many others.

TIGER PRESS (Shafii’s Inc.)
50 Industrial Dr., East Longmeadow
(413) 224-1763
www.tigerpress.com
JENNIFER SHAFII
TigerPress is an award-winning, ISO 9001 & FSC-certified custom printing company featuring the latest digital prepress and printing technology. The company manufactures folding cartons, marketing and educational printed products, fulfillment services, and indoor and outdoor signs.
TROY INDUSTRIES INC.
151 Capital Dr., West Springfield
(413) 788-4288
www.troyind.com
Steve Troy, CEO
Troy Industries was founded on the principle of making reliable, innovative, over-engineered products that function without question when lives are on the line. Troy is a leading U.S. government contractor that designs and manufactures innovative, top-quality small-arms components and accessories and complete weapon upgrades.

UNITED PERSONNEL SERVICES *
1331 Main St., Springfield
(413) 736-0800
www.unitedpersonnel.com
Patricia Canavan, president
United provides a full range of staffing services, including temporary staffing and full-time placement, on-site project management, and strategic recruitment in the Springfield, Hartford, and Northampton areas, specializing in administrative, professional, medical, and light-industrial staff.

WESTSIDE FINISHING CO. INC.
15 Samosett St., Holyoke
(413) 533-4909
www.wsfinish.com
BRIAN BELL, PRESIDENT
Founded in the early 1980s, Westside Finishing is a family-owned business specializing wide array of services, including silk screening, conveyorized powder coating, batch powder coating, pad printing, trucking, sub-assembly, final packaging, and more.

Revenue Growth

1. FIVE STAR TRANSPORTATION INC. *
809 College Highway, Southwick
(413) 789-4789
www.firestarbus.com
Nathan Lecrenski, president
Five Star provides school-bus transportation services to school districts and charter schools throughout Western Mass. From its launch a half-century ago with a single bus route, the company currently services more than 12 school districts and operates a fleet of more than 175 vehicles. 

2. BAYSTATE BLASTING INC.
36 Carmelinas Circle, Ludlow
(413) 583-4440
www.baystateblasting.com
Paul Baltazar, president
Baystate Blasting, Inc. is a local family-owned and operated drilling and blasting firm located in Ludlow that began in 2003. Services include site work, heavy highway construction, residential work, quarry, portable crushing, and recycling, and it is an ATF-licensed dealer of explosives as well as rental of individual magazines.

3. IN-LAND CONTRACTING INC.
83 Carmelinas Circle, Ludlow
(413) 547-0100
Denis Baltazar, Treasurer
In-Land Contracting is a general contractor specializing in garages, exterior work, parking lots, and other types of work.

AMERICAN PEST SOLUTIONS INC.
169 William St., Springfield
(413) 781-0044
www.413pestfree.com
BOB RUSSELL, PRESIDENT
Founded in 1913, American Pest Solutions is a full-service pest-solutions company. With two offices, in Springfield and Hartford, Conn., the company serves residential and commercial customers, offering inspection, treatment, and ongoing protection.

BAYSTATE RESTORATION INC.
69 Gagne St., Chicopee
(413) 532-3473
www.baystaterestorationgroup.com
MARK DAVIAU and DON ROBERT, OWNERS
Baystate Restoration Group is a 24-hour emergency service-restoration company specializing in all areas of restoration and insurance claims due to fire, water, smoke, mold, storm, and water damage to homes and businesses.

BURGESS, SCHULTZ & ROBB, P.C.
200 North Main St., Suite 1, South Building, East Longmeadow
(413) 525-0025
www.bsrcpa.com
ANDREW ROBB, MANAGING PARTNER
Burgess, Shultz & Robb is a full-service accounting firm specializing in accounting, auditing, tax, and business planning for closely held businesses and nonprofit organizations, trusts, and estate services.

CENTER SQUARE GRILL (Fun Dining Inc.)
84 Center Square, East Longmeadow
(413) 525-0055
www.centersquaregrill.com
Michael Sakey, Bill Collins, Proprietors
Center Square Grill serves up eclectic American fare for lunch and dinner, as well as an extensive wine and cocktail selection and a kids’ menu. The facility also has a catering service and hosts events of all kinds.

CHICOPEE INDUSTRIAL CONTRACTORS INC.
107 North Chicopee St., Chicopee
(413) 538-7279
www.chicopeeindustrial.com
Carol Campbell, president
Founded in 1992, Chicopee Industrial Contractors is an industrial contracting firm specializing in all types of rigging, heavy lifting, machinery moving, machine installation, millwrighting, machine repair, heavy hauling, plant relocations, concrete pads, foundations, and structural steel installations.

COURIER EXPRESS INC.
20 Oakdale St., Springfield
(413) 730-6620
www.courierexp.com
Eric Devine, president
Courier Express is committed to providing custom, same-day delivery solutions for any shipment. Its focal point is New England, but its reach is nationwide. The company strives to utilize the latest technologies, on-time delivery, customer service, and attention to detail to separate itself from its competitors.

E.F. CORCORAN PLUMBING & HEATING CO. INC. *
5 Rose Place, Springfield
(413) 732-1462
www.efcorcoran.com
CHARLES EDWARDS and BRIAN TOOMEY, Co-OWNERS
E.F. Corcoran Plumbing and Heating, founded in 1963, is a full-service plumbing and HVAC contractor. Services include 24-hour plumbing service, HVAC system installs, design-build services, energy retrofits, system replacements and modifications, gas piping, boilers, and more.

EOS APPROACH, LLC / Proshred Security international
75 Post Office Park, Wilbraham
(413) 596-5479
www.proshred.com
JOE KELLY, OWNER
Proshred is an industry leader in on-site shredding and hard-drive destruction. The company offers a number of services, including one-time paper shredding, ongoing shredding service, hard-drive destruction, product destruction, document scanning, and drop-off shredding.

EWS PLUMBING & HEATING INC.
339 Main St., Monson
(413) 267-8983
www.ewsplumbingandheating.com
BRANT STAHELSKI, PRESIDENT
EWS Plumbing & Heating Inc. is a family-owned and operated company that designs and installs plumbing and HVAC systems. A full-service mechanical contractor, the company specializes in both residential and commercial applications.

FLETCHER SEWER & DRAIN INC.
824A Perimeter Road, Ludlow
(413) 547-8180
www.fletcherseweranddrain.com
Teri Marinello, president
Since 1985, Fletcher Sewer & Drain has provided service to homeowners as well as municipalities and construction companies for large pipeline jobs. From unblocking kitchen sinks to replacing sewer lines, Fletcher keeps up to date with all the latest technology, from high-pressure sewer jetters to the newest camera-inspection equipment.

GALLAGHER REAL ESTATE *
1763 Northampton St., Holyoke
(413) 536-7232
www.gogallagher.com
PAUL GALLAGHER, OWNER
Gallagher Real Estate is an independent brokerage that operates in Hampshire and Hampden counties in Massachusetts and Hartford County in Connecticut, and specializes in both residential and commercial properties. The company has offices in Holyoke, South Hadley, East Longmeadow, and Springfield.

GLEASON JOHNDROW LANDSCAPING INC.
44 Rose St., Springfield
(413) 727-8820
www.gleasonjohndrowlandscaping.com
Anthony Gleason II, David Johndrow, Owners
Gleason Johndrow Landscape & Snow Management offers a wide range of commercial and residential services, including lawnmowing, snow removal, salting options, fertilization programs, landscape installations, bark-mulch application, creative plantings, seeding options, pruning, irrigation installation, maintenance, and much more.

GMH FENCE CO. inc. *
15 Benton Dr., East Longmeadow
(413) 525-3361
www.gmhfence.com
GLENN HASTIE, OWNER
Serving the Western Mass. area for nearly a quarter century, GMH Fence Co. is one of the largest fence companies in the region. The company offers fence installations from a selection of wood, aluminum, steel, and vinyl fencing for residential and commercial customers.

KNIGHT MACHINE TOOL CO. INC.
11 Industrial Dr., South Hadley
(413) 532-2507
Gary O’Brien, owner
Knight Machine & Tool Co. is a metalworking and welding company that offers blacksmithing, metal roofing, and other services from its 11,000-square-foot facility.

L & L PROPERTY SERVICES, LLC
582 Amostown Road, West Springfield
(413) 732-2739
www.
RICHARD LAPINSKI, OWNER
L&L Property Services LLC is a locally owned company providing an array of property services, including lawn care, snow removal, sanding, excavations, patios and stonewalls, hydroseeding, and more.

MARKET MENTORS, LLC *
1680 Riverdale St., West Springfield
(413) 787-1133
www.marketmentors.com
Michelle Abdow, principal
A full-service marketing firm, Market Mentors handles all forms of marketing, including advertising in all media, media buying, graphic design, public relations, and event planning.

MORAN SHEET METAL INC.
613 Meadow St., Agawam
(413) 363-1548
PAUL MORAN, OWNER
Founded in 1993, Moran Sheet metal is a family-owned company specializing in custom fabrication and installation of HVAC systems for commercial clients across Western Mass. and into Central Mass.

NORTHEAST IT SYSTEMS INC.
170 Lockhouse Road, Westfield
(413) 736-6348
www.northeastit.net
Joel Mollison, president
Northeast is a full-service IT company providing business services, managed IT services, backup and disaster recovery, and cloud services, as well as a full-service repair shop for residential customers, including file recovery, laptop screen replacement, PC setups and tuneups, printer installation, virus protection and removal, and wireless installation.

RAYMOND R. HOULE CONSTRUCTION INC.
5 Miller St., Ludlow
(413) 547-2500
www.rayhoule.com
TIM PELLETIER, PRESIDENT
Raymond R. Houle Construction specializes in commercial and industrial construction. Services include general contracting, construction management, and an integrated construction-assistance program.

RODRIGUES INC.
782 Center St., Ludlow
(413) 547-6443
Antonio Rodrigues, president
Rodrigues Inc. operates Europa Restaurant in Ludlow, specializing in Mediterranean cuisine with an interactive dining experience, presenting meals cooked on volcanic rocks at tableside. Europa also offers full-service catering and banquet space.

SECOND WIND CONSULTANTS
136 West St., #102, Northampton
(413) 584-2581
www.secondwindconsultants.com
AARON TODRIN, PRESIDENT
Second Wind Consultants is a Better Business Bureau-accredited business debt-relief consulting firm that helps companies avoid bankruptcy or litigation through a debt workout.

SKIP’S OUTDOOR ACCENTS INC.
1265 Suffield St., Agawam
(413) 786-0990
www.skipsonline.com
JOHN and SCOTT ANSART, OWNERS
Skip’s Outdoor Accents specializes in a wide range of outdoor products, including sheds and garages, gazebos, swingsets, outdoor furniture, yard and garden products, weathervanes and cupolas, indoor furniture, playhouses, and pet structures.

SUMMIT CAREERS INC.
85 Mill St., Suite B, Springfield
(413) 733-9506
www.summetcareers.inc
DAVID PICARD, OWNER
Summit Careers provides temporary, temp-to-hire, and direct-hire services for clients in a variety of sectors, including light industrial, warehouse, professional trades, administrative, accounting, and executive.

TAPLIN YARD, PUMP & POWER (M. Jags Inc.)
120 Interstate Dr., West Springfield
(413) 781-4352
www.fctaplin.com
Martin Jagodowski, president
Taplin has been servicing the local area since 1892, and is an authorized dealer for parts, equipment, service, and accessories for a wide range of brands. It boasts a large inventory of zero-turn mowers, commercial lawn equipment, lawnmowers, lawn tractors, trimmers, blowers, generators, pressure washers, pole saws, sprayers, chainsaws, and more.

VANGUARD DENTAL, LLC
1730 Boston Road, Springfield
(413) 543-2555
www.vanguarddentistry.com
DR. YOGITA KANORWALLA, PRINCIPAL
Vanguard Dental is a full-service dental practice specializing in same-day crowns, dental implants, root canals, bridges and dentures, Invisalign, and cosmetic dentistry.

WANCZYK EVERGREEN NURSERY INC.
166 Russell St., Hadley
(413) 584-3709
www.wanczynursery.com
MICHAEL WANCZYK, OWNER
Wanczyk Nursery has been a premier plant grower in the Pioneer Valley since 1954. The family-owned business offers many kinds of trees, shrubs, bushes, and flowers.

WEBBER & GRINNELL INSURANCE AGENCY INC.
8 North King. St., #1, Northampton
(413) 586-0111
www.webberandgrinnell.com
BILL GRINNELL, PRESIDENT
Webber & Grinnell’s roots can be traced back to 1849, when A.W. Thayer opened an insurance agency on Pleasant St. in Northampton. The agency offers automotive, homeowners, and business coverage, as well as employee benefits.

Departments Picture This

The Super 60

The Springfield Regional Chamber of Commerce staged its annual Super 60 Luncheon at a packed Chez Josef in Agawam on Oct. 28. Now in its 28th year, the program recognizes high-performing companies in two categories: Total Revenue and Revenue Growth.

Bill Grinnell (center), president of Webber & Grinnell Insurance, a winner in the Total Revenue category, accepts his plaque from Ashley Allen, vice president of Sales & Marketing for Health New England, the presenting sponsor, and Don D’Amour, chairman of Big Y Foods, a platinum sponsor

Bill Grinnell (center), president of Webber & Grinnell Insurance, a winner in the Total Revenue category, accepts his plaque from Ashley Allen, vice president of Sales & Marketing for Health New England, the presenting sponsor, and Don D’Amour, chairman of Big Y Foods, a platinum sponsor

Ralph Crowley Jr., CEO of Polar Beverages in Worcester, delivers the keynote address

Ralph Crowley Jr., CEO of Polar Beverages in Worcester, delivers the keynote addres

Paul Whalley, vice president of Whalley Computer Associates, the top finisher in the Total Revenue category, accepts his plaque from Allen and D’Amour

Paul Whalley, vice president of Whalley Computer Associates, the top finisher in the Total Revenue category, accepts his plaque from Allen and D’Amour

Drive Time

A host of local and state officials were on hand on Nov. 1 for the ribbon cutting for Mercedes-Benz of Springfield, the $12 million dealership created at the site of the former Plantation Inn in Chicopee. First conceived nearly three years ago, the dealership marks the return of Mercedes-Benz to the Greater Springfield area after a decade-long absence.

Attendees mingle in the showroom prior to the ceremonies

Attendees mingle in the showroom prior to the ceremonies

Jay Ashe, state secretary of Housing & Economic Development, addresses the attendees

Jay Ashe, state secretary of Housing & Economic Development, addresses the attendees

Cutting the ribbon are

Cutting the ribbon are, from left, state Rep. Joseph Wagner, Ashe, Chicopee Mayor Richard Kos, partners Peter and Michelle Wirth, partner Richard Hesse, and his wife, Amy

Peter Wirth says a few words to the attendees

Peter Wirth says a few words to the attendees

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Ralph Crowley Jr., president and CEO of Polar Beverages, will serve as the keynote speaker at the Springfield Regional Chamber’s Super 60 event on Friday, Oct. 27. Now in its 28th year, the program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing and privately-owned businesses in the region which continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy.

Worcester-based Polar Beverages was founded by Crowley’s great-grandfather, Dennis Crowley, in 1882, primarily as a wholesale and retail liquor business. However, prohibition put a stop to the family’s liquor sales, forcing them to focus on bubbly waters and bottled water instead. Under the entrepreneurial and visionary leadership of fourth-generation Ralph Crowley Jr., Polar Beverages has grown to be the largest privately owned soft-drink bottler in the U.S., having completed more than 30 acquisitions, including proprietary brands Adirondack, Waist Watcher, Clear ‘n’ Natural, and national brands 7Up, A&W, Sunkist, Seagram’s, Royal Crown, and Diet Rite, along with new-age brands Snapple, AriZona, Fiji Water, O Water, HyDrive, and Nantucket Nectars. Polar also bottles home and office water.

In September 2001, Polar Beverages formed a joint venture with Cott Corporation. The partnership is known as Northeast Retailer Brands, LLC. This joint-venture partnership produces and distributes most of the retailer-branded beverages in the Northeast. At one time, Polar Beverages maintained a warehouse in Springfield.

“Polar Beverages is an example of a regional, family-owned business that has remained true to its roots, while at the same time growing its brand by smart acquisitions and innovative, entrepreneurial thinking,” said Springfield Regional Chamber President Nancy Creed. “Its founder could probably not have envisioned a line of mythically inspired, limited-edition cans of seltzer with names like Mermaid Songs, Unicorn Kisses, and Dragon Whispers that, in 2017, fly off of store shelves.”

The Super 60 Celebration event honoring this year’s class will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef, 176 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam. Reservations are required. The cost is $60 for members, $75 for general admission. Reservations may be made for tables of eight or 10. The deadline for reservations is Oct. 18. No cancellations will be accepted after that date, and no walk-ins will be allowed. Reservations may be made online at www.springfieldregionalchamber.com or by e-mail to [email protected].

The Super 60 event is presented by Health New England and sponsored by Farmington Bank. The event is also sponsored by the Republican, the Regional Employment Board of Hampden County, and Zasco Productions.

40 Under 40 The Class of 2017

President, Noonan Energy Corp.; Age 37

Ted Noonan

Ted Noonan

Ted Noonan says he’s extremely proud of his family history and the company that was started by his great-great-grandfather in 1890, and is doing his part to add to that legacy.

His father, Ed, introduced him to Noonan Energy at age 7 and served as a role model who inspired him to become active in the industry. Noonan pumped diesel fuel in his youth, drove an oil truck in high school, joined the company as a full-time employee in 1998, and worked his way up to the role of president.

Under his leadership, the company has acquired several oil companies, started a plumbing division, and further diversified into home-energy audits and providing lighting improvements and air sealing through the Mass Save program.

Noonan overhauled the company’s service department, streamlined the dispatch system and fleet, and spearheaded the company’s transition to Bioheat fuel, advocating for its use, he says, because it is better for the environment.

He has been interviewed by trade publications regarding the proposed natural-gas pipeline expansion in New England, is immediate past chairman of the board and current board member of the Mass. Energy Marketers Assoc. (MEMA), is an executive committee board member and vice chair of the New England Fuel Institute, and advocates for his industry in Washington, D.C.

“The industry has changed dramatically in the last 20 years, but everyone wants to be comfortable, either warm or cool depending on the season, so we focus on being able to offer those services,” Noonan said. “And the more I get involved, the more I realize the value of giving our employees a future they can feel good about.”

In 2013, the Springfield Regional Chamber of Commerce named Noonan Energy a Super 60 company, and Noonan and his father were feted with the Industry Leadership Award by MEMA. He served as corporator for Country Bank from 2013 to 2016 and is on its board of trustees.

Noonan Energy supports many charitable organizations, including the Gray House in Springfield and others that provide discounts for fuel deliveries. The company also supports local sports teams and has donated four $250 gift certificates as part of the Noonan Warm Wishes contest on 94.7 WMAS.

