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SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that Brian Rucki and Amanda Carpe have joined the firm as associate attorneys. Rucki is a member of the real-estate team, and Carpe has joined the probate and estate-planning department.

Bacon Wilson’s managing partner, Kenneth Albano, welcomed the new associates, noting that “both Attorney Rucki and Attorney Carpe have significant prior experience that makes them especially valuable additions to the firm, and means they are ready to hit the ground running. Brian and Amanda are already hard at work serving clients and getting to know their colleagues. We are very happy to have them as part of Bacon Wilson’s team of excellent lawyers.”

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Rucki spent five years practicing law in Westfield, where he worked on all aspects of real-estate transactions including purchases, sales, refinances, and title work, as well as estate-planning matters. Previously, he also served as a clerk in the solicitor’s office for the town of Agawam, where his work focused on municipal law. He attended Western New England University School of Law, earning his juris doctor laude in 2016. He earned a bachelor’s degree from UMass Amherst in 2013.

Carpe comes to Bacon Wilson with five years of experience in estate planning, estate administration, guardianship, conservatorship, and residential real estate. She previously practiced in Ludlow and Worcester. In addition to her work in estates and probate, she clerked for the Hampden County Juvenile Court and interned with the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families, where her work focused on juvenile and child-welfare law. She earned her juris doctor in 2016 from Western New England University School of Law, and a bachelor’s degree from Wilkes University in 2013.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that eight of the firm’s attorneys have been named to Best Lawyers in America® 2022: Attorney Kenneth Albano, the firm’s managing partner, was recognized in Best Lawyers for business organizations including LLCs and partnerships; Michael Katz for bankruptcy and reorganization; Stephen Krevalin for family law; Hyman Darling for elder law; Gary Breton for banking/finance law and business organizations; Gina Barry for elder law; Mark Tanner for real estate litigation; and Peter MacConnell for real estate law.

In addition to being named a Best Lawyer, MacConnell was also named as 2022 Lawyer of the Year for real estate law in Springfield, a designation presented to a single outstanding lawyer in each practice area for each region.

Founded in 1895, Bacon Wilson, P.C. is one of the largest Pioneer Valley firms, with 43 attorneys, and approximately 80 paralegals, administrative assistants, and support staff. The firm has five locations – Springfield, Amherst, Hadley, Northampton, and Westfield.

First published in 1983, Best Lawyers is regarded as one of the definitive guides to legal excellence. There is no opportunity to pay for a listing in Best Lawyers; rather, lists are based entirely on peer review, and as such, inclusion in Best Lawyers in America® is considered an honor.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced the opening of a new facility at 99 Springfield Road in Westfield. On June 23, the firm welcomed clients, neighbors, and friends to a grand-opening reception. Westfield Mayor Donald Humason Jr. officiated at a ribbon-cutting ceremony, while the firm’s managing shareholder, Kenneth Albano, welcomed the assembled guests, noting in his remarks that the gathering was a particularly happy occasion, as it was the firm’s first opportunity for in-person festivities since the pandemic began.

Bacon Wilson has enjoyed a longtime presence in the city of Westfield. The firm’s original Westfield office space was located on Chapel Street for more than a decade. In 2015, the firm moved to the Westwood Building on Elm Street. The current move to the newly renovated, state-of-the-art office space at 99 Springfield Road brings Bacon Wilson to one of the city’s most important thoroughfares. The firm hopes that clients and colleagues will enjoy the highly visible and convenient location.

Founded in 1895, Bacon Wilson is one of the largest firms in the Pioneer Valley, with 41 lawyers and approximately 80 paralegals, administrative assistants, and support staff working from five locations: Springfield, Amherst, Hadley, Northampton, and Westfield.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that Lisa Carpenter has joined the firm as the new executive director. She comes to Bacon Wilson with more than 20 years of experience in legal administration and management in the Kansas City area, with specialized skills and expertise in law-firm management and operations. She works directly with Bacon Wilson’s managing shareholder, Kenneth Albano, on all aspects of directing the firm’s five offices.

“Joining Bacon Wilson at this particular time — in the middle of a pandemic and during an important phase of the firm’s growth — is an exciting challenge,” Carpenter said. “I received a very warm welcome from the attorneys and staff, and I’m gratified to say that my prior experience in operations management has allowed me to hit the ground running on Bacon Wilson’s many projects.”

