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Daily News

HOLYOKE — PeoplesBank has announced the promotions of several key associates.

Alexander Hoyo has been promoted to data management and analytics officer. He has more than seven years of analytics and banking experience. In his new position, he will oversee and participate in the construction and maintenance of reliable, secure, and innovative information systems to support the organization’s data needs. He is responsible for the day-to-day management of the analytics team as it facilitates the acquisition of information from multiple sources and manages the custodianship and distribution of information to business units in a useful and consumable manner.

Clare Ladue has been promoted to assistant vice president, banking center regional manager in the Holyoke region. She has more than 25 years of financial-services and banking experience. In her new position, she will oversee the growth and development of banking-center associates and customer relationships within the defined region.

Amos McLeod III has been promoted to assistant vice president, commercial credit officer. He has more than 18 years of financial-services and banking experience. In his new position, he will underwrite new loan requests, review existing borrowing relationships, and assist with training junior credit analysts.

Jeanna Misischia has been promoted to customer solutions officer. She has more than 20 years of financial-services and banking experience. In her new position, she will have oversight of the bank’s call center and VideoBanker staff as well as day-to-day operations of both departments.

Patricia O’Brien has been promoted to assistant vice president, consumer lending. She has more than 21 years of financial-services and banking experience. In her new position, she will assist in running the daily operations of the residential underwriting department, as well as analyzing residential and consumer applications.

Cassandra Pierce has been promoted to vice president, data management and analytics. She has more than 18 years of data-management and banking experience. In her new position, she will lead the data management and analytics team in constructing and maintaining effective, reliable, secure, and innovative information systems to support the organization’s data needs. She will also provide leadership for effective strategic and tactical planning in the use of information, and will oversee the acquisition of information from one or more sources and manage the custodianship and the distribution of that information to those who need it in a useful and consumable manner.

Mike Raposo has been promoted to digital marketing officer. He has more than seven years of financial-services and banking experience. In his new position, he is responsible for end-to-end management of all digital platforms, including website content and improvements, outbound e-mail marketing, digital message boards in 21 banking-center locations in Massachusetts and Connecticut, online banking advertising, as well as related analytics and analysis.

Christopher Scott has been promoted to assistant vice president, portfolio manager. He has more than eight years of financial-services and banking experience. In his new position, he will continue to support relationship managers in addition to managing his own commercial portfolio.

Tracy Sicbaldi has been promoted to vice president, commercial and institutional banking. She has more than 30 years of financial-services and banking experience. In her new position, she will identify, develop, and manage new municipal, commercial, and institutional deposit relationships.

Karen Sinopoli has been promoted to first vice president, controller. She has more than 15 years of financial-services and banking experience. In her new position, she will maintain the financial records of the bank in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, supervise all accounting and financial-reporting functions of the bank and its subsidiaries, and prepare all requisite corporate tax filings to conform with federal and state law. 

Aaron Sundberg has been promoted to assistant vice president, portfolio manager. He has more than 10 years of financial-services and banking experience.

Daily News

GREENFIELD — This spring, Greenfield Community College (GCC) and Double Edge Theatre will embark on a formal collaboration to grow the role of visual and performing arts within the college and Franklin County. Kicking off with an experimental-performance class taught by Double Edge at GCC next semester, this partnership will evolve into a multi-year endeavor to engage a diverse mix of students and community members in longer productions and spectacles.

“We’re in the early stages of planning, but the excitement is obvious for both parties,” said GCC Theater Department Chair Tom Geha, who has been instrumental in getting this partnership off the ground.

Founded in Boston in 1982 as a feminist ensemble and laboratory for the creative process, Double Edge has been an integral part of the community in Ashfield for the past 25 years. Located on a 105-acre former dairy farm, the theatre welcomes people from around the world to come study, move, perform, produce, and explore the intersection of art and social justice. Over 700 students have come through the company’s rigorous and intensive training. Artistic home to a multitude of passions, skills, and interests, Double Edge attracts thousands of theater-goers every year. Shows are sold out months in advance, and the company has brought its imaginative and visceral work across the U.S. and as far as Central Europe, South America, and Norway.

“We see eye to eye,” says Stacy Klein, Founder and Artistic Director of Double Edge, “Our values and our missions are really similar.”

Added Leo Hwang, GCC’s dean of Humanities, “we see Double Edge as one of the real hallmarks of a forward-thinking organization in Franklin County — they’re really pushing the envelope. It’s an incredible opportunity for GCC to have access to this world-class theater company that’s willing to collaborate with us and include us in this process of discovering and learning.”

Daily News

AGAWAM — The West of the River Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with Agawam Junior High School, held its annual Career Day earlier this month.

Career Day focuses on bringing local business owners and specialty trade members to educate the students on opportunities in various fields of work. The students sign up for selected seminars on skilled trades they are interested in learning more about. It offers the students an insight on numerous opportunities for potential careers. 

Before Career Day started, a program was presented in the auditorium. Alan Rogers of the West of the River Chamber of Commerce introduced Agawam Mayor William Sapelli and keynote speaker Dave Ratner of Dave’s Pet Food City. Special recognition was given to Ashley Fleming, guidance counselor for the eighth-graders. Also recognized were the members of the West of the River Chamber education committee for their efforts in recruiting speakers from the community.

More than 20 speakers — ranging from chefs to lawyers to nurses to sports-management professionals, and many more — addressed students for four sessions on a rotating basis in the classrooms during the course of the morning.

Similar events are held at Agawam High School, West Springfield Junior High School, and the Lower Pioneer Valley Educational Collaborative in conjunction with the West of the River Chamber of Commerce. Through its education committee, the chamber sponsors several events throughout the year, including career days, job shadowing, and mentoring programs.

Daily News

NORTH ADAMS — BFAIR has been selected as a beneficiary of the Stop & Shop Community Bag Program for the month of January. The Stop & Shop Community Bag Program, which launched in May, is a reusable-bag program that facilitates community support with the goal to make a difference in the communities where shoppers live and work. BFAIR was selected as the January beneficiary of the program by store leadership at the Stop & Shop, located at 876 State Road, North Adams. 

BFAIR will receive a $1 donation every time the $2.50 reusable ‘community bag’ is purchased at this location during January, unless otherwise directed by the customer through the giving tag attached to the bag.

“We are excited to participate in this program,” said Rich Weisenflue, CEO of BFAIR. “It’s a win-win for BFAIR and the community — supporting BFAIR programs and services and helping the environment by supporting the reusable-bag initiative.”

For more information on the Stop & Shop Community Bag Program, visit stopandshop.bags4mycause.com.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Michael Matty, president of Springfield-based St. Germain Investment Management, and Christopher Milne, president of Northampton-based Gage-Wiley & Co. Inc., announced they have reached an agreement in which St. Germain is acquiring the assets of Gage-Wiley & Co. Inc. This merger brings together two of the oldest independent investment-management firms in Western Mass. under one entity.

The combined company will hold more than $2 billion in client assets and will operate four offices across the state: St. Germain Investments in Springfield, October Mountain in Lee, and Gage-Wiley in Northampton and Plymouth.

Both St. Germain Investments and Gage-Wiley began as independent broker-dealers in the city of Springfield, founded by their namesakes in 1924 and 1933, respectively. They have both remained locally owned, privately held investment-management firms with a commitment to independence, conservative investment management, and highly personalized client service. They serve a growing clientele of individuals, nonprofits and businesses throughout area, the state, and the world.

The investment professionals at Gage-Wiley, and its registered investment advisor affiliate, New England Capital, will combine with those at St. Germain to create a deep team of 35 financial-management professionals under the St. Germain umbrella. The offices will continue with business as usual, with advisors and managers seeing their own clients in their usual locations, but behind the scenes there will be coordination of strengths and resources that will further enhance services to the companies’ clientele.

“This is a perfect fit for our clients and our organization,” Milne said. “Our cultures are similar, and our approach to clients is akin to St. Germain’s. With this transition, there’s even more expertise available to help our clients plan for their financial future.”

Added Matty, “we are very excited for what the future holds for our newly united company. It will allow us, as a group, to reach a wider client base, provide additional services and resources, while also maintaining the family-oriented, boutique feel Gage-Wiley is so well-known for.”

Though now an affiliate of St. Germain, Gage-Wiley and New England Capital will continue to do business under their current name, and Milne will continue to manage the Northampton and Plymouth offices in his role as managing director.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Through March 1, the Greater Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau (GSCVB) is providing an opportunity to thank individuals who provide great service by nominating them for a Howdy Award for Hospitality Excellence. To nominate someone, visit explorewesternmass.com and click on the Howdy logo.

For 25 years, the Howdy Awards for Hospitality Excellence program has recognized outstanding restaurant servers, attraction attendants, bartenders, hotel personnel, retail clerks, and others across Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties. Official categories include accommodations, attractions, banquets and meetings, beverage, food casual, food tableside, public service, retail, transportation, and people’s choice (a category voted on by the public via social media).

“It’s amazing how popular the Howdy Awards have become, and we work hard to keep that momentum going,” said GSCVB President Mary Kay Wydra. “We started this out over 25 years ago in the hopes we’d help attract some media attention for the hundreds of good frontline folks who meet and greet visitors every day, and it simply took off.”

Since the program’s inception, she noted, dozens of winners have taken home a trophy from the annual awards dinner. This year’s dinner is Monday, May 18 at the MassMutual Center in Springfield.

The path to the winner’s podium begins with a nomination from someone — sometimes a business or leisure traveler but many times a local resident — who felt they’d been noticeably well-treated by a hospitality staff person. Nominations trigger a response by the GSCVB back to the nominee’s employer, seeking more information on the person. Those receiving the strongest feedback may be elevated by the Howdy Awards committee to finalist status. Finalists are ultimately assessed by a three-person panel of judges selected from well outside Western Mass. to ensure impartiality, and those scoring the best earn top honors.

Howdy sponsors for 2020 include Yankee Candle Village, Eastern States Exposition, Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, MGM Springfield, MassMutual Center, Aladco Linen Service, Freedom Credit Union, New Belgium Fat Tire, Baystate Health, People’s United Bank, iHeartMedia, WWLP, the Republican, and MassLive.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Need a haircut or manicure? How about a scalp treatment? Consider stopping by the Cosmetology Student Salon at Springfield Technical Community College (STCC).

The salon, located in Building 20, Room 217, is open to clients Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays for walk-ins 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is a nominal fee for services. No appointment is necessary.

Students can assist with haircuts, styling, scalp treatments, conditioning treatments, manicures, and paraffin hand treatments. A Redken Professional School, the student salon uses and sells Redken and Matrix professional products.

Students in the salon are enrolled in the cosmetology program at STCC, which teaches the art, science, and business aspects of the cosmetology profession. Students who successfully complete the two-semester program will receive a certificate in cosmetology. All students who work in the lab have completed certain requirements mandated by the Massachusetts Cosmetology Rules and Regulations.

For more information, call the salon at (413) 755-4837. To learn more about the cosmetology program at STCC, visit stcc.edu/explore/programs/cosm.crt.

Daily News

CHICOPEE — At its recent annual meeting, the Boys & Girls Club of Chicopee approved a new slate of officers and directors.

Officers include George Flevotomos, Demayo Properties, president; Sarah Mailhott, Polish National Credit Union, first vice president; Rich Rheault, Integrity Merchant Solutions, second vice president; Richard Bernard Jr., Pilgrim Interiors Inc., treasurer; and Tracy Hebda, Complete Payroll Solutions, secretary.

Directors include Tom Baron, Buffalo Wild Wings; Holly Davis, Chicopee Police Department; Angela Gotay-Cheverez, Freedom Credit Union; Anne Gancarz, Chicopee Public Library; Benjamin Garvey, Insurance Center of New England Inc.; Katie Kalbaugh, Chicopee Fire Department; Roberto Nieves, National Ambulance; Jacqueline Pleet, retired; William Sharp, Greater Springfield Credit Union; Tania Spear, Silver Linings Home Care, LLC; Robert Houle, Unity Financial & Insurance Group; and Mike Vogel, Westfield Bank.

Reappointed as members of the board of trustees were Jim Bugbee, Granfield, Bugbee, & Masse Insurance; Kevin Vann, Dufault, Vann & Carella; and Donna Wiley, PeoplesBank. And reappointed as board members emeritus were Bertram Gardner IV, Caolo & Bieniek Architects Inc.; and Earl LaFlamme III, retired.

Four awards were presented at the meeting. The Helping Hands Award was given to Buffalo Wild Wings for its commitment and support. The Dr. Edward Ryan Award, given to fellow board members that have gone above and beyond for the organization, was presented to Anne Gancarz and Rick Rheault. And the Community Partnership Award was given to the members and administration of the Chicopee Police Department.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The final project of a Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) computer information technology class transformed unwanted computers into a gift for students in need.

Students in Professor Brian Candido’s CIT 131 UNIX 2 class rehabbed nine discarded computers, which will be donated to STCC students facing financial hardship.

Student Mohamed “Mo” Arshad arranged to bring in nine older computers from Willie Ross School for the Deaf in Longmeadow, where he works in information technology (IT). After the hard drives were wiped clean, Arshad and other students in December installed the UNIX operating system, which is free software that does not require a license.

“The main concern is to help people who are financially vulnerable, and help them get support for their education,” Arshad said.

Candido, chair of the Computer Information Technologies program, said he has asked his students over the past several years to repurpose computers as a final project in the class. Some of the equipment is not very old and can be of use to students at STCC.

“But it’s obsolete for the company that has it. For us, it can have a second life for a low-income family,” he said. “In the past, these re-imagined computers have been invaluable to the recipients and at times have made a difference in their degree completions.”

Candido plans to deliver the computers to the Center for Access Services at STCC, which provides a range of support services for students facing hardships.

“It’s a win-win,” he said. “It’s a win for our students and a win for the companies. We take the computers off their hands. They’d have to pay to get the equipment removed.”

Bonnie Katusich, director of operations at Willie Ross School for the Deaf, said the school was thrilled to help the students in need and praised Arshad for his efforts in getting the equipment to STCC.

“Technology changes quickly, and we as a school try to recycle or repurpose equipment effectively when we can,” Katusich added. “Many times, there is a fee for such recycling. This time, it feels like we are able to pay it forward thanks to Mo.”

One of the students working on the project added Urdu, the official language of Pakistan, to the operating system. Users can choose English or Urdu on the computer. “My grandmother would prefer it in her own language. She would understand it,” said STCC student Syeda Salman. “I thought maybe there were other people like that.”

Another student, Sean Hundley, of Brimfield, said the computers might inspire students who receive them to consider careers in IT.

“I think it’s great for them not only to have computers, but to give them exposure to an alternative operating system that they can experiment with themselves,” Hundley said. “There’s a lot of opportunities in IT in general. You never know what people will develop out of this, what they will get out of it, and what it will become in the future.”

Daily News

HOLYOKE — As the fall semester concluded recently, representatives from four Holyoke Community College (HCC) student clubs delivered hundreds of winter care packages to agencies in Holyoke and Springfield that serve the homeless.

Members of the HCC Military Club, Criminal Justice Club, Radio Club, and Sociology Club created hygiene kits (84 for women, 86 for men) that included basic toiletries such as razors, shaving cream, deodorant, lip balm, soap, lotion, toothbrushes, toothpaste, combs, and sanitary products.

They also prepared 208 kits that included hats, mittens, scarves, and blankets and gave away winter coats.

On Dec. 20, they dropped off the care packages to the Springfield Rescue Mission and handed out items to the lunchtime crowd at Kate’s Kitchen in Holyoke, part of Providence Ministries.

“Hygiene products were the things the agencies told us were needed the most, especially by homeless people, who often don’t have the opportunity to maintain their hygiene on a regular basis,” said HCC student and Military Club member Robert Vigneault.

The items were collected in donation boxes placed at various locations on the HCC campus, then stored and sorted in the HCC Veterans Lounge. The kits were prepared by students in the days before the delivery using clear plastic bags so people could see what was in them.

“They appreciate wholeheartedly what you’re all giving back,” said Kate’s Kitchen chef Tonya Miller, who is also a housing administrator at Lerato House, a sober-living home for men run by Providence Ministries. “This touches my heart.”

Kate’s Kitchen volunteer Michael Porcello added that “people here really appreciate it. This is a tremendous gift. There are a lot of people who are cold out there. We take this stuff for granted, but this is a necessity for life.”

Jose Laboy collected several kits he said he intended to hand out to people living on the streets, as he once did, who could not make it to Kate’s Kitchen. “My mission is reaching out to people,” he said. “This is great. These people are doing the right thing. A lot of people need these things.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Springfield College unveiled its new master of science in athletic training program, which is accredited under the 2020 Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Curricular Content Standards.

“We are extremely pleased with the feedback from our self-study,” said Mary Barnum, director of the college’s Athletic Training program. “The CAATE stated that the MSAT program strengths include a well-thought-out and structured curriculum highlighted by curricular flexibility in sequencing that will accommodate student needs and interest. We are fortunate that we have such a strong and successful history to build upon, and current faculty who are engaged in leadership positions at all levels of the athletic training profession.”

The new curriculum is the combined effort of many dedicated athletic training educators working over a three-year period to design a program that stayed true to the core values of Springfield College and the athletic training education program. 

The new program also seeks to incorporate innovative and engaging ways to ensure that athletic training graduates are well prepared to meet the healthcare needs of physically active individuals.

Springfield College has a long-standing tradition in preparing athletic trainers for successful careers dating back to 1925. As part of this internationally recognized program, students gain the training and experience to help them succeed in the field. Springfield College’s athletic training tradition includes graduates employed by professional teams, high schools, and colleges and universities.

Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — Aaron Thayer, a chef with experience at exclusive fine-dining establishments in Boston and San Francisco — and at Coco & the Cellar Bar in Easthampton — will open a restaurant called Patria in Thornes Marketplace with his business partner and wife, Abby Fuhrman.

Patria will be located on the basement level in the space formerly occupied by ConVino, which closed in August.

Thayer and Fuhrman expect to open Patria in the spring of 2020. Currently, they are renovating the dining room and kitchen to create a more functional flow and enhance the décor with new furnishings and lighting.

Key in creating a new workflow is a restructuring of the dining room and kitchen to account for the fact that Patria will be focused more on food service, whereas ConVino’s emphasis, as a wine bar, was on beverage sales. “We want to increase usable space,” Thayer said. 

Thayer said Patria will offer fine dining with a relaxed and casual approach. “We don’t want to seem elitist or exclusive,” he said. “We’re taking the things I’ve learned about fine dining and translating them to a more approachable dining experience.”

Patria will specialize in large, family-style roasts, fresh pastas, and vegetable dishes that will all be sharable.

“We’ll start out with a recognizable menu to gain trust and build comfort. As people get to know us, we’ll expand peoples’ palates and bring in some more unique flavors and ingredients,” Thayer said.

Service and quality will be a major focus of the restaurant, and Thayer and Fuhrman will work to create an atmosphere that is comfortable and adventurous. Thayer will use as much local produce and other ingredients as is possible.

Previously, Thayer and Fuhrman planned to open a restaurant in Easthampton called Hunt and Gather. They bought property at 77 Union St., which formerly housed a florist shop, in August 2018. However, because they were changing the use of the structure, the renovation estimates from contractors were cost-prohibitive. The two still own the building, leasing apartments on the upper floors. They are seeking a commercial tenant for the storefront space. 

“We are pleased to welcome Abby and Aaron to the Thornes community,” said Richard Madowitz, Thornes co-president. “We look forward to dining with them, and we are pleased to be able to offer another attractive dining option to residents of the Valley.”

Daily News

SOUTH DEERFIELD — Pilot Precision Products, which opened the doors to its new, 24,000-square-foot facility in South Deerfield in April, received a Silver award in the Western Mass. division at the 2019 Team Massachusetts Economic Impact Awards. Nineteen companies from across the Commonwealth were selected as finalists for MassEcon’s 16th annual celebration of firms for their outstanding contributions to the Massachusetts economy.

MassEcon, the state’s private-sector partner in promoting business growth in Massachusetts, selected the finalists based on their job growth, facility expansion, and investment since Jan. 1, 2018, as well as other criteria, including community involvement. The winners were selected after site visits and a reception with their competitors and judges from Nutter McClennen & Fish, LLP.

Locally owned and operated, Pilot Precision Products is the parent company of duMONT Minute Man Industrial Broaches and Hassay Savage broaching tools, and is the exclusive American distributor of Magafor and GMauvaisUSATM products. Pilot currently has 33 employees and had tripled its sales over the past three years.

“We have invested heavily in state-of-the-art computer-controlled machines, modern manufacturing processes, and software to help ensure a sustainable and profitable future,” said Eric Hagopian, founder and CEO of Pilot Precision Products. “We are community-committed, globally dominant in our field, and poised for continued growth in today’s very competitive, fast-paced manufacturing environment.”

The finalists collectively have added more than 6,200 jobs to the Commonwealth, invested more than $3.2 billion, and expanded their facilities by more than 4 million square feet since January 2018.

“The location of our company was just as important as the breadth of our product offerings because I believe the two go hand in hand,” Hagopian said. “It was important to us to stay in Massachusetts, and specifically in Franklin County. We are strategically located among potential customers and employees; close to many aerospace, defense, and medical-device companies; near numerous vocational schools, colleges, and universities who are developing new talent; and in an area with an abundance of top-notch, skilled metal-working experts. We are proud to call Western Massachusetts the home of Pilot Precision Products.”

Finalists competed on a regional basis in the West, Central, Southeast, Northeast, and Greater Boston areas, with Gold, Silver, and Bronze winners selected by region.

Daily News

MONSON — For the 10th year in a row, Monson Savings Bank is asking the community to help plan the bank’s community-giving activities by inviting people to vote for the organizations they would like the bank to support during 2020.

“Every year, we donate over $150,000 to organizations doing important work in the communities we serve,” said Steve Lowell, president of Monson Savings. “For several years now, we’ve been asking the community for input on which groups they’d like us to support. We’ve been so pleased by how many people inquire each year as to when the voting will begin again and how many people actually participate.”

To cast a vote, visit www.monsonsavings.bank/connect/community-giving.html. On that page is a list of organizations that the bank has already supported in 2019, previously nominated organizations, and a ‘vote now’ button, so voters may provide up to three names of groups they’d like the bank to donate to in 2020. The only requirement is that the organizations be nonprofit and provide services in Hampden, Monson, Wilbraham, or Ware.

The voting ends at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 31. The bank pledges to support the top 10 vote getters and will announce who they are by the middle of January.

Daily News

WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. — The Connecticut Airport Authority and Travelers Aid International (TAI) announced that, in TAI’s first year at Bradley International Airport (BDL), passenger assists have surpassed the 200,000 mark, exceeding last year’s total by a wide margin.

TAI began serving BDL passengers as the operator of the guest-services volunteer program in October 2018.

As of Nov. 30, 2019, the program had helped 212,455 passengers for the year, compared to 130,643 assists for all of 2018. If the Travelers Aid volunteers maintain their average of 19,000-plus assists per month in December, they will surpass last year’s total by 100,000 assists.

“I could not be prouder of the efforts of our incredible volunteers to make passengers and guests feel welcome and to assist them on their journeys,” said Mary Kate Doherty, program manager for Travelers Aid at BDL. “Our volunteers go out of their way to provide high-quality customer service and are true stakeholders in ensuring everyone has a positive experience while traveling to and from Bradley International Airport.”

TAI’s 63 volunteers currently staff the Information Center in Terminal A, on the baggage-claim level, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week. TAI partners with local high schools, senior centers, civic groups, and community groups such as the Greater Hartford and Central CT Retired and Senior Volunteer Program to recruit additional volunteers in order to better serve the airport’s passengers. In appreciation of the hard-working volunteers, Travelers Aid staff hosted a volunteer recognition breakfast at the New England Air Museum this fall.

Anyone interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities may contact Doherty at (860) 500-8582 or [email protected].

Daily News

HOLYOKE — MassHire Holyoke Career Center will present a free workshop on the laws enforced by the Attorney General’s Fair Labor Division, including the payment of wages, minimum wage, overtime, and earned sick time.

At the event — slated for Tuesday, Jan. 28 from 8 to 10 a.m. at 850 High St., Holyoke — guest speaker Barbara Dillon DeSouza will also discuss the broad powers of the Fair Labor Division to investigate and enforce violations of these laws and explain the various ways a company can become the subject of an investigation. Finally, she will note some resources available to companies to keep informed of the laws.

DeSouza is an assistant attorney general in the Fair Labor Division of the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office. She focuses on enforcing Massachusetts wage and hour laws, including prevailing-wage laws. She has been with the office since March 2010.

Coffee and light refreshments will be provided. Seating is limited, so attendees are encouraged to reserve a seat early. Register by contacting Yolanda Rodriguez at (413) 322-7186 or [email protected].

Cover Story

From the Casino to Cannabis, Powerful Forces Have Changed the Landscape

By George O’Brien and Joseph Bednar

As the year and the decade come to a close, BusinessWest takes a look back at the stories that dominated the past 10 years and the forces that have in many ways changed the landscape — literally and metaphorically. These include everything from the tornado that touched down that June day in 2011 to the arrival of casino gambling in Western Mass.; from the emergence of a new and multi-faceted business sector — cannabis — to the growth and maturity of the entrepreneurship ecosystem. In short, the region looks a lot different than it did in January 2010, and most of it is for the better. Because this is 2020, here are the top 20 stories from the past decade.