“My family has always been very giving,” said Noonan, who has three sons — Brady, 9, Dillon, 6, and Ethan, 3 — with his wife, Jessica, “and that will continue under my leadership.”

—Kathleen Mitchell

Sections Women in Businesss

Tapping Potential

Jill Monson-Bishop

Jill Monson-Bishop says women who own businesses can benefit from creating a team of advisors who can support them.

That famous quote from Oprah Winfrey — “Follow Your Passion: It is What Will Lead to Your Purpose” — is emblazoned in oversized letters on a wall in the waiting room of Inspired Marketing Inc. in Springfield.

The quotation is in line with the belief system embraced by the company’s self-named ‘chief inspiration officer,’ Jill Monson-Bishop, a title she put on her business card when she established her full-service advertising company, then went on to hire team members with a driving desire to help clients realize their goals.

The climate within the office was also carefully orchestrated: there are three dogs on-site most days; they sport the titles  ‘employee satisfaction manager,’ ‘customer experience associate,’ and ‘siesta manager.’ Everyone has a pair of comfortable slippers under their desk, and not only is collaboration encouraged, milestones of any kind are announced and celebrated.

It’s a formula that has led to success: Over the past three years Inspired Marketing has retained 93% of its clients and increased revenue by 362%.

“We don’t strive to be the number-one local marketing agency and win awards,” Monson-Bishop said. “Our aim is to have our clients win awards and reach goals and know that everyone here is invested in their growth.”

Indeed, awards have been forthcoming: One client was feted with a Better Business Torch Award; others were finalists for the honor; and still others have been named Super 60 companies by the Springfield Regional Chamber of Commerce for revenue and revenue growth.

Monson-Bishop tells new clients she doesn’t just want to purchase media for them, create a logo, or do graphic design; instead, she wants to be part of their team. That vision has materialized, and one business sends her their weekly sales report.

“I’m part of their growth or struggle depending on the week,” she noted.

She took pride in the fact that one client, the Good Dog Spot was recently able to open a second location, which was among its goals, and says she and her team have been invited to a number of company holiday parties.

Team members at Inspired Marketing

Team members at Inspired Marketing have increased revenue over the past three years by 362% and retained 93% of their clients.

One thing she focuses on is creating synergistic relationships between clients. For example, when Square One needed a pizza donation, she approached Frankie and Johnnie’s Pizzeria. Today the restaurant donates pizza to the non-profit once a month and employees and families involved with Square One frequent the eatery and buy lunches there, which they hadn’t been doing in the past. In addition, Frankie & Johnnie’s will cater an event for Square One next year.

Another example is a collaboration between Bob Pion Buick GMC; Square One; and the American International College Men’s –D1 Ice Hockey team.

AIC had planned to stage a toy drive at a December ice hockey game, and, thanks to Inspired Marketing, Bob Pion has volunteered to donate a truck, the toys will go to Square One, and every donor will receive a ticket to another AIC hockey game.

“I believe businesses are stronger together and if they can find opportunities to work together, they can grow together,” Monson-Bishop said “Our clients know we put our heart into what we do. If I write a press release and the media uses it, my teammates come running down the hall to tell me. They get very excited when we help a business attain success.”

Personifying Beliefs

Monson-Bishop says starting her own business has been the most difficult and rewarding thing she has ever done.

“I love being an employer,” she said, “being able to watch people’s dreams come true and being part of it.”

The decision to launch her advertising firm was made after her mother died unexpectedly at age 56. The loss was devastating, but also prompted the thought, “What if I only get 56 years on this planet? What would my legacy be?”

Monson-Bishop had worked as a radio broadcaster, and when her mother passed away she was selling coupon advertising and making more money than she ever had in her life. “But I didn’t want my legacy to be selling 50% off pizza coupons,” she said.

“I enjoyed working with clients and had found that small and medium-sized businesses were not being served by advertising agencies. Many were good at what they did but they had no idea how to spend money effectively on marketing,” she noted, explaining that the belief was reinforced by Butler Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning, which had been in business for 30 years, and became her first client.

Monson-Bishop launched her new venture by renting a desk in a friend’s Springfield office. She moved to Agawam after hiring one part-time employee; then moved back to Springfield two years ago, which is a city she truly loves.

“I just purchased a Victorian in the Historic McKnight area, and believe the city is on the cusp of a renaissance. Great things are happening and I want to be part of them,” she said, noting that she also owns another house in the City of Homes.

Today Inspired Marketing has five team members in addition to Monson-Bishop  and gets help from two interns every college semester.

Their business is split equally between marketing and events, and clients include Smith & Wesson; Northwestern Mutual, American International College and the City of Springfield School Department; as well as smaller businesses.

They also work with a number of nonprofits including Valley Venture Mentors and the Zoo in Forest Park. “They do so much for us and we need to support them,” Monson-Bishop said, noting that last year, Inspired Marketing staged a Tiny Tea to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Square One’s popular fundraiser. Dignitaries included Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno and Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse who enjoyed tea seated at a child’s table. They wore hats and the event attracted a lot of media attention.

The crew also takes pride in coming up with creative advertising ideas. When they did a campaign for one non-profit they mailed reading glasses to potential donors with a note that said, “See the difference we can make,” then went on to explain the charity’s mission.

Another client received the attention it was seeking when Inspired Marketing did a mailing that contained scratch tickets with a note that said, “You wouldn’t throw away the enclosed without taking a chance on it. Take a chance on us and you will win every time;” while a press release delivered to media outlets about a classic-car cruise night contained matchbox cars; and another client’s business blossomed due to a marketing promotion in which packets of seeds were mailed with handwritten notes that said, “Let us help your business grow.”

Unique Challenges

Monson-Bishop believes female entrepreneurs face challenges unique to their gender. Her own accomplishments are significant: not only has she grown from a sole entrepreneur to a thriving advertising firm; she lost 125 pounds 3 1/2 years ago, has kept it off and been sugar-free for more than 1,200 days; was chosen as a BusinessWest 40 Under Forty 2010 class member, among other honors.

When she was notified about the most recent award, “I only celebrated for about 10 seconds,” she said, adding that she believes it’s easier for women to praise other people’s accomplishments and victories than take pride in their own.

“We tend to beat ourselves up for mistakes and need to learn to celebrate our own accomplishments and say ‘thank you’ when we receive a compliment,” she noted.

She believes her weight loss has led business professionals to take her more seriously and is now able to purchase a professional wardrobe, which was difficult to do when she was 125 pounds heavier.

Monson-Bishop has an advisory board composed of 10 local business leaders who have guided her over the years by providing honest and critical input. She shares her financial information with them and believes every female business owner could benefit from creating her own confidential circle of supporters.

“When you have a hard day or have to make a difficult decision, it helps to have someone to talk to, and that person isn’t always your spouse,” she said.

The founder of Inspired Marketing also feels many women suffer from what she calls the “Wizard of Oz Syndrome,” which is her metaphor for the imposter syndrome.

“The world may see you as the big and powerful Oz, but sometimes you feel like the man behind the curtain who is afraid to have it pulled back and be found out,” she said.

But testimonials from clients say that Monson-Bishop and her crew are truly inspired, have the ability to attract attention and help clients succeed.

Blazing a Path

Monson-Bishop not only used personality and drive as criteria when she began hiring people, today when a new position is created all team members are included in interviews with prospective job candidates to ensure they are a good fit.

Heather Ruggeri was thrilled the team chose her to be vice president and chief events officer, even though her credentials didn’t exactly match the job description.

“But she had a willingness to learn; a desire for absolute customer satisfaction and it was evident that she was deeply loyal. She didn’t want a job, she wanted to be part of something,” Monson-Bishop said, adding that Ruggeri is one of many team members whose professional achievements have made her proud.

Kristin Carlson was hired immediately after graduating from Fitchburg State University, and says her fellow team members have become like family and whenever they reach a goal, it is viewed as cause for celebration.

“I have run down the hall to Jill’s office when we have achieved something such as getting 10,000 Likes on a client’s Facebook page,” said Carlson. “We get excited about things here.”

That enthusiasm is generated by passion and the purpose that Monson-Bishop has found since she started her business venture. “You only get one chance at life, and this is it,” she said.

Departments Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

Super 60

Super 60

More than 500 guests gathered at Chez Josef in Agawam on Oct. 28 for the Super 60 awards luncheon, presented by the Springfield Regional Chamber to honor the region’s fastest-growing privately owned companies. This year’s top honoree in the Total Revenue category was Stavros Center for Independent Living Inc. in Amherst, while the top honoree in Revenue Growth was Lavishlyhip, LLC in Feeding Hills. The event’s keynote speaker was Tree House Brewing co-founder Dean Rohan.

 

Justin Pelis, board treasurer of Stavros Center for Independent Living

From left, Justin Pelis, board treasurer of Stavros Center for Independent Living; Ashley Allen, vice president of Sales and Marketing for Health New England; Nancy Bazanchuk, board vice president of Stavros; and John Patrick, president and CEO of Farmington Bank

 

Bill Grinnell, president of Webber

Bill Grinnell, president of Webber and Grinnell Insurance (left), and Richard Venne, CEO and president of Community Enterprises

From left, Allen; Jay Ray, president of Detector Technology Inc.; and Patrick

From left, Allen; Jay Ray, president of Detector Technology Inc.; and Patrick

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Regional Chamber announced the honorees for its annual Super 60 award, presented by Health New England and sponsored by Farmington Bank. Now in its 27th year, the program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately-owned businesses in the region which continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy.

The Super 60 celebration event honoring this year’s class will be held Friday, Oct. 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef, presented by Health New England; sponsored by Farmington Bank, Zasco Productions and WWLP-TV 22; with reception sponsors the Republican and the Regional Employment Board of Hampden County, gold sponsor Berkshire Bank, and in partnership with the East of the River Five Town Chamber of Commerce (ERC5). Tree House Brewing Co. co-Founder Dean Rohan will keynote the event and discuss the success of the artisan brewery.

Reservations are required for the event; the cost is $50 for Springfield Regional Chamber and ERC5 members, $70 for general admission. Reservations for tables of eight or 10 are available. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday, Oct. 19. No cancellations are accepted after that date, and no walk-ins will be accepted. Reservations must be made in writing, online at www.springfieldregionalchamber.com or by e-mail to [email protected].

To be considered, a company must be based in Hampden or Hampshire counties or be a member of the Springfield Regional Chamber, have revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and be in business at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year.

This year’s winners hail from 17 communities across the region and represent all sectors of the economy, including nonprofit, transportation, energy, healthcare, technology, manufacturing, retail, and service.

“Small business is the backbone of our region and our continued growth engine, and the success of this year’s winners is a clear indication that our regional economy is strong,” said Springfield Regional Chamber President Nancy Creed. “What is interesting to see this year is the emergence of the digital world. Two of our honorees, 3BL Media and LavishlyHip — which also took the top spot in Revenue Growth — have a strong presence in the online community and do business primarily on the web versus brick and mortar. I think this might be first year we’ve had such honorees.”

This year’s top honoree in Total Revenue is Amherst-based Stavros Center for Independent Living, one of the oldest independent-living centers in the country. The organization came in at number two in Total Revenue in 2014.

Creed noted that one-third of the Total Revenue winners exceeded $45 million in revenues, with all the winners combining for more than $1.3 billion in revenues. In the Revenue Growth category, she said all winners had growth in excess of 25%, while one-third had growth in excess of 60%.

Three companies in the Total Revenue category also qualified for the Revenue Growth category, while nine companies in the Revenue Growth category also qualified for the Total Revenue category. These companies are indicated by asterisks below. The top three in each category are ranked as such, with the rest following alphabetically.

The 2016 winners in Total Revenue are: 1. Stavros Center for Independent Living Inc.; 2. Springfield College; 3. Whalley Computer Associates Inc.; Baltazar Contractors Inc.; Behavioral Health Network; Braman Chemical Enterprises Inc.; City Tire Company Inc.; Collaborative for Educational Services; Commercial Distributing Co. Inc.; Community Enterprises Inc.*; the Dennis Group; Filli, LLC d/b/a ConTest Analytical Laboratory; Grand Prix International; HAPHousing (HAP, Inc.)*; Holyoke Chicopee Springfield Head Start Inc.; Human Resources Unlimited Inc.; Kittredge Equipment Co. Inc.*; Lancer Transportation & Logistics and Sulco Warehousing & Logistics; Marcotte Ford Sales Inc.; Multicultural Community Services of the Pioneer Valley Inc.; Northeast Treaters Inc.; P.C. Enterprises Inc. d/b/a Entre Computer; Pathlight Inc.; Sarat Ford-Lincoln; Specialty Bolt & Screw Inc.; Tighe & Bond Inc.; Troy Industries Inc.; United Personnel Services Inc.; Valley Opportunity Council Inc.; WestMass ElderCare Inc.

The 2016 winners in Revenue Growth are: 1. Lavishlyhip, LLC; 2. City Enterprises Inc.*; 3. 3BL Media, LLC; Aegenco Inc.; Aegis Energy Services Inc.*; Bart Truck Equipment, LLC; Baystate Crushing; Charter Oak Insurance & Financial Services*; Courier Express Inc.; Detector Technology Inc.*; Environmental Compliance Services Inc.; Fletcher Sewer & Drain Inc.; Fun Dining Inc. d/b/a Center Square Grill; Gandara Mental Health Center Inc.*; GMH Fence Co. Inc.; Knight Machine Tool Co. Inc.; M. Jags Inc.; Maybury Associates Inc.*; Michael’s Party Rentals Inc.; MicroTek Inc.*; O’Connell Care at Home; Orthotics & Prosthetics Laboratories Inc.; Paragus Strategic IT Inc.; Powervestors II, LLC; Rediker Software Inc.*; Rodrigues Inc.; Tech Roofing Service Inc.; Universal Plastics Corp.*; Webber & Grinnell Insurance Agency Inc.; Yankee Home Improvement.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Time is running out to submit nominations for the Springfield Regional Chamber’s annual Super 60 awards program. The deadline is this Friday, Aug. 12.

Now in its 27th year, the awards program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately owned businesses in the region, which continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. Each year, the program identifies the top-performing companies in revenue growth and total revenue. Last year, total-revenue winners combined for revenues of more than $1 billion, with only-third of winners exceeding revenues of $30 million. All winners in the revenue-growth category had growth in excess of 20% while one-third experienced growth in excess of 65%.

To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire county or be a member of the Springfield Regional Chamber, produce revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and have been in business for at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year.

Companies may be nominated by financial institutions, attorneys, or accountants, or be self-nominated. Companies must submit a nomination form and provide net operating revenue figures for the last three full fiscal years, signed and verified by an independent auditor. All financial information must be reported under generally accepted accounting principles and will be held and considered confidential and not released without prior approval.

Nomination forms are available here or by contacting Kara Cavanaugh at [email protected] or (413) 755-1310.

The Super 60 awards will be presented in partnership with the East of the River Five Town Chamber of Commerce at the annual luncheon and recognition program on Friday, Oct. 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam.

Briefcase Departments

UMass Vaults to Top 30 in Patents Awarded in 2015

BOSTON — In the latest display of its R&D firepower, the University of Massachusetts vaulted to 30th globally in the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents in 2015. Winning a record 62 U.S. patents arising out of faculty inventions, UMass placed third in Massachusetts and New England and was tied for 24th place among American universities. “Our faculty continues to shine with cutting-edge research and innovation that places us in the top tier of universities in the world. They lead us to new frontiers of human understanding, and their work opens the door to a more prosperous economic future,” President Marty Meehan said. “We’re proud of this accomplishment because today’s patent is tomorrow’s job-creating startup technology company.” The patents awarded are based on UMass research in areas as diverse as gene silencing, high-technology textiles, polymers, and nanotechnology, according to Abigail Barrow, interim executive director of the university’s Office of Technology Commercialization and Ventures. The 62 patents represent a 55% increase over the 40 awarded to UMass in the previous year and is the highest number issued in a single calendar year since UMass began its technology-transfer program in 1995, she added. UMass is also a national leader among universities in licensing income earned on its patented inventions. “Congratulations to the University of Massachusetts for making the Top 100 again this year and for an impressive increase,” said Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors, which produces the rankings along with the Intellectual Property Owners Assoc. One of the UMass patents relates to Geckskin, a super-strong adhesive discovered at UMass Amherst that can be used multiple times without losing effectiveness. This year’s top 10 ranked universities worldwide were: the University of California system, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Texas, Tsinghua University (China), California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, and University of Michigan. The rankings are calculated using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. UMass is on pace to match or modestly exceed its record 62 patents in the next report, Barrow said. “Our impressive patent numbers reflect the rapid growth and influence of UMass’ research enterprise and the discovery going on at all of our campuses.” UMass shares the number-30 spot with the University of Utah Research Foundation and the Research Foundation of the State University of New York. The National Academy of Inventors is a nonprofit organization of U.S. and international universities and governmental and nonprofit research institutions with more than 3,000 members. The Intellectual Property Owners Assoc. is a trade association of owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets. This is the fourth year they have collaborated to issue the rankings report.

Springfield Regional Chamber Seeks Super 60 Nominations

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Regional Chamber is seeking nominations for its annual Super 60 awards program. Now in its 27th year, the awards program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately owned businesses in the region, which continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. Each year, the program identifies the top-performing companies in revenue growth and total revenue. Last year, total-revenue winners combined for revenues of more than $1 billion, with only-third of winners exceeding revenues of $30 million. All winners in the revenue-growth category had growth in excess of 20% while one-third experienced growth in excess of 65%. To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire county or be a member of the Springfield Regional Chamber, produce revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and have been in business for at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year. Companies may be nominated by financial institutions, attorneys, or accountants, or be self-nominated. Companies must submit a nomination form and provide net operating revenue figures for the last three full fiscal years, signed and verified by an independent auditor. All financial information must be reported under generally accepted accounting principles and will be held and considered confidential and not released without prior approval. Nomination forms are available here or by contacting Kara Cavanaugh at [email protected] or (413) 755-1310. Nominations must be submitted no later than Friday, Aug. 12. The Super 60 awards will be presented in partnership with the East of the River Five Town Chamber of Commerce at the annual luncheon and recognition program on Friday, Oct. 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam.