Before joining Bacon Wilson, Carpenter served as office administrator for Littler Mendelson P.C.’s Global Service Center in Kansas City, Mo., as well as its Kansas City local practice office. Littler Mendelson P.C. is an international labor and employment law firm with offices in more than 70 U.S. locations and 15 countries. Prior to that, Carpenter worked for 14 years in operations management at the Kansas City headquarters of Shook, Hardy & Bacon, LLP, a large international product litigation firm with more than 16 locations.

Carpenter holds a bachelor’s degree in business management from Friends University and is a member of the Assoc. of Legal Administrators (ALA), where she has published multiple articles, including “Five Steps to Forming Business Partner Relationships” for Kansas City ALA publication the Hearsay, as well as “Nothing to be Afraid of … Successfully Requesting Vendor Proposals,” a piece on the request-for-proposal process for the ALA national publication ALA Currents.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that two of the firm’s attorneys have been promoted. Daniel McKellick and Christopher Pierson have both been named shareholders.

McKellick is a business and real-estate attorney who works primarily on commercial and corporate matters, including real-estate transactions, leases, commercial lending, mergers and acquisitions, business startup and succession, and contract drafting and review. His prior experience in senior management for a large wholesale distribution company provides him with insight into business operations and profitability. He is licensed to practice in both Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Pierson is an experienced trial attorney who has successfully tried numerous cases to verdict in courts across Massachusetts. His practice encompasses all aspects of civil litigation, including commercial disputes, individual matters, and accident and injury litigation. He is a graduate of Northeastern University Law School and Gettysburg College.

“The experience and work ethic Dan brings to our commercial/corporate practice, and that Chris has delivered to our litigation department, is immeasurable,” Managing Partner Kenneth Albano said. “I am gratified and honored to welcome them to Bacon Wilson’s team of partners.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney David Lavenburg has joined the firm as of counsel and a member of the litigation team. He will practice primarily from Bacon Wilson’s Springfield location.

Lavenburg represents creditors of all kinds, such as banks, credit unions, and debt purchasers, in loan-recovery and collection matters. He also litigates extensively for commercial property landlords and tenants, management companies, and large and small businesses. His legal work spans a variety of areas, including complex commercial litigation, lease disputes, commercial collections, real-estate foreclosure, and bankruptcy litigation. He is admitted to practice in the state and federal courts of Massachusetts and Connecticut, appears regularly in the trial and appellate courts for both states, and has argued in the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Lavenburg was a partner with Kroll, McNamara, Evans & Delehanty, LLP, of West Hartford, Conn., preceded by his partnership with the Springfield law firm Gold & Vanaria, P.C. He received his juris doctor in 1990 from Capital Law School of Columbus, Ohio, having earned his bachelor’s degree in journalism in 1987 at Ohio Wesleyan University. He also chairs Longmeadow’s Zoning Board of Appeals.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Joshua Woods has joined the firm. Woods is an associate and a member of the firm’s business and commercial law team, and is licensed in both Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Woods practiced law in Hartford, Conn. and also in the Boston area, where he handled a wide variety of business matters including all aspects of corporate formation, franchising, joint ventures, leasing, and business and commercial litigation. He attended Western New England University School of Law, earning his juris doctor in 2017, and earned a BBA from Hofstra University in 2013. He will practice primarily from Bacon Wilson’s office in Springfield, working with clients throughout Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Michael Locke has joined the firm as an associate and a member of the real-estate team, focusing on matters of land use, planning, and zoning.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Locke served as a clerk in both the Massachusetts Superior Court and the Massachusetts Court of Appeals. He earned his juris doctor magna cum laude from New England Law School in 2018, and his bachelor’s degree magna cum laude from UMass Amherst in 2015. He will be practicing primarily from Bacon Wilson’s Amherst location, working with real-estate and business clients throughout the Commonwealth.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Katharine Shove has joined the firm as an associate and a member of the firm’s litigation team. She will practice primarily from Bacon Wilson’s offices in Springfield and Northampton.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Shove served as a clerk for the Massachusetts Appeals Court. She attended Western New England University School of Law, where she served as the senior articles editor for the Western New England Law Review. She earned her juris doctor degree magna cum laude in 2019, and earned her bachelor’s degree from Utica College in 2015.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson is pleased announced that 10 attorneys have been named to The Best Lawyers in America© 2021.