The Casino Era

Perhaps the most dominant story of the decade was the introduction of casino gambling to the Common-wealth — and it covered the entire decade, to be sure, with a number of plots and subplots.

And, of course, the story continues.

Through the early part of the 2010s, the dominant story was where the casinos would be located. Legislation dictated that one of the resort casinos be located in what is considered ‘Western Mass.’ — everything west of Worcester — and a number of sites in several different communities emerged.

That list included the Big E grounds, the Wyckoff Country Club site in Holyoke, a location just off the Mass Pike entrance in Palmer, a site in Brimfield, and, of course, several locations in Springfield, including two downtown — one on the Peter Pan bus terminal site and the other in the tornado-ravaged South End — and one in East Springfield that eventually became home to CRRC (see listing below).

Eventually, MGM’s proposal to revitalize the South End with a $950 million resort casino was chosen by Springfield and then the Gaming Commission. Construction began in the spring of 2015, and for more than three years, the region watched the massive facility take shape.

It opened in August 2018, and since then, the focus has primarily been on revenues that are lagging well behind what was projected when the casino was proposed. However, Mike Mathis, president and COO of MGM Springfield, has maintained that casinos go through a “ramping-up” process that is generally three years or more in duration, and that the Springfield facility is still very much still in this ramping phase.

Looking forward, MGM officials are optimistic that sports gambling — still being considered by the Legislature — will provide a needed revenue boost. Meanwhile, they point to a number of positive developments spurred by the casino, including jobs, greater vibrancy in the downtown area, a trickle-down effect to other hospitality-related businesses, and new events, such as concerts and the upcoming Red Sox Winter Weekend.

Springfield’s Revitalization

When the decade began, Springfield was still climbing out of a very deep, very dark fiscal hole that it fell into several years earlier, one that took the city into receivership and made it the butt of jokes in the eastern part of the state.

As the decade ends, there is still considerable work to do, but Springfield is a very different place than it was 10 years ago. Its downtown, now anchored by a $960 million casino, is much more vibrant. CRRC is making subway cars in East Springfield. Union Station has been revitalized, and rail service has been expanded. The I-91 viaduct has been replaced. Many of the areas damaged by the tornado of 2011 have been revitalized. Tower Square has new ownership and some intriguing new tenants, including the YMCA of Greater Springfield.

Meanwhile, several of the parks, including Riverfront Park and Court Square, have been restored, and Pynchon Park, which links Dwight Street with the Quadrangle, is getting a facelift. Way Finders is building a new, $17 million headquarters building on the site of the old Peter Pan Bus Terminal. MassMutual is is spending $50 million to renovate and expand facilities in Springfield. Big Y recently completed a $46 million expansion. A $14 Educare facility just opened its doors. The list goes on.

There are still things to be done, such as revitalizing Court Square, building a replacement for the crumbling Civic Center Parking Garage, and spreading the vibrancy at MGM Springfield to properties across Main Street from that complex. But overall, Springfield is enjoying a resurgence, and has taken the step of announcing this loudly, and locally, in a marketing campaign created in concert with the Economic Development Council of Western Mass.

A city that was still very much in a dark place at the start of the decade has now come into the light.

The Rise of Cannabis

While many states have since followed suit, Massachusetts has long been near the vanguard when it comes to legalizing marijuana — first for medicinal purposes in 2012, then for recreational, or ‘adult,’ use in 2016. Both measures were passed by voters at the ballot box, and together they have created nothing less than another economic driver in Western Mass.

New England Treatment Access (NETA), the state’s first dispensary to begin adult sales, drew massive lines when it first opened in November 2018, but still maintains a healthy flow of customers as other shops, like Insa in Easthampton, Theory Wellness in Great Barrington, and others have begun recreational sales — with dozens more, in myriad communities, in various stages of permitting and development.

The burgeoning cannabis trade has impacted other fields as well, such as law, as firms have launched specialized practices to help entrepreneurs navigate the intricacies of this business. Meanwhile, banks eagerly await a possible move on the federal level to allow them to handle cannabis accounts.

Municipalities no doubt appreciate the additional tax revenue, which differs by town — in Northampton’s case, it’s 6% on top of the 17% tax customers pay the state, resulting in a $737,331 haul during NETA’s first three months of operation. In this light, it’s no surprise so many communities have embraced this new cannabis era in Massachusetts.

Marijuana remains illegal federally, but a surge of state-level legalization has probably gained too much momentum for that to remain the case forever. Massachusetts has played no small part in that trend.

A Decade-long Expansion

When the decade began, the economy, in many ways still recovering from what became known as the Great Recession, was nonetheless expanding.

And 10 years later … it is still expanding.

It’s been an historic run in many ways, and one that has seemingly defied the odds and host of issues — from trade wars to turmoil overseas to chaos on Capital Hill — to continue as it has.

For most of the decade, the expansion has been anything but profound — usually a percentage point or two or three of growth — but it has continued, bringing the stock market to new and sometimes dizzying heights — the Dow was above 28,000 as this issue went to press, and the S&P was nearing 3,200 — and the region and the nation to something approaching full employment.

These historically low unemployment levels have brought opportunities for workers and challenges for employers (see below), but they are the most obvious sign that the economy is still humming.

The question is … just how long can this last?

Many of the experts predicted a recession for sometime in 2019. It didn’t happen. Now, many are saying that one is likely for 2020, especially with the current inversion of the yield curve, whereby interest rates have flipped on U.S. Treasuries, with short-term bonds paying more than long-term bonds.

If history is any indicator, then this expansion seems destined to come an end soon. Then again, all the signs, from the stock market to the job market, seem to indicate otherwise.

Workforce Issues

As noted, the expansion has brought with it historically low unemployment in most regions of the country, including Western Mass.

And, as also noted, this has created a market heavily tipped toward the job seeker, which has meant challenging times for employers across virtually every sector of the economy.

Indeed, one consistent theme in the hundreds of interviews BusinessWest conducted with business owners and managers over the past decade has been the ongoing difficulty with finding and retaining good help.

It doesn’t matter which sector you’re talking about — healthcare, financial services, construction, distribution, retail, or hospitality — the one constant has been the struggle to fill the ranks.

At the start of the decade and maybe until a few years ago, employers would say it was a good problem to have; now, they don’t use that phrase so much. It’s just a problem.

And one that has led to some new terminology entering the lexicon: ‘ghosting,’ a situation that occurs when someone is slated to show up for work (or even an interview) and doesn’t, because something better has come along.

The situation has been exacerbated by forces ranging from the retirement of Baby Boomers to the arrival of MGM Springfield, and addressed by initiatives at the state and local levels — from agencies, community colleges, and organizations like Dress for Success — to give more people the skills they need to succeed in a technology-driven economy.

A Growing Entrepreneurship Ecosystem

One of the very best stories over the past decade has been the growth and maturation of the region’s entrepreneurship ecosystem, to the point where it is now a powerful force in the region when it comes to economic development.

The ecosystem has come to have a number of moving parts, from mentorship groups such as Valley Venture Mentors, EforAll Holyoke (formerly SPARK), and Launch 413 to entrepreneurship programs at area colleges and universities; from angel-investing groups that provide much-needed capital to initiatives like UMass Amherst’s Institute for Applied Life Sciences and Springfield-based TechSpring, which are working to take ideas from the lab to the marketplace.

Together, these moving parts have created large amounts of what could be called entrepreneurial energy, which has led to hundreds of new startups selling everything from cookies to mops to software programs that can enable machines to operate more efficiently.

Many of the entrepreneurs behind these ventures have made their way to the cover of BusinessWest, an indication of just how important the startup economy has become to the overall vitality of this region, and how large and impactful the entrepreneurship ecosystem has become.

While many are waiting and hoping for the next Google, Facebook, or Uber, most understand that the many smaller businesses now employing a handful of workers are already changing the landscape in individual communities, such as Holyoke and Springfield.

The Opioid Crisis

In 2016, when Gov. Charlie Baker signed into law a sweeping series of measures aimed at curbing opioid addiction, that class of drugs had long been recognized as a health crisis in the Commonwealth.

Specifically, it was the first law in the nation to limit an opioid prescription to a seven-day supply for first-time adult prescriptions and every prescription for minors, with certain exceptions. Among other provisions, information on opiate use and misuse must be disseminated at head-injury safety programs for high-school athletes, doctors must check the Prescription Monitoring Program database before writing a prescription for a Schedule 2 or Schedule 3 narcotic, and prescribers have ramped up continuing-education efforts, ranging from effective pain management to the risks of abuse and addiction associated with opioid medications, just to name a few.

Progress has been slow. In 2017, there were 1,913 drug-overdose deaths involving opioids in Massachusetts — a rate of 28.2 deaths per 100,000 persons, roughly double the national rate of 14.6. The greatest increase in opioid deaths was seen in cases involving synthetic opioids, mainly fentanyl: a rise from 67 deaths in 2012 to 1,649 deaths in 2017.

More recent news has been mixed. Opioid-related overdose deaths in Massachusetts fell 6% in the first nine months of 2019 compared to the first nine months of 2018, according to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Between January and September of 2019, there were 1,460 confirmed and estimated opioid-related overdose deaths in Massachusetts, compared to 1,559 in the first nine months of 2018.

However, the fentanyl problem grows — it was present in 93% of opioid-related overdose deaths where there was a toxicology screen over that time frame, up from 89% in 2018. Still, the state’s multi-pronged approach to the opioid epidemic may finally be making a difference.

The Tornado of 2011

There aren’t many residents and business owners who don’t have vivid recollections of the tornado that roared across Western Mass. on June 1, 2011.

Indeed, it traveled through a number of communities, leaving in its wake heavy damage and rebuilding challenges like the region had never seen.

It ravaged rural areas like Belchertown, but also traveled right down Main Street in Springfield, crossing over City Hall as it did so.

As it tore across Springfield and the region, the tornado didn’t discriminate; it damaged elementary schools, colleges, and especially what was then Cathedral High School, which was eventually razed and replaced with a much smaller facility known as Pope Francis High School. It laid waste to Monson’s scenic landscape. It changed the landscape at Veterans Golf Course in Springfield and completely uprooted Square One, the early-childhood education provider located in Springfield’s South End. (Joan Kagan, executive director of Square One, became the face of the disaster, literally and figuratively, as her picture — taken on Main Street with the agency’s ravaged home behind her — graced the cover of BusinessWest a few days later.)

After the dust settled, the difficult and inspiring cleanup and recovery began, and in some ways, it is still ongoing. Efforts to rehabilitate the South End of Springfield were greatly accelerated by MGM’s proposal to build a resort casino partly on parcels damaged by the casino. But several other businesses have risen in that era, including a new CVS pharmacy.

The Potential of Rail

State Sen. Eric Lesser has long been touting east-west rail service connecting Western Mass. and Boston, arguing that an 80-minute ride from Springfield’s Union Station to Boston’s South Station would be a game changer — and not only for Springfield.

“In Western Mass., we have great quality of life, great schools, a lot to offer, but we’re not creating jobs fast enough to keep people here,” he told BusinessWest. “As a result, we’ve seen a vacuuming of jobs and opportunities into a handful of zip codes. And in Boston, two crises are playing out simultaneously: out-of-control traffic gridlock and skyrocketing housing prices.”

Connecting the regions with high-speed rail could help solve both problems, he often argues. High-speed rail service between Pittsfield and Boston — with up to 16 round-trip trains running every day along the Interstate 90 corridor — was among the options for linking Western Mass. to Boston presented by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation to a state advisory committee in Springfield recently.

It’s not like rail hasn’t already made life easier in Western Mass., what with the launch of the Amtrak Vermonter line in 2016 and the Valley Flyer service between Greenfield and Springfield earlier this year. Ridership originating in Northampton on the Vermonter line increased from 17,197 riders in 2016 to 21,619 in 2018, reflecting a growing demand for rail.

“The new generation — people my age and younger — don’t want to sit in their cars all day,” Lesser said. “They don’t want long commutes on clogged highways. They’re open to using buses and trains in a way that maybe previous generations weren’t. Again, it would solve a lot of overlapping challenges we’re facing all at the same time.”

CRRC’s Rail Cars

A region that used to be home to many major manufacturing companies — at least, more than exist today — got a major boost in 2014 with the announcement that Chinese rail-car manufacturing giant CRRC was coming to Springfield to build hundreds of new cars for the MBTA’s Orange Line and Red Line systems.

The initial contract was for 152 Orange Line cars and 132 Red Line cars to replace aging trains. Two years later, an additional order was placed for 120 more Red Line cars, bringing the state’s total investment in new cars to $566 million.

From CRRC’s $95 million factory on Page Boulevard, which employs about 200 people, about a dozen trains have been delivered, and the company also built a 42,500-square-foot warehouse at the site this year to house large components.

The company’s leaders say they invested in Springfield with an eye on significant growth in the U.S. That has come to fruition, with a deal in 2016 to manufacture new subway cars for the city of Los Angeles and an agreement in 2017 to build new train cars for SEPTA, Philadelphia’s transit system, to name just two developments.

MBTA says the new vehicles incorporate improved safety features, wireless communications for monitoring potential maintenance needs, improved passenger comfort, new technology that provides important customer-facing information, and cutting-edge accessibility features, such as platform gap-mitigation devices.

For Springfield, however, the trains represent something greater — a major manufacturing success story at a time when one was needed.

The Dr. Seuss Museum

For years, people visiting the Dr. Seuss sculpture garden in the Quadrangle would ask where the museum devoted to the beloved children’s author and Springfield native was located. And they would be told there wasn’t one.

That all changed in the summer of 2017, with the opening of the Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum, a facility that has provided a true measure of the awesome power of the Seuss name and brand by attracting visitors from across the region and country and from around the world.

In its first year of operation, the museum enabled the Quadrangle to shatter attendance records, and the numbers have been steady and quite impressive since.

Museum officials are optimistic that the attendance and revenue boost from the Seuss facility will enable it to modernize and expand many of its other facilities. Meanwhile, civic and economic-development leaders say Seuss gives Springfield a powerful addition to its roster of attractions, one that can inspire — and lengthen — visits to the region.

Holyoke’s Renaissance

Another intriguing story from this past decade has been the resurgence in the city of Holyoke, a proud industrial city that has been re-inventing itself as a center for the arts, entrepreneurship, and, yes, cannabis.

In fact, in one interview with a TV crew several months ago, Holyoke’s mayor, Alex Morse, joked that it was goal, if not his mission, to see the community’s nickname change from the Paper City to the Rolling Paper City. That remark speaks to the enthusiastic manner in which the city embraced the legalization of cannabis in the Commonwealth and essentially opened its doors to many different kinds of businesses within that sector. Today, hundreds of thousands of square feet of former mill space is being eyed for cannabis cultivation and other uses, and several facilities are already operating.

But cannabis is only one of many good stories that have unfolded in Holyoke over the past decade. Others include the opening of the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center in 2012; renovation of the property known as the Cubit Building, which is now home to apartments as well as the Holyoke Community College MGM Culinary Arts Institute; creation of SPARK, an agency devoted to encouraging and mentoring entrepreneurs (now named EforAll Holyoke); new rail service; and a burgeoning cultural district in the heart of downtown.

Like Springfield and other gateway cities and former industrial centers, Holyoke has evolved beyond those roots, and with very positive results.

Springfield Thunderbirds

One of the best stories of the decade involved hockey in Springfield, and specifically a new team that has infused the region with energy, imagination, and, yes, entertaining hockey.

We’re talking about the Springfield Thunderbirds, a team, and a story, so good that the franchise’s owners and managers were named BusinessWest’s Top Entrepreneurs for 2017.

To recap quickly, hockey, which has a rich history in Springfield dating back to the 1930s, was struggling in Springfield toward the middle of the decade. And then, it was gone, as the franchise known as the Springfield Falcons relocated to Arizona.

But a large group of entrepreneurs and community activists were determined not to see hockey relegated to the past. Their first move was to purchase a franchise in Portland, Maine, and relocate it to Springfield. Their second, even more important, move was to put Nate Costa, then working for the American Hockey League in its Springfield office, in charge.

His goal was to turn the Thunderbirds into a household name, and he has done just that, making the T-Birds, as they’re called, a big part of the renaissance taking place in Springfield.

The team is averaging more than 5,000 fans a night through a host of imaginative efforts — from promotions such as 3-2-1 Fridays ($3 beers, $2 hot dogs, and $1 sodas) to bringing in celebrities such as Red Sox stars David Ortiz and Pedro Martinez.

The end result? A ticket to a hockey game at the MassMutual Center is much more difficult to come by. That’s a sign of the T-Birds’ success on the ice, and in their ability to become part of the proverbial big picture when it comes to Springfield’s revitalization.

Bay Path University’s Evolution

A quarter-century ago, Bay Path College was a small, two-year school experiencing an identity crisis on a number of levels. Today, the institution is a university and a brand known across the region, and also across the country.

And the continued growth and emergence of Bay Path, led by President Carol Leary, who will be retiring next spring, certainly deserves to be among the biggest stories of the past decade.

The college, recently ranked among the fastest-growing private baccalaureate institutions in the nation, has, over the past several years, created the American Women’s College, an online institution; added several new programs, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels; opened a new science center in East Longmeadow; and become an industry leader in cybersecurity and computer-science programs. Meanwhile, it continues to stage its annual Women’s Leadership Conference each spring, an event that draws roughly 1,000 people to the MassMutual Center.

And in 2014, the institution had to create a new sign at its entrance in the center of Longmeadow, one with enough room for the word ‘university,’ a step that reflects its more global reach and its rising brand.

Over the past few years, Leary has been twice honored by BusinessWest, first with its Difference Makers award, and then its Women of Impact award. Those accolades speak to how much she has done for the school and within this region. But they also reflect just how far this school has come.

Ludlow Mills on Schedule

It’s been more than eight years since Westmass Area Development Corp. announced the 20-year project known as Ludlow Mills — a blend of both brownfield and greenfield development — and, about a third of the way through that time frame, progress at this complex of 60 buildings and adjoining undeveloped land has been steady.

When it started the clock back in 2011, Westmass said this project would generate $300 million in public and private investments, more than 2,000 jobs, and a more than $2 million increase in municipal property taxes. To date, high-profile initiatives on the site include the building of Encompass Health Rehabilitation Hospital of Western Massachusetts, WinnDevelopment’s overhaul of the structure known as Mill 10 into over-55 housing, and several smaller developments.

And there is more on the drawing board, most notably WinnDevelopment’s planned conversion of Mill 8, the so-called Clock Tower Building, into a mixed-used project featuring commercial space on the ground floor and more housing in the floors above.

The next key milestone for the project is the construction of Riverside Drive, which will open up approximately 60 acres of pre-permitted light-industrial property.

“We’re getting a lot of interest,” said Jeff Daley, Westmass’ new CEO, who noted that one of the front parcels was sold to the town of Ludlow for a new senior center, which recently broke ground. “That’s going to be a beautiful building to showcase the property from the eastern side.”

Ludlow’s municipal leaders say Ludlow Mills is already creating a trickle-down effect to the town and the region in terms of jobs and other benefits.

“It’s growing,” Daley added, “and there’s a lot of momentum, a lot of interest. People are coming in and creating stable businesses, and creating jobs. It’s really exciting.”

Ideas Take Shape at IALS

UMass Amherst may be renowned for cutting-edge scientific research, but when it comes from turning published papers into public benefits, the transition hasn’t always been smooth. Enter UMass Amherst’s Institute for Applied Life Sciences (IALS, pronounced ‘aisles’), where a collection of ‘core facilities’ is helping boost the state’s manufacturing economy — and innovation reputation — in myriad ways.

IALS was created in 2013 with $150 million in capital funding from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC) and the university itself. Its mission is to accelerate life-science research and advance collaboration with industry to effectively shorten the gap between scientific innovation and technological advancement.

The institute achieves this goal through three translational centers: the Models to Medicine Center, which harnesses campus research strengths in life science; the Center for Bioactive Delivery, which seeks to discover new paradigms for the discovery of optimized delivery vehicles for drugs; and the Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, which aims to accelerate the development and commercialization of low-cost, wearable, wireless sensor systems for health and biometric monitoring.

Located inside the IALS building, these core facilities — now numbering more than 30 — and their high-tech equipment are available not only to UMass researchers, but to companies that want to rent the space and equipment. For those companies, IALS provides a key resource they might not be able to afford on their own — and it could make a difference whether they invest in Western Mass. or go elsewhere.

Together, they form a pathway to commercialization — a vehicle to bring research to fruition and make an impact on society. By creating connections between research and the marketplace, IALS is doing its part to make Western Mass. a hub of innovation.

Baystate’s Expansion

Baystate Medical Center was already the region’s largest hospital — and the flagship of an ever-broadening network of hospitals and specialty practices — when it launched an ambitious, $295 million expansion, called ‘the Hospital of the Future,’ toward the end of the last decade.

‘Future,’ in this context, had multiple meanings. One was a forward-looking mindset when it came to technology, how a modern emergency room should look, and sustainable design and construction elements in the 640,000-square-foot addition. Another was the fact that Baystate left much of the new space undeveloped inside, knowing it would be needed in, well, the future.

When the new space opened in April 2012, its MassMutual Wing housed the Davis Family Heart and Vascular Center, which includes six surgical/endovascular suites designed to accommodate advanced lifesaving cardiovascular procedures, as well as 32 cardiovascular critical-care rooms that support state-of-the-art medicine. Later that year, a much larger Emergency Department opened in the new building, replacing an outdated ER that was designed to handle much less traffic than it was currently receiving.

That’s not the only way Baystate was expanding, of course. It also brought Wing Memorial Hospital and Noble Hospital into its system in 2014 and 2015, respectively, and continued adding to what has become a broad medical campus on the north end of Main Street in Springfield — not to mention its partnership with UMass Medical School in creating a downtown campus, which opened in 2016.

In short, whatever the future brings in healthcare locally, Baystate has placed itself square in the center of it.

Transformation in North Amherst

Cinda Jones, who, with her brother, Evan, represents the ninth generation of Cowls family landowners in North Amherst, has said each generation has transformed the land into what was most beneficial to the community at the time.

These days, she’s putting that philosophy to work at North Square at the Mill District. In fact, Jones’ company, W.D. Cowls Inc., and Boston-based Beacon Communities are developing three mixed-use buildings featuring 130 residential units — including 26 affordable units for people at or below 50% of the area’s median income — and 22,000 square feet of commercial space. The first residents began moving in over this past summer.

The partnership has benefited from local, state and federal support; in fact, it’s the first time that Amherst has taken advantage of legislation allowing the town to grant special tax incentives for projects that include affordable housing for low- and moderate-income tenants.

While impressive on its own, North Square reflects one of the more notable development trends in recent years: mixed-use structures in urban and village centers that generate economic vibrancy simply by putting more feet on the street.

Isenberg Climbs in the Rankings

One of the more intriguing stories from the past decade has been the steady rise of the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst, a facility that has taken on a new profile — on campus and across the country.

The school, which first opened its doors in 1947, is now ranked first (actually, it’s tied with UConn) among the public undergraduate business programs in the Northeast in the 2020 U.S. News & World Report listings, 11th among the best public business schools in the country, and 50th in the rankings of the best business schools overall.

These numbers have been climbing steadily over the past years as the Isenberg School has made every greater investments in its programs and faculty, an expansion initiative punctuated by the opening this year of a $62 million expansion that puts a new face on Isenberg and boldly announces its intentions to continue its rise in the ranks.

EDC on a Mission

The goal of the Economic Development Council (EDC) of Western Mass. is multi-faceted, but has long boiled down to one core mission: encouraging the growth of the region’s economy, which was pounded by the Great Recession but has since been on a decidedly upward trajectory.

Its president, Rick Sullivan, says the EDC has seen a definite uptick in site searches, both from companies in the region that want to expand and those looking at Western Mass. for the first time.

“What we’ve become is what we call an ‘honest broker,’ he said. “We treat private developers and quasi-public developers the same. When a request comes in, it goes out to everyone on the list, all the economic-development professionals in the area, and we do not care whether the development occurs in Greenfield or Agawam or anywhere in between. We just want to have growth happen in the region, and that will continue to be the case.”

Many of the searches don’t result in a business moving here, he added, but those inquiries are a good gauge of the current health of the economy and the potential of the region, and they’re coming from a range of industries, from manufacturers and construction-materials companies to warehousing operations and call centers. When the region is doing well, Sullivan said, its natural pluses, such as its position near major interstates roughly between Boston and New York, become even more attractive.

Meanwhile, the EDC has forged stronger partnerships with colleges and universities, such as a cybersecurity management program at Bay Path and water-innovation and clean-energy work at UMass Amherst. “I think you’ll see the EDC do more with higher ed,” Sullivan said. “That’s where the talent pool is.”