Springfield Launches Futurecity Massachusetts

SPRINGFIELD — On Friday, July 15, the Springfield Central Cultural District (SCCD) will be one of three statewide districts to launch Futurecity Massachusetts, a new approach to transforming cities that puts art, culture, and creativity at the center of redevelopment and revitalization. Futurecity Mass is a joint initiative of the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the Boston Foundation. Futurecity Massachusetts will work with mayors, urban planners, and arts and business leaders in Boston, Worcester, and Springfield on key real-estate projects in state-designated cultural districts in the three cities, targeting areas ready for development and job growth. It is the first U.S. effort to advance the strategies of Mark Davy and his London-based Futurecity, which has created more than 200 partnerships across the globe that reposition cultural assets from community amenities to marketplace drivers. Futurecity has been immersed in cultural placemaking projects for more than a decade, and Davy believes Futurecity Massachusetts will secure the Commonwealth’s global position as a cultural leader. Davy will visit Springfield on July 15 to meet and workshop with local cultural and economic-development leaders. He will take knowledge from a walking tour of the Cultural District, an extensive workshop, and a general reception back to his UK team to review. In October, Futurecity will return to present a strategy to the Springfield public. The MCC hopes to eventually expand the program statewide. A press event will take place at 9:30 a.m. on Friday with Davy, MCC Executive Director Anita Walker, Mayor Domenic Sarno, and SCCD Executive Director Morgan Drewniany on the steps of City Hall. Both press and the general public are invited to attend. The Springfield Central Cultural District, which encompasses an area of the metro center of Springfield, is membership-based, involving many of the downtown arts institutions. Its mission is to create and sustain a vibrant cultural environment in Springfield.

Local Business Volunteers Bring JA to Fairview School

CHICOPEE — Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts (JA) and 33 volunteers from area banks, businesses, and colleges teamed up to bring Junior Achievement programs to all 436 students at Fairview School in Chicopee for last month’s JA in a Day event. “This is the sixth year that Chicopee Savings Bank Foundation has sponsored JA in a Day for these students,” noted Jennifer Connolly, president of Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts. “The students and teachers look forward to ending their year with JA, and Junior Achievement looks forward to ending our year with this terrific school. Nowhere else are our JA Volunteers treated to a final assembly with hundreds of cheering students and handmade cards and notes. It is an amazing event.” This year, JA volunteers from Chicopee Savings Bank, Bank of America, Santander Bank, Westfield Bank, Webster Bank, TD Bank, Babson Capital, Elms College, UMass Amherst, and Lead Yourself Youth brought Junior Achievement programs to students in grades K-5 at Fairview School. Carlos DeLeon, a Chicopee Savings Bank volunteer, noted, “the students had a good understanding of how a city runs. They had a great understanding of a savings account, and we talked about how taxes help the city rebuild.” Erika Eisnor, a Santander volunteer who taught JA Our Region in a fourth-grade class, noted that “JA is so much fun and a great learning experience.” Added Kidon Gebersadik from Bank of America, “it’s never too early to learn about good money habits. These exceptional students are learning about building blocks that will lead to more stable financial lives down the road, making our communities and local economies stronger.” Tim Dominick, a teacher at Fairview School, explained that the program “further offered the students a chance to explore their creative thinking process. The students benefited from the teamwork and problem solving the program offered.” JA programs empower students to make a connection between what they learn in school and how it can be applied in the real world, enhancing the relevance of their classroom learning and increasing their understanding of the value of staying in school. Each year, JA reaches more than 10 million students worldwide and helps them develop successful financial-management habits, empowering them to explore the potential of becoming an entrepreneur and providing them with the skills necessary to succeed in a global workforce. Locally, Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts reaches more than 11,000 students.

Baker Signs Transgender Anti-discrimination Law

BOSTON — Gov. Charlie Baker signed into law an anti-discrimination bill, previously passed by the state House and Senate, that gives transgender people the right to use public restrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identities, regardless of their sex at birth. The Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination will adopt policies to enforce its provisions, a statement from the governor’s office said. “No one should be discriminated against in Massachusetts because of their gender identity,” Baker said, according to CNN. “This compromise legislation extends additional protections to the Commonwealth’s transgender community, and includes language to address the public-safety concerns expressed by some by requiring the attorney general to issue regulations to protect against people abusing the law.”

Area Business Leaders to Head to Capitol Hill

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Regional Chamber will hold its biannual Washington Symposium on September 21-23 hosted by U.S. Rep. Richard Neal. This popular event brings the region’s business leaders to Washington, D.C. to listen to and question some of the country’s most influential leaders, including members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, top federal policy makers, and members of the Obama Administration in its last months in office. Past speakers have included political strategist Stan Greenberg, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, U.S. Rep. John Lewis, U.S. Sen. Edward Markey, House Ways and Means Chair David Camp, U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisors Jason Furman, and Ireland’s Ambassador to the U.S. Anne Anderson. Registrations are limited and include air transportation, airport parking, hotel transfers, hotel accommodations at the Phoenix Park Hotel within walking distance to the Capitol, breakfast and lunch each day, and welcome and closing evening receptions. The reservation deadline is Friday, Aug. 5, and no refunds will be granted after that date. The all-inclusive cost is $1,395 (single) or $1,270 (per person, double occupancy) if made by Friday, July 15. Reservations made after July 15 will increase to $1,495 (single) or $1,370 (per person, double occupancy). Sponsorship opportunities are also available and include complimentary attendance. For reservations or more information, visit www.springfieldregionalchamber.com or e-mail Nancy Creed at [email protected]

BTCF HousingUs Initiative Issues RFP

SHEFFIELD — Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation’s HousingUs initiative is soliciting proposals from nonprofits, community organizations, and public agencies to plan and convene outreach activities that bring residents together to explore the interrelated issues of affordable housing, economic development, and town-center vitality. Grants of up to $10,000 will be available for projects that result in action-oriented community-development strategies or create broader public awareness of the elements of healthy and resilient communities, including the availability of affordable housing. Only collaborative proposals with one lead applicant and at least one other partner will be considered. Organizations serving Berkshire County, Mass.; Columbia County and Northeast Dutchess County, N.Y.; and Northwest Litchfield County, Conn., are eligible. The deadline for submitting proposals is Friday, Aug. 26. For more information, visit www.berkshiretaconic.org/housingus.

AMA Recognizes Benefits of Paid Sick Leave

CHICAGO — The American Medical Assoc. (AMA) recently adopted new policy recognizing the public-health benefits of paid sick leave and other discretionary time off. Citing a growing body of evidence that lack of access to paid sick leave results in the spread of infectious diseases, as well as delayed screenings, diagnoses, and treatment, the new AMA policies support paid sick leave, as well as unpaid sick leave, for employees to care for themselves or a family member. “With both dual-earner and single-parent households on the rise in the United States, it is increasingly challenging for workers to juggle family and work,” said former AMA board chair Dr. Barbara McAneny. “Workers without paid sick days are more likely to work sick and are more likely to delay needed medical care, which can lead to prolonged illness and worsen otherwise minor health issues. Lack of paid leave also has a ripple effect across a worker’s family. Paid sick leave has been shown to aid children’s health, shorten hospital stays, and reduce the risk of disease transmission by allowing parents to stay home with sick children. Paid sick leave keeps our homes, offices, and communities healthier while ensuring the family’s economic security.” The U.S. is the only industrialized nation without a federal family-leave law that guarantees workers may receive pay while taking time to care for themselves or their family. Although the Family and Medical Leave Act mandates that companies provide leave, the law does not require that it be paid. The AMA also reaffirmed existing policy supporting voluntary leave policies that provide employees with job security and the continued availability of health-plan benefits in the event that leave becomes necessary due to medical conditions.

Rep. Neal Releases Rail Study for Northern New England

SPRINGFIELD — U.S. Rep. Richard Neal, dean of the New England congressional delegation, held a press conference in Springfield last week to release the Northern New England Intercity Rail Initiative (NNEIRI), a study funded by the Federal Railroad Administration and requested by Neal and former U.S. Rep. John Olver to identify and improve rail service in the region, including Springfield to Boston. NNEIRI is a conceptual planning study that examines the benefits, opportunities, and impacts of adding more frequent and higher-speed inter-city passenger rail service on two rail corridors, the inland route and the Boston-to-Montreal route. The inland route would run between Boston and New Haven, Conn. via Springfield. The Boston-to-Montreal route would run between Boston and Montreal, Quebec via Springfield. The two routes would share the trackage between Boston and Springfield. The combination of these two rail routes defines the study area that is collectively identified as the NNEIRI Corridor. “More than 2 million people live within three miles of a station along this corridor,” said FRA Administrator Sarah Feinberg. “For everyone to move safely and efficiently, this region needs a robust rail system, and this blueprint will help achieve that goal.”

Report Details State Residents without Insurance Coverage

BOSTON — The Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation released a new report, “Massachusetts Residents without Health Insurance Coverage: Understanding Those at Risk of Long-term Uninsurance.” Massachusetts currently has the lowest uninsurance rate in the nation, and as part of the individual mandate to carry health insurance coverage, the state collects detailed information through its tax-filing process about the health-insurance status of more than 4 million residents. This report analyzes 2011 and 2012 state-tax-filer data and provides new information about Massachusetts residents who are prone to remaining uninsured over consecutive years. The findings can help inform stakeholders who want to maintain the state’s low uninsurance rate and strive to lower the number of individuals without health-insurance coverage. Prepared by Michael Chin of UMass Medical School and Audrey Gasteier of the Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority, the analyses in this report represent the first time that tax-filer data is being used to quantify the state’s uninsured population over a period of two consecutive calendar years. No other state has such detailed information on its residents’ insurance status.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Regional Chamber is seeking nominations for its annual Super 60 awards program.

Now in its 27th year, the awards program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately owned businesses in the region, which continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. Each year, the program identifies the top-performing companies in revenue growth and total revenue. Last year, total-revenue winners combined for revenues of more than $1 billion, with only-third of winners exceeding revenues of $30 million. All winners in the revenue-growth category had growth in excess of 20% while one-third experienced growth in excess of 65%.

To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire county or be a member of the Springfield Regional Chamber, produce revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and have been in business for at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year.

Companies may be nominated by financial institutions, attorneys, or accountants, or be self-nominated. Companies must submit a nomination form and provide net operating revenue figures for the last three full fiscal years, signed and verified by an independent auditor. All financial information must be reported under generally accepted accounting principles and will be held and considered confidential and not released without prior approval.

Nomination forms are available here or by contacting Kara Cavanaugh at [email protected] or (413) 755-1310. Nominations must be submitted no later than Friday, Aug. 12.

The Super 60 awards will be presented in partnership with the East of the River Five Town Chamber of Commerce at the annual luncheon and recognition program on Friday, Oct. 28 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam.

Daily News

WILBRAHAM — Jules Gaudreau, third-generation owner of the Gaudreau Group, was recently inducted as president of his industry’s national trade organization, the National Assoc. of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA).

“It will be a great privilege and responsibility to lead an association of over 42,000 professionals who help American families achieve financial security. I look forward to advocating on their behalf in Washington and throughout the country as I have done for over 25 years here in Massachusetts,” Gaudreau said.

Founded in 1890 as the National Assoc. of Life Underwriters, NAIFA is one of the nation’s oldest and largest associations representing the interests of insurance professionals and financial advisors across the U.S. NAIFA is the only organization that serves and represents insurance and financial advisors regardless of the products they sell or the focus of their practice. Members include insurance agents, financial advisors, multi-line agents, and health-insurance and employee-benefits specialists. NAIFA’s mission is to advocate for a positive legislative and regulatory environment, enhance business and professional skills, and promote the ethical conduct of its members.

The Gaudreau Group, launched in 1921, is one of the largest independently owned insurance agencies in the Northeast. This family-owned business was originally founded by Oscar Gaudreau, and today serves more than 6,000 families and businesses across 14 states with a broad range of insurance and financial products. A perpetual Super 60 Winner, it was recently honored with the Reader Raves award from the Republican as the region’s best insurance agency. The Gaudreau Group and its affiliated wealth-management firm, Gaudreau-Wealth New England, employs 30 professionals, including the next generation, Jules Gaudreau III.

Gaudreau is a member of the Million Dollar Round Table and a Top of the Table qualifier. He is also past president of both the state and local affiliates of NAIFA, and past president of Independent Insurance Agents of Hampden County and the Estate Planning Council of Hampden County.

Gaudreau has served as president of numerous community organizations, including the Wilbraham Rotary Club and the Wilbraham Nature and Cultural Center. He also chaired the annual scholarship campaign for the YMCA of Greater Springfield, and encourages his employees to serve on nonprofit boards as well.

“In my position, I am able to help individuals when they are most vulnerable, many times suffering a business or personal loss,” he said. “It is in our enlightened self-interest to make our area a better place to work and live.”

Daily News

WILBRAHAM — Jules Gaudreau, president of the Gaudreau Group in Wilbraham, was recently inducted as president of his industry’s national trade organization, the National Assoc. of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA).

“It will be a great privilege and responsibility to lead an association of over 42,000 professionals who help American families achieve financial security,” Gaudreau said. “I look forward to advocating on their behalf in Washington and throughout the country as I have done for over 25 years here in Massachusetts.”

One of the nation’s oldest and largest associations representing the interests of insurance professionals and financial advisors, NAIFA is the only organization that serves and represents insurance and financial advisors regardless of the products they sell or the focus of their practice. Members include insurance agents, financial advisors, multi-line agents, and health-insurance and employee-benefits specialists. NAIFA’s mission is to advocate for a positive legislative and regulatory environment, enhance business and professional skills, and promote the ethical conduct of its members.

The Gaudreau Group, founded in 1921, is one of the largest independently owned insurance agencies in the Northeast, serving more than 6,000 families and businesses across 14 states with a broad range of insurance and financial products. A perpetual Super 60 winner, it was recently honored in the Reader Raves awards from the Republican as the region’s best insurance agency. The Gaudreau Group and its affiliated wealth-management firm, Gaudreau-Wealth New England, employs 30 professionals.

“In my position, I am able to help individuals when they are most vulnerable, many times suffering a business or personal loss,” Gaudreau said. “It is in our enlightened self-interest to make our area a better place to work and live.”

Briefcase Departments

Difference Makers Nominations Due Nov. 20

WESTERN MASS. — Do you know someone who is truly making a difference in the Western Mass. region? BusinessWest invites you to nominate an individual or group for its eighth annual Difference Makers program. Nominations for the class of 2016 must be received by the end of the business day (5 p.m.) on Friday, Nov. 20. Nominations can be completed online by visiting HERE and clicking ‘Our Events.’ Difference Makers was launched in 2009 as a way to recognize the contributions of agencies and individuals who are contributing to quality of life in this region.

East of the River 5 Town Chamber Goes Independent

LONGMEADOW — The East of the River 5 Town Chamber of Commerce (ERC5) officially become an independent organization last month, following the merger of the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield and the Springfield Chamber of Commerce, now known as the Springfield Regional Chamber (SRC). The leadership of the ERC5 decided that dissolving its board and sharing its financial resources with a Springfield-based organization was not in the best interest of its membership. Instead, the 24-person board voted unanimously to maintain its independence and continue as a business association serving the towns of Longmeadow, East Longmeadow, Wilbraham, Hampden, and Ludlow. “When the ERC5 board met, all options were considered. In the end, it was clear that the businesses of our member towns needed and deserved direct representation,” said Dennis Lopata, ERC5 president. The ERC5 will continue its long-standing partnerships with the Western Mass. Economic Development Council and the newly formed SRC. For instance, the ERC5 will maintain a position on the SRC board and continue its partnership with the SRC on its three large regional events: Operation Outlook, the Beacon Hill Summit, and Super 60. Additionally, the ERC5 will hold three seats on the SRC legislative committee and offer a regional discount to its membership for those who would like to enjoy memberships with both organizations. “Our board has worked hard to strike a balance between independence and maintaining a partnership with the Springfield Regional Chamber,” said Lopata. “Although it’s important that our membership get direct representation in their respective towns, it’s also important that we continue to support efforts at the regional level. We believe our arrangement … does just that.” Added First Vice Chair Edward Zemba, “there has never been a more exciting time to be a part of the ERC5. This will be the first time in over 20 years that the ERC5 membership will have its own executive director. The membership will now have someone working exclusively on their behalf to ensure that they share in all of the benefits coming from the economic development taking place within our region.”

UMass President Praises Legislators for Funding Contracts

BOSTON — UMass President Marty Meehan praised the Massachusetts House for approving funding for UMass labor contracts when it passed a supplemental budget this week. “We appreciate the strong support that the University of Massachusetts continues to receive from the House of Representatives and commend Speaker Robert DeLeo, Ways and Means Committee Chairman Brian Dempsey, and all members of the House for making a critical difference for the university that makes a difference in the lives of so many of our citizens,” Meehan said. The $360 million supplemental budget approved by the House includes $10.9 million in funding of labor contracts with faculty and staff working in the UMass system. “This kind of support allows us to recruit and retain faculty members who are among the very best in their fields and who make us the world-class academic and research institution that the Commonwealth deserves and needs,” Meehan added. The House action comes at a time when enrollment throughout the UMass system continues to rise, reaching a record 73,700, according to fall 2015 projections. Meanwhile, recent Thomson Reuters rankings place UMass as the 57th-most innovative university in the world, and the new World University Rankings rate UMass as the number-one public university in New England, the 24th-best public university in the U.S, and among the best universities in the world. The $10.9 million approved by the House would fully fund the first year of three-year contracts, covering 6,500 faculty and staff across the UMass system, the terms of which were prescribed by the Patrick administration. The salary increases were to have gone into effect during the 2014-15 fiscal year, but were delayed until Meehan authorized their payment last month, saying he intended to seek offsetting funding in the budget bill pending before the Legislature. The supplemental budget containing the funding for UMass now moves to the Senate for consideration.

Daily News

LONGMEADOW — The East of the River 5 Town Chamber of Commerce (ERC5) officially become an independent organization last month, following the merger of the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield and the Springfield Chamber of Commerce, now known as the Springfield Regional Chamber (SRC).

The leadership of the ERC5 decided that dissolving its board and sharing its financial resources with a Springfield-based organization was not in the best interest of its membership. Instead, the 24-person board voted unanimously to maintain its independence and continue as a business association serving the towns of Longmeadow, East Longmeadow, Wilbraham, Hampden, and Ludlow.

“When the ERC5 board met, all options were considered. In the end, it was clear that the businesses of our member towns needed and deserved direct representation,” said Dennis Lopata, ERC5 president.

The ERC5 will continue its long-standing partnerships with the Western Mass. Economic Development Council and the newly formed SRC. For instance, the ERC5 will maintain a position on the SRC board and continue its partnership with the SRC on its three large regional events: Operation Outlook, the Beacon Hill Summit, and Super 60. Additionally, the ERC5 will hold three seats on the SRC legislative committee and offer a regional discount to its membership for those who would like to enjoy memberships with both organizations.

“Our board has worked hard to strike a balance between independence and maintaining a partnership with the Springfield Regional Chamber,” said Lopata. “Although it’s important that our membership get direct representation in their respective towns, it’s also important that we continue to support efforts at the regional level. We believe our arrangement … does just that.”

Added First Vice Chair Edward Zemba, “there has never been a more exciting time to be a part of the ERC5. This will be the first time in over 20 years that the ERC5 membership will have its own executive director. The membership will now have someone working exclusively on their behalf to ensure that they share in all of the benefits coming from the economic development taking place within our region.”