Attorney Kenneth Albano, the firm’s managing partner, was recognized in Best Lawyers for business organizations including LLCs and partnerships; Michael Katz for bankruptcy and reorganization; Stephen Krevalin for family law; Hyman Darling for elder law; Gary Breton for banking/finance law and for business organizations; Gina Barry for elder law; Jeffrey Fialky for commercial finance; Mark Tanner for real estate litigation; Paul Rothschild for litigation; and Peter MacConnell for real estate law.

First published in 1983, Best Lawyers is regarded as one of the definitive guides to legal excellence. Best Lawyers lists are compiled based on peer-review evaluations. Lawyers are not permitted pay for a listing, and due to the peer-review nature of the process, inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor.

Founded in 1895, Bacon Wilson, P.C. is one of the largest firms in the Pioneer Valley, with 43 lawyers, and approximately 60 paralegals, administrative assistants, and support staff.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Erin Chrzanowski has joined the firm as an associate and a member of the firm’s business and corporate practice group, where she works on matters related to commercial real estate and financing.

In addition, she was recently elected to serve on the board of Revitalize Community Development Corp. in Springfield.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, Chrzanowski attended Syracuse University College of Law, earning her JD in 2019, and UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management, earning her BBA cum laude in 2017. She is licensed to practice in both Massachusetts and New York.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that the firm has recently completed a $10,000 contribution to the capital campaign for the YMCA of Greater Springfield. The pledge originated in the fall of 2019, as Bacon Wilson supported the YMCA’s transition from the former Chestnut Street location to the new Tower Square facility in downtown Springfield. 

“My partners and I are very pleased to be able to support the Springfield YMCA at this critical moment,” said attorney Kenneth Albano, Bacon Wilson’s managing partner. “Bacon Wilson is pleased to know our contribution will boost the mission and continuing good works of the YMCA of Greater Springfield.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — In light of the COVID-19 health crisis, the law firm Bacon Wilson is hosting Legal Living Room, a free series of web discussions, allowing attorneys to communicate directly with the public about important legal topics.

Starting with the April 14 kickoff event, the firm has held weekly conversations each Tuesday on the topics of estate planning, employment, family law, and real estate. The discussions have been lively and interactive, with attorneys answering questions from participants and customizing program content on the spot according to audience preference.

The series now continues on May 12 with a session on long-term care planning, followed by bankruptcy on May 19.

The long-term care planning discussion, set for Tuesday, May 12 at 6 p.m., will feature attorneys Hyman Darling, Gina Barry, Benjamin Coyle, Todd Ratner, Lisa Halbert, and Valerie Vignaux. The team will review essential topics relative to planning for nursing care, including Medicare, long-term care insurance, asset protection, and an overview of the regulations and qualification process for Medicaid and MassHealth. To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with a link to join the meeting.

The Legal Living Room series then continues on Tuesday, May 19 at 6 p.m., when attorneys Michael Katz and Rebecca Mercieri Rivaux will present bankruptcy topics including financial options for both businesses and individuals, Chapter 7, Chapter 11, Chapter 13, and options outside bankruptcy. To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with a link to join the meeting.

Bacon Wilson is hosting the Legal Living Room web discussions on Zoom, allowing participants to join in from the safety and comfort of home. The Zoom platform also allows a degree of anonymity, if desired, as participants register via e-mail and have the ability to select a screen name of their choosing. Legal Living Room web discussions are free and open to the public. For more information or to reserve a spot, click the direct registration links provided, or contact Carolyn Coulter at (413) 886-8316 or [email protected].

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — In light of the COVID-19 health crisis, the law firm of Bacon Wilson is hosting Legal Living Room, a free series of web discussions, allowing attorneys to communicate directly with the public about important legal topics. After presenting informative sessions for estate planning on April 14 and employment on April 21, Bacon Wilson will continue the Legal Living Room series with an additional estate-planning presentation and a family-law session.

The estate-planning ‘encore’ presentation is set for Thursday, April 23, at 6 p.m. Attorneys Hyman Darling, Gina Barry, Benjamin Coyle, Todd Ratner, Lisa Halbert, and Valerie Vignaux will outline the essential elements of a successful estate plan and answer questions from participants, including subjects such as how documents can be signed while maintaining safe social distancing, considerations when nominating guardians for minor children, and more. The firm added this additional estate-planning session due to high interest and participation in the Legal Living Room kickoff event, held April 14.

The Legal Living Room series then continues on Tuesday, April 28 at 6 p.m., when attorneys Julie Dialessi-Lafley and Melissa Gillis will present family-law topics including issues of custody and parenting time, family-court actions, divorce, mediation, child-support and alimony modification, and related issues.