The economy might eventually waver, but the EDC intends to maintain a steady course when it comes to raising the profile and success of its namesake region.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Features

Casting Call

Laura Teicher and Adam Rodrigues, seen here at FORGE’s satellite office in the Springfield Technology Park, say the agency is more than living up to its new name.

The agency formerly known as Greentown Learn has been rebranded as FORGE, a name that more effectively speaks to its mission of making connections between entrepreneurs and manufacturers that can create prototypes of their products or actually produce them. Since its inception, FORGE has facilitated such connections for nearly 200 companies, helping improve the survival rate of such ventures while also bringing more work to a number of area manufacturers.

Neil Scanlon equated it to a sales force — a different kind of sales force, to be sure.

He was referring to the agency now known as FORGE and formerly known as Greentown Learn — a rebranding was deemed necessary, and we’ll get into that in some detail later — the nonprofit arm of Greentown Labs in Somerville, which loudly proclaims itself the “largest clean-technology incubator in the United States” and “the best place in the world to build a clean-tech hardware company.”

FORGE was created to help those entrepreneurs developing this hardware to create prototypes and find manufacturers that could build the products they’ve developed and specific components for them — more specifically, manufacturers in Massachusetts and especially Western Mass.

Indeed, one of the primary goals behind FORGE was to build what’s being called an east-west connection — products developed in the eastern part of the state and prototyped and produced in the western region. It’s still a work in progress, but there have been a number of matches made, including several with Scanlon’s company, Worthington Assembly in South Deerfield.

“It’s like a sales force in a way — not a traditional sales force in most respects. It’s giving recognition to a manufacturer that might be able to help a startup — a connection that might not have happened otherwise.”

He’s not sure exactly how many of these matches have been made because many of the orders are placed through a sophisticated online system. But he’s quite sure that a good number of boxes heading out the door are bound for Somerville.

“Worthington ships to Greentown quite often, and I don’t always know how that connection was made,” he said, adding that he does know that his firm, which specializes in circuit-board assembly and has customers in many different sectors, has gained some new customers through FORGE.

“It’s like a sales force in a way — not a traditional sales force in most respects,” he went on. “It’s giving recognition to a manufacturer that might be able to help a startup — a connection that might not have happened otherwise.”

This is exactly what those at Greentown Labs had in mind when they created its sister organization, now known as FORGE, said Laura Teicher, the agency’s executive director.

As she talked with BusinessWest in FORGE’s satellite office in the Springfield Technology Park in Armory Square, she said the nonprofit is succeeding with its basic mission of helping to see that products blueprinted in Massachusetts are prototyped and manufactured here, when possible.

“Through its Western Mass. office, FORGE is able to engage a critical cluster of precision manufacturers in producing prototypes, early runs, and production at scale, deepening the east-west link between Eastern Mass. startups and Pioneer Valley manufacturers that was started with the support of leadership in the House of Representatives,” she said.

Startups like RISE Robotics, which is working to replace energy-intensive hydraulic systems with clean and efficient electronic models, and has engaged area manufacturers such as Peerless Precision and MTG Inc., both in Westfield, to create prototypes.

And like Clean Crop Technologies (CCT), a Haydenville-based startup working to solve the crisis of aflatoxin infection in grain and nut crops, which reportedly causes more than 100,000 deaths and $1.7 billion in lost revenues each year, especially in developing countries.

Led by co-founder and President Dan White, the company has, through FORGE, connected with Newbury, Mass.-based Product Resources to create a prototype of a post-harvest assembly-line-like fumigation process that removes up to 90% of aflatoxin from crops in less than 20 minutes.

But White noted that some components for this system, which he equated to the sandwich-making line at Quiznos, may be produced by manufacturers in the 413.

For area manufacturers, meanwhile, FORGE acts as that sales force that Scanlon mentioned by introducing entrepreneurs to area shops and acquainting them with their capabilities. And most need some help in this critical step in bringing a product to the marketplace, because they don’t know what skills are needed or how to find a firm that possesses those capabilities.

“Greentown Labs is inventing products in Massachusetts, and FORGE’s mission is to make sure they’re made in Massachusetts,” said Kristin Carlson, president of Peerless Precision, adding that she conducts ‘lunch and learns’ in Somerville and takes other steps to educate entrepreneurs not only about the firms in the area and what they can do, but also how to approach manufacturers, what those shops need to submit a quote, and about the higher quality they’ll get if they choose a Baystate firm instead of one overseas.

Scanlon agreed. “It’s not easy to figure out who might be a good match just by doing Google searches,” he said. “Especially when it comes to small, Western Mass. shops that are not strong in marketing themselves — that’s where FORGE comes in.”

For this issue, BusinessWest talked with manufacturers and entrepreneurs alike to find out how FORGE is living up to its mission — and its name.

Testing Their Metal

Teicher told BusinessWest that, even as she was being interviewed for the job of executive director of Greentown Learn more than a year ago, she was thinking the agency’s name didn’t effectively convey what it was all about, and that it needed to be changed.

And when she won the job, she made it one of her first priorities to orchestrate a rebranding.

This was a months-long process, she noted, adding that the agency wanted a name that reflected its mission, a task made more difficult by the fact that most words associated with manufacturing, making, metalworking, and so on were not usable because they’d been copyrighted or trademarked, or incorporated into a URL.

“It might be six months or 12 months later that you hear from the entrepreneur who has a set of fabrication files, and they need something quoted.”

“Any cool name that you can come up with that signals hardware has been taken,” she said, adding that some that weren’t already taken came with other problems, or baggage.

Like ‘KINECT,’ a brand option that was one of several finalists, if you will. It’s a play on words, and an effective one, blending ‘connect’ with ‘kinetic energy.’ Problem was, said Teicher, that research revealed this same name was attached to a failed Super Nintendo app.

“We were very close; we were attached to it for a while,” she said. “It was great because we’re forging connections, we’re working with physical products, and it’s pretty simple. But we didn’t want to be mixed up with a failed product at all. And there’s something a little childish about it because of the K’Nex toys — so we didn’t want that association, either.”

Kristin Carlson says FORGE helps educate entrepreneurs on the capabilities of Bay State shops and also the advantages to getting work done in the Bay State instead of overseas.

Eventually, those involved with the process settled on FORGE, which is not an acronym for anything (the capital letters are used for emphasis), but a name that drives home that ‘forging relationships’ is a critical part of the equation.

Which is important because, while the companies at Greentown Labs are pushing the envelope when it comes to clean-tech hardware, they often struggle to find partners to take their concepts off the drawing board — or the computer image, as the case may be.

And they are likely unaware of the large and in many ways historic precision-manufacturing sector in the Pioneer Valley, a sector born, in many respects, essentially where that satellite office is located, within what was the Springfield Armory complex.

FORGE makes introductions to companies in a number of ways. It organizes tours — manufacturers we spoke with said they have hosted a number of visits as a result of the initiative — and also helps companies draft requests for proposals for specific projects. And it organizes events such as the first annual Supplier and Innovation Showcase at Greentown Labs.

The gathering was designed to support connection-building efforts between inventors and makers, and it drew more than 200 attendees from the innovation and manufacturing ecosystems, said Teicher, who noted that, since its inception in 2015, FORGE has helped more than 190 startups source their supply chain with what she called “right-fit and ready local connections to manufacturers,” thus helping them over some critical humps that often derail such ventures.

“These startups have an 85% survival rate to date, far exceeding national standards, proving that FORGE has identified and provides a critical intervention for these startups,” she told BusinessWest, adding that programming has led to more than 130 contracts to manufacture innovative physical products and components in the region, infusing a known economic value of roughly $11 million — and counting.

The Western Mass. satellite office plays a key role in these efforts, said Adam Rodrigues, director of Regional Initiatives, adding that it serves as a clearinghouse for connecting startups with area manufacturers, often through those aforementioned tours, which are often eye-opening.

Companies may or may not be ready to seek manufacturing help when they take the tour, he added, but they’ve made a connection and generally go home with a business card. And when they are ready, they use it.

Scanlon agreed.

“Oftentimes, the connection may happen much later — it’s not right after the tour,” he explained. “It might be six months or 12 months later that you hear from the entrepreneur who has a set of fabrication files, and they need something quoted.”

Getting a Lift

The case of RISE Robotics, which has recently ‘graduated’ from Greentown Labs and is now operating in Somerville, exemplifies just how FORGE makes those connections.

Arron Acosta, co-founder and CEO, told BusinessWest that the company is making strides in its efforts to create a ‘green’ alternative to energy-intensive hydraulic systems used in everything from fork trucks to bulldozers to tractor trailers. Through FORGE, the company was connected with three manufacturers with the requisite capabilities, including Peerless and MTG, to produce prototypes of the RISE cylinder, which, according to the company’s website, “delivers hydraulic-like performance in a simple, maintenance-free and fluid-free package.”

The prototypes developed by the firms in this region have not moved to the production stage for various reasons, he said, but the experience of working with those firms has been very beneficial on the company’s long climb to find the optimal market fit.

CCT is another solid example of how FORGE works, said Teicher, noting that the nonprofit not only connected the company with relevant manufacturers, but also helped it find R&D lab space in Haydenville and at the Institute of Applied Life Sciences at UMass Amherst that allowed it to remain in Western Mass.

White said the ag-tech startup combines air with electricity to degrade contaminants in food and is focusing much of its energies on combating alfatoxins on peanuts.

“But as a technology and as a venture, we’re looking much bigger and broader than that over the long term,” he told BusinessWest. “By sterilizing the surface of foods with these ionized gases, we can get up to two to three times shelf-life extension for perishable foods; for example, we’ve been treating blackberries, and we’ve been able to get an additional five days of shelf life in the refrigerator because we’re knocking off that surface mold while otherwise not affecting the quality of the food.”

White said the company, looking to scale up, was drawn to the Bay State and, more specifically, Western Mass. — instead of Virginia, where his partner in the venture was living — because of the extensive innovation ecosystem in the Commonwealth.

And FORGE is a big part of this ecosystem.

“Fairly early on, in April or May, I can’t remember how, but I found out about Greenfield Learn,” he explained. “And they were extremely helpful in connecting me very quickly to a range of product-prototyping and manufacturing partners that I had no idea existed here in Massachusetts.”

Those thoughts sum up why FORGE was created — to give entrepreneurs an idea of the shops that exist and their capabilities, but also some education in why firms in the Bay State are often their best option, said Carlson, who, like Scanlon, sits on the board of advisors for the nonprofit agency.

She told BusinessWest that, oftentimes, entrepreneurs are looking for “cheap and fast” to get a prototype out the door.

“One of the goals at FORGE, and also within the firms in Western Mass., is to educate these entrepreneurs that, in Massachusetts, you get what you pay for,” Carlson went on. “You’re not going to get something you didn’t order.”

Jack Adam, vice president and co-owner of MTG, agreed. He said his firm, which provides a wide range of services, including high-volume laser cutting, welding, machining, precision forming, and more, works with clients — and RISE Robotics is one of them — to look at products and “make them more manufacturable,” as he put it.

“We support the OEMs and new-company startups to some degree, to come up with a product that’s manufacturable — we try to tell them that, ‘if you do it this way, instead of that way, you can eliminate a lot of welding, save some money, be more cost-effective, and be more competitive out there,’” he said, adding that this is the kind of support it provided to RISE Robotics as it helped the company produce close to 20 prototypes of its products.

And while helping startups by providing such services, these manufacturers are also helping themselves become more nimble and more competitive, said Scanlon, adding that it also helps them think more globally.

“It gets them thinking that there’s more out there than defense work, there’s more out there than United Technologies work,” he noted. “Meanwhile, these projects will be a little more challenging, they’ll be a little more cost-sensitive. It’s kind of like working out; it gets you more fit — it gets your business more fit.”

Parts of the Whole

As he talked with BusinessWest about RISE Robotics and the team behind it, Adam said, “they’re trying; they’re young folks, and they’re pretty talented. They’re going to hit some home runs someday, and they’re getting pretty close.”

With that, he described most of the startups at Greentown Labs and those who have graduated as well. Many are getting close, and a good number are potential home-run hitters.

To clear the bases, though, most need help taking a product from the concept stage to the prototype stage to the production line. And the aptly named FORGE is helping companies find that help.

As Scanlon noted, it’s become a different kind of sales force, and a very effective one.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Environment and Engineering

Scaling Up

John Carpenter, left, and Neville Orsmond proudly display some of the commemorative 50th-anniversary rods being manufactured at Thomas & Thomas.

Five years ago, South African Neville Orsmond, an avid fly fisherman, purchased the Thomas & Thomas company and went about resuscitating perhaps the iconic brand within that industry, one that is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. While putting the company on a solid foundation, he has also made it part of conservation efforts locally and globally that will help ensure this sport’s sustainability and preserve some of the most beautiful places in the world.

As the celebrated fly-rod brand Thomas & Thomas marks a milestone — a half-century of helping anglers land the big ones — there is much to celebrate.

Starting with the fact that the brand is still here to commemorate this occasion. That wasn’t a given when Neville Orsmond purchased the Greenfield-based company in late 2015, at a time when the brand wasn’t living up to its high standards for quality, sales were reflecting this reality, and the future was certainly in doubt.

But Orsmond, the South African and avid fly fisherman who visited the plant in the fall of 2015 and became inspired to purchase the company and mount a salvage operation, now has Thomas & Thomas hitting on all cylinders.

Indeed, the workforce has doubled since he took over, sales have increased by 40% on average since Orsmond bought the company, new equipment has been installed and more efficient processes put in place, and the brand fully lives up to the slogan has been attached to it for decades — “the rod you’ll eventually own.”

“We can’t make enough rods to sell — we’re struggling to keep up with demand,” said Orsmond, stating the problem — if it’s really a problem — in concise, impactful fashion, adding that the brand, which had suffered reputation-wise earlier in the decade, is back on its lofty perch looking down on the rest of the industry.

Which is why there is plenty to celebrate as the company marks 50 years since two brothers-in-law named Thomas — Dorsey and Maxwell — decided they could make a fly rod batter than anyone and went ahead and started making them.

Among the things being celebrated:

• The fact that the company still does almost everything by hand and has strongly resisted any and all thoughts of moving to something approaching mass production, despite those struggles to meet demand;

• The waiting times that this operating philosophy creates — maybe nine months for a coveted bamboo rod and four days to two weeks for a composite-material rod. Customers generally understand the wait and the reason for it, said John Carpenter, the company’s sales and marketing manager, adding that they appreciate their rod even more when it does arrive;

• The 50th-anniversary editions of both the company’s bamboo and composite rods, items that are in high demand for their quality, beauty, and what that number ‘50’ signifies — a half-century of excellence;

• The tours Carpenter gives to those who find their way to this decidedly rural location near the border with Bernardston and the T&T facility on Barton Road. Many do, said Carpenter, adding that, during the fall, the busiest time for such visits, he might average one a day and at least a few a week. They’re given to long-time customers, the curious, and even some celebrities who fall into both categories, such as Aaron Lewis, lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist, and co-founder of Staind, who recently dropped by to pick up a new rod and take a look around;

• The ways in which the company is working to bring young people into the sport, something necessary to ensure its survival, said Orsmond, adding that the results of efforts that involve a number of organizations are quite encouraging, and he’s proud to note that Millennials, by and large, have embraced fly fishing, and for a number of reasons, as we’ll see;

• And also the ways the company is taking steps to help preserve the environment and improve conditions for fly-fishing enthusiasts, both locally and globally. Such efforts include ongoing work to secure more fish-friendly water release at the Fife Brook Dam on Deerfield River and support of initiatives undertaken by the Yellow Dog Community and Conservation Foundation (YDCCF), which has the stated mission to “protect, preserve, and enhance the places that matter to anglers.”

One of the commemorative rods being made to celebrate a half-century of excellence at Thomas & Thomas.

“For our industry and for our business, all fly fishermen are conservationists — otherwise, we wouldn’t be fly fishermen,” Osmond explained. “It’s our job to teach people, and it’s our job to make a difference at the end of the day.”

As noted at the top, there are plenty to things to celebrate as T&T turns 50. The stability and growth of the brand is a big part of it, but so are the company’s efforts to preserve and enhance fishing spots and spawn a passion for an activity that people can enjoy for a lifetime.

For this issue and its focus on environment and engineering, BusinessWest looks at how the T&T brand is not only enjoying a renaissance, but how the company is giving back — in all kinds of ways.

Cast of Characters

“It’s like the Porsche 911 … when it’s really good, you don’t change it.”

That’s how Orsmond chose to describe the Thomas & Thomas Paradigm series of rods, a name that has been in use at the company for decades now. Only there’s a new Paradigm series, one that has firmly captured the attention of the industry, having won ‘best new dry-fly rod’ honors for 2020 in Fly Fisherman magazine’s annual Gear Guide.

And it’s not the only product in the catalog to earn hardware recently. Indeed, T&T’s new Zone line of rods, a mid-priced model designed specifically to help introduce new people to the sport, garnered ‘best new rod series honors’ in the 2019 Gear Guide, as well as best-of-show honors for saltwater fly rods at the International Fly Tackle Dealers event in Orlando in 2018.

These honors speak to how the company has regained considerable ground since Orsmond started righting the ship in 2015, and also how it’s pushing ahead with new concepts and strategies to properly position itself for the next 50 years.

“It’s a very exciting time,” said Orsmond, with a noticeable trace of understatement in his voice. “It’s been an amazing few years — we’ve been up every year almost 40%, and we’ve greatly increased our staff; we’re employing a lot more people. We have a ways to go, but we’re making steady progress.”

And that comment covers essentially every aspect of the company, from sales and marketing to workforce development and new-product development. And all of it was necessary to not only bring this brand back to where it was decades ago, but also secure a solid future.

More aggressive marketing has been one of the keys, said Carpenter, noting that such efforts were shoved to the back burner earlier in the decade as the company slashed the budget for such initiatives — and paid a price for it. Orsmond has significantly increased the marketing budget, giving the company a much greater presence.

“The company had really pulled back on marketing by the time Neville arrived, but he has greatly expanded the show schedule,” he explained, referring specifically to the Fly Fishing Show, a seven-event circuit in locales ranging from Marlboro, Mass. to Atlanta. The series starts up again on Jan. 3 in Denver, and wraps up at the Lancaster County Convention Center in Pennsylvania in early March.

“We don’t sell product at the shows, we do this to build the brand and help familiarize customers with the product,” he explained, adding that he’ll be getting on a plane to Denver just after the new year. “It gives them a chance to see, feel, touch, and cast.”

Beyond these shows, the company is investing in print advertising and social media — the latter being a concerted effort to capture and maintain the attention of younger generations, Carpenter went on, adding that such efforts are necessary because, while the T&T brand didn’t disappear from the landscape earlier in the decade, it did suffer from what amounted to lack of attention.

Finished rods on the shop floor at Thomas & Thomas. Company President Neville Orsmond says it is struggling to meet soaring demand.

Now refocused, the company has put together a strategic plan of sorts that calls for everything from continuing its long tradition of making its rods in this country and by hand — things few competitors can claim — to bringing more products to the market, such as clothing and accessories, with the Thomas & Thomas name on them, to training a new generation of employees.

“We’re not changing our ways to make more rods,” said Orsmond. “We took the hard way — we manufacture everything in the U.S., and to make everything here, by hand … I believe the consumer sees more value in our product.”

But finding and training new workers to make T&T’s famous rods — and the company has been hiring steadily since Orsmond arrived — has been a considerable challenge.

Indeed, while all manufacturers are struggling to find workers these days, this one has a deeper challenge because of the intricacy of the work and the passion needed to do it right day after day.

Passion can’t be taught, but it can be developed, said Orsmond, adding that many employees who have been with the company for two decades or more have played key roles in training the growing workforce.

“Between everyone here, we have more than 100 years of experience in how to make rods,” he said. “That makes it easier to bring in people and show them the right way to do things, the right way to make a rod that performs.

“Anyone who wants to come work here loves fly fishing and understands how it works,” he went on, hinting strongly at where the passion comes from. “When you’re standing in the river with a rod and you’re casting to a rising fish, your heart stops pumping, and it’s all excitement. And you look around, and you’re in a beautiful area. They get all that.”

It Comes Naturally

But to secure the next 50 years for this company, those at T&T know their work has go beyond marketing, new products, and training a workforce.

Indeed, the industry has to attract more people to the sport, said both Orsmond and Carpenter, and especially young people. And it also has to make sure this pastime is sustainable, a challenge that grows in size and scope as more land comes under development and climate change continues to alter the landscape.

“If there are no fish … there’s no fishing,” said Carpenter, summing things up succinctly, adding that this mindset explains the company’s efforts both globally and locally to protect the environment for the generations to come. “Anyone who becomes passionate about fly fishing almost automatically has an appreciation of the environment they’re doing it in — that’s part of the sport, really.”

As for the current generations, it wasn’t very long ago when people within the sport-fishing industry were worried about the future of the pastime and the business, said Carpenter, adding that, in recent years, such fears, while not entirely put to rest, have eased considerably.

And the reason is the manner in which Millennials have been drawn to the sport, he said, adding that they have played a big part in the 16% growth rate the industry has seen over the past few years.

“I think we’re seeing a resurgence in young people getting involved in fly fishing and being interested in the sport,” he told BusinessWest. “And part of the reason is the role that social media plays in enabling people to share their adventure. When people share their adventures online, it gets people excited; they see what someone is doing in India, Thailand, the Seychelles, South America, or the South Pacific — all the places people are going to fly fish.

“It’s part of a surge in adventure travel and sports like skiing and snowboarding, and the GoPro craze,” he went on. “That’s part of what’s driving the industry forward and getting young people involved, as opposed to the traditional view of two older men standing on a riverbank smoking cigars and waiting for the trout to rise.”

While working to attract more people into the sport, the company is also trying to engage them in efforts to respect the environment, protect it, and preserve it for future generations. And the two missions certainly go hand in hand, said Orsmond, adding that the company’s efforts are both local and global in scope.

Locally, on the Deerfield River, which runs for 76 miles through Southern Vermont and Western Mass., the company is actively engaged with Trout Unlimited and other groups and individuals to help create what Orsmond called a “healthier river.”

Elaborating, he said the releases of water at the Fife Brook Dam are creating an unhealthy situation for fish and other wildlife that results when there is too much or too little water in the river on a regular basis, meaning something that doesn’t happen naturally.

“There’s not enough water being released during some months to cover the whole bottom of the river,” he explained. “They’ll release a lot of water, and these fish, brown trout, will spawn. But when they drop the water level, these eggs will be uncovered, and those fish won’t make it.”

Working with the Mass. Executive Office of Environmental Affairs and energy companies that own the dam and use it to generate hydro power, T&T, Trout Unlimited, and other parties are trying to get more water released, thus utilizing more of the riverbank.

“The whole aquatic ecosystem, the bugs and everything else, will be more abundant; there will be more food for the fish and, ultimately, a much healthier river,” he went on, adding that these efforts are a work in progress with no timeline on when or if steps might be taken.

“Our end goal isn’t to point fingers,” he said in conclusion. “Our end goal is to create better natural resources and preserve the environment.”

On a more global basis, the company is supporting efforts undertaken by the YDCCF to support the fishing industry and protect areas where people fish. Examples include work in the Bahamas to support the devasted fly-fishing industry on Abaco and Grand Bahama in the wake of Hurricane Dorian.

Another example has been the company’s work to support YDCCF’s efforts in Belize to curb the use of gillnets, which are a suspected culprit in declining fish stocks there.

“Gillnets are horrible … a lot of species that are not even used for eating or selling are being killed,” Orsmond explained. “There are ways to eradicate gillnets and also help these fishermen to become fly-fishing guides rather than fish with gillnets.”

Ties That Bind

These are all examples of how Thomas & Thomas, as it continues to rebuild brand and grow sales, is working actively to preserve the environment and an industry that can’t be separated from it.

“We’re making fly rods, and we’re helping on conservation issues, both inside this country and around the world,” Orsmond said. “That should be the mindset of any responsible manufacturer, and it’s a very big part of who we are as a company and what we’ve stood for 50 years.”

And it’s one of the many things being celebrated as T&T marks this important milestone.”

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Business of Aging

And the Road to Recovery Program Needs More of Them

Ray Bishop, left, with cancer patient Norman Clarke, says volunteers helped him overcome illiteracy, and this inspired him to be part of the Road to Recovery program.

When asked how he came to participate in the American Cancer Society’s Road to Recovery program, which recruits volunteers to drive cancer patients to medical appointments, Ray Bishop was more than ready to answer that question.

He grabbed a book he had with him and quickly pointed to a passage within it while explaining that, 20 years ago, he couldn’t have read it — because he was essentially illiterate.

With help from literacy volunteers, he was able to put that embarrassing problem — one that he somehow managed to hide from others — behind him. Those volunteers gave him a precious gift, he said, but also something more, the firm desire to pay that kindness forward.

“If volunteers can help me, then I can volunteer to help others — that was my thinking,” said Bishop, as he talked with BusinessWest in the waiting room at the Sister Caritas Cancer Center at Mercy Medical Center. He was there with Norman Clarke, a West Springfield resident he has driven to that facility several times over the past year or so.