For more information, contact ERC5 Executive Director Shannon Bliven at (413) 575-7230 or visit www.erc5.com.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield (ACCGS) is seeking nominations for its annual Super 60 awards program, sponsored by Berkshire Bank and WWLP-TV 22. All nominations must be received by the ACCGS no later than midnight on Friday, Aug. 14.

Now in its 26th year, the awards program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately owned businesses in the region, which continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. Each year, the program identifies the top-performing companies in revenue growth and total revenue.

Last year, total-revenue winners combined for revenues of more than $1 billion with average revenue of more than $35 million. One-third of the winners in the revenue-growth category experienced growth in excess of 50%, with the average growth of all the honorees in that category at more than 49%.

To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire county or be a member of the ACCGS, have produced revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and have been in business for at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year.

Companies may be nominated by financial institutions, attorneys, or accountants, or be self-nominated. Companies must submit a nomination form and provide net-operating-revenue figures for the last three full fiscal years, signed and verified by an independent auditor. All financial information must be reported under generally accepted accounting principles and will be held and considered confidential and not released without prior approval.

Nomination forms are available by contacting Kara Cavanaugh at [email protected] or (413) 755-1310.

The Super 60 awards will be presented at the annual luncheon and recognition program on Oct. 23 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam.

Company Notebook Departments

United Personnel Earns Champions of Hope Award
SPRINGFIELD — United Personnel received the Champions of Hope Award at the 93rd United Way Annual Celebration & Meeting at Chez Josef in Agawam. The Champions of Hope Award is given to a local organization that demonstrates commitment and drive to support various community-based initiatives. The recipient of this award is recognized for its commitment to community relationships and initiative. “We are so honored to receive the Champions of Hope Award, and appreciate being part of various community initiatives, including the work of the United Way, to make Western Massachusetts a great place to live and work for all in our region,” said United Personnel President Tricia Canavan. Founded in 1984, United Personnel connects more than 700 people with jobs throughout Western Mass. and beyond. From temporary and contract work to direct-hire placement, United provides clients with staffing solutions in a variety of industries and fields, including professional, administrative, medical, and light-industrial placement and vendor-on-premise project management. A local, woman-owned business, United Personnel has received various awards throughout its history, including Champions of Hope from United Way, Businesswoman of Distinction Award from Pioneer Valley Girl Scouts, Inner City 100 list by Inc. magazine, list of 500 Fastest-Growing Privately Held Companies in America by Inc. magazine, Super 60/Fabulous 50 Away by the Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce, and Top 100 Woman-Led Businesses in Massachusetts from Babson College and Commonwealth Institute.

Greenfield Savings, Baystate Franklin Auxiliary Boost BFMC Campaign
GREENFIELD — The “Keeping Care Local” campaign for Baystate Franklin Medical Center, now underway to raise community support for the hospital’s new surgery building, received a recent boost with two large pledges of support. Greenfield Savings Bank made a commitment of $250,000, and the Baystate Franklin Auxiliary pledged $200,000 to the campaign. These gifts bring the total raised to date to $3.5 million, with the campaign well on track toward reaching its $5 million goal. In thanking these two major donors, campaign co-chair Robbie Cohn noted that their gifts and others are a clear reflection of the community’s confidence in its local hospital. “We have a wonderful opportunity to make our community even better as we work together to raise the funds that will raise the building and provide state-of-the-art surgical suites. This facility will help us keep our fine surgeons who are already on staff, while attracting additional new doctors to Franklin County so that we can offer the best possible patient care.” John Howland, president of Greenfield Savings Bank, added that “Baystate Franklin Medical Center serves as a cornerstone of our community. Having a strong, local hospital improves the quality of services where we live and enhances the long-term health of the Franklin County community. The responsibility of supporting this fine institution rests on all of us, individuals and businesses alike. We see this contribution as an investment in the continuing well-being of our neighbors, and in the bright future we envision for Greenfield and Franklin County.” Speaking for the Baystate Franklin Auxiliary, President Diane Grybko explained that the auxiliary’s purpose is to support the hospital with funds raised through its gift shop, sales, and other events. “Our families and friends have all been touched by Baystate Franklin, and everyone in our community will benefit from this new surgery facility,” she said. “Some of our volunteers, who serve as greeters for patients and families here for day surgery, were actually involved in its planning. So this is a very personal investment for us, and one we are proud to make.” The “Keeping Care Local” campaign has more than 30 volunteers working toward reaching the $5 million goal. They are meeting with friends and neighbors throughout the area to share information and raise people’s awareness about services now available at Baystate Franklin Medical Center, plans for the hospital’s future, and how to get involved. The overall cost of building and equipping the new surgical wing at Baystate Franklin Medical Center is $26 million, with Baystate Health committing $21 million through capital and bonds. To learn about the project and campaign, call Kelli Rafferty Barry, Philanthropy officer, at (413) 773-2763.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield (ACCGS) is seeking nominations for its annual Super 60 awards program, sponsored by Berkshire Bank and WWLP-TV 22.

Now in its 26th year, the awards program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately owned businesses in the region. Each year, the program identifies the top-performing companies in revenue growth and total revenue. Last year, total revenue winners combined for revenues of over $1 billion with an average revenue of more than $35 million. One-third of the winners in the revenue-growth category experienced growth in excess of 50%, with the average growth of all the honorees in that category at more than 49%.

To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire county or be a member of the ACCGS, report revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately owned company, and have been in business for at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year.

Companies may be nominated by financial institutions, attorneys, or accountants, or be self-nominated. Companies must submit a nomination form and provide net-operating-revenue figures for the last three full fiscal years, signed and verified by an independent auditor. All financial information must be reported under generally accepted accounting principles and will be held and considered confidential and not released without prior approval.

Nomination forms are available by contacting Kara Cavanaugh at [email protected] or (413) 755-1310. Nominations must be submitted no later than Aug. 14.

The Super 60 awards will be presented at the annual luncheon and recognition program on Oct. 23 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — United Personnel received the Champions of Hope Award at the 93rd United Way Annual Celebration & Meeting at Chez Josef in Agawam.

The Champions of Hope Award is given to a local organization that demonstrates commitment and drive to support various community-based initiatives. The recipient of this award is recognized for its commitment to community relationships and initiative.

“We are so honored to receive the Champions of Hope Award, and appreciate being part of various community initiatives, including the work of the United Way, to make Western Massachusetts a great place to live and work for all in our region,” said United Personnel President Tricia Canavan.

Founded in 1984, United Personnel connects more than 700 people with jobs throughout Western Mass. and beyond. From temporary and contract work to direct-hire placement, United provides clients with staffing solutions in a variety of industries and fields, including professional, administrative, medical, and light-industrial placement and vendor-on-premise project management.

A local, woman-owned business, United Personnel has received various awards throughout its history, including Champions of Hope from United Way, Businesswoman of Distinction Award from Pioneer Valley Girl Scouts, Inner City 100 list by Inc. magazine, list of 500 Fastest-Growing Privately Held Companies in America by Inc. magazine, Super 60/Fabulous 50 Away by the Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce, and Top 100 Woman-Led Businesses in Massachusetts from Babson College and Commonwealth Institute.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Maura McCaffrey, HNE president & CEO and Mark Keroack, MD, Baystate Health president &
CEO, announced that welcome Carol Campbell and Howard Trietsch, MD have been named to the HNE Board of Directors. Campbell is the president of Chicopee Industrial Contractors, Inc., a company she founded in 1992. She is a member of the Board of Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Chicopee Chamber of Commerce, WestMass Area Development Corporation, and the Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts. She has a distinguished record of community service and leadership, and was recognized as the 2014 Woman of the Year by the Professional Women’s Chamber. She has previously been recognized as a Top 100 Women-led Businesses in Massachusetts, Business of the Year by the Chicopee Chamber of Commerce, a Super 60 Business Growth recipient and a Paul Harris Rotary International honoree. Campbell holds several industry licenses and certifications and is a graduate of University of Massachusetts.

Trietsch is a full-time attending physician at Baystate Ob/Gyn Group Inc., where he has served as managing partner since 1990. Trietsch recently completed his term on the Baystate Health Board of Trustees. He also serves on the BHIC Board and the Baycare Board of Directors, and is well recognized as a local physician leader. Trietsch is a member of many medical societies and serves on community boards including the Springfield Jewish Community Center, the Jewish Geriatric Services and the Jewish Federation of Western Mass. “Ms. Campbell and Dr. Trietsch are both accomplished professionals and exemplary stewards of our community. HNE’s mission is to improve the health status and overall quality of health of our regions,” said McCaffrey. “We are pleased to welcome them to our board and look forward to their contributions to help us fulfill our mission.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield (ACCGS) will stage its 25th annual Super 60 recognition celebration on Friday, Nov. 14 at Chez Josef in Agawam. The event’s keynote speaker will be John Maguire, president and CEO of Friendly’s, LLC. The program starts at 11 a.m. with a VIP reception for honorees in the Tivoli Room. Lunch will begin at noon, followed by the keynote speech and the awards presentation. For more information or to order tickets, call the chamber at (413) 787-1555.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield is seeking nominations for its annual Super 60 awards program. Now in its 25th year, Super 60, formerly the Fabulous 50, celebrates the success of the fastest-growing and privately owned businesses in the region that continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. Each year, the program identifies the top-performing companies in revenue growth and total revenue. Last year, one-third of the winners in the revenue growth category experienced growth in excess of 50% with the average growth of all the honorees in that category at more than 49%. Total revenue winners combined for revenues of more than $1 billion, with an average revenue of more than $35 million. To be considered, companies must be based in Hampden or Hampshire county or be a member of the ACCGS, have produced revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year, be an independent and privately-owned company, and be in business for at least three full years. Companies are selected based on their percentage of revenue growth over a full three-year period or total revenues for the latest fiscal year. Companies may be nominated by financial institutions, attorneys, or accountants, or be self-nominated. Companies must submit a nomination form and provide net operating revenue figures for the last three full fiscal years, signed and verified by an independent auditor. All financial information must be reported under generally accepted accounting principles and will be held and considered confidential and not released without prior approval. Nomination forms are available by contacting Kara Cavanaugh at [email protected] or (413) 755-1310. Nominations must be submitted no later than Sept. 5. The Super 60 awards will be presented at the annual luncheon and recognition program on Nov. 7, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam.

Departments Picture This

Send photos with a caption and contact information to:  ‘Picture This’ c/o BusinessWest Magazine, 1441 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103 or to [email protected]

Scientific Reality

ElmsSciBuildingMore than 100 Elms College students and faculty members attended a dedication ceremony last month for the school’s new 22,000-square-foot Center for Natural and Health Sciences (CNHS). The facility includes a research laboratory, multiple lecture halls, and several other labs for biology, chemistry, and nursing. Pictured at the ceremony are, from left, Paul Stelzer, vice chair of the Board of Trustees; Maxyne Schneider, SSJ, president of the congregation Sisters of Saint Joseph, Springfield; William Lyons III, CNHS Committee co-chair; the Most Rev. Timothy McDonnell, D.D., Bishop of Springfield; Cynthia Lyons, CNHS Committee co-chair; Elms President, Mary Reap; and Walter Breau, vice president of Academic Affairs.

Rays of Hope

20131020RaysofHopeWalk-181120131020RaysofHopeWalk2168The 2013 Rays of Hope Walk-A Walk and Run Toward the Cure of Breast Cancer, staged Oct. 20 in Forest Park in Springfield and Energy Park in Greenfield, raised $750,000 and celebrated a few milestones. This year marked the 20th year for the walk, which was created to raise funds to improve the breast health of the people in local communities with quality and compassion in partnership with Baystate Health Breast Network. The day also marked the five-year anniversary of the Franklin County event, and the fourth year for the Annual Run in Springfield. This year’s walkers and runners added to the nearly $12 million that has been raised by Rays of Hope since its inception. At top are Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny, Warner Bros. mascots from Six Flags New England, and below, are some of the 24,000 participants walking at Forest Park.

Celebrating the Super 60

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The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield staged its annual Super 60 luncheon on Oct. 25 at Chez Josef in Agawam, an event that celebrates the region’s top-performing companies in the categories of total revenue and revenue growth. Top to bottom, left, David Mahan, estimator and sales manager of Mahan Slate Roofing Co. in Springfield, the top finisher in the revenue growth category, receives the company’s plaque from Maura McCaffrey, left, chief operating officer of Health New England, the program’s presenting sponsor, and Meghan Sullivan, a partner with the law firm Sullivan Hayes & Quinn, a platinum sponsor; Scott Berg, center, associate Vice President for Development at Springfield College, the top performer in the total revenue category, receives the school’s plaque from McCaffrey and Glenn Welch, president of Hampden Bank; Jessica Montana, left, and Angie Gregory, principals with Simple Diaper and Linen, present the luncheon’s keynote address; a sellout crowd takes in the proceedings.
(Photographs courtesy of Ed Cohen)

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

Oct. 9: Lunch ‘n’ Learn, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at One Financial Plaza Community Room, 1350 Main St., Springfield. The program, “Birds Tweet, but Should You? Is Social Media Right for Your Business?” will discuss strategies behind using social media, determining your return on investment and tips on how to best deploy social media to your advantage. Reservations are $20 for members, $30 for general admission, and includes networking time and a boxed lunch. Reservations may be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com or by calling Cecile Larose at (413) 755-1313.

Oct. 24: A Chocolate Affair, 6-9 p.m., at Chez Josef in Agawam. Indulge yourself in chocolate, shopping, and networking. Presented by the Professional Women’s Chamber, an affiliate of the ACCGS. Exhibitor space is $70. Reservations to attend are $40. Reservations may be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com or by calling Cecile Larose at (413) 755-1313.

Oct. 25: Super 60, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Chez Josef in Agawam. Celebrate the region’s top-performing companies. Now, in its 24th year, this awards program celebrates the success of the fastest-growing privately owned businesses in the region that continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. Presented by Health New England with support from Hampden Bank, Sullivan Hayes & Quinn, the Republican, and WWLP-TV 22. Reservations are $50 for members, $70 for general admission. Reservations may be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com or by contacting Cecile Larose at (413) 755-1313.

AMHERST AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700

Oct. 18: Legislative Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., at the Lord Jeffery Inn. Sponsored by Western Massachusetts Electric Co. Admission: $15 for members, $20 for non-members.

GREATER EASTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

Oct. 8: Mayoral Forum, 6 p.m., Eastworks Meeting Space, Suite 160, 116 Pleasant St., Easthampton. Learn about the Easthampton mayoral candidates’ views on business and their plans for the future of Easthampton. Free and open to the public.

Oct. 10: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange, 5-7 p.m. Hosted and sponsored by Cernak Buick, 102 Northampton St., Easthampton. Hors d’ouevres, beer, and wine available. Door prizes. Tickets: $5 for members, $15 for future members.

Oct. 15: GRIST — Get Real Individual Support Today, 9-10 a.m. at the Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce, 33 Union St., Easthampton. The GRIST group is a free member benefit, an ongoing small group of folks who meet regularly to share ideas and get advice on the daily challenges of running a successful business. RSVP to group leaders Derek Allard at [email protected] or (413) 282-9957, or Fran Fahey at [email protected] or (413) 529-1189. Free to chamber members and future members.

Oct. 21: Celebrity Bartenders Night, 6-9 p.m., at Opa-Opa Steakhouse & Brewery, 169 College Highway, Southampton. Join us for a night of fun with local celebrities mixing drinks. Tips benefit the chamber’s holiday lighting fund. Raffles and more fun. Admission: free.

HOLYOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

Oct. 9: Autumn Business Breakfast, 7:30-9 a.m., at the Log Cabin. Sponsored by the Republican and Holyoke Medical Center. Recognizing new members, business milestones, and networking breakfast meeting. Cost: members, $22 in advance, $28 at the door. Call the chamber at (413) 534-3376 to sign up.
Oct. 16: Chamber After Hours, 5-7 p.m., at the Center for Health Education, 404 Jarvis Ave., Holyoke (former Grynn & Barrett Studios). Business networking event to take place at HCC’s newest education facility. Networking, 50/50 raffle, and door prizes. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for the public. Call the chamber at (413) 534-3376 to sign up.

Oct. 22: Social Media with Constant Contact Workshop, 8:30-10:30 a.m., at the Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce, Executive Conference Room, 177 High St., Holyoke. Sponsored by PeoplesBank and the Republican. This information-packed seminar offers a basic review of the essential strategies and best practices a business or organization should understand to successfully get started with social-media marketing. Admission is free. Brought to you by Constant Contact. For reservations, call the chamber office at (413) 534-3376.

Oct. 30: Manufacturing Breakfast, 7:30-9:30 a.m., at the Wherehouse, 109 Lyman St., Holyoke. For reservations, call the chamber office at (413) 534-3376.

MASSACHUSETTS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.massachusettschambersofcommerce.com
(413) 525-2506

Nov. 12: Massachusetts Chamber of Commerce Annual Meeting & Awards Luncheon, 9 a.m. registration, at the DoubleTree, Westborough. For more information on ticket sales and sponsorship opportunities, call the chamber office at (413) 525-2506 or e-mail [email protected]

GREATER NORTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

Oct. 8: Business to Customer Marketing Workshop: “On-the-spot Marketing Tips for Increasing Foot Traffic,” 1-3 p.m. Hosted and sponsored by the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce. Presented by the Creative Marketing Group. The Creative Marketing Group will meet with you and your fellow retail business owners and managers at our conference-room table, listen to your marketing and communications concerns, and help you brainstorm practical, professional solutions on the spot. Learn more about how to strategize, advertise, brand, and promote your business, reach the media, and maximize your message in person, in print, and online. Cost: free, but pre-registration is required, and space is limited. To register, contact Esther at [email protected]

Oct. 22: Business to Business Marketing Workshop, 3:30-5 p.m., at the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce. Cost: free, but pre-registration is required, and space is limited. To register, contact Esther at [email protected]

Nov. 6: [email protected] Chamber Networking Event, 5-7 p.m. Hosted by the World War II Club. Sponsors: Homeward Vets. Catered by Big Kats Catering. The chamber will be collecting donations for Homeward Vets. A list of needed donations will be posted on its website. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. RSVP to Esther at [email protected]

WEST OF THE RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.ourwrc.com
(413) 426-3880

Oct. 10: West Springfield Mayoral Debate, 6-8 p.m., at West Springfield City Hall. Event is open to the public and free for both members and non-members. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880 or e-mail [email protected]

Oct. 17: Business with Bacon, 7-9 a.m., at Crestview Country Club. Speaker: Gaming Commissioner Bruce Stebbins. Cost: $25 for chamber members, $30 for non-members. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880, or e-mail [email protected]

Oct. 23: Business to Business Expo, hosted by the West of the River Chamber, the North Central CT Chamber, the Bradley Regional Chamber, and the East Windsor Chamber, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Hosted by Holiday Inn, Enfield. Cost: $100 for a six-foot table if you are a member of any chamber and pay in full by Sept. 27, or $150 for a six-foot table if you are not a member of any chamber or do not pay in full by Sept. 27. For more information, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880, or email [email protected]

GREATER WESTFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

Oct. 9: October WestNet Connection, 5-7 p.m., at East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield. An evening of networking; don’t forget your business cards. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and cocktails. Walk-ins are welcome. Tickets: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members. To register, call Pam Bussell at the chamber office at (413) 568-1618, or e-mail [email protected]

Departments Picture This

Send photos with a caption and contact information to:  ‘Picture This’ c/o BusinessWest Magazine, 1441 Main Street, Springfield, MA 01103 or to [email protected]

Barometer of Business

The 23rd annual Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield Super 60 awards luncheon was held recently at Chez Josef to celebrate the success of privately owned businesses that continue to make significant contributions to the strength of the regional economy. From top to bottom: Art Jasper, left, sales manager at Johnstone Supply, and Alan Stearley, financial advisor at the Gaudreau Group; Dr. Henry Julio East-Trou, center, executive director of Gandara Mental Health Center, accepts a Super 60 award for revenue from Luke Kettles, left, senior vice president at Hampden Bank, and Juan Campbell, vice president of sales at Health New England; Danielle Lord, vice president of operations at O’Connell Professional Nurse Service, accepts the award for overall growth alongside Campbell and Gordon Quinn, principal at Sullivan, Hayes & Quinn; from left, Lynn Ostrowski, director of Brand & Corporate Relations at Health New England, Pat Scheer, director of Quality Operations at Health New England, Michael Scheer, flooring contractor and consultant at Dimauro Carpet & Tile, and Peter Straley, president and CEO of Health New England; guest speaker Greg Bialecki, secretary of the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, addresses the gathering; keynote speaker Stanley Kowalski III, chairman of the board for FloDesign Inc. and founder of FloDesign Wind Turbine, speaks about the misses his ideas experienced before his current success and new ventures.

 









































Super Model

Mike Balise, right, vice president of Balise Motor Sales, poses with Timothy Cardillo, general manager of Balise Lexus, at an unveiling of the new ES350 model at the dealership late last month. The event drew several dozen customers and potential customers to the facility on Riverdale Street in West Springfield.











Groundbreaking Event

Balise Ford in Wilbraham staged an elaborate groundbreaking ceremony for a new dealership on Wilbraham Road late last month. The 27,000-square-foot facility, which will feature 16 service bays and a QuickLane service center, is expected to open next spring. Seen here with ceremonial shovels in front of several Ford officials, are, from left, Hal Dewsnap, Ford regional manager; Michael Balise, vice president of Balise Motor Sales; and Wilbraham selectmen Robert Russell and Robert Bollard.

 

A Grand Opening

Laplante Construction hosted a reception on Oct. 18 to celebrate the opening of its new offices at 94 Maple St., East Longmeadow. The new, fully leased commercial building was designed with a residential look, and is also occupied by Northstar Recycling, M. Scott Investments, and Robert M. Phelan. From top to bottom: Bill Laplante, president of Laplante Construction; Paul Tierney, senior vice president of United Bank; and Brad Campbell, executive director of the Home Builders Assoc. of Western Mass.; Andy Crane, president of A. Crane Construction, with his wife, Tina. Ray Laplante, left, founder of Laplante Construction, with Bill Donovan, president of Donovan Oil Co.

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS

www.myonlinechamber.com

(413) 787-1555

 

• Oct. 2: Rake in the Business Tabletop Showcase, 4:30-7 p.m., 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. The ACCGS has joined the Greater Chicopee, Holyoke, and Westfield chambers of commerce to bring members an affordable way to market their business. Platinum Sponsors: Charter Business, PeoplesBank, and Westfield Bank. Gold Sponsors: BusinessWest, First Niagara Bank, the Westfield News, and Harrington Insurance. Tables cost $100 and include table covering, skirt, and electricity (if needed). This opportunity is open to chamber members only. Make table reservations online at www.myonlinechamber.com, by calling CecileLarose at (413) 755-1313, or e-mailing [email protected] You may also fax your form to (413) 755-1322. The cost to attend the event is $5 if pre-registered, $10 at the door.

• Oct. 11: The Western Mass Business Expo, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., MassMutual Center, Springfield. The ACCGS is partnering with BusinessWest on the event, which starts with the Chamber Breakfast at 7:30 a.m. in the ballroom, where Commissioner of Higher Education Richard Freeland will release the report “Time to Lead: the Need for Excellence in Massachusetts Public Higher Education.” Also planned are brief comments by area college presidents. Tickets cost $25 per person for breakfast and $45 per person for lunch. For reservations to the breakfast or lunch, contact Cecile Larose at [email protected], or register online at www.myonlinechamber.com.

• Oct. 17: Business After 5, 5-7 p.m., Six Flags New England, Agawam. Come join the chamber as Six Flags offers an inside look at the Looney Tunes characters and how they prepare to meet the public. Sponsorships are still available for this event. The Chamber has reduced the price of its After 5 this season to $5 for members and $10 for non-members. Reservations are accepted at www.myonlinechamber.com or by emailing Cecile Larose at [email protected] There will be food and a cash bar.

• Oct. 26: Super 60 Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Chez Josef, 176 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam. This annual chamber event recognizes the top 60 companies in both revenue and growth. Presenting sponsor is Health New England. Other sponsorship opportunities are still available. Guest speakers are Stanley Kowalski III, owner and founder of FloDesign Inc., and Secretary of Housing and Economic Development Greg Bialecki, who will show how government and private industry can work together successfully in this environment. Cost is $50 for members, $70 for non-members. Reservations can be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com or by emailing Cecile Larose at [email protected]

 

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce

www.amherstarea.com

(413) 253-0700

 

• Oct. 4: Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Awards Dinner, 5:30-9 p.m., Lord Jeffery Inn. Annual Awards Dinner presented by PeoplesBank. Emceed by Monte Belmonte of 93.9 FM. This year’s A+ Awards recipients are the Hitchcock Center for the Environment, Legacy Award for Environmental Leadership; Ray Shafie, former owner of Copy Cat Print Shop, Lifetime Achievement in Business; Chris Riddle, retired architect and founder of Kuhn Riddle Architects, Lifetime Achievement in Business; Youssef Fadel, New England Promotional Marketing, Chamber MVP. Additional sponsors: Health New England, J.F. Conlon & Associates.

• Oct. 12: Chamber Legislative Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., Lord Jeffery Inn. Cost: $15 for non-members, $12 for members.

 

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce

www.franklincc.org

(413) 773-5463

 

• Oct. 12-13: Brick & Mortar International Video Arts Festival, 4-10 p.m., downtown Greenfield. A walking tour of video art. Free admission. See www.greenfieldvideofest.org for more information.

• Oct. 19: Breakfast Series Program, 7:30-9 a.m., Bella Notte Restaurant, Huckle Hill Road, Bernardston. Thank you to U.S. Rep. John Olver. Sponsored by Greenfield Cooperative Bank and the Academy at Charlemont. Cost: $12 for members, $15 for non-members. Call (413) 773-5463 for reservations.

 

Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce

www.easthamptonchamber.org

(413) 527-9414

 

• Oct. 6: Casino Night, 6-11 p.m., One Cottage St., Easthampton. Come try your luck at an array of gaming tables. Lucky winners will win prizes. Hors d’oeuvres and a cash beer and wine bar throughout the evening. Major Sponsors: Easthampton Savings Bank, Finck & Perras Insurance Agency. Cost: $25 in advance, $30 at the door. For more information, visit www.easthamptonchamber.org.

• Oct. 11: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange, 5-7 p.m., hosted and sponsored by Cooley Dickinson Southampton, Rehabilitation & Outpatient Services, Big Y Plaza, College Highway, Southampton. Hors d’oeuvres and door prizes. Cost: $5 for members, $15 for non-members.

• Oct. 22: Celebrity Bartenders Night, 6-9 p.m., Opa-Opa Steakhouse & Brewery, 169 College Highway, Southampton. Join us for a night of fun with local celebrities mixing drinks. Your tips benefit the chamber’s holiday-lighting fund. Raffles and fun. Free admission.

 

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce

www.holyokechamber.com

(413) 534-3376

 

• Oct. 2: Rake in the Business Table Top Showcase, 5-7:30 p.m., Chicopee Castle of Knights. Four area chambers — Holyoke, Chicopee, Westfield, and ACCGS — are getting together to present a tabletop mini-trade show. Tables cost $100. Call (413) 534-3376 to register, or sign up online at www.holyokechamber.com.

• Oct. 3: Sales Training Breakfast, 7:45-9 a.m., the Log Cabin, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. “How to Close the Sale in the New Economy,” Marc Wayshak, author of two books on sales and leadership, shares his revolutionary selling system for salespeople, entrepreneurs, and companies alike. Cost: $25 for members, $30 at the door and for non-members. Call (413) 534-3376 to register, or sign up online at www.holyokechamber.com.

• Oct. 10: Autumn Business Breakfast, 7:30-9 a.m., the Log Cabin, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by the Republican and Holyoke Medical Center. Recognizing new members, business milestones, and networking breakfast meeting. Cost: $20 in advance, $25 at the door, $30 for non-members. Call (413) 534-3376 to register, or sign up online at www.holyokechamber.com.

• Oct. 17: Chamber After Hours, 5-7 p.m., the Pioneer Valley Railroad train at Holyoke Heritage Park. Business networking event to take place on a train car and caboose, including a 50/50 raffle, a variety of door prize, and complimentary appetizers and beverages. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. Call (413) 534-3376 to register, or sign up online at www.holyokechamber.com.

• Oct. 22: “Building a Small Business” Seminar, the PeoplesBank Conference Center at the Kittredge Business Center. Reception at 5 p.m., followed by a 6 p.m. panel discussion on “Writing a Business Plan, Sales, Marketing, Networking, and Adapting to a Changing Economy.” Free admission. Call Joanna Brown at (413) 552-2253.

 

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce

www.explorenorthampton.com

(413) 584-1900

 

• Oct. 3: Arrive @ 5, 5-7 p.m., 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Sponsored by Innovative Business Systems, Crocker Communications, and Pioneer Training. Cost: $10 for members.

Professional Women’s Chamber

www.professionalwomenschamber.com

(413) 755-1310

 

• Nov. 14: November Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Max’s Tavern, MassMutual Room, Basketball Hall of Fame, Springfield. Guest Speaker: Lynn Ostrowski of Health New England. Cost: $25 for members, $35 for non-members.

 

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce

www.westfieldbiz.org

(413) 568-1618

 

• Oct. 2: Rake in the Business Table Top Showcase, Castle of Knights, Chicopee. Presented by the Greater Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, Greater Westfield, and Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield. Exhibitor tables cost $100.00 (Westfield’s new members get a 50% discount), and each receive six extra passes to the show. Cost: $5 in advance, $10 at the door. Each ticket is entered into a drawing for a Kindle Touch with a leather case. Platinum Sponsors are Westfield Bank, PeoplesBank, and Charter Business; Gold Sponsors are BusinessWest, the Westfield News, First Niagara, and Harrington Insurance Agency Inc. Call Pam at (413) 568-1618 or e-mail [email protected] to register.

• Oct. 17: WestNet Oktoberfest, 5-7 p.m., East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield. Sponsors: Comcast and Frosted Swirl Cupcakes. Cost: $10 for members, $15 cash for non-members. Your first WestNet is always complimentary. Call Pam at (413) 568-1618 or e-mail [email protected] to register.

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

n Oct. 13: ACCGS October After 5, 5 to 7 p.m. ‘Be Your Best Self’ Table Top Expo, the Mind, Body & Spirit Expo. Hosted by MassMutual Center. Cost: members, $10; non-members, $20. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 23: UMass vs. UNH Bus Trip to Gillette Stadium, 11:00 a.m. bus departure. Cost: ticket to the game, $20; ticket and bus ride, $40; ticket, bus, and food, $50.
n Oct. 29: Super 60 Awards Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Hosted by Chez Josef, Agawam. Keynote dpeaker: Steven Little. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com

n Oct. 21: Third Thursday, 5 to 8 p.m. Hosted by the Munich Haus Restaurant, 13 Center St., Chicopee.
n Oct. 23: The Down Syndrome Resource Group of Western Massachusetts ‘Buddy Walk.’ This group provides information about family support, resources, parent training, and social opportunities. Its mission is to discover, encourage, and embrace the potential of all individuals with Down syndrome. Registration for the walk to begin at 10 a.m., with coffee and light refreshments available. Two-mile walk to begin at about 11 a.m., followed by a complimentary lunch and entertainment.

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

n Oct. 4: Checkpoint 2010, 7:30 a.m. Hosted by Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Keynote Speaker: U.S. Sen. Scott Brown. Presented by the Chicopee and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Cost: members, $25; non-members, $30. To reserve tickets, contact the Chicopee Chamber of Commerce at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org
n Oct. 20: October Salute Breakfast. Hosted by Summit View Banquet & Meeting House, Holyoke. Guest speaker: political consultant Tony Cignoli. To reserve tickets, contact the chamber at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org
n Oct. 27: After 5 Business Card Swap – Speed Networking, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Hosted by the Delaney House, 3 Country Club Road, Holyoke. Limited to 24 people; registration ends on Oct. 25. Cost: members, $25; non-members, $35. To reserve tickets, contact the chamber at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

n Oct. 13: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange, 5 to 7 p.m. Co-hosted and co-sponsored by Nashawannuck Gallery and Harry King Rug & Home, 36-40 Cottage St., Easthampton. Hors d’ouevres by Sunshine Bakery, beer and wine, door prizes. Cost: members, $5; non-members, $15.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

n Oct. 14: Fall Salute Breakfast, 7:30 a.m., at the Log Cabin, Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by Holyoke Medical Center and Comcast. Cost: $18; tables reserved for parties of eight.
n Oct: 20: Chamber After Hours, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by Holyoke Children’s Museum, 444 Dwight St., Holyoke. Sponsored by All Sales Consulting, LLC. Cost: members, $5; non-members, $10 cash.

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Northampton Area Young Professional Society
www.thenayp.com
(413) 584-1900

n Oct. 14: NAYP Party with a Purpose, 5 to 8 p.m., at KW Home. Cost: members, free; guests, $5.

Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce
www.qvcc.biz
(413) 283-2418
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

South Hadley/Granby Chamber of Commerce
www.shchamber.com
(413) 532-6451

n Oct. 12: Speaker Series Breakfast, 8 to 9:30 a.m., hosted by the Willits-Hallowell Center at Mount Holyoke College. Sponsored in partnership with Mount Holyoke College. Speaker: Vincent Ferraro, professor of Politics at MHC, on “Politics of the Global Economic Crisis.” Cost: $15 at the door. Call (413) 532-6451 for more information.
n Oct. 15: Legislative Breakfast, 7:15 to 9 a.m. Hosted by the Courtyard by Marriott. Sponsored by Western Massachusetts Electric Co.
n Oct. 19: Beyond Business, 5 to 7 p.m., hosted by Johnny’s Tap Room, the Village Commons, South Hadley. Hors d’oeuvres courtesy of Johnny’s. Cash bar. Cost: $5 at the door for chamber members. RSVP by Oct. 15 at (413) 532-6451
n Oct. 27: After 5, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by Hickory Ridge Country Club. Sponsorships available.

Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce
www.threeriverschamber.org
(413) 283-6425
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

n Oct 13: WestNet After 5 Networking Octoberfest, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield. Cost: members, $10; non-members, 15. Bring plenty of business cards for exchange, and bring a gift to highlight your business. For more information, e-mail [email protected], call (413) 568-1618, or check out www.westfieldbiz.org
n Oct. 16: ‘Bring Back the 80s’ Dance, 7 to 11 p.m. Hosted by Westwood Restaurant and Pub, 94 North Elm St., Westfield. Featuring Orange Crush, the 80s Dance Party Band. Cost: $20. Prizes awarded for most authentic dressers and raffles.

Chamber Corners Departments

ACCGS
www.myonlinechamber.com
(413) 787-1555

n Oct. 1: Hampden/Wilbraham Golf Classic. Hosted by the Country Club of Wilbraham. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 6: ACCGS October [email protected], 7:15 to 9 a.m. Hosted by the Cedars, 419 Island Pond Road, Springfield. Cost: members, $20; non-members, $30. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 13: ACCGS October After 5, 5 to 7 p.m. ‘Be Your Best Self’ Table Top Expo, the Mind, Body & Spirit Expo. Hosted by MassMutual Center. Cost: members, $10; non-members, $20. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]
n Oct. 23: UMass vs. UNH Bus Trip to Gillette Stadium, 11:00 a.m. bus departure. Cost: ticket to the game, $20; ticket and bus ride, $40; ticket, bus, and food, $50.
n Oct. 29: Super 60 Awards Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Hosted by Chez Josef, Agawam. Keynote dpeaker: Steven Little. To register, contact the chamber at (413) 787-1555 or [email protected]

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com
n Oct. 21: Third Thursday, 5 to 8 p.m. Hosted by the Munich Haus Restaurant, 13 Center St., Chicopee.
n Oct. 23: The Down Syndrome Resource Group of Western Massachusetts ‘Buddy Walk.’ This group provides information about family support, resources, parent training, and social opportunities. Its mission is to discover, encourage, and embrace the potential of all individuals with Down syndrome. Registration for the walk to begin at 10 a.m., with coffee and light refreshments available. Two-mile walk to begin at about 11 a.m., followed by a complimentary lunch and entertainment.

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

n Oct. 4: Checkpoint 2010, 7:30 a.m. Hosted by Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Keynote Speaker: U.S. Sen. Scott Brown. Presented by the Chicopee and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Cost: members, $25; non-members, $30. To reserve tickets, contact the Chicopee Chamber of Commerce at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org
n Oct. 20: October Salute Breakfast. Hosted by Summit View Banquet & Meeting House, Holyoke. Guest speaker: political consultant Tony Cignoli. To reserve tickets, contact the chamber at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org
n Oct. 27: After 5 Business Card Swap – Speed Networking, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Hosted by the Delaney House, 3 Country Club Road, Holyoke. Limited to 24 people; registration ends on Oct. 25. Cost: members, $25; non-members, $35. To reserve tickets, contact the chamber at (413) 594-2101 or www.chicopeechamber.org

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce
www.franklincc.org
(413) 773-5463
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

n Oct. 1: Casino Night, 7 to 11 p.m., at One Cottage St., Easthampton. Major sponsors: Easthampton Savings Bank and Finck & Perras Insurance Agency. Cost: $25 in advance; $30 at the door. See www.easthamptonchamber.org for more information.
n Oct. 13: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange, 5 to 7 p.m. Co-hosted and co-sponsored by Nashawannuck Gallery and Harry King Rug & Home, 36-40 Cottage St., Easthampton. Hors d’ouevres by Sunshine Bakery, beer and wine, door prizes. Cost: members, $5; non-members, $15.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
www.holycham.com
(413) 534-3376

n Oct. 14: Fall Salute Breakfast, 7:30 a.m., at the Log Cabin, Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by Holyoke Medical Center and Comcast. Cost: $18; tables reserved for parties of eight.
n Oct: 20: Chamber After Hours, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by Holyoke Children’s Museum, 444 Dwight St., Holyoke. Sponsored by All Sales Consulting, LLC. Cost: members, $5; non-members, $10 cash.