Now battling stage-4 cancer that has spread from his gallbladder to his liver, Clarke says he will go on fighting the disease, through aggressive chemotherapy treatments “that won’t stop until I tell them I can’t take it anymore.”

To fight this fight, he relies heavily on the Road to Recovery program and people like Bishop, many of whom have what amount to backstories when it come to their volunteerism and, specifically, this particular program. Indeed, many have loved ones who have battled the disease, and some have fought it themselves.

But others, like Becky Mason, simply have some flexibility in their schedules and found an intriguing and quite rewarding way to take full advantage of it.

“I was looking for a volunteer opportunity,” said Mason, who has been driving for just a few months now. “They had a table for the Road to Recovery program at a breast-cancer event I attended recently with a friend. I knew there was a large need because I’ve had a few friends who have had different types of cancer, and in talking to them, one of their biggest concerns, beyond getting well, was all their appointments and how they had to go here and there. And they can’t drive, obviously.

“I never really thought about it, because I never had to go through it myself,” she went on. “But it is definitely a stressor in their lives to make sure they have the rides to and from.”

Kelly Woods says there is a strong need for new drivers for the Road to Recovery program to meet demand for the service.

There are more than 75 volunteers (50 who would be considered active) working to help relieve this stress by donating time and energy to the Road to Recovery program for the American Cancer Society’s Northwest Region, headquartered in Holyoke, said Kelly Woods, senior manager for Mission Delivery at that office, adding that each one has a different story, a different motivation for getting involved.

“Sometimes they’re cancer survivors or they have someone in their life who’s a survivor and they want to give back, or there’s someone they lost and that they want to honor,” she said, adding that, through November, volunteers provided roughly 1,000 rides in the four western counties. “But there are also individuals who are just looking for something meaningful to do; each story is different.”

Behind all their stories, though, is an even bigger one, said Woods, who told BusinessWest there is now a critical need for more drivers to meet the number of requests for assistance pouring into the agency. Among all the statistics she has regarding this program — and there are many — perhaps the most eye-opening, and easily the most concerning, involves how many requests the agency is not able to honor.

“Last year, in Hampden County alone, there were a little more than 300 rides that we could not meet,” she said, adding that, over the past few years, the program has lost some drivers due to what she called “natural attrition,” a situation that has actually led to fewer requests for rides.

This has left the local chapter in what she termed a rebuilding mode, meaning it is actively recruiting new drivers, with the goal of being able to meet more requests, thus generating more referrals down the road, as they say.

For this issue, BusinessWest takes an in-depth look at the Road to Recovery program, the drivers who are its life blood, and the critical need for more volunteers to step forward.

Driving Force

Mason works as a project manager for a company called Test America, which tests water and soil. Her duties fall largely within the realm of customer service, she explained, adding that she’s often on the phone with clients discussing scheduling or test results.

While there’s always plenty to do, there is room for flexibility with her schedule, she went on, adding that she had this flexibility firmly in mind when she learned about the Road to Recovery program and started considering whether she could become a part of it.

The more she learned, the more intrigued she became. She learned, for instance, that drivers can essentially choose their assignments and how many they take on — at least a few times a month is requested. She was intrigued by the mission, impressed by the level of training that drivers must undertake (more on that later), and motivated by the obvious need for more volunteers.

Becky Mason has been driving just a few months, but she already finds her participation in the Road to Recovery program very rewarding.

And just a few months in, she can say it’s been an extremely rewarding experience.

“It gives me warm fuzzies when I do it,” she explained. “I like to help people, and I feel that when I do this I’m making a good impact on the world, I’m doing a good deed that is making a bright spot in someone’s life. I can’t change the world, but I can at least help one person with one small thing that they couldn’t get done.”

With that, she pretty much spoke for everyone who has been part of this program, said Woods, adding that Road to Recovery has been a big part of the landscape at the cancer society for decades now.

At the heart of the program lies a very basic need. Indeed, cancer care has improved exponentially over the past several decades, but it is a simple fact that, in most cases, people need to travel to receive treatments — often several times a week and even daily, as with radiation treatments.

And a good many of them, even those with family and a strong core of friends, need help getting ‘to and from,’ as Mason put it.

“These treatments can last several months, and then there’s follow-up appointments,” she explained. “Even for people with a good family network and friends, that gets tapped after a while. It may be that at the beginning they don’t need any help, but as time goes on, they do.

“And sometimes, we just serve as that ‘in-between,’” she went on. “Radiation treatment is six weeks — that’s 30 rides. They may be able to parcel 20 together, but they may need us for 10. And sometimes, we do all 30 because people don’t have a support network.”

To become a volunteer, one must obviously have a vehicle, a valid driver’s license, and a good driving record, said Woods. But they must also undergo a screening process and some training, the former involving a criminal background check and the latter including everything from using something called a service match portal computer to pick and schedule assignments to understanding the many rigid privacy laws now on the books.

“It’s great for the drivers, because there’s flexibility,” Woods said of the match portal. “They can log in as often as they want, and the system communicates with them and sends them e-mails if there are requested rides in their area.”

But there are some things that cannot really be taught, she told BusinessWest, noting that drivers essentially have to learn how to share time — and a front seat — with someone going through perhaps the most difficult time of their life.

Elaborating, she said they have to get a feel for what to talk about and when, knowing that cancer patients have both good and bad days.

Bishop, who drives two or three times a week, a schedule he’s maintained since he retired five years ago, said he learned this early on. He also learned that many patients do like to open up about their condition, their treatments, and life in general.
“They talk to me more about their stuff than I think they do with their own families,” he said. “I’m kind of like a second doctor sometimes; they’re not afraid to talk about it.”

Clarke said that individuals like Bishop are more than drivers; they’re companions and good listeners who help take some of the stress out of an already very stressful and difficult time.

“A lot of the people who drive me have been through cancer or have seen a family member affected by it, and that’s why they’re doing it,” he said. “I can’t thank them enough — they take a lot of stress off my wife; I do this to break it up so that she can have a life without running me back and forth all the time.”

The Ride Stuff

Moving forward, the biggest challenge is to recruit more drivers and thus reduce the number of requests that could not be met, said Woods, adding that, while there are many retirees within the current roster of drivers, one doesn’t have to wait until they’re done working to be a part of this program.

Indeed, she said a number of college students drive, as well as those who work second or third shift, like police officers and firefighters, and those like Mason — and Woods herself — who have some flexibility in their schedules.

The only real requirement is to be able to drive between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., when most all appointments are scheduled, she said, adding that those interested in volunteering can call (800) 227-2345 or log onto cancer.org for more information.

If they do call that number and become part of this special volunteer force, they will find a way to give back that is rewarding on a number of levels, said all those we spoke with.

They’ll discover, as Mason did, that while they can’t change the world, they can help one person in a very meaningful way.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Women in Businesss

Scenes from the Dec. 5 Event

More than 450 people turned out at the Sheraton Springfield on Dec. 5 for BusinessWest’s second annual Women of Impact luncheon. Eight women were honored for their achievements in business and in giving back to the community. The keynote speaker was Lisa Tanzer, president of Life is Good. This year’s honorees are (pictured, left to right):

• Katherine Putnam, managing director of Golden Seeds;

• Carol Moore Cutting, president, CEO, and general manager of Cutting Edge Broadcasting;

• Lydia Martinez-Alvarez, assistant superintendent of Springfield Public Schools;

• Mary Hurley, Massachusets Governor’s Councilor;

• Ellen Freyman, partner at Shatz, Schwartz & Fentin;

• Tricia Canavan, president of United Personnel;

• Jean Deliso, principal with Deliso Financial Services; and

• Suzanne Parker, executive director of Girls Inc. of the Valley.

The Women of Impact program was sponsored by TommyCar Auto Group and Country Bank (presenting sponsors), Comcast Business and Granite State Development (supporting sponsors), New Valley Bank & Trust (speaker sponsor), and WWLP 22 News/CW Springfield (exclusive media sponsor).

Commercial Real Estate

A Tale of Two Cities

Evan Plotkin says congestion and sky-high rents in Boston demand creative solutions. One of them could be incentivizing companies to move west, into Springfield’s downtown.

Evan Plotkin was talking about how “something has to give.”

With that one phrase, he was talking about the commercial real-estate markets in the central business districts of Boston and Springfield.

In the Hub, said Plotkin, president of NAI Plotkin, rents are sky-high and continue to climb — to more than $100 per square foot in some locations and to roughly $63 per square foot on average, with more space being built to accommodate soaring demand. Meanwhile, traffic, congestion, and problems with mass transit are strangling businesses, he said, to the point where meetings can’t start until 10 a.m. and overall productivity is impacted.

Meanwhile, in Springfield, rents are low — less than one-third the average in Boston — and they are flat, as in consistently flat. “They really haven’t gone up at all in maybe 25 years,” said Plotkin, who noted that there are several reasons for this, but especially the fact that there is, by his estimate, roughly 600,000 square feet of vacant class A space in Springfield’s downtown.

Exacerbating this relative stagnancy in the City of Homes has been new and seemingly unneeded inventory coming on the market — especially the 60,000 square feet at Union Station and the redeveloped property known as 1550 Main — and movement among a growing number of businesses to reduce their physical footprint by enabling (or in some cases requiring) employees to work from home.

This is where the ‘something has to give’ part comes in, said Plotkin, in a very candid interview with BusinessWest, noting that things need to change in both cities. And both would seemingly benefit if just some of the state offices now based in the Hub, as well as many different types of private businesses, would change their mailing address from Boston to Springfield when their leases expire.

“There’s 70% rent inflation in Boston, so when these businesses’ leases expire, they’re looking at incredibly high turnover rent,” said Plotkin, who co-owns a portion of the office tower known as 1350 Main St. He noted that class A rents in Boston have climbed $12 to $15 per square foot over the past few years. Meanwhile, in Springfield, property owners are charging $15 to $20 per square foot of class A space.

“It’s outrageous what’s going on in Boston — and everyone can do the math,” he said. “If state agencies don’t have to be in Boston, they can be decentralized and relocated to office space in Springfield or perhaps Worcester. They’re looking for creative solutions for Boston, and this could be one of them.”

Besides these opinions, all Plotkin really has at this point are those numbers he mentioned earlier (as well as some other statistics) and what appears to be that sound theory — that businesses and state agencies that don’t really need to be in Boston could and should be incentivized to seek other locations, including the 413 and especially downtown Springfield.

He has meetings planned with other downtown property owners as well as Rick Sullivan, present of the Economic Development Council of Western Mass., to discuss what can and perhaps should be done to at least raise awareness of what Springfield has to offer and perhaps create some migration west.

Plotkin said he understands there are reasons why state agencies and businesses want to be in Boston — especially because they know there’s a skilled workforce there — and he understands that moving about 90 miles west on the Turnpike is expensive and presents some risks, especially when it comes to workforce issues.

But he says the numbers speak for themselves, and if those paying sky-high rents in Boston could come to understand the numbers in this market, they could become inspired to relocate.

And if high-speed rail between Boston and Springfield becomes a reality, then people could, in theory, live in the Boston area and work in businesses and agencies relocated to the 413 — a decidedly differently spin on how that service might change the business landscape in the Bay State.

That’s a very large number of ‘ifs,’ and Plotkin acknowledges this as well. But as he said at the top, and repeatedly, something has to give in both cities.

Space Exploration

As he talked with BusinessWest, Plotkin continually leafed through the pages on a white legal pad he brought with him.

They contain various notes he’s collected over the past weeks and months on the Boston real-estate market and the overall business climate in New England’s largest city.

There are some statistics he’s collected — such as those regarding average rents in the Hub, the amount of new space under construction (2.5 million square feet was the number he had), and the current vacancy rate in the city — an historically low 6%, according to the New York-based real-estate giant Cushman & Wakefield.

But there were also some general thoughts, observations, and notations from various publications and other sources.

Among them was a quote from the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council citing a survey which revealed that 60% of the life-science employees working in Boston would “change their job tomorrow” if they could get a better commute. There was also something he read in another publication (he couldn’t remember which one), noting that many Boston-area residents had simply given up on mass transit because it was so unreliable and were instead driving to work and getting there mid-morning.

“In one report I read, business owners in Boston said they had to add staff to make up for transit delays,” he said, putting a verbal exclamation point behind that comment. “Think about how disruptive that is to your business. We don’t understand that here — there’s no such thing as traffic in Springfield.”

Summing up all he’s read and heard about Boston and possible solutions to its congestion problems — everything from incentivizing employers to let workers telecommute to taxing motorists for using certain roads at certain hours — he said the situation is fast becoming untenable for many living and trying to do business there.

“You have inefficiency, spiraling upward costs, shortages of affordable housing, transportation problems, congestion, and sky-high cost of living there,” he said. “Businesses locate in Boston because they can attract that workforce, which makes sense, but if that workforce can’t afford to live there and can’t deal with the congestion, then what’s the point of being in Boston?”

Which brings him back to Springfield and its downtown. And for this subject, Plotkin didn’t need a legal pad.

He’s been working in, and selling and leasing commercial real estate in, downtown Springfield for more than 40 years. He knows what’s changed and, perhaps more importantly, what hasn’t, especially when it comes to demand for space in the central business district, and what would be called net gains.

Indeed, Plotkin said that what the region has mostly experienced — there have been some notable exceptions, to be sure — is companies moving from one downtown office building to another.

In this zero-sum real-estate game, one building owner loses a tenant, and another gains one — but the city and its downtown don’t gain much at all, he said.

“There’s been negative absorption in the downtown for many years now, and I don’t see anything really changing,” he told BusinessWest. “I’m seeing people moving from one block to another, one office building to another, but not many new businesses moving in. Meanwhile, everyone’s vying for the same tenants, which drives the rental rates down even lower than they have been historically; it’s a tenant’s market here.”

It’s anything but that in Boston, which has seen a surge of new businesses moving in — everything from tech startups to giant corporations, like GE. The real-estate market is exploding, and traffic woes and mass-transit headaches have been consistent front-page news. All this calls for creative thinking — as in very creative — and perhaps looking west, said Plotkin, who did some simple math to get his point across.

“Using the example of a 20,000-square-foot tenant paying $63 per square foot in Boston … if the same tenant came to Springfield and paid $18 per square foot, we’re talking about millions of dollars,” he explained, adding that these numbers should strike a chord, especially when it comes to businesses and agencies that don’t have to be in Boston.

Many of those who think they do need to be in Boston are focused on workforce issues, he went on, adding that he believes the Greater Springfield area can, in fact, meet the workforce requirements of many companies.

And over the past several years, the city has become more vibrant with the addition of MGM Springfield, said Plotkin, adding that there are certainly other selling points, like a high quality of life and a cost of living that those residing in and around Boston might find difficult to comprehend.

Bottom Line

As he talked with BusinessWest, Plotkin all but acknowledged that getting businesses and agencies to trade Boston for Springfield will be difficult, for all the reasons stated above.

But the situation in the Hub could be reaching a tipping point when it comes to affordability, traffic, congestion, and quality of life.

And these converging factors might, that’s might, finally convince some decision makers to seek a very creative alternative.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Community Spotlight

Community Spotlight

Mayor Thomas Bernard says North Adams has been investing in economic development, public safety, education, and a host of other areas.

Seven priorities, 43 goals, 95 policies, and 355 actions.

This tall list makes up the master plan for the city of North Adams. The Vision 2030 Plan was launched in 2011, and just this year, Mayor Thomas Bernard and cohorts revisited the plan to check up on the progress made to date.

“We had a really good session in October where we got some interesting suggestions for setting priority areas around marketing and promotion to move the needle on some of the economic developments,” he said.

In addition to the information session in October, Bernard says another will be held in early 2020 in which the town will tackle three things: review what has been accomplished so far, identify things that five years ago may have seemed urgent but are not as pressing now, and identify issues that have changed in the last five years.

The plan’s seven priorities — economic renewal, investment in aging infrastructure, creation of a thriving and connected community, intergenerational thinking, fiscal efficiency, historic preservation, and food access — are all currently being reviewed, and Bernard says these undertakings make for an exciting time in the city.

“There are some really great developments happening in a lot of different areas,” he told BusinessWest. “There’s a good chance to work in collaboration with a lot of people.”

Some of the more prominent developments include a project to build a much-needed new elementary school, updating zoning for the town, investing in public safety, and several projects that cater to younger children.

Bernard knows that, in order to be successful with new projects, the city must still take care of the older, foundational matters, and says North Adams has done a great job keeping track of both.

“We want to double down on the things we’ve already done, both this cultural development that’s happening, but also doing the foundational work to ensure that we can be successful so that we’re championing the big developments, we’re celebrating the jobs that are coming in, but we’re also making sure that the quality of life in neighborhoods is strong and solid,” he said.

“There are some really great developments happening in a lot of different areas. There’s a good chance to work in collaboration with a lot of people.”

Indeed, he says the overall feedback from the community has been extraordinarily positive, and mentioned one feeling in the city in particular: optimism.

Youthful Approach

That optimism, said Bernard, now going into his second term as mayor of North Adams, comes amid an increasing number of investments in economic development, public safety, and other key areas.

But you can’t move forward without looking back, so one big goal is investing in the youth and education sector, which includes the renovation of a very old elementary-school building.

Just a few weeks ago, Bernard and Superintendent of Schools Barbara Malkas visited the Massachusetts School Building Authority and were invited into eligibility for consideration of the reconstruction of Greylock Elementary School — a building that is 70 years old.

North Adams at a glance

Year Incorporated: 1878
Population: 13,708
Area: 20.6 square miles
County: Berkshire
Residential Tax Rate: $18.62
Commercial Tax Rate: $40.67
Median Household Income: $35,020
Family Household Income: $57,522
Type of government: Mayor; City Council
Largest Employers: Crane & Co.; North Adams Regional Hospital; BFAIR Inc.
* Latest information available

“If we’re able to be successful in the feasibility phase, then we’re invited to proceed forward, and we can put the funding plan together,” said Bernard. “It really will set the course for elementary education in the city for the next 50 years.”

Other investments for the youth population in the city include a splash park and a skate park. While Bernard acknowledged North Adams is an aging community and its leaders are always thinking about what it means to be age-friendly, he sees a lot of energy and — here’s that word again — optimism when it comes to investing in the younger population.

“What this splash park and the other main investment, which was a skate park, has done is create community engagement, excitement, energy, vibrancy, and a sense of optimism that comes from things that are youth-focused,” he said.

On the economic-development side, Dave Moresi, a local developer, recently embarked on a mill project that celebrated its grand opening this past June. Bernard said Moresi bought the mill in mid-2017, and it already has more than 50 businesses inside, including a financial-services office, a mental-health clinician, a coffee roaster, a gym, a hair salon, and much more.

“I think this speaks to a couple things,” said Bernard. “It speaks to the quality of work that Dave and his team do, but it also speaks to this moment that we’re in, bringing it back full circle to this energy, excitement, and potential.”

Moresi also purchased a school building the city no longer uses and is turning it into residential apartments.

Adding to that excitement are two enabling projects that have occurred over the past year. Bernard said bringing life into the downtown area continues to be a challenge, so a parking study was done to look at what assets and needs are necessary if the city were to attract additional housing and development. North Adams also updated its zoning map to reflect current conditions — a process that hadn’t been tackled since the late ’50s to early ’60s.

With all this activity going on, the city has also been investing in public safety. Just this year, Lt. Jason Wood was appointed as the new police chief for North Adams. In addition, the city added its first hybrid vehicle to the city fleet and is working on adding a hybrid cruise, which would make it the first city in Western Mass. to do so.

Forward Momentum

While North Adams still faces economic and socioeconomic challenges, like all cities do, the mayor feels optimistic that the community is on the path for success.

“We continue to be in an exciting time for North Adams, and I think more and more people are picking up on it, whether that’s visitors who are coming here or whether it’s longtime residents who are seeing some of these developments and being really excited about it,” Bernard said. “We have a lot of work to do to make sure we stay on an even keel.”

Kayla Ebner can be reached at [email protected]

Women in Businesss

Wellness in Season

Denise Pelletier was inspired by her own experience with the benefits of salt therapy to help others find similar success.

Denise Pelletier was gifted a trip to a salt cave for her birthday — not your average way to celebrate another trip around the sun.

But Pelletier has bartonellosis, a chronic Lyme disease co-infection that can produce symptoms like fever, fatigue, headaches, and bone pain. When her sister heard about salt therapy and the benefits it can bring, she took Pelletier to a salt cave, thinking it might help with some of the pain she was suffering from.

In the process known as halotherapy, pure, drug-free, pharmaceutical-grade salt is heated and ground into microparticles by a machine called a halogenerator and dispersed in a room or salt bed.

The results of her first salt-therapy session, Pelletier said, included relief from allergies and asthma, among other things.

“I realized that, when I do salt therapy, I don’t need to use my inhaler twice a day, and I don’t need to take my allergy medicine every day,” she said, adding that, if she doesn’t get in at least one or two salt sessions a week, she finds herself needing to use more medication. “For me, it made such a huge difference.”

Although she originally had no intention to start a business, she felt she needed to share the benefits of halotherapy with other people who may be going through a similar thing.

“I’m one of those people that, when something works so wonderfully for me, I want to help other people,” she said. “I thought, ‘how can I bring this to other people?’”

The answer was opening Enisde’s Salt Therapy Halotherapy Spa on Main Street in Palmer.

Science hasn’t quite caught up with the halotherapy trend yet, at least in the U.S., and concrete evidence of the benefits are oftentimes conflicting. But salt therapy has been around for centuries and is more popular in Europe, used as a natural and holistic method for health and wellness.

For Pelletier, the results were fantastic — which is why she’s sharing the benefits of the holistic regimen with others.

Go with the Flow

When thinking about her main goals for her new business, Pelletier had one thing in particular on her mind: keeping a positive and relaxed energy throughout the entire space.

But it took a lot of work to get there, as months were spent gutting the entire building with help from family to make it the business she dreamed of.

“The feel is very important to me, which is why we put so much into the décor,” she said, adding that salt walls and salt floors, while they do not necessarily contribute to the health benefits, add a lot to the relaxation part of the experience. “There’s a lot of people that feel a whole shift in energy when they come in.”

According to Pelletier’s website, salt is negatively charged, which means it naturally attracts positively charged particles and cancels out harmful electromagnetic vibrations in the environment and in people’s bodies. In many cases, this feeling is compared to visiting a waterfall or spending a day at the beach.

Denise Pelletier says she put much thought and effort into the décor and and feel of her establishment, and people “feel a whole shift in energy when they come in.”

And while she by no means recommends eliminating prescribed medicine while practicing halotherapy, she says using it along with salt therapy may help people cut back on the medication they are taking.

“Whether you have breathing issues or skin issues, it’s just something that’s so good to do for yourself, even if you decide to do it once or twice a month,” she said. “It really is that feeling of well-being because it’s actually doing something for you.”

There are five rooms in Enisde’s Halotherapy focused on this well-being feeling — the Dawn Room, which provides the full salt-cave experience with a room-wide salt floor; the Willow Room, with moon pods to sit on that deliver a full-body, weightless sensation; the Bosai Room, featuring a large salt sandbox floor on half of the room and wood floors on the other half; and the Zen Room and Namaste Room, which include state-of-the-art salt-therapy beds for those who want a more private experience.

Salt therapy is more popular in Europe, but is starting to gain traction in the U.S.

Halotherapy rooms are 45-minute sessions for $40, and salt-bed rooms are 20-minute sessions for $20. The salt beds, Pelletier said, were a must-have because the concentrated salt air in the enclosed space is beneficial to those seeking relief, and at a quicker pace.

Give Salt a Chance

Pelletier says the benefits, especially during this time of year, are far greater than what most people would expect.

“It definitely helps you stay healthier in the wintertime, with the flus and the bugs going around,” she noted. “If you are overcoming something, this is wonderful for you because the salt removes toxins from your lungs, it reduces swelling in your lungs and sinuses, and it detoxes your skin.”

While this method of relaxation hasn’t quite caught on in too many places yet, Pelletier hopes people will give halotherapy a try and see the benefits for themselves.

“It’s nice to have something that’s positive and about wellness,” she said. “My hope is that people will want to start taking better care of themselves and making it a priority.”

Kayla Ebner can be reached at [email protected]

Business of Aging

A Warm Handoff

Jim Carroll says one of the most rewarding parts of his job is seeing people turn their lives around.

Addiction knows no boundaries.

This is the main message Jim Carroll, medical director at OnCall Healthy Living Program, tries to instill in everyone he comes in contact with.

By this, he means addiction can affect people in all walks of life, and is not specific to one group of individuals like the stereotype may depict.

“What many people don’t realize is, addiction is in your neighborhood, in your workplace,” he said. “It doesn’t have any boundaries.”

This is what he and other staff members at OnCall keep in mind at all times when treating patients who are recovering from a substance-abuse disorder. What first started as a mixed-treatment facility with urgent care and addiction switched over to strictly addiction services in early 2018.

The facility pulls patients all the way from the Berkshires to Worcester, and Carroll says between 550 to 600 patients visit the main office in Northampton and a satellite office in Indian Orchard.