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

n Oct. 6: Annual Chamber Open House, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. It’s the don’t-miss chamber event of the year. More than 300 people regularly attend. Food and drink donated by member restaurants. Cost: $10 for members.

Northampton Area Young Professional Society
www.thenayp.com
(413) 584-1900

n Oct. 14: NAYP Party with a Purpose, 5 to 8 p.m., at KW Home. Cost: members, free; guests, $5.

Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce
www.qvcc.biz
(413) 283-2418
Please see chamber’s Web site for news of upcoming events.

South Hadley/Granby Chamber of Commerce
www.shchamber.com
(413) 532-6451

n Oct. 15: Legislative Breakfast, 7:15 to 9 a.m. Hosted by the Courtyard by Marriott. Sponsored by Western Massachusetts Electric Co.
n Oct. 27: After 5, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by Hickory Ridge Country Club. Sponsorships available.

Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce
www.threeriverschamber.org
(413) 283-6425

n Oct. 4: Chamber Meeting, 7 p.m. Hosted by Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce office, Palmer Technology Park, Springfield St., Palmer.
Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

n Oct 13: WestNet After 5 Networking Octoberfest, 5 to 7 p.m. Hosted by East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield. Cost: members, $10; non-members, 15. Bring plenty of business cards for exchange, and bring a gift to highlight your business. For more information, e-mail [email protected], call (413) 568-1618, or check out www.westfieldbiz.org
n Oct. 16: ‘Bring Back the 80s’ Dance, 7 to 11 p.m. Hosted by Westwood Restaurant and Pub, 94 North Elm St., Westfield. Featuring Orange Crush, the 80s Dance Party Band. Cost: $20. Prizes awarded for most authentic dressers and raffles.

Departments

Super 60

Clockwise from top left: at the recent Super 60 gathering, Paul Whalley (center), vice president of Walley Computer Associates, receives his #1 Revenue Award from Peter Straley (left), CEO of presenting sponsor Health New England, and Glenn Welch of platinum sponsor Hampden Bank; Above, keynote speaker Dennis Snow shares his secrets of excellent customer service with the crowd of 600 people; At left, Bruce Robinovitz (center), president of R & R Industries, receives his #1 Growth Award from Straley (right) and Gordon Quinn of platinum sponsor Sullivan, Hayes & Quinn.


Rays of Hope

More than 15,000 walkers in Springfield and Greenfield participated in the annual Rays of Hope – A Walk Toward the Cure of Breast Cancer on Oct. 25, raising more than $900,000 for the care and treatment of breast-cancer patients and cancer research in Western Mass. For the first time, breast-cancer survivors, their relatives, friends, and supporters participated in simultaneous walks in Forest Park in Springfield and Energy Park in Greenfield. More than 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer every year. Many of the programs funded by the walk are geared toward early detection and breast-cancer awareness.


New Life at Reed’s Landing

Carol Katz, CEO of the Loomis Communities, chats with Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno at the recent rededication of Reed’s Landing, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this year and was purchased by Loomis. None of the resident contracts have been affected by the change in ownership.

Departments

Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield
(413) 787-1555
www.myonlinechamber.com

Oct. 14: ACCGS After 5 Table Top Exhibit, hosted by the MassMutual Center in Springfield, 5 to 7 p.m. Tickets: $125 for members, $175 for non-members.

Oct. 15: West of the River Legislative Breakfast, hosted by Chez Josef in Agawam, 7:15 to 9 a.m. Guest speaker is Dolores Mitchell, executive director of the Group Insurance Commission. Tickets: $20 for members, $30 for non-members.

Oct. 23: Super 60, hosted by Chez Josef in Agawam, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tickets: $45 for members, $65 for non-members.

Oct. 27: West of the River Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting, hosted by Captain Charles Leonard House, 7:30 to 9 a.m.

Oct. 28:  Executive Power Networking, hosted by TD Banknorth Conference Center,7:30 to 9 a.m. Tickets: $20 for members, $30 for non-members.

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com  

Oct. 15: Third Thursday, hosted by Hofbrauhaus restaurant in West Springfield.

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
(413) 594-2101
www.chicopeechamber.org

Oct. 27: 12th Annual Table Top Meeting, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Presented by South Hadley/Granby, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Exhibitor tables cost $90; reserve online at www.chicopeechamber.org or call (413) 594-2101. Admission; $5 for members, $10 non-members

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce
(413) 773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

Greater Easthampton Chamber Of Commerce
(413) 527-9414
www.easthamptonchamber.org

Oct. 14: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange , hosted by Nini’s Ristorante, 124 Cottage St., Easthampton, 5 to 7 p.m. Sponsored by Greater Easthampton Jr. Miss Program. Event will include door prizes, hors d’ouevres, and a cash bar. Tickets: $5 for members, $15 for non-members.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce
(413) 534-3376
www.holycham.com

Oct. 14: Fall Salute Breakfast, hosted by the Delaney House, Country Club Road, Holyoke, 7:45 a.m. Sponsored by Holyoke Medical Center. Tickets are $18. Tables reserved for parties of eight.

Oct. 21: Chamber After Hours, hosted by Holiday Inn, 245 Whiting Farms Road, Holyoke, 5 to 7 p.m. Sponsored by Yellowbook. Admission: $5 for members, $10 for non-members. 

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce
(413) 584-1900
www.explorenorthampton.com  

Oct. 16: Chamber Information Session, Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 12 noon to 1 p.m. Considering membership? Come to an information session.

Northampton Area Young Professionals
www.thenayp.com

Oct. 8: October’s Party with a Purpose, hosted by dani. fine photography in the Eastworks building in Easthampton.

Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce
(413) 283-2418
www.qvcc.biz

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

South Hadley/Granby Chamber of Commerce
(413) 532-6451
www.shchamber.com

Oct. 20: Beyond Business, hosted and sponsored by Olde Hadleigh House & Patio, 5 to 7 p.m. No guest speaker. Cost: $5 members, $10 for general public, who are welcome. RSVP at (413) 532 6451 by Oct. 16.

Oct. 27: 12th Annual Table Top Meeting, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Presented by South Hadley/Granby, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Cost: $5. To reserve a table, call (413) 532-6451.

Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce
(413) 283-6425
www.threeriverschamber.org

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce
(413) 568-1618
www.westfieldbiz.org

Oct. 21: Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce WestNet After Hours Networking, hosted by East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield, sponsored by Sovereign Bank. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. For reservations, call (413) 568-1618, e-mail [email protected], or register at www.westfieldbiz.org.

Oct. 27: 12th Annual Table Top Meeting, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Presented by South Hadley/Granby, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Display tables cost $90 for members. For reservations, call (413) 568-1618, e-mail [email protected] , or register at www.westfieldbiz.org.

Departments

Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield
(413) 787-1555 www.myonlinechamber.com

Oct. 2: Hampden/Wilbraham Golf Classic, hosted by the Country Club of Wilbraham. Registration at 10 a.m., lunch at 11 a.m., shotgun start at 12:00 noon. Tickets: $110 for golf entry, $440 for a golf foursome. Sponsorships available.

Oct. 7:  ACCGS Breakfast, hosted by the Springfield Marriott, 7:15 to 9 a.m. Tickets: $20 for members, $30 for non-members.

Oct. 14: ACCGS After 5 Table Top Exhibit, hosted by the MassMutual Center in Springfield, 5 to 7 p.m. Tickets: $125 for members, $175 for non-members.

Oct. 15: West of the River Legislative Breakfast, hosted by Chez Josef in Agawam, 7:15 to 9 a.m. Guest speaker is Dolores Mitchell, executive director of the Group Insurance Commission. Tickets: $20 for members, $30 for non-members.

Oct. 23: Super 60, hosted by Chez Josef in Agawam, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tickets: $45 for members, $65 for non-members.

Oct. 27: West of the River Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting, hosted by Captain Charles Leonard House, 7:30 to 9 a.m.

Oct. 28:  Executive Power Networking, hosted by TD Banknorth Conference Center,7:30 to 9 a.m. Tickets: $20 for members, $30 for non-members.

Young Professional Society of Greater Springfield
www.springfieldyps.com   

Oct. 4: Hike for Habitat, Mt. Tom, Holyoke, 10 a.m. Join the YPS team for the annual Hike for Habitat to benefit Greater Springfield Habitat for Humanity. The hike features two courses: a leisurely, 90-minute hike, or a more difficult, three-hour route to the summit. To register, hikers must raise a minimum of $25 per person, due on the day of the hike. To join the YPS team, contact Maureen Picknally at [email protected]  or Nicole Williamson at (413) 739-5503 or [email protected].

Oct. 15: Third Thursday, hosted by Hofbrauhaus restaurant in West Springfield.

Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce
www.amherstarea.com

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

Chicopee Chamber of Commerce
(413) 594-2101 www.chicopeechamber.org

Oct. 1: BusinessWest Speed Sales, hosted by the Bartley Center at Holyoke Community College, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Program Sponsors include the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House, Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C., Kittredge Center, HCC, Marcotte Ford, and First American Insurance Agency Inc. Cost: $350 for members, $450 for non-members.

Oct. 7: CheckPoint ’09, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 12 noon to 2 p.m. Keynote speaker is  Robert A. DeLeo, speaker of the state House of Representatives. Sponsors include Our Dentist, Future Works, Westmass Area Development Corp., and Health New England. Tickets: $30 for members, $35 for non-members; tables of 8: $200 for members, $240 for non-members.

Oct. 27: 12th Annual Table Top Meeting, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Presented by South Hadley/Granby, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Exhibitor tables cost $90; reserve online at www.chicopeechamber.org or call (413) 594-2101. Admission; $5 for members, $10 non-members

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce (413) 773-5463
www.franklincc.org

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

Greater Easthampton Chamber Of Commerce (413) 527-9414
www.easthamptonchamber.org

Oct. 14: Networking by Night Business Card Exchange , hosted by Nini’s Ristorante, 124 Cottage St., Easthampton, 5 to 7 p.m. Sponsored by Greater Easthampton Jr. Miss Program. Event will include door prizes, hors d’ouevres, and a cash bar. Tickets: $5 for members, $15 for non-members.

Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce  (413) 534-3376
www.holycham.com

Oct. 1: BusinessWest Speed Sales Business Event, hosted by the Bartley Center at Holyoke Community College, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Sponsored by BusinessWest, First American Insurance Agency Inc., Holyoke Community College, Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C., Log Cabin and Delaney House, and Marcotte Ford.

Oct. 14: Fall Salute Breakfast, hosted by the Delaney House, Country Club Road, Holyoke, 7:45 a.m. Sponsored by Holyoke Medical Center. Tickets are $18. Tables reserved for parties of eight.

Oct. 21: Chamber After Hours, hosted by Holiday Inn, 245 Whiting Farms Road, Holyoke, 5 to 7 p.m. Sponsored by Yellowbook. Admission: $5 for members, $10 for non-members. 

Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce (413) 584-1900
www.explorenorthampton.com  

Oct. 7: [email protected] Open House at the Chamber, 5 to 7 p.m. Sponsored by Crocker Communications Inc., Innovative Business Systems Inc., and Pioneer Training. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for guests.

Oct. 8: Northampton Area Young Professionals Party with a Purpose, hosted by dani. fine photography in the Eastworks building in Easthampton, 5 to 8 p.m. Cost: free for members, $5 for guests.

Oct. 16: Chamber Information Session, Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 12 noon to 1 p.m. Considering membership? Come to an information session.

Northampton Area Young Professionals
www.thenayp.com

Oct. 8: October’s Party with a Purpose, hosted by dani. fine photography in the Eastworks building in Easthampton.

Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce (413) 283-2418
www.qvcc.biz

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

South Hadley/Granby Chamber of Commerce (413) 532-6451
www.shchamber.com

Oct. 20: Beyond Business, hosted and sponsored by Olde Hadleigh House & Patio, 5 to 7 p.m. No guest speaker. Cost: $5 members, $10 for general public, who are welcome. RSVP at (413) 532 6451 by Oct. 16.

Oct. 27: 12th Annual Table Top Meeting, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Presented by South Hadley/Granby, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Cost: $5. To reserve a table, call (413) 532-6451. 

Three Rivers Chamber of Commerce  (413) 283-6425
www.threeriverschamber.org

Visit the chamber online to learn more about upcoming events.

Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce (413) 568-1618
www.westfieldbiz.org

Oct. 9: Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce Annual Fall Breakfast, hosted by the 104th Fighter Wing, Dining Hall, 175 Falcon Dr., Westfield. Guest speaker will be  Rick Forgay, president of the Rich Forgay Leadership Institute. Sponsors include Noble Health Systems, Westfield Gas & Electric, NewAlliance Bank, FieldEddy Insurance, and the Carson Center for Human Services Inc. Cost:  $20 for members, $25 for non-members. For reservations, call (413) 568-1618, e-mail [email protected] , or register at www.westfieldbiz.org . The deadline for reservations is Oct. 5.

Oct. 21: Greater Westfield Chamber of Commerce WestNet After Hours Networking, hosted by East Mountain Country Club, 1458 East Mountain Road, Westfield, sponsored by Sovereign Bank. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. For reservations, call (413) 568-1618, e-mail [email protected] , or register at www.westfieldbiz.org .

Oct. 27: 12th Annual Table Top Meeting, hosted by Castle of Knights, 1599 Memorial Dr., Chicopee, 4:30 to 7 p.m. Presented by South Hadley/Granby, Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, and Greater Westfield chambers of commerce. Display tables cost $90 for members. For reservations, call (413) 568-1618, e-mail [email protected] , or register at www.westfieldbiz.org.

Departments

The Super 60

The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield staged their annual Super 60 luncheon on Oct. 26. The event recognized the top performers in the categories of revenue and revenue growth.

Above: keynote speaker Dale Collie shares his war stories and the U.S. Army’s ‘6 Elements of Surprise.’

Above: receiving the award for the top ‘Growth’ company, Kleer Lumber, LLC, is Walter Valentine, center, president and CEO, along with Peter Straley, president and CEO of presenting sponsor Health New England, and Meghan Sullivan, with platinum sponsor Sullivan, Hayes & Quinn.

Center right: receiving the award for the top ‘Revenue’ company, Springfield College, is Brendan Neal, director of Community Relations, along with Straley and Thomas Burton, president of platinum sponsor Hampden Bank.

Above: nearly 700 Western Mass. business leaders attended this year’s luncheon at Chez Josef.

Sections Supplements
Some Ground-breaking Developments Signal a New Era at Springfield College
Richard Flynn

Richard Flynn, president of Springfield College, said moving forward with various improvement projects has sparked some new life on campus.

When it comes to facilities planning, Springfield College President Richard Flynn wrote the book on the subject.

Actually, he’s written four of them.

That’s just one line on the resume Flynn brought with him to Western Mass., after living and working in Omaha, Neb. for most of his life, serving as a dean at the University of Nebraska and an interim president at Peru State College. But it’s a line he’s been asked, repeatedly, to prove out at Springfield, and judging by the mounds of dirt created by recently broken ground on campus, he’s doing just that.

Flynn took his post in March of 1999, and shortly thereafter launched an extensive strategic plan for the college that included 10 broad goals, such as maintaining financial integrity and enhancing academic programs.

“What we wanted to do was create an action plan that was aimed at where we aspired to be and the objectives we needed to reach to get there,” he said. “We started with 10 fairly general goals, with specific steps within each of them. Not all of the areas we addressed were matters we were behind on, but rather areas we needed to maintain, to retain our vibrancy, reputation, and image.”

The general nature of those goals has allowed the strategic planning process to remain fluid, added Flynn, and has provided for a clear direction while also allowing for constant tweaking.

“These are living goals,” he said. “The specific strategies change year in and year out, and we have a lot of great discussions because of that. But we also track our progress each spring and detail it in the annual report, and each year we’re looking to see that each financial measure we’ve employed has improved.”

One such measure has been the capital campaign, The Leadership Campaign for the 21st Century, which began in 2002 and is funding many of these new and ongoing developments. It has a goal of raising $40 million, and has about $27.5 million, and two years, to go.

“It’s an aggressive goal for us,” said Flynn. “Up to this point, the college hadn’t had a major campaign in 35 years, and this is an international campaign that is drawing on the support of alumni, the business community, foundations, and friends.”

Building Blocks

That campaign has already made a number of visible improvements to the campus possible, including the renovation of the Brennan Center, home to the School of Social Work, and Wilbraham Hall, once used for storage and now home to several academic departmental offices.

And in addition to those renovations, the college has also broken ground on Schoo Hall, the Bemis Science Center, a new residence hall and suites, the Cheney dining hall, and new athletic fields that include 4 1/2 acres of synthetic, all-weather turf.

“We’ve also added green space,” said Flynn, referring to new lawn areas and quads scattered across the campus. “We know students have a need for green space, so not to feel restrained by boundaries.

“There are many other small things that people don’t readily notice,” he added, continuing the long list of recent improvements and additions to the Springfield College campus. “We’ve done a lot of things to improve the classrooms, and the residence halls have new bathrooms. Those are examples of the things we’re adding to improve the overall quality of life on campus.”

As the campaign continues, a new field house will be constructed, as will a new wellness center, a renovated beverage hall, and a new college union.

“There’s a ripple effect,” Flynn said. “When all is said and done, very few parts of this campus will be left untouched.”

The physical improvements are just one of many initiatives designed to raise the profile of the college, and judging by the school’s recent financial success (which landed it on the Affiliated Chambers’ Super 60 list this year) that profile is already inching up.

With so many construction projects recently completed, underway, or on the drawing board, it’s hard to imagine that the college would be moving forward in the black, but Flynn, returning to his facility-planning roots, said he’s not surprised.

“One of the most important things to remember about facilities planning is that facilities facilitate programs,” he stressed. “A lot of time has been spent on building infrastructure. And as we start to cultivate that, we are afforded a chance to take a closer look at every part of an organization … how things are done, and how much of yesterday will still be relevant tomorrow.”

Revisit, Repair, and Retain

As those improvements continue, Flynn said the college has also kept a close eye on tuition rates, in an effort to keep them as low as possible. To date, the college has seen gradual increases, like nearly all colleges, but has remained about 10% below the national average for private colleges.

“When I arrived, we had 180 empty beds,” said Flynn. “Now, those beds are filled, and we’ve added 205 additional beds. Since each year, a major stimulus for us is to fill those beds, that’s an excellent benchmark for success.”