Carroll began at OnCall in 2008 as an attending doctor before moving up to medical director in 2013, but has been on staff in the Emergency Department at Mercy Medical Center for 13 years, giving him plenty of experience with addition services and showing him how much need exists for this kind of care.

“It became clear over several years that we wanted our focus to be on the addiction side of things,” he said. “Being in the Emergency Department, we were always very well aware of the opioid crisis and what it was doing to each individual and society as a whole, so we wanted to be a part of the solution.”

And there certainly is a need.

“We’re all about getting people on the path to becoming a better version of themselves.”

The opioid epidemic in Massachusetts has skyrocketed over the last decade. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health reported 1,091 confirmed opioid-related overdose deaths in the state during the first nine months of 2019, with an additional 332 to 407 deaths expected by year’s end.

This makes the services OnCall provides even more imperative. In recent years, OnCall has been putting a new two-part model to the test to make its services even more effective, working toward trying to bring the number of opioid-related deaths much closer to zero.

Beyond the Medicine

Carroll said the mission for every medical provider and behavioral-health professional at OnCall is to help patients recover and lead healthy lives, providing a comfortable environment free of judgment.

“We’re all about getting people on the path to becoming a better version of themselves,” he explained. “The more people we have in treatment, the less people we have at risk for death from overdose that we see in the Emergency Department on an almost daily basis.”

In order to accomplish its goal of helping people get on a healthier and safer path, OnCall uses a two-part model and what it calls ‘a warm handoff’ to get patients back on track. This includes the use of medication along with therapy and other supportive services to help address issues related to alcohol and opioid dependence.

“I really couldn’t say that one would be okay without the other, which is why we utilize both,” said Carroll, adding that frequency of visits for therapy and medication checkups vary based on how patients are doing.

He added that one of the hardest parts is getting people to take that first step through the door. “One of our biggest challenges is getting people in for the first follow-up visit. When we actually get people to show up, they usually have a positive experience, and then they’re off and running on their recovery.”

He also noted that, according to the limited studies OnCall has conducted, somewhere between 70% and 90% of people who have an opioid-use disorder are not in treatment — yet another reason for the facility to eliminate its urgent-care services and move to addiction services full-time.

“We know a lot of people need help, and with a rise of more and more urgent cares, that became less of a need,” he said.

Another big challenge is the stigma surrounding addiction and treatment, and Carroll said people sometimes worry about how they are going to be treated. This has prompted OnCall to focus on cultivating a comfortable environment for patients from the time they walk in the door to the moment they walk out.

“One of the things we’ve been very cognisant of is what kind of environment we present for patients who present to our clinic,” he told BusinessWest. “Our philosophy and our feeling here is that, once someone actually presents here, they should feel very comfortable being here.”

Rewarding Challenge

“A no-judgment zone” is another way Carroll describes OnCall.

Unfortunately, stigma still does get in the way of people seeking treatment, and labels are often assigned to people who have substance-abuse disorders. He stressed that it’s important for people to realize addiction is a disease — one that can happen to anyone.

“Addiction doesn’t have any special predilection toward any race, gender, age, or profession,” he said. “When people actually understand the disease process and understand that addiction is a brain disease and that it’s not a moral failing, they’ll understand that this isn’t someone trying to proactively ruin their lives or the lives of the people around them.”

He drove this point home by asking a perspective-shifting question: “if someone had type-2 diabetes, would you hold that against them?”

Despite the various challenges that come with the job, for Carroll, the rewards are innumerable.

“Seeing the turnarounds that happen in people’s lives is amazing,” he said. “We see people at some of their lowest moments, and when we can be part of the support team that turns things around for them and you see people get their self-esteem back, their jobs back, their families back, that’s very gratifying as a provider. Seeing people literally turn their lives around in front of you is one of the most rewarding things of my professional career.”

And although the 600 patients OnCall currently serves might seem like a huge number, Carroll says the practice has the capacity for double that amount, and encouraged anyone who is suffering from a substance-abuse disorder, or knows someone who is, to seek help immediately.

“The busier we are, the more people we’re helping, and that’s a good feeling,” he said. “Until we aren’t seeing any overdoses anymore, we just keep moving forward and trying to be part of the solution.”

Kayla Ebner can be reached at [email protected]

Environment and Engineering

Taking the Industry Lead

As part of its commitment to environmental sustainability, Eversource Energy announced an industry-leading goal to be carbon-neutral by 2030. The energy company plans to achieve this aggressive goal through a series of targeted steps across its operations to reduce carbon emissions while also continuing to support regional economic growth and maintaining safe and reliable service for its approximately 4 million customers.

While the goal to be carbon-neutral is limited to the energy company’s own corporate emissions across all departments and operations, Eversource will continue to work with state leaders to reduce emissions from energy supply for customers in accordance with state and regional regulatory requirements. 

“As New England’s largest utility, we are proud to partner with our states and communities to achieve regional clean-energy and carbon-reduction goals,” said Eversource Chairman, President, and CEO Jim Judge. “Today, we are going one step further by setting a goal for our own operations to help demonstrate that carbon neutrality is achievable.”

With its goal set for 2030, Eversource would become the first investor-owned utility in the nation to be carbon-neutral. In order to achieve this, the energy company will take a series of targeted steps across corporate operations, gas distribution, and electric transmission and distribution. These include reducing energy use by improving the efficiency of its 69 facilities and reducing fleet emissions of its 5,200 vehicles, continuing to enhance the electric transmission and distribution system to reduce line losses, reducing sulfur hexafluoride (a potent greenhouse gas) in gas-insulated electric switchgear, and replacing remaining bare steel and cast-iron natural-gas distribution main lines to improve safety and help prevent methane leaks.

“The business community has an important role to play as we pursue clean-energy and carbon-reduction goals, as environmental sustainability and economic development go hand in hand,” said Dan Moon, president and executive director of the Environmental Business Council of New England. “As one of the nation’s leading energy companies, it’s encouraging that Eversource is proactively setting its own goals and demonstrating its commitment to a cleaner-energy future.”

Eversource has already significantly reduced its own carbon emissions through a series of steps, including the divestiture of all its remaining fossil-generation facilities in 2018. The company is also helping the region in achieving carbon-reduction targets that have been set by state and regional requirements with its clean-energy initiatives, such as the offshore wind partnership with Ørsted, award-winning energy-efficiency programs, solar development, innovative battery-storage projects, and electric-vehicle-charging infrastructure.

“We are excited to set an ambitious goal with our own corporate operations to lead by example,” Judge added. “Today’s news reinforces our position at the forefront of environmental sustainability and builds on our efforts to help our customers and communities reduce their carbon footprint.”

Opinion

Editorial

Often, when we say that something, or some trend, is ‘changing the landscape,’ we don’t mean literally, and we’re often exaggerating.

That was not the case with some of the biggest stories of the 2010s, a decade in which the landscape was changed literally, but also figuratively, and in all kinds of ways.

Start with the tornado that roared through the region on June 1, 2011. It certainly altered the landscape, from Springfield to Brimfield. But there were other landscape-altering developments over the past 10 years, especially the introduction of casino gambling and the arrival of a broad, multi-faceted cannabis industry in Massachusetts. More on both of those later.

But there were other significant changes to the landscape — specifically, the business landscape — that took place over the past decade. And they’re all still having a profound impact.

These range from ongoing workforce challenges facing employers across every single sector of the economy to the continued growth and maturity of the region’s entrepreneurship ecosystem, to the opening of the Dr. Suess Museum at the Quadrangle, an addition that is certainly helping to put Springfield on the map.

Speaking of Springfield and being on the map, it’s pretty safe to say that more people are setting their GPS for the City of Homes than at any time in recent memory (we know, GPS hasn’t been around that long, but you get the point). The casino in the city’s South End has a lot to do with that, but overall, the city is enjoying a renaissance of sorts that involves the arts, tourism, entrepreneurship and innovation, a new hockey team, some new businesses, and even some new places to live.

There is still considerable work to do, but it’s safe to say that the city has rebounded nicely from the fiscal nightmare of a decade ago and now has what could be called momentum as we enter the 2020s.

As for the casino and cannabis, these were the biggest stories of the decade, and they could well be among the biggest in the decade to come.

MGM Springfield has transformed the South End into something one might find in Las Vegas. The question on everyone’s minds, though, is just how many people are finding it. The revenues — as in gross gambling revenues, or GGR — are not what they were projected to be, and that is certainly cause for concern.

But, revenues aside, the casino is certainly bringing more vibrancy to the downtown, especially when big shows are slated. And the complex holds considerable promise for luring more convention groups to the region.

The casino will certainly be making headlines for years, but the question remains — what kind of headlines?

As for cannabis … we wrote several months ago that this development is likely to be far more impactful than the casino on a regional basis, and we’re already seeing that. In communities like Holyoke, Easthampton, Northampton, and others, cannabis is bringing jobs, tax revenues, and new opportunities for development of commercial real estate, much of it previously vacant or underutilized.

And we’re talking about hundreds of thousands of square feet of commercial real estate.

The cannabis industry, in most respects, is still very much in its infancy. What will it look like when it’s all grown up? That’s a matter to be decided in the next decade.

As for the one that’s soon to be referred to in the past tense … it was one of profound change to the landscape, in every sense of that phrase.

Opinion

Opinion

By Robert Rio

The climate protesters who took to the streets of Boston earlier this month targeted the wrong people.

If these people really want to impact the climate debate, they should turn their attention outside of a state that is already well on its way to achieving the goals outlined at the State House demonstrations.

Massachusetts has had a law on the books for more than a decade that mandates an 80% reduction in carbon emissions from all sectors (electric generation, transportation, and buildings) by 2050. Admittedly, that isn’t 100%, but worrying about whether Massachusetts meets 80% or 100% misses the larger picture.

There are separate regulations aimed at carbon reduction as well. State policy requires that 80% of electricity be generated using carbon-free sources by 2050. And new proposed regulations by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection will move that requirement to nearly 100% during the same time frame. Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) supports the proposed regulations.

The Baker administration has already finalized contracts for one offshore wind farm, and another one is going through the approval process. These developments will leave the region humming with new turbines.

Additionally, a large hydro power project is being routed through Maine to supply about 18% of Massachusetts’ total power. Without hydro power, our transition to carbon-free energy will be delayed for decades because it would take an enormous amount of additional solar or offshore wind to make up for the loss of carbon-free hydro power.

That leaves transportation, which accounts for the largest portion of greenhouse-gas emissions — 45% and growing.

Gov. Baker has been a leader in addressing transportation-based greenhouse gases and is a visible backer of the 12-state (plus the District of Columbia) regional effort to reduce greenhouse gases in the transportation sector known as the Transportation and Climate Initiative (TCI). AIM has joined with the administration and several environmental groups to support this effort, and the governor is always looking for more support.

TCI will establish a regional cap on carbon emissions while auctioning emissions allowances. Proceeds from the TCI fee will be sent back to each participating state to improve statewide public transportation and to encourage fuel users to purchase alternative vehicles.

A MassINC poll published this month found that a majority of registered voters in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia strongly or somewhat support their home state’s participation in TCI. Some states, however, are balking at joining TCI. Perhaps the Boston climate activists could take their message to other state capitals to ensure that this critical multi-state effort gets off the ground.

Declaring victory and moving on is tough, but it is necessary to move on from Massachusetts and concentrate efforts in those areas where the greatest changes should be made. The best thing for all of us to do is acknowledge our work favorably and let the rest of the nation know it can be done with the right leadership.

Robert Rio is senior vice president, Government Affairs at AIM.

Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]

 


 

Care Where It’s Needed

Baystate Health recently received a $1 million grant from TD Bank to further the health system’s commitment to the communities it serves by funding an innovative new mobile health clinic called the TD Bank – Baystate Health Bus, which will deliver preventive care to people in urban and rural communities who are not receiving services due to financial and transportation barriers, including a shortage of providers in their neighborhoods. As a mobile medical unit, the bus will be staffed by a multi-disciplinary healthcare team to bring health screenings, early detection, and referrals for needed treatment or other services directly to at-risk individuals.

At the announcement, from left: Mark Keroack, president and CEO, Baystate Health; Rebecca Blanchard, senior director of Education, Baystate Health; Steve Webb, regional vice president, TD Bank; Dr. Kevin Hinchey, chief education officer, Baystate Health; Christina Cronin, philanthropy officer, Baystate Foundation; and Scott Berg, executive director, Baystate Health Foundation

Keroack talks about the importance of the health bus

 


Going Above and Beyond

Polish National Credit Union (PNCU) has made a $10,000 donation to the Chicopee Police Department, to be used to purchase an aerial drone for public safety. Drones have become a critical tool for first responders, allowing for additional capabilities for search and rescue, surveillance, crash reconstruction, and other tasks.

Pictured, from left: PNCU board members John Murphy and Stephen Burkott with Chicopee Police Chief William Jebb.

 


 

STEM Center at STCC

On Dec. 11, Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) officially opened its STEM Center, featuring resources and services to assist students studying science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Students who visit the facility can use a computer lab and study lounge and take advantage of other services, including exam proctoring, career exploration, and class support. In addition, the center features collaborative spaces for group study, tutoring, supplemental instruction, and group meetings.

Pictured: faculty and staff join STCC President John Cook, right, at the grand opening of the STEM Center at STCC. Barbara Washburn, interim dean of the School of STEM, second from right, cuts the ribbon with Vice President of Academic Affairs Geraldine de Berly.


 

Helping Students Thrive

A reception on Dec. 10 acknowledged a $50,000 donation from PeoplesBank to Holyoke Community College’s (HCC) Thrive Center, which assists students as they negotiate the complex bureaucracies associated with myriad issues, such as health insurance, food, housing and utility assistance, and credit repair. The money will be used to establish a dedicated fund for Thrive managed by the HCC Foundation, the college’s nonprofit fundraising corporation.

Pictured, from left: Thomas Senecal, president and CEO, PeoplesBank; HCC President Christina Royal; HCC student Christopher Royster; and Amanda Sbriscia, executive director, HCC Foundation.

 


 

Third Party Lender of the Year

Florence Bank was recently recognized by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) as the Western Massachusetts Third Party Lender of the Year for loans the bank administers to small businesses in the area. Third-party loans, called SBA 504 loans, are offered by the bank in collaboration with certified development corporations such as Granite State Development Corp., Bay Colony Development Corp., and BDC Capital/CDC New England.

Pictured, from left:  Peter Kontakos, office deputy district director, SBA Massachusetts; Erin Couture and Michael Davey, Florence Bank vice presidents in Commercial Lending; Robert Nelson, office district director, SBA Massachusetts; and Ili Spahiu, assistant district director for Lender Relations, SBA Massachusetts.

 

 

 

Court Dockets

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

HAMPDEN DISTRICT COURT

Marvin Jordan v. Prevalent Transport Inc. and Sergey Kucherenko

Allegation: Violation of wage-and-hour laws: $2,783.75

Filed: 11/12/19

E.B. Thomsen Inc. d/b/a Thomsen Food Service v. Eight Eight One Entertainment Inc. d/b/a the Tap Room Grill and John Siniscalchi

Allegation: Money owed for goods sold and delivered: $13,203.58

Filed: 11/13/19

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT

Tyra Dixon v. Michael Kors Retail Inc. and Cesar Delaza

Allegation: Employment discrimination: $25,000+

Filed: 11/12/19

Zena Sky Perez v. Rocky’s Ace Hardware Inc. and Mitchell Johnson

Allegation: Employment discrimination: $25,000+

Filed: 11/12/19

Elizabeth Sullivan, individually and on behalf of those similarly situated v. Med Express Urgent Care, P.C. Massachusetts

Allegations: Unpaid wages: $50,000+

Filed: 11/12/19

Thomas Graziano v. Meredith Corp. d/b/a Western Massachusetts News, Raymond S. Hershel, and David A. Madsen

Allegation: Defamation, employment loss, wage loss, emotional distress, damage to reputation: $489,500

Filed: 11/12/19

FCIA Management Co. Inc. v. Turley Publications Inc.

Allegation: Breach of contract, failure to provide services paid for: $37,996.03

Filed: 11/13/19

HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COURT

Commerce Insurance Co. a/s/o Elena Volpe v. Jeffrey Miller d/b/a Cosmic Cab Co. and Daniel Hale

Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury and property damage: $9,062.88

Filed: 11/1/19

Edgardo Cancel v. Corps Logistics Inc. and James Duffney individually

Allegation: Non-payment of wages, breach of contract, retaliation, violation of overtime laws: $2,516

Filed: 11/19/19

PALMER DISTRICT COURT

Christopher Shalvoy v. Custom Creations Enterprises, LLC and Custom Creations Inc.

Allegation: Defendants misclassified plaintiff as an independent contractor: $8,262

Filed: 11/4/19

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT

Brenda McNair v. Knight Associates Realty Inc. and Meadow Village, LLC

Allegation: Negligence causing personal injury: $34,664.53

Filed: 11/22/19

Agenda

Loomis Village Art Exhibit

Jan. 1-31: The public is invited to view a new exhibit coming to Loomis Village in January, “Five Felters, Five Perspectives,” which will showcase bespoke garments, landscapes, and abstract and sculptural wall pieces inspired by nature, historical artifacts, and imagination. The artists are Nina Compagnon, Sally Dillon, Martha Robinson, Flo Rosenstock, and Margaret Stancer. The exhibit will be displayed in the second- and third-floor galleries at Loomis Village, 20 Bayon Dr., South Hadley every day in January from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. A reception with the five artists will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 15 from 4 to 6 p.m. A demonstration of felting techniques, also open to the public, will be presented on Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 2 p.m.

Project Management Exam Prep Workshop

Jan. 6-8: Are you ready to become a certified project-management professional (PMP)? Forbes.com lists a PMP certificate as the second-highest-paying IT certification for 2019, and the Project Management Institute (PMI) states that, through 2020, 1.57 million new project-management jobs will be created each year. To help prepare community members to begin the certification process, Bay Path University’s Strategic Alliances division is hosting a three-day workshop that will prepare participants to take the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) Exam. The CAPM workshop, led by IT consultant and project manager Rick DeJohn from Camus Consulting Inc., combines lectures, discussions, case studies, and in-class practice testing with a review of test results. Project-management experience is not required, and anyone interested in demonstrating to employers that they have the skill set to become a project manager is encouraged to attend. Participants who complete the program will be awarded a certificate of completion and will earn the required 23 education hours to sit for the CAPM examination. Per the Project Management Institute, a high-school diploma, associate degree, or global equivalent is required as an exam prerequisite. This workshop will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day on the Bay Path campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow. To register, visit capm2020.eventbrite.com. For additional information, contact Briana Sitler at [email protected] or (413) 565-1066.

Cannabis Certificate Program

Jan. 13 to May 5: American International College (AIC) is announcing a new undergraduate initiative in the School of Business, Arts and Sciences titled Micro-Emerging Markets: Cannabis Certificate Program. Three business courses are offered in rotation beginning with the spring 2020 semester. The first course of the series will run on Wednesdays, 3:50 p.m. to 6:20 p.m., starting Jan. 13, 2020 and continuing through May 5, 2020. There are no prerequisites to enroll other than a high-school diploma or GED equivalency. Non-matriculated students can enter the program at any time in the sequence. The first course, “Cannabis Entrepreneurship,” will examine customer groups, products, and services in the recreational market. The effect of price, quality, and competitors will be explored relative to competing effectively. This will involve key components of the industry, including legal aspects, business models, financing, and marketing. In “Cannabis Business Operations,” students will analyze the evolving cannabis marketplace and investigate the complexities and challenges of this sector. This course will conduct an in-depth look at the key components of different business types, how the sector is evolving, starting and operating a cannabis business, in addition to financial constraints, investments, and strategic marketing in the industry. The final course, “The Law and Ethics of Cannabis,” will examine the legalization of cannabis. Discussion around the legal and ethical implications of cannabis use, its legalization, criminal activity, and marketing will be explored in addition to perspectives of law enforcement, business owners, and recreational uses. For more information, visit aic.edu/mem.

Cannabis Education Center

Jan. 16, 23: The Cannabis Education Center, a joint venture between Holyoke Community College (HCC) and C3RN – the Cannabis Community Care and Research Network – has scheduled three standalone courses for people working in the cannabis industry or those who want to get started. The first, “How to Start a Cannabis Business,” — a comprehensive, introductory session about starting a cannabis business — was held on Dec. 17. The next, “Professional Cannabis Business Plan Development,” will run on Thursday, Jan. 16 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the HCC MGM Culinary Arts Institute, 164 Race St., Holyoke. This $199 course is for experienced cannabis entrepreneurs who need assistance developing a business plan. The third, “Medical Cannabis 101,” is geared toward dispensary agents and healthcare providers. That will run on Thursday, Jan. 23 from 6 to 10 p.m. in the HCC Kittredge Center. The cost is $99. Space is limited, so advance registration and pre-payment are required for all courses. No walk-ins will be allowed. To register, visit hcc.edu/bcs and click on ‘Cannabis Education.’

‘Stress Less in 2020’

Jan. 17: The free monthly Lunch and Learn program at Ruth’s House Assisted Living Residence at JGS Lifecare has announced its next topic. Dr. Bill Bazin, a chiropractor for more than 30 years, will present “Stress Less in 2020 with Time and Energy Efficiency,” offering strategies to better manage stress and increase quality of life. Almost 60% of Americans consider themselves stressed and depressed, and stress can play a major factor in heart attacks. Bazin will talk about stress and offer strategies on what to do to deal with it. Topics will include why we have stress; different types of stress; signs and symptoms of an overstressed life; how to get exponential growth from one’s time and energy; strategic planning for one’s life and family; eliminating fear, panic, and anxiety; the five factors of health; solutions for stress that can be done at home, and when to take the next step to deal with stress. The lunch at noon will be followed by the presentation from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. The Ruth’s House Lunch and Learn program is free and open to the public. RSVP to Lori Payson at (413) 567-3949, ext. 3105, or [email protected] For more information, visit jgslifecare.org/events.

All Ideas Pitch Contest

Feb. 5: Entrepreneurship for All (EforAll) Berkshire County is holding an All Ideas Pitch Contest from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Green at 85 Main St., Suite 105, North Adams. EforAll’s first Pitch Contest at the Berkshire Museum in October created a lot of community buzz, with more than 100 attendees and 11 companies competing. The big winner that night was Kaitlyn Pierce of Binka Bear. Described as “Shark Tank without the teeth,” EforAll’s friendly, free event features a business showcase and then pitches from six pre-selected contestants and two more that are added the night of the event. Each participant is given two and a half minutes to pitch a business or nonprofit idea to a panel of judges and the audience. At the end of it, EforAll gives away seed money to help launch these ideas. The first-place finisher wins $1,000, second place gets $750, third place wins $500, and the audience favorite also wins $500. Applications and audience registration are both available online at www.eforall.org/berkshire-county.

Women’s Leadership Conference

March 27: Bay Path University’s division of Strategic Alliances announced that producer, author, entrepreneur, educator, and, of course, top model Tyra Banks will bring her bold attitude, unique style, and well-honed business acumen to Springfield as the keynote speaker at the 25th annual Women’s Leadership Conference (WLC). This year’s theme, “Own Your Now,” will encourage conference guests to examine the forces that have shaped their careers, relationships, and aspirations; recognize what drives them and what holds them back; and empower them to confidently move forward. Banks is the creator of America’s Next Top Model, the reality show and modeling competition that has been replicated in 47 international markets and viewed in 150 countries. This year’s conference also will feature breakout sessions focused on navigating the complicated relationships, personalities, and dynamics of the workplace and the impact those have on our careers and opportunities. Sessions will be led by bestselling authors and researchers including Laura Huang, Harvard Business School professor and author of Edge: Turning Adversity into Advantage; Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning; Dr. Ramani Durvasula, licensed clinical psychologist and author of Don’t You Know Who I Am: How to Stay Sane in the Era of Narcissism, Entitlement and Incivility; and Jennifer Romolini, author of Weird in a World That’s Not: A Career Guide for Misfits. For further information on the conference and to register, visit www.baypathconference.com.

Hooplandia

June 26-28: Hooplandia, the largest 3-on-3 basketball competition and celebration on the East Coast, will take place on June 26-28, 2020, hosted by Eastern States Exposition and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. The event will feature hundreds of games for thousands of players of all ages and playing abilities, with divisions for young girls, boys, women, men, high-school elite, college elite, pro-am, ‘over the hill,’ wheelchair, wounded warrior, Special Olympians, veterans, first responders, and more. More than 100 outdoor blacktop courts will be placed throughout the roadway and parking-lot network of the Eastern States Exposition fairgrounds in West Springfield. Slam-dunk, 3-point, free-throw, dribble-course, vertical-jump, and full-court-shot skills competitions will be spotlighted. Themed state courts will be mobilized along the Exposition’s famed Avenue of States. Featured ‘showcase games’ will be held on new court surfaces in the historic Eastern States Coliseum and on the Court of Dreams, the center court of the Basketball Hall of Fame. A year-long community outreach effort will begin immediately. Registration will open on March 1, 2020. Information and engagement is available now through www.hooplandia.com or on Instagram: @hooplandia.