What’s more, Flynn said the physical improvements on campus as well as the addition of several new academic programs and majors over the past seven years, including a new school of Health Sciences and a doctorate in Physical Therapy, have made Springfield College an institution of choice for many students, further augmenting marketing efforts and graduation and retention rates.

“About 80% of our first-year students report that this was their first choice of college, and it’s easier to keep them here if this is where they wanted to be in the first place,” said Flynn.

Outreach 101

Another facet in retaining students, however, has taken shape as a series of ‘community engagement’ initiatives, also detailed in an annual report by the college.
Each year, the program allocates five professional staffers to work exclusively on community outreach programs, to the tune of $229,000 in annual salaries and benefits. It also stipulates that Springfield College regularly donate the use of many of its facilities to nonprofit organizations such as the American Cancer Society and the Senior Games, and serves as the umbrella program for the PROHill Initiative, dedicated to renewing the Old Hill neighborhood and rehabilitating 100 homes over the next five years. Artistic and athletic-based community outreach programs are also part of the project.

It’s one of Flynn’s favorite projects, and a forward-thinking endeavor, he said, which is focused not only on development of the college but of its namesake city, too.

“I’ve done a lot of work with community-school initiatives,” he said, referring to another line, and list of publication credits, on his resume. “We can’t improve the community without everyone contributing, and if the city gets bad publicity, it hurts the college too.

“But beyond that, it’s difficult to imagine the city of Springfield without its colleges,” he continued. “I’m not sure the colleges are fully appreciated for the vibrancy and vitality they add to a city, and each one in Springfield is doing its share.”

Mission: Control

The further cultivation of that vitality is one of those 10 broad goals that Flynn set out for the college and himself in 1999, and as the final two years of the Leadership campaign approach, accounting for every dollar raised will be just as important as accounting for every reason why those contributions are necessary.

“We have a passion for excellence, but at the same time, a compassion for others,” Flynn said of himself and the college community. “This had been my mission since day one, and I’m proud to say that everyone here knows what that mission is: to add a sense of community, good morale, and great partnerships.”

And while he may not have time for writing these days, Flynn is indeed helping to author a new chapter in Springfield College’s proud history.

Jaclyn Stevenson can be reached at[email protected]

Sections Supplements
Merriam-Webster Helps Shape Evolution in Dictionary Publishing
John Morse, with Noah Webster, creator of America’s first dictionary.

John Morse, with Noah Webster, creator of America’s first dictionary.

‘The Age of Also.’

John Morse didn’t coin that phrase — credit usually goes to noted author and self-described “information architect” Richard Saul Wurman — but, as president and publisher of the Springfield-based dictionary maker Merriam-Webster, he’s used it many times to describe the company’s current view of the world and its product line.

Elaborating, Morse said that, while the hardbound version of Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, now in its 11th edition, its paperback cousin, and other printed volumes remain the company’s bread and butter, there is considerable also when it comes to methods of accessing language information. Indeed, people can now also check the usage of affect and effect — the most-commonly referenced words day in and day out (affect is almost always a verb, while effect is usually a noun) — through CD-ROMs, the company’s many Web sites, a hand-held model, even via their PDA or cell phone.

That’s right, for $1.95 a month, individuals can now subscribe to a service that will enable them to access Merriam-Webster’s Web sites through their cell, giving new meaning to the phrase smartphone.

This isn’t something that Noah Webster, who created America’s first dictionary, or George and Charles Merriam, who revised Webster’s work and mainstreamed it, probably could have imagined. But it does fit nicely into their shared philosophy about putting information in people’s hands — by whatever means available.

And this is the message that Morse is leaving with people as he crisscrosses the country on a speaking tour devoted to the 200th anniversary of Noah Webster’s creation.The latest stop was the fabled Tattered Cover bookstore in Denver and a program that will later be broadcast on C-Span. During it, Morse talked about ‘also,’ but devoted significant time to another word — democracy — and how it effectively defines dictionary publishing.

“The dictionary is the quintessential democratic document,” Morse writes in the foreword of a booklet the company has published to commemorate the dictionary’s bicentennial. “Written for a nation, it is a document that describes its citizens’ thoughts and behavior. Indeed, it can be said that the nation writes its own dictionary, as in order for the dictionary to succeed, it must faithfully and fully reflect the language of the people and do so in a way that meets the people’s needs and expectations.”

This phenomenon explains why the the Collegiate, now in its 11th edition, is updated slightly every year with maybe 100 new words (the list for 2007 is not yet finalized). Morse added that a dictionary is not actually a book, but more a mirror held up to society, one that must be accessible — in every way that word is defined.

“A dictionary has to be convenient to use,” he explained. “On the print side, I think that’s been achieved; now, we have to achieve that on the electronic side.”
This issue, BusinessWest looks at the history and future of one of Springfield’s most venerable businesses — and Super 60 winner in the Total Revenue category. In simple terms, this is a company blending and balancing mission with technology.

“We’re really here to be the schoolmasters to the country, and maybe now the schoolmasters to the world,” Morse explained. “And we will use any available technology to do so.”

Word Association

“Well-engineered.”

That’s one of the phrases Morse used to describe the print dictionary, specifically the Collegiate, and one that many people might not expect.

“It’s the culmination of several hundred years of various forms of print technology coming to bear on that object,” he explained, referring to everything from the thumb notches that help people find a place to start, to the bold-faced ‘headwords’ at the top of each page that help narrow the search. “Most people can get to the particular piece of information they want within the dictionary usually in 10 to 30 seconds. And when you think that the dictionary holds, conservatively, maybe a million to 2 million separate pieces of information and you can get to yours in less than half a minute, you sense that this is a well-engineered product.”

And this explains why the print version of the dictionary has persisted despite the introduction of new, electronic products, said Morse, who said the prices of both hardbound ($26.95) and paperback ($8) versions of the 11th edition are other reasons.

Overall, sales of print products are flat, said Morse, meaning that, while they’re not going up, they’re not really going down, either. He was not very specific with numbers — this is a privately held business and a wholly owned subsidiary of Chicago-based Encyclopedia Britannica — but did say the company continues to grow due in large part to its ability to evolve but also remain true to the vision of both Noah Webster and the brothers Merriam.

“That’s an amazing price,” he said of the going rate for the 1,600-word hardbound volume, which he said is similar to that of a 400-page novel. “And there’s an historical aspect to this; that was the wisdom that George and Charles Merriam brought to the Merriam-Webster combination when they bought the company in 1843.”

“By the time Noah Webster died, his dictionary was big and expensive,” he continued. “What the Merriam brothers said was ‘let’s return the dictionary to what Noah Webster originally intended; let’s make it very inexpensive and have the widest possible distribution. That’s still the strategy today.”

The company’s ongoing dedication to that basic mission is what is really being celebrated this year, said Morse, adding that there are several programs scheduled to mark the dictionary’s bicentennial, including his speaking tour (next stops, the Prairie Light Bookstore and the Iowa City Public Library), a spelling bee, and a partnership with booksellers to promote local literacy; ‘Party like it’s 1806,’ shouts the company’s Web site.

The speaking tour’s programs are designed to be entertaining, but mostly enlightening, said Morse, adding that the story of why and how Noah Webster came to create A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language is fascinating but generally unknown.

And it is the why that Morse focuses on most.

“He was a very famous person in his own lifetime for things other than dictionary making,” he told BusinessWest. “He was very politically involved and one of the real founders of the U.S. Constitution. What made him decide to focus all his efforts on creating a new dictionary for this new country?”

Apparently, need was at the heart of the discussion; the only dictionaries available at the time were printed in England, and did not include American coinages such as skunk, hickory, or chowder.

“A national language is a national tie,” Webster was quoted as saying, “and what country wants it more than America?”

Webster’s first dictionary was small in size (408 pages, 37,000 entries) compared to later volumes, but significant in that it marked the beginning of American lexicography and set a direction for dictionary making that continues today, said Morse, adding that while the early dictionary was generally admired, it was not very popular because of its high price.

The task of popularizing, or democratizing, the dictionary fell to the Merriam brothers, who grew up in their father’s printing office in West Brookfield and in 1931 opened the G. & C. Merriam Company in Springfield, a retail stationery and book-selling operation that first published law books and bibles.

Ambitious, entrepreneurial, and opportunistic, the Merriam brothers acquired 1,400 unsold copies of Webster’s latest dictionary soon after his death in 1843, as well as the rights to publish and revise the work. They produced the first Merriam-Webster dictionary — An American Dictionary of the English Language (New Revised Edition) in 1847. Its $6 price tag (one third the original cost) led to the mainstreaming of the dictionary in homes and schools across the country.

A steady stream of new products emerged over the years, said Morse, listing the first unabridged dictionary in 1864, the Collegiate in 1898, the first paperback version in 1947, and the groundbreaking yet controversial Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged, or simply Webster’s Third, introduced in 1961 complete with more-concise definitions and the word ain’t.

Today, the company produces more than 120 different products ranging from punctuation guides to the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary; the popular French-English Dictionary to Coined by Shakespeare, a compilation of words and phrases first penned by the Bard. The latest addition to the list, Merriam Webster’s Visual Dictionary, with 6,000 color illustrations and 20,000 definitions, hit bookstores earlier this month.

Coming to Terms

This wide diversity of products, as well as the platforms in which they are made available, speaks to life in the Age of Also, said Morse, describing it as a challenging time for dictionary publishers, but nonetheless one of opportunity. This is a period of slow transition, he explained, with accent on the adjective.

“Surprisingly, the print dictionary remains very robust,” he explained. “Unlike some other kinds of reference materials — the encyclopedia comes to mind — there has not yet been a massive switch from a print preference to an electronic preference, and there are many reasons for that.”

Sound engineering is at the top of that list, he said, adding that loyalty to the book and growing, if slow, acceptance of new platforms means that publishers must try to be all things to all people — even those who would use a cell phone to check the spelling of defenestration, the act of throwing someone or some thing out of a window.

This is where some of the challenge, and cost, comes into play, he continued, noting that the company has a growing list of both print and electronic products. For example, it has partnered with Franklin Electronic Publishers to create a hand-held version of the Collegiate dictionary (which Morse takes with him on his travels) that sells for $100. There is also a CD-ROM version, which got off to a very slow start when first introduced because some consumers thought they needed to put the disc in their hard drive each time they wanted to check a word, and has never really caught on.

Meanwhile, there are several Web sites, including www.merriamwebster.com, that provide convenience for consumers — they can look up a specific word or phrase, scroll by letter, or check the ‘word of the day’ for example — and some intriguing insight for publishers because they can now track where users are going.

“It’s really fascinating,” he said. “Until this, publishers put words into the dictionary, but they didn’t know which words people were looking up.

“What’s become clear to us from that record is that people are not using the dictionary for spelling; mostly, they’re looking things up for meaning,” he continued, adding that this conclusion was gleaned from a consistently high volume of visits to affect/effect, principal/principle, rein/reign/ rain, and other sets of homophones.

There is little rhyme or reason to the demographic breakdown of who’s using what products, said Morse, noting that many older people like online products, while somewhat surprising numbers of younger individuals still prefer the book.

From a business perspective, Morse said that, potentially, the cheapest way to create a dictionary is in electronic form — “how much does it cost to shoot electrons across the wires?” — but for now and the foreseeable future, the print products remain the most profitable.

“Talk to me again in five years and those numbers may have crossed, and I won’t care,” he explained. “Ultimately, what I’ve told people is that while we’re still a print dictionary predominantly, we are a print dictionary publisher contingently, which is to say that if the preference for people getting their language information switches from print to the Web or E-books or some other form, we’ll go there with them.

“Our principal mission in life is to get language information into the hands of interested users,” he continued. “And we really don’t care that much how we do it. We will find a profitable business model no matter where consumer preferences go.”

The Final Word

The list of ‘new’ words for the first and latest editions of the Collegiate show just how much the language — and society — has changed over the past 108 years.
In 1898, telephone, kindergarten, metabolism, hello, cocaine, and shortstop made their debuts. The list for the 2006 update to the 11th edition included ringtone, phishing, bird flu, cybersecurity, text messaging, and google.

The preponderance of terms from the world of telecommunications speaks to the Age of Also, said Morse, adding this is more than a crack in time; it’s an attitude.

And one that Merriam-Webster is helping to define.

George O’Brien can be reached at[email protected]

Uncategorized

John Maybury is used to getting passed over at Thanksgiving dinner when the topic of discussion turns to work.

“There’s someone who’s a nurse, someone who’s a teacher … and then there’s me,” said the owner and founder of Maybury Material Handling in East Longmeadow. “When they get to me, the question usually becomes, ‘so how are the kids?’”

It’s not that Maybury’s business, now celebrating its 30th year, is that difficult to explain; it’s just hard to describe in 30 words or less. The company specializes in the sale and installation of power equipment such as forklifts, and heavy-duty storage systems including shelving, vertical carousel systems, platforms, steel stairways, and mezzanines, and manufactures several of those product lines.

Maybury also works with several large firms in Massachusetts and Connecticut, including Friendly’s Ice Cream, Big Y, Hasbro, OMG (formerly Olympic Manufacturing Group), and Suddekor, not only selling storage and heavy equipment for manufacturing and distribution facilities, but also servicing them, renting additional units when needed, and providing training for those clients’ employees.

“The way I usually put it is, there’s a tomato, and then there’s ketchup. People don’t often think of how the tomato made it all the way to ketchup, and why there’s always ketchup on the grocery store shelves when you need it,” Maybury explained. “But from a tomato on the vine to the store shelves, there’s a lot going on, and part of that is what we do.”

A Steely Resolve

Indeed, few give much thought to the towering steel shelves in a warehouse or the forklift that moves products from point A to point B. But that’s the business Maybury has been immersed in since 1976, and when he tells the story, the industry suddenly seems much more intriguing.

Business is brisk at Maybury Material Handling, where Maybury, who started the business out of his home while still a student at Western New England College, said the company is expecting to see about a 25% increase in revenue this fiscal year. The company was also recently included on the Affiliated Chambers’ Super 60 list, for revenue reported in 2005.

Also in 2005, Maybury said a sister company, Atlantic Handling Systems, was launched in New Jersey to help capitalize on the manufacturing pace in that market while, at the same time, offering new product lines without stepping on the toes of Maybury’s current wholesalers.

“It’s referred to a lot as Baby Maybury,” he said, “though that’s not really what it is. Starting Atlantic was a move forward in covering that market, and starting up something new instead of expanding made sense so we could offer different lines and work with new, different suppliers.”

On a guided tour of his company’s headquarters on Denslow Road in East Longmeadow, Maybury pointed out several examples of his wide product line — from different-sized fork trucks to massive platforms — as well as business operating systems; the company is considered progressive and a leader in the implementation of quality programs to reduce errors and improve customer service.

In the building’s suite of offices, Maybury explained further that his company not only sells, installs, and services those storage and material-handling products, but also assists clients with the design and configuration of their manufacturing and storage facilities, adding an extra wrinkle to the Maybury business model.

“A portion of our business is aimed at taking the waste out of the manufacturing process, making space more efficient, and storing things more dynamically,” he said, standing over the shoulder of an employee who was working on a plant design scheme for Table Top pies. “It’s not a matter of us finding a piece of equipment we sell and trying to find a need for it within a customer’s operations. It’s looking at all of the equipment we have — and having a lot to choose from helps — and finding the best solution for that customer. Being able to assist from soup to nuts makes us that much more competitive.

“There’s really no one else like us,” he continued. “There is some isolated competition, but we can go into a client’s space with five, six, or seven totally different solutions to a problem. And among our 74 employees, we are approaching 1,000 years of combined experience. We’re a complete resource.”

To Protect and Store

This quality has enabled Maybury Material Handling to effectively corner the regional market in its specialized industry; while there are some companies that sell or service similar equipment, Maybury said, none include the breadth of products or accompanying services.

He’s gone so far as alphabetizing the list of major offerings in his company literature, and that list starts with aerial platforms and continues to catalog baskets, batteries, benches, and bins; hand trucks and hoists; modular offices and monorails (yes, monorails), sweepers, scrubbers, traffic doors, wheels, and workstations.

“Our business is about 50% power equipment and 50% storage racks, mezzanines, conveyors, and platforms,” he explained, pausing at just such a platform. “We manufacture and sell these, and they’re a great product. They add space to an existing warehouse, but can also be relocated and reconfigured.”

To the right of the platform is a steel cage, at first glance unremarkable; but Maybury is quick to point out that these products are becoming increasingly valuable in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries, which require the strict segregation of chemicals or organically based materials.

Translating the importance of steel enclosures, stairways, and other structures can be daunting, but Maybury has created more than a production facility at the 42,000-square-foot Denslow Road location, which the company has occupied for just a year and a half. The building also includes a showroom and an adjacent conference room that allows Maybury employees to explain the various pieces of equipment and how each might serve the needs of a given client. And beyond that, the facility is equipped with many of the systems Maybury sells, including high-speed doors and vertical carousel filing systems (just the push of a button can locate a file from any year and any month in just a matter of seconds).

Many Moving Parts

That conference room, for instance, is equipped with a retractable wall, which allows for one of Maybury’s favorite tricks: after explaining a few specific pieces of equipment at a computerized white board, he can push a remote control and ask clients to pivot in their seats and look behind them, where an employee has positioned the same equipment behind the wall for viewing.

These high-tech, customer-oriented bells and whistles help in illustrating what the company does and how its services can benefit businesses of varying size, and Maybury said he suspects the healthy leap in business is due in part to the fast pace at which current customers are purchasing new equipment and new clients are discovering the firm.

But as the manufacturing and distribution landscape has shifted in the region and across the country, Maybury said his company has as well, and that is a major contributor to the company’s strong performance of late.

“We understand the Western Mass./Connecticut dynamic, and the manufacturing-to-distribution ratio and how that has changed,” he noted. “Distribution in the area has increased, as well as storage.

“There’s also a greater emphasis within many companies on manufacturing and distribution processes, such as ISO 9000, lean manufacturing, and a greater focus on OSHA requirements,” Maybury added. “That has brought with it different set-up procedures and more emphasis on creating clean working environments, so we’ve adapted to those needs.”

All the Fixin’s

In the coming years, said Maybury, that attention to detail both within his own facility and the industry at large will be a primary driver as he steers the company toward consistent, controlled growth. By adhering to a specific set of procedures and philosophies, he expects the business will continue to flourish.

As for explaining those philosophies over turkey and stuffing … that’s a separate challenge that Maybury will tackle again soon, this time perhaps with the help of some high-tech visual aids.

Jaclyn Stevenson can be reached at[email protected]

Departments

Guerrilla Marketing

Oct. 18: For business owners who want to grow their business but feel stuck in a rut, this presentation will be helpful in understanding how guerrilla marketing can improve sales without spending money on advertising. The Steady Sales Group will present the 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. workshop at the Andrew M. Scibelli Enterprise Center, 1 Federal St., Springfield. The cost is $30. For more information, call (413) 737-6712.