Chamber Corners

GREATER WESTFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• Jan. 6: Mayor’s Coffee Hour, 8-9 a.m., hosted by Andrea York Photography, 16 Union Ave., Westfield. Join us for coffee with Westfield Mayor-elect Donald Humason. The event is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is requested so we may give our host a proper head count. For more information and to register, visit westfieldbiz.org/events or call (413) 568-1618.

• Jan. 13: After 5 Connections, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Union Crossing Realty, LLC, 420 Union St., Westfield. Refreshments will be served. A 50/50 raffle will benefit the chamber scholarship fund. Bring your business cards and make connections. Chamber members and non-members are free. For more information and to register, visit westfieldbiz.org/events or call (413) 568-1618.

• Jan. 28: Block Party, 4-6 p.m., hosted by Westwood Restaurant and Pub, 94 North Elm St., Westfield. Join us for an open house and meet Westwood and chamber businesses for drinks, appetizers, networking, and more. Chamber members are welcome. Marketing tables are available. For more information and to register, e-mail [email protected] or call (413) 568-1618.

• Feb. 10: After 5 Connections, 5-7 p.m., hosted by the Pottery Cellar, the Mill at Crane Pond, 77 Mill St., Westfield. Refreshments will be served. A 50/50 raffle will benefit the chamber scholarship fund. Bring your business cards and make connections. Chamber members and non-members are free. For more information and to register, visit westfieldbiz.org/events or call (413) 568-1618.

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S CHAMBER

www.springfieldregionalchamber.com

(413) 787-1555

• Jan. 16: PWC Headline Luncheon, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., hosted by Storrowton Tavern, 1305 Memorial Ave., West Springfield, with Karla Medina, retired Hartford police sergeant and owner and founder of Sudor Taino Fitness. Cost: $35 for PWC members, $40 general admission, and $25 for students. To register, visit www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, e-mail [email protected], or call (413) 755-1310.

SPRINGFIELD REGIONAL CHAMBER

www.springfieldregionalchamber.com

(413) 787-1555

• Feb. 5: “The 2020 Elections: Fasten Your Seatbelts — From Massachusetts to the Beltway, It’s All on the Line” Rise & Shine Business Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., hosted by MassMutual Center, 1277 Main St., Springfield. Featuring political consultant Tony Cignoli. Cost: $25 for members in advance ($30 at the door), $35 general admission in advance ($40 at the door). To register, visit www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, e-mail [email protected], or call (413) 755-1310.

• Feb. 20: Third annual Fire & Ice Craft Cocktail Competition, 5:30-8 p.m., hosted by Springfield Country Club, 1375 Elm St., West Springfield. Cost: $50 for members in advance ($60 at the door), $60 general admission in advance ($70 at the door). To register, visit www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, e-mail [email protected], or call (413) 755-1310.

• Feb. 27: Leadership Institute professional development program kickoff, 1-4:30 p.m., hosted by TD Bank Conference Center, 1441 Main St., Springfield. To register, visit www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, e-mail [email protected], or call (413) 755-1310.

WEST OF THE RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.ourwrc.com

(413) 426-3880

• Jan. 16: Networking Lunch, noon to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Crestview Country Club, Agawam. Enjoy a sit-down lunch while networking with fellow chamber members. Each attendee will get a chance to offer a brief introduction and company overview. You must be a member or guest of a member to attend. The only cost to attend for members is the cost of lunch. Non-members pay $10 plus lunch. Attendees will order off the menu and pay separately that day. Please note, we cannot invoice you for these events. Register online at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

Company Notebook

Westmass Moves Corporate Offices to Downtown Springfield

SPRINGFIELD — Westmass Area Development Corp. announced the opening of its new corporate offices in downtown Springfield. Located at One Monarch Place, Suite 1350, the new offices will host all corporate functions of Westmass with capacity to continue regional awareness and growth. The new office location will enable Westmass to continue to brand itself as a regional development company focusing on opportunities in real estate and economic development in Western Mass. “An opportunity to move into downtown Springfield is great for Westmass,” said Jeff Daley, president and CEO. “We look to expand our market throughout Western Mass. for real-estate development opportunities as well as working with municipalities and private developers providing consulting services to assist with the technical details of real estate and economic-development projects in Western Mass.” He noted that Westmass also maintains offices at Ludlow Mills. “As a nationally recognized brownfield-redevelopment site and the marquee project in our portfolio, with hundreds of residents and employees living and working at the Mills, it is important to not only have our facilities management office there, but to house our expanding leasing and marketing departments as well.”

Florence Bank Unveils Renovated Easthampton Branch

EASTHAMPTON — Florence Bank has completed a renovation of the interior and drive-through at its existing Easthampton branch at 5 Main St. The renovation is part of Florence Bank’s ongoing effort to align its physical branch locations with modern banking offerings and customer needs. The Easthampton renovation included interior updates and modernizations, along with two new ATMs. Florence Bank is a full-service, mutually owned bank based in Florence and has served the Easthampton community for 20 years. It first merged with Easthampton Cooperative Bank and expanded and remodeled its present location on Main Street in 1999. The Easthampton location serves more than 6,400 customers annually. The renovations were intended to maintain the branch’s charm while also embracing the innovative design of Florence Bank’s newly constructed locations. The bank partnered with the following local contractors on the project: HAI Architecture in Northampton, Pioneer Contractors in Easthampton, Broadway Office Interiors in Springfield, Fine Woodworks Millwork in South Hadley, Mercier Carpets in West Springfield, and Grimaldi Painting in East Longmeadow. Inside, the lobby, teller line, and customer-service area were renovated and updated, making the interior brighter and more contemporary. A new digital screen has also been installed to keep customers up to date on bank-wide enhancements and notifications. Outside, two new ATMs are now available, and the drive-up teller equipment was enhanced to provide two-way audio/video communication. Florence Bank opened a branch on Allen Street in Springfield in late 2018. In 2020, the bank will open its newest Hampden County location in Chicopee, expanding its network to 12 locations.

Behavioral Health Network Receives $10,000 Grant from PeoplesBank

SPRINGFIELD — Behavioral Health Network Inc. (BHN) has been awarded a $10,000 grant from PeoplesBank to be used for BHN’s Money School program, a financial-independence initiative for survivors of domestic or sexual violence who are also recovering from addiction. PeoplesBank’s grant to BHN will support the operation of the Elizabeth Freeman Center’s Money School program. Money School is an award-winning, trauma-informed, financial-independence initiative designed to create long-term safety and economic security for survivors. Participants are given individually tailored financial and career mentoring as well as intensive advocacy and support for their substance-use recovery and healing in the aftermath of domestic or sexual violence. The program helps survivors achieve and maintain safety, economic independence, and family well-being for themselves and their children. Kathy Wilson, president and CEO of BHN, noted that “much of our work at BHN has to do with supporting and engaging with people as they overcome obstacles and plan a better future for themselves. The Money School program has been particularly effective in helping women to take control of their finances, one of the most difficult challenges for anyone when navigating the long-term impact of domestic violence. We deeply appreciate the resources being provided by PeoplesBank in this vital program that is changing the lives of the women served.” The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence states that one in four women report experiencing domestic violence. In addition to physical abuse, domestic-violence survivors often experience financial duress, and almost half of domestic-violence victims struggle with substance-use disorders.

Tighe & Bond Opens Office in Portland, Maine

WESTFIELD — Tighe & Bond Inc. a northeastern leader in engineering and environmental consulting, opened a new office in Portland, Maine this month. The 4,400-square-foot office, located just minutes from Portland City Hall and the Old Port, will allow the firm to better serve its growing base of clients throughout Maine and the region while providing an opportunity to employ professionals native to the area. Senior Project Manager Dan Bisson will provide leadership for Tighe & Bond’s newest office. Bisson has more than 25 years of experience with management, permitting, planning, design, and construction of water infrastructure projects for municipalities, utilities, and private clients. Tighe & Bond’s strategic plan calls for geographic growth to further reinforce its position as a Northeast regional leader in engineering and environmental services. The company is experiencing office expansions and staffing growth in multiple locations throughout the Northeast, adding four offices in the past five years and expanding its Worcester office earlier this year.

Davis Educational Foundation Awards $100,000 to CCGS Joint Purchasing Initiative

LONGMEADOW — The Davis Educational Foundation has awarded the CCGS Joint Purchasing Initiative a $100,000 grant to be distributed over two years. This is the third grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to underwrite this collaborative project. The Joint Purchasing Initiative (JPI) consists of the five private member institutions of the Cooperating Colleges of Greater Springfield (CCGS), including American International College, Bay Path University, Elms College, Springfield College, and Western New England University. The goal of the JPI, which will continue to be administered by Bay Path University, is to identify and implement strategic opportunities for collaboration where shared purchasing and shared services in high-cost and high-impact areas will result in significant institutional cost savings across the JPI’s partner institutions, ultimately containing the cost of higher education for students. Since its founding in 2017, the efforts of the JPI have resulted in collective cost savings of nearly $900,000, with varying degrees of savings by institution. During this time, the JPI reduced costs by negotiating better deals on contracted services with vendors, such as student transportation for athletics and van leasing, rental-car agreements, contract management, corporate payment systems, IRB software, employee and student background checks, electricity and solar sources of energy, interpretive and captioning services, medical-waste-disposal services, and computer purchases. With the funding from the latest grant from the Davis Educational Foundation, the next step in the evolution of the JPI is to explore and develop potential plans for shared services, implement best practices, reduce duplication of efforts, and drive efficiency gains with the expertise already existing within the institutions.

HCC Marks 20th Year of Giving Tree Campaign

HOLYOKE — Holyoke Community College (HCC) celebrated the 20th anniversary of its annual Giving Tree campaign Thursday, fulfilling the holiday wishes of 375 consumers from four nonprofits that aid and support some of the area’s most at-risk residents. During the campaign’s closing ceremony, HCC students, faculty, and staff gathered with representatives from WestMass Elder Care, Homework House, the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (MSPCC), and the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home to share food, stories, and gifts. Eleven HCC departments participated in this year’s Fall Food Fest in November, raising $833 for the Giving Tree campaign. The money was used to fulfill 26 gift tags for MSPCC and create gift boxes that included baby wipes, diapers, clothing, books, and toys. Each year during the annual campaign, Giving Trees are set up in designated areas around the HCC campus. Participants choose colored-coded tags from one of the nonprofit agencies based on the age of the recipient and their wish for a gift. The wrapped gifts are then sorted and piled on tables for the closing celebration.

Family Business Center Awards Grand-funded Memberships to Three Women Business Owners

HOLYOKE — At the Family Business Center’s (FBC) December Log Cabin Dinner Forum, Lakisha Coppedge of Coppedge Consulting, Kimberley Betts of Betts Plumbing & Heating Supply, and Sherryla Diola of Mundo Artisan Foods were awarded grant-funded memberships for the 2020 year. This inaugural grant, aimed at supporting women business leaders in Western Mass., was funded by Encharter Insurance. “My goal is to grow our trusted business learning community intentionally, and to increase diversity and inclusion,” said Jessi Kirley, FBC executive director, who collaborated with the women leaders of local partner organizations, including the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center, Leadership Pioneer Valley, EforAll, and Valley CDC, for nominations and selection of the award recipients. Added Tracey Benison, president of Encharter Insurance, “women-owned businesses are critical to the success of small business in the Pioneer Valley. As a women-led insurance agency, Encharter looks for meaningful ways to support women-owned businesses. The recipients of the scholarships are standouts in their professions. We are excited to support their continued journey of learning.”

People on the Move

Evan Dowd

The Dowd Agencies, LLC announced the recent hire of Evan Dowd as account executive, joining his brother, Jack Dowd, as a fifth-generation employee of the company. “Evan brings the necessary experience to his new role,” said John Dowd Jr., president and CEO of the Dowd Agencies. “He gained extensive industry knowledge through positions at both local and national insurance companies while living in Boston. He’s excited to return to Western Mass. and to be a part of his hometown community. Furthermore, he is excited to join the family business and help continue and build on a legacy spanning over 120 years. We’re excited to have him join the team.” Prior to his current position at Dowd, Evan worked in Boston in various industry roles, including sales, claims adjustment, and underwriting. A 2013 graduate of Bates College, he is a licensed property and casualty insurance producer and is currently working toward his chartered property casualty underwriter designation.

•••••

Western New England University President Anthony Caprio will retire at the end of June 2020 after 24 years in that role — making him the longest-serving president in WNEU’s history. He took over in 1996 as the fifth president in the 100-year-old institution’s history. The board of trustees will conduct a nationwide search to find a successor. “Western New England University has benefited greatly from Dr. Anthony Caprio’s leadership and stewardship over these many years. His upcoming retirement after 24 years of service is well-deserved, and he has worked tirelessly to advance our institution,” board of trustees chair Kenneth Rickson said last month. “There have been many major achievements under Dr. Caprio’s term as president,” he added. “We made significant advancements in every area of campus life. We expanded our programs and curriculum, completed numerous changes and additions to the physical plant, enhanced our athletics programs, increased our student programs, and made significant advances in our technology. Dr. Caprio’s crowning achievement was completion of the plan to gain recognition as a university.”

•••••

Spiros Hatiras, president and CEO of Holyoke Medical Center and Valley Health Systems, announced Dr. Simon Ahtaridis as the new chief medical officer at Holyoke Medical Center. Before joining Holyoke Medical Center, Ahtaridis was the national clinical advisor and chief medical officer for Sound Advisory Services. In this role, he oversaw the overall clinical performance of Sound’s onsite and remote advisory services. His prior experience also includes serving as the chief medical officer for Mercy Medical Center in Springfield, where he also served as the chief of Hospitalist Service and chief of Medicine. Additionally, he has been an instructor in medicine, first at Harvard Medical School and most recently at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine. His main focus has been improving utilization management in the inpatient setting and population-health programs, including improved documentation, reduced length of stay, readmissions, and appropriate utilization of resources. Ahtaridis received his medical degree from the Temple University School of Medicine. Prior to graduation, he took two years off to serve as the Legislative Affairs director for the American Medical Student Assoc. in Washington, D.C., and also received his master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health with a focus on health systems. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance, where he received several teaching awards. He was also a chief resident and chief of the hospitalist service at Cambridge Health Alliance.

•••••

Gabrielle Young

Michael Tucker, president and CEO of Greenfield Cooperative Bank, announced that Gabrielle Young has joined the bank as a mortgage loan originator. “Ms. Young has over 10 years of banking experience,” Tucker said. “Most recently, Gabrielle was a financial center operation manager at another area bank. In her new role, Gabrielle will be responsible for educating and guiding borrowers through the loan-application process. She is currently working out of our Florence location but will be permanently based at our Northampton location beginning in January 2020.” Young studied business at the University of Hartford. She is current in all banking regulation training.

•••••

Springfield-based law firm Egan, Flanagan & Cohen, P.C. announced it has promoted attorney Katie Manzi McDonough to partner. McDonough’s law practice includes estate and business planning, nonprofit governance, trust and probate administration, and general corporate law. She works with a wide range of clients, including nonprofit boards, family-owned businesses, and families whom she can help through the estate-planning and probate process. She joined Egan, Flanagan & Cohen in 2017. She began her career first as an analyst for J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. in New York and then as a transactional lawyer for Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, LLP, a Wall Street law firm routinely ranked among the best firms internationally. McDonough attended the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester and Seton Hall University School of Law, graduating magna cum laude from each. She was recently elected to serve on the board of directors of the Hampden County Bar Assoc., and is an active member of the Holy Cross Club of the Pioneer Valley, the St. Thomas More Society, and St. Mary’s Parish in Longmeadow.

•••••

Cynthia Malinowski

Florence Bank has promoted Cynthia Malinowski to the position of vice president and branch manager of the downtown Northampton office. Malinowski brings extensive knowledge and skills to her new role. Prior to her recent promotion, she was the assistant vice president and branch manager at the downtown Northampton office. During her tenure at the bank, she has been the recipient of the President’s Club Award, which is awarded to employees who demonstrate superior levels of performance, customer service, and overall contribution to the bank. She has also completed various professional banking series course studies, including America’s Community Bankers Training Series. Malinowski serves her community as an active member of Easthampton’s Helping Hand Society and is a member of the Greater Northampton Chamber of Commerce.

•••••

Michael Ostrowski

Michael Ostrowski, president and CEO of Arrha Credit Union, has received the honor of a third reappointment to the World Affairs Committee of the Credit Union National Assoc. (CUNA). This committee reports to the CUNA board of directors with respect to matters related to the World Council of Credit Unions and international policy matters. The World Affairs Committee serves as a focal point for developing policies, strategies, leadership, education, and resources for credit unions throughout the world. Ostrowski has been assisting in overcoming challenges and capitalizing on opportunities between and among the U.S. and international credit-union activities to expand credit-union access throughout the world. He traveled to Cuba to engage its government on establishing credit unions and to Poland to assist its credit unions in regulatory advocacy with the Polish government. He also serves as a connection between CUNA and the World Council of Credit Unions, where he provided financial education, assistance, and guidance to Puerto Rico’s credit unions in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

•••••

Alison Shimel

Cooley Shrair announced that Alison Shimel has joined the firm as associate legal counsel in the general business and commercial real estate practice. She will work with a broad base of clients, including developers, landlords, and general business clients. Shimel attended the University at Albany, participating in an accelerated undergraduate and law school program, and was awarded her juris doctorate in 2019 after six years of study. While attending law school, she worked as a law clerk in the city of Springfield Law Department and at Cooley Shrair. She was active in the law-school community, participating in the Health Law Society and as research assistant for the Lawsuit Reform Alliance of New York.

•••••

The Westfield Starfires of the Futures Collegiate Baseball League (FCBL) have named Hunter Golden director of Player Personnel. Golden will be responsible for recruiting talent from colleges across the U.S. and Puerto Rico and transition them into summer baseball in New England. Players will live with host families in Western Mass. and become involved with many community initiatives each summer. “Westfield is a great baseball community that deserves a winning team. We’re already focused on assembling a group of players who won’t just be successful this season, but that is the kind of team that sets the tone for a culture of sustained success that we hope to build on year after year,” Golden said. “We’re in a fortunate position to have a lot of trust placed in us by ownership, and have been granted a lot of freedom and latitude in terms of using whatever resources we need in order to build a great roster and provide as good a player experience as we possibly can,” he went on. “The framework already exists here for a winning program, and we’re extremely optimistic that, with a little work, we’ll have a chance to be competitive right off the bat.”

•••••

Steve Chase

Steve Chase, president and CEO of Fuel Services Inc. Oil and Propane (FSi), was recently sworn in as chairman of the Propane Gas Assoc. of New England (PGANE). FSi Oil and Propane has been a leader in the fuel industry for almost 30 years. Over these three decades, many things have changed, including the company’s management, which now includes Chase’s son, daughter, son-in-law, and grandson; expanding its service areas; as well as adding in new fuels such as Bioheat, kerosene, and propane. PGANE is a regional alternative-energy trade association representing more than 800 members of the propane industry by promoting safety, education, and public awareness of the uses of propane. Chase said he is honored by this appointment because he has a passion and commitment to the propane industry and educating consumers on the benefits of this type of energy. Throughout New England, he noted, there are nearly 300,000 residential customers using this climate-friendly energy and more than 11,500 jobs in the propane industry. Chase serves as the state director of the National Propane Gas Assoc. board, is a board member of the BBB of Central and Western Mass., devoted 25 years on the Oxford, Conn. Fire Department, and is a U.S. Navy veteran, having served on the USS Little Rock.

•••••

Deirdre Griffin

Elms College announced the hiring of Deirdre Griffin, SSJ as director of International Programs. She will be responsible for supporting the college’s international students, growing traditional and faculty-led study-abroad programs, and developing a vibrant community of global learning that celebrates diverse cultures and explores current issues. Griffin is a graduate of Boston College Law School and Bowdoin College. She has worked at Jewish Family Service and the Gray House in Springfield, providing a variety of transitional and support services to diverse, global populations. She entered the community of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Springfield in 2017 and made her initial profession of vows in July. During her 20-year career as an immigration attorney, she has worked in private practice, managed interpreter services in Massachusetts courts, and coordinated refugee-resettlement services. In 2014, she spent three months on staff at the Centre Internationale of the Sisters of Saint Joseph in Le Puy, France, and this summer lived with a family in Guatemala. Within the current student body, Elms College has enrolled students from 14 countries, representing five continents. The college also has a thriving International Club.

•••••

M. Kate Van Valkenburg

NBT Bank Connecticut Regional President Andreas Kapetanopoulos announced that M. Kate Van Valkenburg has joined NBT’s expanding team in Connecticut. Van Valkenburg will serve as senior vice president and senior commercial banking relationship manager. Van Valkenburg has more than 18 years of commercial-banking experience, including underwriting, management, and lending. Most recently, she served as commercial loan officer for ION Bank in Farmington, Conn. She earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration with a concentration in finance from UMass. She serves the community as a board member for Gifts of Love in Avon and Neighborhood Housing Services of New Britain. Last month, NBT Bank announced the addition of Regional Commercial Banking Manager Steve Angeletti and Senior Credit Analyst Elizabeth Hayden. The bank expects to reveal the location for its regional headquarters in the first quarter of 2020.

Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

BARRE

R.H. Martin Inc., 2 Sunrise Ave., Barre, MA 01005. Russel H. Martin, same. Contractor.

Russell H. Martin Construction Inc., 2 Sunrise Ave., Barre, MA 01005. Russell H. Martin, same. Contractor/construction.

CHICOPEE

Shree Shakti Inc., 355 Dale St., Chicopee, MA 01013. Vanita Patel, 34 Fenton St., Monson, MA 01057. Variety store.

EAST LONGMEADOW

Santiago Squared Inc., 26 Roderick Ave., East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Jennifer Santiago, same. Restaurant with alcoholic beverages and brewery.

GOSHEN

Ruger Properties Inc., 137 West St., Goshen, MA 01032. William Graham, same. Residential rentals.

HOLYOKE

Plant Foods Inc., 267 Southampton Road, Holyoke, MA 01040. Daniel Liboissonnault, same. Producing, packaging, marketing, and selling of plant-based foods.

LONGMEADOW

Shoenique Inc., 700 Bliss Road, Longmeadow, MA 01106. Jennifer A. Bates, 34 Brookford Dr., Somers, CT0601. Retail sales of shoes and accessories.

NORTHAMPTON

Pastrich-Klemer RE Inc., 86 Moser St., Northampton, MA 01060. Deborah L. Pastrich-Klemer, same. Real estate holding company.

Pioneer Valley Democratic Socialists of America Inc., 19 Trumbull Road #2, Northampton, MA 01060. Amy Borezo, 12 Shelter St., Orange, MA 01364. Facilitate the transition to a democratic and socialist society, one in which the means as well as the resources of production are democratically and socially controlled.

PITTSFIELD

Pamaruto Publishing Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Michael Ruhoy, same. Publishing.

Pax Assist Inc., 82 Wendell Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Asmahan Dahbali, same. Airline ground handling company for passenger services.

ROZ100 LLC, 27 East Housatonic St., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Daniel Talmi, same. Ballet touring.

Shawn Courtney Memorial Inc., 86 Strong Ave., Pittsfield, MA 01201. Richard T. Courtney, 71 Glover Ave., Apt 3, Quincy, MA 02171. Annual golf tournament to raise funds for charitable organizations in memory of Shawn Courtney.

SPRINGFIELD

Spectrum Construction and Development Inc., 42 Cornell St., First Floor, Springfield, MA 01109. Eugeniu Banaru, same. Construction.

WARE

Pennington Painting Inc., 18 Bellevue Ave., Ware, MA 01082. Dustin Pennington, same. Painting and remodeling.

WESTHAMPTON

Richard Huntley & Sons Inc., 175 Reservoir Road, Westhampton, MA 01027. Richard P Huntley, same. Recycling.

DBA Certificates

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the month of December 2019.

AMHERST

Visual Concepts 123
170 East Hadley Road, Apt. 24
Yvonne Mendez

Pasta E Basta
26 Main St.
Moran & MacCartney Inc.

Winn Residential – Mill Valley Estates
420 Riverglade Dr.
Winn Managed Properties, LLC

BELCHERTOWN

rlsblingspot.com
137 Gold St.
Rosemarie Glaude

Thorton’s
577 Warren Wright Road
Todd Thorton

CHICOPEE

Chicopee Motor Sales
184 Center St.
Stanley Kobylanski

Walgreens #11688
1195 Granby Road
Walgreen Eastern Co. Inc.

DEERFIELD

Environmental Planning Associates
12 Ridge Road
Peter LaBarbera

Greg’s Auto Body
239 Greenfield Road
Gregory Gardner

US Equity Finance
25 Conway Road
Gary Bowen

EAST LONGMEADOW

Baumshells (Cabelo Salon)
51 Prospect St.
Carey Walas

Caring Transitions
144 Southbrook Road
James White

Kristin Mittler @ Obsessions Salon
10 Center Square
Kristin Mittler

New England Functional Fitness
168 Denslow Road
Michael Mulhollen

PMK Nail Salon
52 Shaker Road
Hang Truong

Race Appraisal Services, LLC
200 N. Main St., Unit 1201
Michael Race

Volo Aero MRO
140 Industrial Dr.
Andrew Walmsley

GREENFIELD

Anne Christopher Nail Co.
5 Arch St.
Sheila Dupras

Athens Pizza
25 Main St.
Vassilios Arvanitis

Cohn & Co.
117 Main St.
Cohn, LLC

Sketch Design
30 Warner St.
Mathew Beaudoin

Studley Do Right Cleaning
28 Woodleigh Dr.
Lisa Studley

HOLYOKE

DR ResCom Property Improvement
60 West Glen St.
David Roman

Jackson Law
573 Northampton St.
Karen Jackson

Melz Custom Threadz
298 West Franklin St.
Melissa Santiago

Rememory Consulting
396 Pleasant St.
Micha Broadnax, Jessica O’Neal

LONGMEADOW

BOC Construction and Remodeling
85 Mill Road
Barry O’Connor

The Flahive Consulting Group
76 Coventry Lane
Jim Flahive

Found Meaning Therapy
123 Dwight Road
Nicholas DeCoteau

Goldaper Tax and Accounting
7 Eastland Road
Jason Goldaper

LMF Consulting Services
76 Coventry Lane
Linda Flahive

LUDLOW

Esteem Skin Care, LLC
733 Chapin St.
Carol Santini

Ludlow Nutrition
194 East St.
Jacqueline Vermette

NORTHAMPTON

Chaput Marketing
152 Crescent St.
Christopher Chaput

Commercial & Investment Properties
24 Forbes Ave.
David Russell

Gimle’s Gallimaufy
131 Bridge St.
Ana Alves, Elaine Keyes

Oxbow Zen
26 Crescent St., Apt. 201
Roger Stawasz

Sew Good
137 Damon Road, Suite D
Ki Chun Park
Style Nails Spa
241 King St., Suite 18
Phuong Bui

Zoom Auto Sales
245 North King St.
John Hunter

SOUTHWICK

Anthony Wheeler Construction
15 Gableview Lane
Anthony Wheeler

Western Mass Rendering
94 Foster Road
Patrick Facke

SPRINGFIELD

Auntine Adrienne’s
646 Page Blvd.
Adrienne Burton

Crew Investigations Inc.
41 Luden St.
John Brock

D & D Carriers
26 Mapledell St.
Edgardo Correa

Dollar Tree #3541
1101 Boston Road
Rosa Banks

Enriquez Therapy & Healing
43 Sullivan St.
Jeanette Enriquez

Fontanez Trucking
117 Gardens Dr.
Fontanez Trucking

Fortis Stone Realty
1391 Main St.
Nyles Courchesne

Hall Improvements
6 Beaumont St.
Eli Hall

Jay’s Communications Inc.
56 West Alvord St.
Jeremy Bronco

Katherine C. Garvey
111 Berard Circle
Katherine Garvey

Magnetiq Entertainment
12 Ladd St.
Benjamin Blake

Nets and Co.
42 Dewey St.
Nesty Diaz

Nexthome Elite Realty
308 Main St.
Elite Realty

Ora Care Inc.
878 Sumner Ave.
Violet Hall

Proud Homes Realty, LLC
31 Palmer Ave.
Timothy Cooper

R & M Upholstery
1 Allen St.
Richard Howell

Swift Mart
1271 Page Blvd.
Farhad Iftikhar

Top Notch Property Service
52 Lloyd Ave.
Jonathan Denault

Weeman’s Custom Vinyl
104 Balis St.
Sean Adams

Wood Peckers Wood Works
447 Page Blvd.
Taj Dobbins

WILBRAHAM

Amituofo Spa
2400 Boston Road
Robert Benjamin

Armored Landscaping, LLC
168 Burleign Road
Jose Gonzalez

The Jam Girl
180 Soule Road
Ashley Bigda

Lotte’s Dog Grooming
2489 Boston Road
Sharon Kozik

Tommy’s Painting & Cleaning
5 Wilton Dr.
Thomas Guilbault

WJF GeoConsultants Inc.
2789 Boston Road
William Fabbri

WARE

Rock House Restoration
12 School St.
Dane Duquette

Simply Wrapped
3 Boivin Ave.
Tammy Darling

WESTFIELD

Advance Payroll Service
41 Court St.
Donald Belisle

Al’s Tire Shop
918 Southampton Road
Lou Jean Inc.

Cities Gateway
18 Whispering Wind Road
Jack Clemente

Dugebrown Construction, LLC
10 Nicholas Lane
Joseph Aimua

The Executive SEO
247 Munger Hill Road
Scott Pierson

Magic Images
133 Ridgeview Terrace
Animesh Bose

Max’s Residential Re-developers
15 May St.
Edward McCabe

Nextgen Roofing
301 North Elm St.
Nextgen Construction Service Inc.

Patton Firearms
24 Old Holyoke Road
Michael Patton

Shea’s Barbers
Justin Bard
243 Elm St.

Smart Nurses
63 Spruce St.
Jacquelyn Margarites

Twerk Boot-Y Camp
1029 North Road
Thomasina Frimpong-LeClair

WEST SPRINGFIELD

CTNC – Nutrition Coach
14 Rochelle St.
Marci Cooley

Guns Inc.
1050 Main St.
E. David Knapik

Inspire Me Photo
230 Day St.
Maria Vickers

Shri Ghanshyam Subway, LLC
356 Memorial Ave.
Navin Patel

The Cauldron Temple
65 Van Horn St.
Karen Frasca

Bankruptcies

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Arbuzova, Tamara
27 Rose St., Apt. 2L
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/19

Barry, Keren D.
29 King St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/19/19

Curzi, Barbara J.
32 West St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/20/19

DeLorme, Karen N.
a/k/a Hartwright, Karen N.
54 River St.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/26/19

Gonzalez, Shelika M.
PO Box 6188
Springfield, MA 01101
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/19

Hurley, Frederick L.
11 Melville Court
Lenox, MA 01240
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/19/19

Irizarry, Glenn R.
293 Central St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/20/19

O’Shea, Jean Marie
141 Onota St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/19/19

Parrilla, Damaris
109 St. James Circle, 1st
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/21/19

Pierce Building and Repair
Pierce, Gary A.
Pierce, Christine
50 Mystery Lane
Phillipston, MA 01331
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/18/19

Rauh, Edward Anthony
36 Monrovia St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/19/19

Reed, Lewis K.
Reed, Patricia E.
98 Essex St.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/21/19

Rivers, Ann Marie
519 East River St.
Orange, MA 01364
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/19

Robinson, Sarah H.
85 Pinewood Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/22/19

Santiago, Annette
18 Fitzpatrick Lane
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 11/22/19

Santos, Jose R.
59 Peekskill Ave.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/19/19

Serafino, Anthony F.
16 Roseland Terrace
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 11/21/19

Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

131 Emmett Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $469,500
Buyer: Ethan Vandermark
Seller: Helen I. Hall IRT
Date: 11/22/19

BERNARDSTON

433 Huckle Hill Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $123,000
Buyer: Peter E. Bassett
Seller: Jonathan C. Bassett
Date: 11/25/19

BUCKLAND

33 Sears St.
Buckland, MA 01370
Amount: $127,669
Buyer: MHFA
Seller: Devon M. Kelleher
Date: 11/22/19

CONWAY

260 Hoosac Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Thomas L. Henyey
Seller: Cheryl A. Patterson
Date: 11/25/19

DEERFIELD

53 Eastern Ave.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: David E. Hayes
Seller: Boron IRT
Date: 11/26/19

14 Mountain Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Susan W. Handler
Seller: Heller 2018 IRT
Date: 11/26/19

98 North Main St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Lindner
Seller: Alan Lipp
Date: 11/19/19

GREENFIELD

14 Barton Heights
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Tami J. Thompson
Seller: James D. Whitney
Date: 11/22/19

80 Beech St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Christopher J. Edes
Seller: Jane A. Brady
Date: 11/21/19

229-231 Chapman St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Michael R. Pendriss
Seller: Ronald P. Croteau
Date: 11/27/19

14 Colorado Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Jonathan D. Jordan
Seller: Richard D. Bukowski
Date: 12/03/19

15 Frederick Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $231,500
Buyer: Charles C. Balzer
Seller: Philippe McAntoine
Date: 11/25/19

12 Leonard St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Sarah Maney
Seller: Susan D. Banks
Date: 12/03/19

31 Leyden Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Treacy E. Henry
Seller: Jeffrey Dean
Date: 11/22/19

271 Log Plain Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Seneca Realty LLC
Seller: Matthew J. Lindner
Date: 11/19/19

40 School St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: School St. LLC
Seller: STS Properties LLC
Date: 11/25/19

249 Wells St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: Amy M. Walker
Seller: Ryder, Ellen Louise, (Estate)
Date: 11/25/19

MONTAGUE

131 4th St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $143,000
Buyer: Allen Fowler
Seller: Richard G. Becker Jr. LT
Date: 11/26/19

7 K St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Michael S. Wells
Seller: Dagmara M. Brzezowska
Date: 11/22/19

19 Randall Wood Dr.
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $269,725
Buyer: Frederick B. Smith
Seller: Tracey L. Ankiewicz
Date: 11/18/19

33-35 X St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: James J. Zaccara
Seller: Layne V. Floyd
Date: 11/20/19

ORANGE

43 Anderwood Lane
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Ari J. Pugliese
Seller: Reid J. Anderson
Date: 11/22/19

161 East Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $129,900
Buyer: Aastin Patterson-Smith
Seller: Catherine M. Thebeau
Date: 11/20/19

92 Jasmine Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: Daniel Faneuf
Seller: William Maclay-Schmick
Date: 11/26/19

345 Mayo Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Brandee J. Walden
Seller: Richard T. Kwiatkowski
Date: 12/03/19

71 Oak Dr.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Richard J. Brown
Seller: Alan M. Vieu
Date: 11/20/19

32 Terrace St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: John D. Forbes
Seller: Philip J. Harris
Date: 11/27/19

SHUTESBURY

6 Great Pines Dr. Ext.
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $317,000
Buyer: James A. Moore
Seller: Bryan Hobbs
Date: 12/03/19

27 Merrill Dr.
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Sean D. Genereux
Seller: Thomas P. Bruno
Date: 11/25/19

SUNDERLAND

30 Reservoir Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $382,500
Buyer: Anthony M. Maio
Seller: William M. Girardi
Date: 11/21/19

227 River Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $514,900
Buyer: Richard W. Strycharz
Seller: Anthony M. Maio
Date: 11/18/19

WARWICK

634 Winchester Road
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $150,550
Buyer: Slater K. Alden
Seller: Anderson, Joyce C., (Estate)
Date: 12/03/19

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

79 Cesan St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $254,000
Buyer: Joseph A. Depalma
Seller: Domenic A. Depalma
Date: 11/21/19

54 Charles St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Barbara Brizzolari
Seller: Andrea M. Davis
Date: 12/03/19

265 Colemore St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Gary Lambert
Seller: Keri L. Regnier
Date: 11/22/19

700 Cooper St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Vadim Nazarets
Seller: Antonio P. Liquori
Date: 12/02/19

174 Edgewater Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $432,000
Buyer: David Kutz
Seller: Vicki Benson
Date: 11/19/19

34-36 Ellison Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $291,000
Buyer: Antonio M. Castro
Seller: Paul J. Nascimbeni
Date: 11/22/19

39 Federal St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Wayne A. Wilson
Seller: Oak Ridge Custom Home Builders
Date: 11/27/19

43 Federal St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $385,000
Buyer: Michael A. Sukharam
Seller: Oak Ridge Custom Home Builders
Date: 11/27/19

87 Forest Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $328,000
Buyer: Joshua Snell
Seller: Nikolay Zhupikov
Date: 12/02/19

24 Frances St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $193,500
Buyer: Helen Pariza
Seller: Donald J. Piacentini
Date: 11/27/19

158 Karen Lynn Circle
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Tiffani A. Beeman
Seller: Eagle Home Buyers LLC
Date: 11/26/19

40 Kosak Court #33
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $446,200
Buyer: Rosamaria Kehoe
Seller: Tirone Development Corp.
Date: 11/27/19

144 Kosak Court
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $399,900
Buyer: Michael J. Donovan
Seller: Thomas L. Fournier
Date: 11/27/19

116 Letendre Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $233,000
Buyer: Bobbi J. Belanger
Seller: Vineyard Partners Ltd
Date: 11/22/19

35 Mallard Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $289,000
Buyer: Walker FT
Seller: Charles D. Sullivan
Date: 11/22/19

57 Mallard Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $289,000
Buyer: Joanne M. Demers
Seller: Lynn Griffin
Date: 11/21/19

99 Pineview Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Charles Heimann
Seller: James Thomas
Date: 11/18/19

323 Poplar St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Jillian Pena
Seller: Joshua T. Snell
Date: 11/26/19

438 Springfield St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $680,000
Buyer: Jasnia Realty LLC
Seller: BRVS LLC
Date: 11/27/19

53 Windermere Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $575,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Poe
Seller: Bretta Construction LLC
Date: 11/18/19

BRIMFIELD

37 East Hill Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $412,000
Buyer: Joel T. Martin
Seller: Born In Brimfield Construction
Date: 11/25/19

12 Forest Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $249,000
Buyer: Cindy Alicea
Seller: Brian D. DelNegro
Date: 11/22/19

CHESTER

47 Bromley Road
Chester, MA 01050
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Stephanie L. Vierstra
Seller: Daniel R. Holve
Date: 11/19/19

14 Soisalo Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $123,500
Buyer: Sheryl Keeley
Seller: Sandra Dunn
Date: 11/20/19

45 Soisalo Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $229,000
Buyer: Corbin A. Lavertu
Seller: Elizabeth M. Bolduc
Date: 11/26/19

CHICOPEE

79 Acrebrook Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $186,353
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Patricia A. Dugre
Date: 11/29/19

81 Blanchard St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: John P. Zwisler
Seller: David W. Covington
Date: 11/26/19

45 Brightwood St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Jeremiah Adkins
Seller: Kustra, Rita A., (Estate)
Date: 12/03/19

395 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Premium Properties Inc.
Seller: Jeary Beaudette
Date: 11/25/19

29 Daniel Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Yamil J. Brito
Seller: Willard Goldie
Date: 11/22/19

117 Fairview Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $204,000
Buyer: Wendy L. Brouillette
Seller: Stanley T. Cheika
Date: 11/22/19

120 Hilton St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Luis A. Bazalar
Seller: Robert E. Rojowski
Date: 11/22/19

20 Holland St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $232,400
Buyer: Richard W. Ostrowski
Seller: Eugene J. Przybylowicz
Date: 11/22/19

86 Laramee St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Keimy Rodriguez
Seller: William Soto-Rivera
Date: 11/25/19

26 Plymouth St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Ty D. Frappier
Seller: Monica Dos-Santos
Date: 11/25/19

815 Sheridan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Julia R. Mohlala
Seller: Robert Bator
Date: 11/22/19

22 Walter St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Davon R. Dallas
Seller: Robert J. Perreault
Date: 11/27/19

18 Whittier Place
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $323,000
Buyer: Jorge Ulises-Bracetty
Seller: Denis V. Mikhaylichenko
Date: 11/21/19

EAST LONGMEADOW

11 Alandale Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Edward M. Walsh
Seller: Linnae M. Rondeau
Date: 11/25/19

36 Breezy Knoll Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $274,500
Buyer: Jonathan M. Dangelo
Seller: Janet L. Carlyle
Date: 11/22/19

16 Converse Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Amy E. Villalobos
Seller: Karen A. Murphy
Date: 11/25/19

175 Dwight Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Stephanie M. Lussier
Seller: Cailin Donovan
Date: 11/18/19

153 Elm St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $157,500
Buyer: Marline A. Claremont
Seller: Bank New York Mellon
Date: 11/22/19

21 Greenacre Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Tom Despins
Seller: Mark A. Zingarelli
Date: 12/03/19

33 Holland Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Adam J. Turner
Seller: Timothy E. Friel
Date: 11/25/19

26 Marshall St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $339,900
Buyer: Sujith Sasidharan
Seller: Edmond W. Drewnowski
Date: 11/26/19

141 Prospect St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Frank Alves
Seller: Thompson, Joyce E., (Estate)
Date: 11/21/19

8 Savoy Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $289,900
Buyer: Kevin D. Matheny
Seller: Alicia R. Carabine
Date: 11/22/19

14 Somerset St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: Patrick T. Dillon
Seller: Carolynn B. Hastie
Date: 12/02/19

126 Tanglewood Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Timothy E. Friel
Seller: Hugh A. Taylor
Date: 11/25/19

167 Tanglewood Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Gavin J. Kelly
Seller: John C. Conant
Date: 11/20/19

12 Vadnais St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Glenn E. Shippy
Seller: Hartman, Elaine E., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

18 Wisteria Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Kelly A. Bednarz
Seller: Katie E. Winseck
Date: 11/18/19

GRANVILLE

107 Barnard Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Joseph Charter
Seller: Eve M. Waterman
Date: 11/19/19

50 McCarthy Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $161,540
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Travis K. Britt
Date: 11/26/19

HAMPDEN

19 Deerfield Circle
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Zachary J. Muscaro
Seller: Nancy L. Quill
Date: 12/03/19

38 Fernwood Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $262,381
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: James V. Stevens
Date: 12/02/19

601 Glendale Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Chris Lomascolo
Seller: Irene Mantle
Date: 11/26/19

63 Mountain Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Steven P. Webster
Seller: Heather E. Turcotte
Date: 11/22/19

42 North Monson Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $384,900
Buyer: Michael M. Hastie
Seller: Chris Lomascolo
Date: 12/03/19

164 North Monson Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Danielle M. McMaster
Seller: Laurence E. Leclerc
Date: 12/02/19

8 Springhouse Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Stuart A. Fearn
Seller: James M. McNeill
Date: 11/25/19

HOLLAND

29 Kimball Hill Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: CNC Note Holdings LLC
Seller: Carr Design & Equities Inc.
Date: 11/22/19

25 Pine Tree Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Michael Bogacz
Seller: Jeffrey J. Candito
Date: 11/22/19

2 White Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $285,900
Buyer: Todd Marsh
Seller: Robin Pelletier
Date: 11/20/19

HOLYOKE

31 Alderman St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $144,545
Buyer: Posiadlosc LLC
Seller: Hampden Homebuyers LLC
Date: 11/21/19

297 Apremont Hwy.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Maisha LLC
Seller: Arsalaan Khawaja
Date: 11/25/19

2 Blossom Lane
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $237,000
Buyer: Edward Casey
Seller: Eduard E. Chrzanowski
Date: 12/03/19

15 Edbert Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Moira A. Cannon
Seller: Sarah Fefer
Date: 11/22/19

783 Homestead Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $242,500
Buyer: Brian T. Matlock
Seller: Lauren M. Magri
Date: 11/22/19

21 Jackson St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Rescom Mass Investments
Seller: Roberto Fernandes
Date: 11/27/19

33 Labrie Lane
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $560,000
Buyer: Lori L. Beuadry-Flint
Seller: Frederick W. Kramer
Date: 11/22/19

211 Oak St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Rosaliz Gonzalez
Seller: Richard Rubin
Date: 11/20/19

17 Phillips Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: James E. McLoyd
Seller: Eric M. Dembinske
Date: 11/22/19

90 Sargeant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Buudda Brothers 90 Sargeant
Seller: Sargeant Street Realty
Date: 11/21/19

117 Sheehan Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Michael A. Catuogno
Seller: Cailin M. Moran
Date: 11/22/19

416 Southampton Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $183,680
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Michael A. Larkin
Date: 11/27/19

7 Stratford Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $201,000
Buyer: Kathleen M. Denner
Seller: Constance A. Gwozdz
Date: 11/21/19

35 Vassar Circle
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Maureen C. Etchells
Seller: Fitzgibbons, Mary L., (Estate)
Date: 11/21/19

LONGMEADOW

470 Bliss Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Shirley B. Dudeck
Seller: Brendan M. Quinn
Date: 11/20/19

55 Cedar Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $182,869
Buyer: Reginald D. Smith
Seller: Diane Stocks
Date: 11/18/19

113 Chiswick St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $256,000
Buyer: Anthony E. Heim
Seller: Frank J. Yesu
Date: 11/26/19

739 Frank Smith Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: William T. McCarrhy
Seller: Esther M. Moomjian
Date: 11/22/19

336 Inverness Lane
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $419,900
Buyer: CIL Realty Of Mass Inc.
Seller: Roberta A. Axler
Date: 11/26/19

66 Lincoln Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $331,000
Buyer: Stephen Boyle
Seller: Charles A. Elfman
Date: 11/22/19

102 Lincoln Park
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Stratton Renovation LLC
Seller: Craig S. Devonshire
Date: 12/02/19

47 Ridge Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Jerry L. Gibson
Seller: Shapiro, Mildred J., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

289 Tanglewood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $485,000
Buyer: Thomas L. Reale
Seller: Theodore K. Mlapah
Date: 11/22/19

LUDLOW

575 Chapin St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Octaviano S. Vital
Seller: Desautels, Aurora A., (Estate)
Date: 11/26/19

50-52 Duke St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $233,900
Buyer: Jason A. Houghton
Seller: Prime Partners LLC
Date: 11/18/19

12 Franklin St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Tammy M. Hudyka
Seller: Cesar C. Faustino
Date: 11/19/19

147 Gamache Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Ashlee L. Picard-Flores
Seller: William D. Masse
Date: 12/02/19

101 Lavoie Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $118,000
Buyer: Gyu Y. Nam
Seller: FNMA
Date: 11/22/19

611 Miller St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Acacio Ferreira
Seller: Devin J. Mulhern
Date: 11/22/19

56 Valley View Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $404,900
Buyer: Sandra L. Peterson
Seller: Jeffrey M. Sajdak
Date: 11/22/19

182 Westerly Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $429,000
Buyer: Leonard Allen
Seller: Ireneusz S. Morawiec
Date: 11/27/19

53 Wilson St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Benjamin E. Fisher
Seller: Stuart, Denise M., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

MONSON

4 Hilltop Dr.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Enderle
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 11/20/19

292 Hovey Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Dany J. Dallaire
Seller: Chantal D. Keating
Date: 11/26/19

14 Mechanic St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $136,000
Buyer: David A. Burden
Seller: Gary A. Fontaine
Date: 11/22/19

137 Moulton Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Gina S. Panzieri
Seller: John M. Pekala
Date: 11/20/19

6 North Lane
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $184,900
Buyer: Charles J. Thompson
Seller: Cathy Howard
Date: 11/25/19

43 Zuell Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Wenwei Li
Seller: Jacques R. Vadnais
Date: 12/02/19

PALMER

19 Glenn St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $179,500
Buyer: Zachary R. Urekew
Seller: Roger R. Duguay
Date: 12/03/19

1448 North Main St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: 1448 North Main St LLC
Seller: Warka Associates LLC
Date: 11/21/19

58 Randall St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $131,750
Buyer: US Bank NA
Seller: Ronald S. Midura
Date: 11/25/19

RUSSELL

200 Huntington Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $204,900
Buyer: Jaymie White
Seller: Nicholas R. Mello
Date: 11/27/19

90 Ridgewood Dr.
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Nicholas Mello
Seller: Cornerstone Homebuying
Date: 11/27/19

SOUTHWICK

51 Bugbee Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $312,000
Buyer: Brian M. Weller
Seller: Pamela A. Fournier
Date: 11/27/19

166 Fred Jackson Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $229,900
Buyer: David R. Whitelock
Seller: Joan M. Johnson LT
Date: 11/27/19

112 Granville Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $326,000
Buyer: Michael F. Albro
Seller: Nathan A. Kane
Date: 11/22/19

21 Grove St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Joseph J. Horwatt
Seller: Candyce A. Cressotti
Date: 11/27/19

240 Hillside Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Brandon M. Clonch
Seller: Judith A. McDonald
Date: 11/20/19

4 Maple St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Kyle P. Davidson
Seller: Brett D. Colson
Date: 11/18/19

320 North Loomis St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Kristina Y. Podzemelnova
Seller: Raquel V. Obregon
Date: 12/02/19

33 Woodland Ridge
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $302,500
Buyer: Riley J. Campbell
Seller: Rodger C. Bancroft
Date: 12/03/19

SPRINGFIELD

262 Abbott St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: James Black
Seller: Judith Donnellan
Date: 11/27/19

20 Aberdale Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Terrence A. Cabey
Seller: Katelyn E. Plasse
Date: 11/22/19

89 Alvin St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: Rafael Hernandez
Seller: Vineyard Partners Ltd
Date: 11/18/19

555-557 Armory St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: MTGLQ Investors LP
Seller: Joseph G. Bailey
Date: 11/19/19

22 Ashmont St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: Luz C. Rodriguez-Gonzalez
Seller: Robin K. Lang
Date: 11/26/19

122 Atwater Terrace
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Andrew W. Skorupski
Seller: Maura E. McDonald
Date: 11/27/19

104 Audubon St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Jillian L. Washburn
Seller: Peter J. Banusewicz
Date: 11/26/19

30 Bacon Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $211,000
Buyer: Victoria M. Wilson
Seller: Wayne A. Wilson
Date: 11/27/19