‘Wild on Wine’

Oct. 19: Max’s Tavern on West Columbus Avenue in Springfield will be the setting for a unique wine event titled ‘Wild on Wine’ to benefit the Springfield Boys and Girls Club. The fund-raiser will feature a large selection of fine wines complemented by hors d’oeuvres and carving stations from 6 to 9 p.m. A live jazz ensemble will provide the entertainment. Tickets are $75 per person, and $20 of the ticket price is tax-deductible. For tickets and more information, contact AnnMarie Harding at Max’s Tavern, (413) 746-MAXX, ext. 381 or via e-mail at [email protected] The fund-raiser is sponsored by UBS Financial Services Inc.

Legislative Breakfast

Oct. 20: The Agawam Chamber of Commerce will host a Legislative Breakfast from 7:15 to 9 a.m. at Chez Josef. Speakers expected to participate at the breakfast include State Sen. Stephen Buoniconti and candidates for the state representative seat.

New Traps for Business

Oct. 25: Businesses need to be more aware of the everyday risks and liabilities resulting from new and evolving regulations relating to employment relationships (temporary labor, privacy issues, computer use and fraud, copyright and trade secret abuses, and lending transactions). The Nicolai Law Group, PC will present the 9 to 11 a.m. workshop at the Andrew M. Scibelli Enterprise Center, 1 Federal St., Springfield. The cost is $30. For more information, call (413) 737-6712.

Panel Discussion

Oct. 26: “Un/Welcome Guests: Labor, Law and the Politics of Immigration” is the title of a panel discussion in the Gamble Auditorium at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Legal experts, journalists, and activists will discuss the controversial issues of immigration, migrant labor, homeland security, and the U.S. and Mexican border issues. For more information, visit www.mtholyoke. edu/go/wcl. The event is free and open to the public.

Super 60

Oct. 27: The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield will present its annual “Super 60” program at Chez Josef in Agawam. The event is a salute to the entrepreneurial spirit of the region’s privately owned businesses.

Advanced Internet Marketing

Nov. 1: Participants will learn how to ensure one’s Web site serves its target audience as well as best practices for Web site design and maintenance as part of a 9 a.m. to noon lecture by Ashton Services. Topics also planned: how to judge Web site performance, how to budget for development and operation, and how to interpret Web site statistics and how they can tell you where to focus your efforts. The workshop will be conducted at the Andrew M. Scibelli Enterprise Center, 1 Federal St., Springfield. The cost is $35. For more information, call (413) 737-6712.

“Innovative Thinking & Entrepreneurship”

Nov. 8: Jeffrey C. Taylor, founder and CEO of Eons Inc. and founder of Monster.com, will be the featured speaker from 7 to 9 a.m. in Blake Student Commons as part of Bay Path College’s ongoing Innovative Thinking and Entrepreneurship Lecture Series. Eons Inc. targets people 50 and over, and Taylor is now focused on helping individuals enjoy a better life. Taylor’s new mantra is “Let’s live to be 100 or die trying.” A continental breakfast will be served from 7 to 7:45 a.m. Seating is limited, and reservations may be made by calling Kary Lewis at (413) 565-1293 or via e-mail, [email protected]

Team MA Economic Impact Awards

Nov. 21: The Mass. Alliance for Economic Development will host its third annual Team Massachusetts Economic Impact Awards luncheon at noon at the Seaport Hotel in Boston. For sponsorship and ticket information, contact Jess Millward at (781) 489-6262, ext. 15, or visit www.massecon.com.

Departments

ACCGS Announces ‘Super 60’ Winners

SPRINGFIELD — Business is alive and well in the region as this year’s Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield Inc. (ACCGS) Super 60 revenue winners combined for almost $1.2 billion in the past fiscal year with average revenue for the top 30 exceeding $31 million and 50% exceeding $20 million. Now in its 17th year, the ACCGS award honors the fastest growing, privately held companies in the region for their significant contributions to strength of the regional economy. Companies eligible for the award must be independent, privately owned businesses, be based in either Hampden or Hampshire counties or be a member of the ACCGS, be in business for at least three full years and produce revenues of at least $1 million in the last fiscal year. Seventeen companies are new to the revenue category this year. Four companies on the revenue list also qualify for the growth category, with two companies in the top 10 qualifying for both lists. In addition, four companies new to the category this year are also new to the top-10 revenue winners list. In the growth category, the average growth among the winners was more than 57% with companies needing to have had at least 23% growth in order to be included in the category. Twenty-six of the companies reported growth in excess of 30%, with 18 companies exceeding 40% growth. Winners will be honored at the Super 60 Luncheon and Recognition Program on Oct. 27 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Chez Josef in Agawam. Steven Rothschild, CEO and chairman of bulbs.com, an online specialized lighting distributor, will deliver the keynote address, sharing insights on how to achieve rapid rates of growth in business.

Survey: Single Resume Typo Can Ruin Job Prospects

MENLO PARK, Calif. — The adage “It’s not what you say, but how you say it” holds particular weight when it comes to resumes, a recent survey shows. More than eight in 10 executives polled (84%) said it takes just one or two typographical errors in a resume to remove a candidate from consideration for a job opening; 47% said a single typo can be the deciding factor. The survey was developed by OfficeTeam and includes responses from 150 senior executives at the nation’s 1,000 largest companies. Resumes often are a job seeker’s first contact with prospective employers, according to Diane Domeyer, executive director of OfficeTeam. Domeyer stressed that candidates who submit application materials with typographical or grammatical errors may be seen as lacking professionalism and attention to detail, and thus spoil their chances for an interview or further consideration.

Former State Hospital Project Receives Funding

NORTHAMPTON — Gov. W. Mitt Romney recently signed a bill to provide $7 million in state aid to finish the demolition of the former Northampton State Hospital. The funds were part of a larger bill to assist infrastructure improvements for large private development projects. The House and the Senate passed the bill Aug. 31. Billed as The Village at Hospital Hill, the redevelopment plans include a mix of residential and commercial uses at the site. When completed, the development project will feature 476,000 square feet of office, retail and light industrial space, as well as 207 units of housing, according to the Mass. Development Finance Agency.

Director Named for Embattled PVTA

SPRINGFIELD — Worcester Transit Authority Director Mary L. MacInnes was recently chosen as the new administrator for the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority (PVTA) by its advisory board members. Pittsfield Transit Authority Director Charles M. MacNeil was the other finalist who also received strong support from the advisory board, however, it was Springfield Mayor Charles V. Ryan who cast the deciding vote. Both candidates had indicated their experience in the transit industry would be a benefit to leading the PVTA out of its current crisis of an ongoing federal probe. In other news, board members announced it will terminate its contract with auditing firm KPMG since the firm refused to complete its audit until the PVTA expands its own investigation into possible mishandling of the agency’s finances.

1,000 Jobs Lost Across State in August

BOSTON — The state’s total jobs capped at 3.207 million in August as the unemployment rate climbed to 4.9%, according to the state Department of Workforce Development. Due to a statistical revision to July’s estimated jobs total, Massachusetts lost 1,000 jobs in August. The agency noted the loss of 1,000 jobs was in part due to a new estimate of the state’s jobs gain in July, based on a survey of state employers. The state revised its original estimate of 4,000 jobs gained in July to 4,600. Jobs in education and health care had the greatest gains during the summer, while the financial and manufacturing sectors lost some ground. Overall, the state has added 21,600 jobs since January, and had 29,000 more jobs in August compared with August of 2005.

Unemployment Rate Up Across Valley

The unemployment rate for the Pioneer Valley reached 5.2% in August, according to the state Division of Unemployment Assistance. Job postings in August at FutureWorks, a one-stop career center in Springfield, were down by 31% to 508 listings, while the number of job seekers was up 24%, to 2,390. Of the jobs posted in August, the biggest proportion was in the retail sector, followed by administrative support. Sectors losing jobs included financial activities, information, and government, while the construction and manufacturing sectors remained flat over the year. FutureWorks representatives noted that area residents who are employed don’t appear to be seeking out new job opportunities. Approximately 95% of the job seekers who use the services at FutureWorks are currently unemployed

Departments

The Big E

Sept. 15-Oct.1: The 2006 edition of The Big E will present more than $1.7 million in free entertainment, a ticketed Brad Paisley concert, the Miss Latina U.S.™ Pageant, the return of Marriage on the Midway, and BiggiE’s Character Breakfast as well as the Mardi Gras Parade, rides, crafts, good food, animals and the best of the old and new that fairgoers have come to expect and enjoy. The Big E is located on Memorial Avenue in West Springfield.

‘Team Creativity Disney Style’ Workshop

Sept. 26: The Center for Business and Professional Development at Holyoke Community College will sponsor an all-day workshop titled Team Creativity Disney Style from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development on the HCC campus. The Disney Institute will share with participants the motivational tools that can unleash the creative power of one’s entire organization. The cost is $349 per person which includes continental breakfast, lunch and materials. For more information, contact Maria at (413) 552-2122 or via E—mail at [email protected]

HCC Business Summit

Sept. 27: The Holyoke Community College Center for Business and Professional Development is sponsoring a free workshop for business owners and managers who are looking for more effective ways to train their employees. Titled “Training for the 21st Century,” the workshop is planned from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at HCC’s Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development. The workshop will introduce employers to a new training approach that uses real-life scenarios, follow-up sessions, ongoing contact with instructors, and actual homework for participants. For more information, call (413) 538-5817 or (413) 538-5815.

Planning Amherst Together

Oct. 12, 14, 18, 20: Several public meetings are planned in October to help create an Amherst Master Plan titled Planning Amherst Together. The master plan will address goals and policies on land use, housing, transportation, economic development, community facilities, parks and open space, natural and cultural resources, services and facilities and utilities. Meeting dates are Oct. 12, 7 p.m., and Oct. 14, 10 a.m., both at the Amherst Middle School; Oct. 18 at 1 p.m. at the Jones Library, and Oct. 20 at 9 a.m. in Franklin Patterson Hall at Hampshire College. For more information, contact Neils la Cour at (413) 259-3040 or [email protected].

Women in Technology Workshop

Oct. 13-14: Springfield Technical Community College, in conjunction with the National Institute for Women in Trades, Technology and Science, will present a ‘Women in Technology’ workshop for high school and college teachers and guidance counselors in math, science and technology. The two-day workshop uses case studies, lectures, role-playing and interactive video to present solutions that work in recruiting and retaining young women in programs leading to technology careers. For more information, contact Dean Adrienne Smith at [email protected] or visit http://cbt.stcc.edu/descriptions/women _in_technology.html.

Medical Device Seminar

Oct. 16: The Regional Technology Corp. (RTC), in cooperation with the Mass. Medical Device Industry Council (MassMEDIC), will conduct a seminar focused on medical device product development at FDA regulatory approval procedures. Sponsored by the Bank of Western Massachusetts, the event will take place from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Colony Club, 1500 Main St. in Springfield, and is the opening kick-off to two days of showcasing the life sciences industry in Western Mass. Tom Merle, vice president of Product Innovation at Continuum Inc., and James Wason, executive vice president of Medical Device Consultants Inc. (MDCI) will be guest presenters as experts in medical device product development and FDA regulatory issues. Tom Summer, president of MassMEDIC will also be on hand to discuss any other topics related to medical devices. Advanced registration is required. For more information, contact April Cloutier (413) 755-1314.

‘The Politics of Immigration’

Oct. 26: Un/Welcome Guests: Labor, Law and the Politics of Immigration is the title of a panel discussion in the Gamble Auditorium at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Legal experts, journalists and activists will discuss the controversial issues of immigration, migrant labor, homeland security, and the U.S. and Mexican border issues. For more information, visit www.mtholyoke.edu/go/wcl. The event is free and open to the public.

Super 60

Oct. 27: The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield, Inc. will present its annual “Super 60” program at Chez Josef in Agawam. The event is a salute to the entrepreneurial spirit of the region’s privately owned businesses.

Departments

“Doing Well By Doing Good”

Sept. 12: The Western New England College Law and Business Center for Advancing Entrepreneurship will open its 2006-2007 Entrepreneurship Speaker Series at 5:30 p.m. in the S. Prestley Blake Law Center. Nadine Thompson, chief executive officer and president of the beauty and wellness products company Warm Spirit, will speak on “Doing Well By Doing Good.” Warm Spirit, founded in 1999, is dedicated to socially responsible entrepreneurship and empowering women. The company boasts more than 20,000 direct-sales consultants nationwide. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (413) 736-8462 or visit www.law.wnec.edu/lawandbusiness.

Course for Artists, Artisans

Sept. 13-Dec. 13: The Valley Community Development Corporation (Valley CDC), under contract with the City of Easthampton, will present a 13-week course titled Business Planning for Artists on Wednesdays from 6 to 9 p.m. in Plimpton Hall, Railroad Street, Easthampton. The course is designed for qualified artists and artisans who live in town or whose studios are located in Easthampton. Course topics will include small business management, copyright protection, contracts, market research, working with galleries, trade shows, selling to retail customers and financial management. The deadline to register is Aug. 25 in person at the Valley CDC, 116 Pleasant St., Easthampton. For more information and registration forms, call (413) 529-0420.

The Big E

Sept. 15-Oct.1: The 2006 edition of The Big E will present more than $1.7 million in free entertainment, a ticketed Brad Paisley concert, the Miss Latina U.S.™ Pageant, the return of Marriage on the Midway, and BiggiE’s Character Breakfast as well as the Mardi Gras Parade, rides, crafts, good food, animals and the best of the old and new that fairgoers have come to expect and enjoy. The Big E is located on Memorial Avenue in West Springfield. Advance discount tickets and 17-day value passes are available online at www.thebige.com and the Big E Box Office by calling (800) 334-2443, now through Sept. 9. Tickets are also sold at Big Y World Class Markets now through Sept. 13.

‘Team Creativity Disney Style’ Workshop

Sept. 26: The Center for Business and Professional Development at Holyoke Community College will sponsor an all-day workshop titled Team Creativity Disney Style from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development on the HCC campus. The Disney Institute will share with participants the motivational tools that can unleash the creative power of one’s entire organization. The cost is $349 per person which includes continental breakfast, lunch and materials. For more information, contact Maria at (413) 552-2122 or via e-mail at [email protected]

HCC Business Summit

Sept. 27: The Holyoke Community College Center for Business and Professional Development is sponsoring a free workshop for business owners and managers who are looking for more effective ways to train their employees. Titled “Training for the 21st Century,” the workshop is planned from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at HCC’s Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development. The workshop will introduce employers to a new training approach that uses real-life scenarios, follow-up sessions, ongoing contact with instructors, and actual homework for participants. The deadline to register is Sept. 13. For more information, call (413) 538-5817 or (413) 538-5815.

Western Mass. Entrepreneurship Hall of Fame

Oct. 5: The seventh annual induction ceremony for the Western Massachusetts Entrepreneurship Hall of Fall is planned Oct. 5 at the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House in Holyoke. The event is sponsored by Springfield Technical Community College. Inductees are include The Fontaine Family (Fontaine Bros. Inc.); Jesse and Barbara Lanier (Springfield Food Systems); Horace Smith and Daniel Baird Wesson (Smith & Wesson); The Balise Family (Balise Motor Sales), and The Grenier Family (Grynn & Barrett.)

Super 60

Oct. 27: The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield, Inc. will present its annual “Super 60” program at Chez Josef in Agawam. The event is a salute to the entrepreneurial spirit of the region’s privately owned businesses.

Departments

Stone Soul Festival

Sept. 1-3: Hampden Bank will continue its title sponsorship for the 18th annual Hampden Bank Stone Soul Festival at Blunt Park in Springfield. One of the largest multicultural events in the Northeast, the festival features fun and educational activities for all ages, as well as prize drawings, great food and live music. Festival hours are Sept. 1, 6 to 10 p.m., Sept. 2, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sept. 3, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free admission.

The Big E

Sept. 15-Oct. 1: The 2006 edition of The Big E will present more than $1.7 million in free entertainment, a ticketed Brad Paisley concert, the Miss Latina U.S.™ Pageant, the return of Marriage on the Midway, and BiggiE’s Character Breakfast as well as the Mardi Gras Parade, rides, crafts, good food, animals, and the best of the old and new that fairgoers have come to expect and enjoy. The Big E is located on Memorial Avenue in West Springfield. Advance discount tickets and 17-day value passes are available online at www.thebige.com and the Big E Box Office by calling 1-800-334-2443, now through Sept. 9. Tickets are also sold at Big Y World Class Markets now through Sept. 13.

“Generations …”

Sept. 20: At its September professional development meeting, the Women’s Partnership will present “Generations…Working and Living Side by Side.” A representative from Big Y Foods Employee Services department will be presenting material about preparing employees to face the everyday life of managing and working with people of all generations. The meeting will be held at the Best Western Sovereign Hotel and Conference Center in West Springfield. Networking begins at 11:30 a.m., the program and lunch will be begin at noon and end at 1:15 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance for chamber members, $25 for non-chamber members or payment at the door. To register and purchase a ticket to the meeting, book online at www.myonlinechamber.com or contact Diane Swanson at (413) 755-1313.

‘Team Creativity Disney Style’ Workshop

Sept. 26: The Center for Business and Professional Development at Holyoke Community College will sponsor an all-day workshop titled Team Creativity Disney Style from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development on the HCC campus. The Disney Institute will share with participants the motivational tools that can unleash the creative power of one’s entire organization. The cost is $349 per person which includes continental breakfast, lunch and materials. For more information, contact Maria at (413) 552-2122 or via E-mail at [email protected]

HCC Business Summit

Sept. 27: The Holyoke Community College Center for Business and Professional Development is sponsoring a free workshop for business owners and managers who are looking for more effective ways to train their employees. Titled Training for the 21st Century, the workshop is planned from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at HCC’s Kittredge Center for Business and Workforce Development. The workshop will introduce employers to a new training approach that uses real-life scenarios, follow-up sessions, ongoing contact with instructors, and actual homework for participants. The deadline to register is Sept. 13. For more information, call (413) 538-5817 or (413) 538-5815.

Western Mass. Entrepreneurship Hall of Fame

Oct. 5: The seventh annual induction ceremony for the Western Massachusetts Entrepreneurship Hall of Fall is planned Oct. 5 at the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House in Holyoke. The event is sponsored by Springfield Technical Community College. Event hosts include The Fontaine Family (Fontaine Bros. Inc.); Jesse and Barbara Lanier (Springfield Food Systems); Horace Smith and Daniel Baird Wesson (Smith & Wesson); The Balise Family (Balise Motor Sales), and The Grenier Family (Grynn & Barrett).

Super 60

Oct. 27: The Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield, Inc. will present its annual ‘Super 60’ program at Chez Josef in Agawam. The event is a salute to the entrepreneurial spirit of the region’s privately owned businesses.