32 Beaven St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $226,000
Buyer: Matthew D. Adams
Seller: Greenleaf Holdings Inc.
Date: 12/02/19

732 Belmont Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $128,900
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Anthony V. Fanuele
Date: 12/03/19

118 Belvidere St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $178,500
Buyer: Shandyce Willis
Seller: Staples, Joseph A., (Estate)
Date: 11/19/19

47-49 Blodgett St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $196,000
Buyer: Lam H. Nguyen
Seller: Blythewood Property Management
Date: 11/25/19

24 Breckwood Circle
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Keishla Hernandez-Gomez
Seller: Della Ripa Real Estate
Date: 11/27/19

32 Briarwood Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Santa Ortiz
Seller: Charles G. Lee
Date: 11/20/19

217 Cabinet St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $234,000
Buyer: Edson J. Navarro
Seller: CIG 2 LLC
Date: 11/29/19

33-39 Cameron St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $226,000
Buyer: Andrey Khromets
Seller: Constant O. Ogutt
Date: 11/21/19

128 Canterbury Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Daniel T. Rowe
Seller: Mary E. Sullivan
Date: 11/19/19

13 Cedar St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: Khal Group LLC
Seller: WJSM Management Co. LLC
Date: 11/27/19

244 Centre St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: Khal Group LLC
Seller: WJSM Management Co. LLC
Date: 11/27/19

250 Centre St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $700,000
Buyer: Khal Group LLC
Seller: WJSM Management Co. LLC
Date: 11/27/19

23 Cindy Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Richard E. Duffy
Seller: Myron B. Callender
Date: 11/21/19

200-202 College St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Datlin M. Williams
Seller: Ruth M. Maio
Date: 11/20/19

45 Dearborn St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $217,000
Buyer: Edgardo Diaz-Laporte
Seller: JJJ 17 LLC
Date: 11/19/19

11 Denesley Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Katelyn M. Soja
Seller: Randall J. Fortunato
Date: 12/03/19

146 Draper St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Sheena Watkins
Seller: Gaunt, Gary E. Sr., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

37 Dubois St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $119,000
Buyer: Emily A. Linzi
Seller: Teresa Batista
Date: 11/22/19

35 Dwight Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $158,400
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Edward Cruz
Date: 11/26/19

175 Dwight Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Stephanie M. Lussier
Seller: Cailin Donovan
Date: 11/18/19

84-86 East Alvord St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Franklin J. Saenz
Seller: Simmons Ventures LLC
Date: 11/26/19

79 Eckington St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $214,900
Buyer: Claudine M. Rabidoux
Seller: Matthew L. Burt
Date: 12/03/19

112 Eddy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $220,500
Buyer: Ramon Guerra
Seller: Chester Sulborski
Date: 11/22/19

93 Elaine Circle
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Bac T. Son
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 11/25/19

268 Evergreen Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Narapati Kafley
Seller: Gabriel Santana
Date: 11/18/19

55 Fisk Ave.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $1,600,000
Buyer: RVN Storage I. LLC
Seller: Hodge Realty LLC
Date: 11/22/19

52 Gatewood Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Michelle Hernandez
Seller: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Date: 11/27/19

83 Gatewood Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $161,000
Buyer: Lourdes Cedeno
Seller: Plasse, Joyce M., (Estate)
Date: 12/02/19

27-R Glenmore St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Debra L. Shippee
Seller: John P. Kennedy
Date: 11/27/19

31 Governor St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Ismael Ortiz
Seller: Tok Chang
Date: 12/03/19

127 Governor St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Steven Nguyen
Seller: Matthew J. Slowik
Date: 11/22/19

42-44 Griffin St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Julio Soba
Seller: Laura D. Walter
Date: 11/19/19

159 Groveland St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $122,000
Buyer: Orchid M. Nguyen
Seller: US Bank
Date: 11/20/19

96 Harkness Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Keeira T. Hall
Seller: Melvin J. Mattei
Date: 11/22/19

18-20 Harriet St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Efrain Santana
Seller: Ariel Garcia
Date: 11/25/19

44 Hawthorne St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Yvonne Robinson
Seller: Jean Amiss
Date: 11/20/19

71-73 Humbert St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Jheymi J. Frias
Seller: Onota Rental LLC
Date: 11/27/19

207 Jamaica St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $164,500
Buyer: Michelle L. Sicard
Seller: Andrew Woods
Date: 11/27/19

60 Jenness St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $169,500
Buyer: Sean Hayes
Seller: Jesica L. Stoecker
Date: 11/18/19

90 Leatherleaf Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: Clifford Gervais
Seller: Daniel Alicea
Date: 11/29/19

95 Lyndale St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $169,888
Buyer: Jean Ocasio
Seller: Carlos Aguasvivas
Date: 11/19/19

91 Manchester Terrace
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Ryan N. Dibernardo
Seller: Ob Properties LLC
Date: 11/22/19

127 Massachusetts Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $118,500
Buyer: CIG 4 LLC
Seller: Della Ripa Real Estate
Date: 11/21/19

41 Metzger Plaza
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $116,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Grip
Seller: Bank Of America
Date: 11/26/19

90 Monticello Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $117,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Jared Morgan
Date: 11/26/19

99 Monticello Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: LE & Associates LLC
Seller: Kathleen E. Sullivan
Date: 12/03/19

67 Newton Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $226,000
Buyer: Adan R. Garib
Seller: Burritt, Frederick G., (Estate)
Date: 11/26/19

113 Norfolk St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $158,500
Buyer: Marilyn Crespo
Seller: Merline A. Bailey
Date: 11/25/19

39 Norfolk St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $244,000
Buyer: Jerry A. Beltre-Gonzalez
Seller: Viviana Council
Date: 11/22/19

150 Oklahoma St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $121,500
Buyer: Beth Moriarty
Seller: USA VA
Date: 11/22/19

117-119 Orange St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Christina L. Acevedo
Seller: Kelnate Realty LLC
Date: 11/26/19

49 Overlea Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Melissa Stetson
Seller: Giovanni Giordano
Date: 11/22/19

1134 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Imalay Vargas-Ortiz
Seller: Gilberto Ortiz
Date: 11/22/19

1723 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Jaquan L. Robinson
Seller: Nicholas M. Soriano
Date: 11/27/19

76 Pasadena St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Molly Realty LLC
Seller: Amat Victoria Curam LLC
Date: 11/25/19

185 Pasco Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Chad M. Roberts
Seller: Homestead Connections LLC
Date: 11/29/19

41 Pear St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Pearwood LLC
Seller: Western Mass. Property Developers
Date: 11/27/19

124 Powell Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Keith A. Critchlow
Seller: Monica M. Borgatti
Date: 11/26/19

22 Redlands St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $116,000
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Migdalia Sanchez
Date: 11/25/19

52 Rockland St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $207,000
Buyer: Chericka Hill
Seller: Diane E. Meunier
Date: 11/27/19

863 Roosevelt Ave.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Jayce Barr
Seller: Tisha McCoy
Date: 11/27/19

51 Savoy Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Winston Bernard
Seller: Maritza Alvarado
Date: 11/27/19

43 Sedgewick St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: Brittney M. Gonzalez
Seller: US Bank
Date: 11/26/19

76 Sorrento St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $404,000
Buyer: SLF Realty Corp.
Seller: MNBC LLC
Date: 12/03/19

557-559 Springfield St.
Springfield, MA 01030
Amount: $137,000
Buyer: Yang Maggie Inc.
Seller: Alfredo Falvo
Date: 12/02/19

694-696 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Pacific Ave. Properties
Seller: 700 Sumner Avenue Ent. Inc.
Date: 11/18/19

28 Sycamore St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $169,900
Buyer: Jynai McDonald
Seller: Arnold Construction Inc.
Date: 11/22/19

267 Talmadge Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $193,800
Buyer: Julia M. Lopez
Seller: Paul Adams
Date: 11/22/19

6 Teakwood Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $126,050
Buyer: Hussein Toghlob-Mourad
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 11/20/19

115 Temby St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Russell Cable
Seller: Manuel Robles
Date: 11/26/19

18 Thornfell St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $179,000
Buyer: Omar E. Ramos
Seller: Craig B. Schacher
Date: 11/25/19

314 Tremont St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Alexander Flores
Seller: David Malloy
Date: 11/25/19

31 Undine Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: J. A. Dominicci-Feliciano
Seller: Brital 1987 LLC
Date: 11/21/19

32 Undine Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: David P. Ortona
Seller: US Bank
Date: 11/27/19

18-20 Wareham St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: True Pyramid Architects
Seller: Joshua C. Brooks
Date: 11/22/19

29 Wendell Place
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $188,000
Buyer: Sheng-Shiang Peng
Seller: Eda Ema LLC
Date: 11/19/19

99 Willowbrook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Jacklyn Lopes
Seller: Avet RT
Date: 11/26/19

91 Windemere St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Noelani Washington
Seller: Sawsan Abdoo
Date: 11/26/19

138-140 Yale St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $146,500
Buyer: Harrington Investments RT
Seller: Williams, Tamara, (Estate)
Date: 11/25/19

TOLLAND

617 Rivers Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $580,000
Buyer: Harry P. Benham
Seller: Roy G. Jinks
Date: 11/25/19

WEST SPRINGFIELD

37 Burford Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Mohammed M. Salih
Seller: Hadley, Linda T., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

18 Cedar Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Kyle M. Bryant
Seller: Juan E. Flores
Date: 11/27/19

267 City View Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $242,000
Buyer: Shawn D. Carter
Seller: Gary J. Lambert
Date: 11/20/19

114 Deer Run Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $406,000
Buyer: Steven R. Williams
Seller: Abel Dejesus-Silveira
Date: 11/22/19

29 Field St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Jonathan S. McFadden
Seller: Kathryn S. Sady
Date: 11/27/19

37 Fox St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Michael Baran
Seller: Michael E. Williams
Date: 11/21/19

69 Hale St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Isaac New
Seller: Christopher T. Connelly
Date: 12/03/19

25-27 Herrman St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $231,500
Buyer: Charlene A. Fernandes
Seller: Mark E. O’Malley
Date: 11/29/19

1004 Memorial Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $1,400,000
Buyer: Koch Real Estate Corp.
Seller: Anna Pugliano
Date: 11/27/19

187 Monastery Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kevin Conroy
Seller: Lyle Benoit
Date: 11/22/19

972 Morgan Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $297,000
Buyer: Melvin J. Mattei
Seller: AEM Property Investment
Date: 11/25/19

255 Morton St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Yhimmy Pena
Seller: Jillian Pena
Date: 11/22/19

42 Norman St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: 42 Norman Street LLC
Seller: Double N Enterprises LLC
Date: 11/26/19

61 Oakland St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $184,000
Buyer: Sarah A. Andrew
Seller: Fahey, Theresa A., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

658 Rogers Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Kathleen Librera
Seller: Patrick J. Doyle
Date: 11/19/19

8 Squassick Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Shams J. Thaher
Seller: St.Martin, Cheryl M., (Estate)
Date: 11/19/19

140 Sweetfern Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Lidiya P. Ionkin
Seller: Theodore J. Paradise
Date: 11/22/19

51 Talcott Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $351,000
Buyer: AGA Properties LLC
Seller: Talcott Ave. LLC
Date: 12/03/19

14 Van Horn St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $207,500
Buyer: Benjamin C. Lungren
Seller: Alexander P. Seymour
Date: 11/26/19

62 Warren St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $180,500
Buyer: Nitza Ortiz-Borges
Seller: Lindsey E. Draleau
Date: 11/19/19

1521 Westfield St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Jonathan J. Isham
Seller: Yegor Stefantsev
Date: 11/26/19

WESTFIELD

Breighly Way
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Danil A. Politov
Seller: DDLP Development LLC
Date: 11/22/19

41 Cross St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Debra K. Grochmal
Seller: Patricia A. Clem
Date: 12/03/19

31 Crown St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $132,660
Buyer: V. Sergeyevich-Dubovoy
Seller: JP Morgan Chase Bank
Date: 11/18/19

18 Dubois St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $144,500
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Domingo Vazquez
Date: 11/26/19

91 Farnham Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Shane T. Morse
Seller: Fumi Realty Inc.
Date: 11/27/19

11 Flynn Meadow Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Cailin M. Moran
Seller: Kevin D. Matheny
Date: 11/22/19

10 Franklin Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $175,500
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Angela A. Cooley
Date: 11/19/19

30 Grandview Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: John F. Izzo
Seller: Mary A. Dyba
Date: 11/25/19

1164 Granville Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Brett M. Tassinari
Seller: Stuart L. Whitney
Date: 11/26/19

200 Hillside Ave.
Westfield, MA 01040
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Charles H. Lamarche
Seller: Ernesto Nolasco
Date: 11/22/19

35 Joyce Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Mihai Timircan
Seller: Benjamin C. Gillespie
Date: 11/21/19

16 Knollwood Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $299,500
Buyer: Theresa Bui
Seller: Elijah Lisyany
Date: 11/27/19

5 Leonard Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $117,000
Buyer: Timothy R. Tierney
Seller: Sawyer, Robert J., (Estate)
Date: 11/22/19

9 Lincoln St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $145,482
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Jason F. Karnolisz
Date: 11/27/19

110 Main St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Althea Carter
Seller: Nicholas J. Shamey
Date: 11/20/19

40 Mechanic St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $307,000
Buyer: Cam Property Management
Seller: James Jaron
Date: 11/26/19

65 Paper Mill Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Andrew J. Bishop
Seller: Thomas J. Murray
Date: 11/22/19

44 Park St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $154,900
Buyer: Kyle Fleetwood
Seller: Gerald J. Fratini
Date: 12/03/19

35 Pineridge Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $406,000
Buyer: Alexander P. Seymour
Seller: Maureen A. Devine
Date: 11/19/19

409 Pochassic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Nadia E. Diaz
Seller: Edward Diaz
Date: 11/18/19

32 Saint Dennis St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $224,900
Buyer: Amadis Rivera
Seller: Angela M. Marsh
Date: 11/22/19

11 Skipper Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $289,000
Buyer: Dmytro Monko
Seller: G&F Custom Built Homes
Date: 11/22/19

57 Tannery Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $194,300
Buyer: Allison Bednarsky
Seller: Daniel G. Cook
Date: 11/27/19

244 Union St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $230,850
Buyer: Brian McDonald
Seller: Robert A. Page
Date: 11/26/19

1098-R Western Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Viktorian Estate LLC
Seller: MTGLQ Investors LP
Date: 11/27/19

WILBRAHAM

4 Belli Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Ruben Negron
Seller: Cynthia Lambert
Date: 11/19/19

99 Bennett Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $328,000
Buyer: Laurence D. Heller
Seller: Laura Rollins
Date: 12/02/19

1844 Boston Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $224,750
Buyer: Mannbarb LLC
Seller: 935-979 Main Street Realty
Date: 11/20/19

55 Brainard Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Justin T. Teehan
Seller: Kszepka, Henry J., (Estate)
Date: 11/26/19

9 Bungalow Point
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Lauren Congo
Seller: James W. Mika
Date: 11/21/19

2 Crane Park Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Theorod LLC
Seller: 2 Crane Park LLC
Date: 11/19/19

9 Dudley St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $224,750
Buyer: Mannbarb LLC
Seller: 935-979 Main Street Realty
Date: 11/20/19

11 Dudley St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $224,750
Buyer: Mannbarb LLC
Seller: 935-979 Main Street Realty
Date: 11/20/19

13 Dudley St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $224,750
Buyer: Mannbarb LLC
Seller: 935-979 Main Street Realty
Date: 11/20/19

15 Dudley St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $224,750
Buyer: Mannbarb LLC
Seller: 935-979 Main Street Realty
Date: 11/20/19

16 Forest St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: Mark D. Forest
Seller: Grace E. Maciolek
Date: 11/26/19

15 Hollow Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Chris Lomascolo
Seller: Irene Mantle
Date: 11/26/19

65-67 Stony Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Fernanda J. Rodrigues
Seller: Joseph Kaminski
Date: 11/26/19

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

23 Blake Field
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $650,000
Buyer: Caren M. Rotello
Seller: Elizabeth Hawes-Brown
Date: 11/26/19

8 Charles Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $265,200
Buyer: Daniel Cook
Seller: Wilmington Savings
Date: 11/22/19

232 East Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Browns College Properties
Seller: Lynda Faye
Date: 11/25/19

635 East Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Gregory Haughton
Seller: Bass FT
Date: 11/25/19

999 East Pleasant St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Alexander F. Bukoski
Seller: Bukoski, Alice M., (Estate)
Date: 11/25/19

490 Middle St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $530,000
Buyer: Finnegan P. Kelly
Seller: Chocorua Realty Invests
Date: 11/22/19

1151 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Heather E. Ernest
Seller: Carol J. Drexler
Date: 11/25/19

5 Trillium Way
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $448,000
Buyer: Ian Galloway
Seller: Jonathan C. Chen
Date: 12/03/19

BELCHERTOWN

91 Clark St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $193,000
Buyer: Dennis H. Connor
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 11/25/19

264 Cold Spring Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $281,400
Buyer: James S. Cummings
Seller: Gail S. Malone
Date: 12/02/19

143 Mountain View Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $730,000
Buyer: Jeffrey M. Sajdak
Seller: Arthur Dellatorre
Date: 11/22/19

EASTHAMPTON

40 Chapin St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $352,000
Buyer: Kathryn A. Schechter
Seller: Brooke W. Matuszko
Date: 11/25/19

108 Ferry St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Crystal Ohman
Seller: Prucnal FT
Date: 12/03/19

37 Glendale St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: KM Properties LLC
Seller: Eleanor M. Russell IRT
Date: 11/25/19

6 Grove St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Dorothy M. Greto
Seller: Marcia A. Glidden
Date: 11/26/19

1 Plain St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Ferzet Hodzic
Seller: Kevin D. Kober
Date: 11/27/19

5 Westview Terrace
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $313,500
Buyer: Lois J. Keefe
Seller: Brian E. Shelasky
Date: 11/20/19

GOSHEN

584 East St.
Goshen, MA 01096
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: Joshua E. Lafond
Seller: Katherine Marsh
Date: 11/22/19

GRANBY

391 Batchelor St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Judge S. Bean
Seller: Debra C. Schauer
Date: 11/19/19

9 Harris St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Jacob G. Callery
Seller: Fei Ma
Date: 11/22/19

34 West St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $299,900
Buyer: Sarah Meaux
Seller: Courtney E. Moreno
Date: 11/26/19

HADLEY

269 Bay Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: David E. Krock
Seller: Gregory J. Omasta
Date: 11/26/19

246 River Dr.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Anthony J. Pipczynski
Seller: Fradera, Dorothy H., (Estate)
Date: 12/03/19

HATFIELD

Great Neponsett Road
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Szawlowski Realty Inc.
Seller: Robert W. Start
Date: 11/21/19

90 Linseed Road
Hatfield, MA 01088
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Kristina Bezanson
Seller: Donavin A. Gratz
Date: 11/18/19

NORTHAMPTON

428 Bridge Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $445,000
Buyer: Julee L. Clement
Seller: Thomas Quinlan
Date: 11/18/19

94 Crescent St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $579,000
Buyer: Theodore Paradise
Seller: Elizabeth K. Singer
Date: 11/22/19

21 Dickinson St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Emily F. Lash
Seller: Wayne K. Dills
Date: 12/03/19

59 Dryads Green
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Lilianna Milani
Seller: Smith College
Date: 11/25/19

34 Graves Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $565,000
Buyer: 34-36 Graves Avenue LLC
Seller: Stanley Streciwilk
Date: 11/19/19

35 Jackson St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Thomas Petrolati
Seller: Richard J. Rogalski
Date: 11/22/19

22 Mountain St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Julie E. Corwin
Seller: Danielle M. Smith
Date: 11/22/19

206 Spring St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: Logan D. Shapiro
Seller: Hal E. Marshall
Date: 12/03/19

11 Verona St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $252,500
Buyer: Christine Mark
Seller: Caitlin Thomas
Date: 11/29/19

85 Woods Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Kristen Joyce
Seller: Lois J. Keefe
Date: 11/22/19

PLAINFIELD

91 Pleasant St.
Plainfield, MA 01070
Amount: $214,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Shearer
Seller: Keith R. Bohonowicz
Date: 11/26/19

SOUTH HADLEY

288 Newton St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $260,750
Buyer: Joseph A. Marois
Seller: Norma V. McCain
Date: 11/20/19

419 Newton St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Tammy Bibeau
Seller: Daniel R. Henry
Date: 11/22/19

34 Searle Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Dominic Russo
Seller: Dream Realty Group LLC
Date: 11/21/19

SOUTHAMPTON

22 Mountain View Circle
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $134,480
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Heather M. Duso
Date: 12/03/19

WARE

2 Warebrook Village
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Dawn M. Bates
Seller: Marjorie M. Wojcik
Date: 12/03/19

WESTHAMPTON

96 Southampton Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $334,150
Buyer: John S. Hoops
Seller: Helen E. Clement
Date: 11/25/19

WORTHINGTON

45 Conwell Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Brian B. McAllister
Seller: John M. Robards
Date: 11/26/19

Building Permits

The following building permits were issued during the month of December 2019.

AMHERST

LHB Enterprises Inc.
360 College St.
$2,000 — Install beacon panel

Pi Kappa Phi Properties Inc.
38 Nutting Ave.
$1,500 — Install new fraternity symbols on building

Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield
472 North Pleasant St.
$25,000 — Add lighting to existing Bank of America kiosk

Theta Mu Housing Corp.
372 North Pleasant St.
$15,700 — Reinforce rear fire escape and front handicap ramp

UDrive, LLC
40 University Dr.
$44,748 — Install new fire sprinkler system in newly constructed restaurant

CHICOPEE

Legacy Church
780 Chicopee St.
$2,800 — Install new wet chemical kitchen fire-suppression system

MEG Realty, LLC
199 Broadway
$12,000 — Repair rear deck and stairs

Thomas Nault
76 Meadow St.
$16,000 — Roofing

EASTHAMPTON

155 Northampton, Easthampton
155 Northampton St.
$15,000 — HVAC work

Autumn Properties, LLC
2-ACEF Mechanic St.
$5,000 — Remove wall partition and reception window, replace with drywall, add two doors

John Dunphy
49-53 Union St.
$26,500 — Change of use to restaurant, including construction of commercial kitchen, unisex bathroom, and food-ordering counter

Mandal Group, LLC
89-91 Main St.
$13,000 — Roofing, replace skylights

EAST LONGMEADOW

Arclin
82 Deer Park Dr.
$3,300 — Two signs

Center Square
80 Center Square
$3,500 — Relocate 11 sprinkler heads

GREENFIELD

Key Program Inc.
139 Shelburne Road
$26,975 — Roofing

HADLEY

CBR Realty Corp.
189 Russell St.
$49,500 — Interior renovation for Tandem Bagel

LEE

Paul Face, Dawn Face
76 Main St.
$6,369 — Install fire-alarm system

Thomas Touponce
1160 Pleasant St.
$6,500 — Install vinyl siding on front of building, replace two office windows

LENOX

Church Street Inn, LLC
16 Church St.
$14,000 — Selective exploratory demolition

MRG CRW Holdings, LLC
55 Lee Road
$8,605 — Replace existing fire alarm at Sloane’s Tavern with notifier addressable fire-alarm system

LONGMEADOW

Colvest/Longmeadow, LLC
475 Longmeadow St.
$6,500 — New sign for Edward Jones

Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield
56 Hopkins Place
$3,500 — New sign for St. Mary’s Church

Willie Ross School
32 Norway St.
Add strobes and horn to fire alarm

NORTHAMPTON

Aquadro Family Limited, LLP
640 Kennedy Road
$6,934 — Replacement door

Cutlery Building Associates
320 Riverside Dr., Suite B
$62,750 — Interior office space demolition and renovation

Smith College
123 Elm St.
$60,000 — Modify existing antenna facility in steeple

SPRINGFIELD

Baystate Medical Center Inc.
759 Chestnut St.
$4,100 — Alter third-floor space in former radiology locker room for use as office and scrub machine room

Burger King
755 Page Blvd.
$4,800 — Install fire-alarm system at existing restaurant

City of Springfield
70 Tapley St.
$7,500 — Install partition wall and doorway dividing lobby area for retirement office

Linden Towers, LLC
310 Stafford St.
$15,300 — Alter space for future office on fourth floor

Mittas Hospitality, LLC and DD Development, LLC
2 Boland St.
$1,500,000 — Alter interior of pool area and exercise room on sixth floor of Tower Square Hotel

Mittas Hospitality, LLC and DD Development, LLC
1500 Main St.
$253,000 — Alter tenant space in Suite 146 for White Lion Brewery

Springfield Investors, LLC
1105 Boston Road
$90,000 — Alter space at Walmart for new online grocery pickup area

WARE

Aldrich Management Co., LLC
124 West St.
$69,800 — Remove stone ballast, install new roofing

Aldrich Management Co., LLC
124 West St.
$1,284.76 — Install pull station and six horn strobes for fire-alarm system

Mary Lane Hospital Assoc.
85 South St.
$948,329 — Renovate unoccupied space into new pharmacy

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Century Investment
135 Memorial Ave.
$29,800 — Roofing