Bacon Wilson is hosting its Legal Living Room web discussions on the Zoom platform, allowing participants the opportunity to talk from the safety and comfort of home. Legal Living Room web discussions are free and open to the public.

For more information or to reserve a spot, click here for the April 23 event or here for the April 28 event, or e-mail Carolyn Coulter at [email protected].

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — In light of the COVID-19 health crisis, the law firm of Bacon Wilson is offering a free series of web discussions, allowing attorneys to communicate directly with the public about important legal topics.

The Legal Living Room discussion series kicked off Tuesday evening, April 14, featuring Bacon Wilson’s estate-planning team fielding questions from approximately 30 discussion participants during a lively, informative conversation.

Legal Living Room continues Tuesday, April 21, when employment-law attorneys Kathryn Crouss and Meaghan Murphy will be on hand to address employment topics including employee rights and employer responsibilities under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, elements of the CARES Act relevant to employment considerations, severance agreements, Massachusetts and federal expanded unemployment benefits, aid for small businesses, and the Paycheck Protection Program. Crouss and Murphy will take questions and customize discussion content.

The series will continue with sessions on family law on Tuesday, April 28, and real estate on Tuesday, May 5.

Bacon Wilson is hosting Legal Living Room web discussions on the Zoom platform, allowing participants the opportunity to talk from the safety and comfort of home. The web discussions are free and open to the public. For more information or to reserve a spot, e-mail Carolyn Coulter at [email protected].

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that, in honor of its 125th anniversary year, the firm will donate $25,000 to various community organizations throughout the Pioneer Valley. Bacon Wilson will make five contributions of $1,250 for each quarter of 2020.

Originally founded in 1895, Bacon Wilson’s community involvement and connections stretch back over a century. As the firm worked on a plan for the 2020 milestone, there was no question that contributing to the community would be the most important element of the anniversary celebrations. The only question was how.

The answer became clear after the firm’s managing partner, Kenneth Albano, attended a fundraiser for Michael’s House, a sober-living group home in Ludlow. As he later reported back to his colleagues, Albano found himself moved by the work of the volunteers and residents at Michael’s House, and steered the firm toward the notion of giving to organizations that had not formerly been on Bacon Wilson’s radar for the firm’s regular annual contributions.

After gathering suggestions from members of the firm, first-quarter contributions of $1,250 were awarded to:

• Michael J. Dias Foundation, which provides aid and education for individuals and families on substance abuse, and help for those battling the disease of addiction;

• All Out Adventures, which promotes health, community, and independence for people with disabilities, seniors, veterans, and their families and friends through outdoor recreation;

• Amherst Survival Center, which connects people to food, clothing, healthcare, wellness, and community, primarily through volunteer efforts;

• Our Community Table: Westfield Soup Kitchen, a 100% volunteer organization dependent upon donations to provide a clean and safe environment to serve those in need; and

• Treehouse Foundation, an intergenerational community neighborhood where adoptive families and their children, older youth, and elders invest in one another’s health, dreams, and futures.

Bacon Wilson will be announcing recipients for the firm’s remaining quarterly giving in June, September, and December.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bacon Wilson announced that attorney Jaime Margolis has joined the firm. Margolis is an associate and a member of Bacon Wilson’s domestic relations and family law team.

Prior to joining Bacon Wilson, she worked in the Children and Family Law Division of the Committee for Public Counsel Services, and as a clerk for the Justices of the Western Massachusetts Probate and Family Courts.

Founded in 1895, Bacon Wilson, P.C. is the largest firm in the Pioneer Valley, with 41 lawyers, and approximately 60 paralegals, administrative assistants, and support staff. It has five locations — in Springfield, Amherst, Hadley, Northampton, and Westfield.

 

Law

Firm Resolve

Managing Partner Kenneth Albano

Managing Partner Kenneth Albano

As Bacon Wilson approaches its 125th anniversary next year, it can look back on plenty of history and change — with perhaps the past couple of decades representing the most dramatic evolutions in law. Through it all, the practice has remained remarkably steady, boasting numerous long-time attorneys and a measured growth strategy that has led Bacon Wilson to its position as the region’s largest law firm — one with its focus squarely on the future.

Just before he sat down with BusinessWest, Kenneth Albano was looking through an old file at Bacon Wilson, dating from 1993. Two things struck him about the letterhead.

One was the number of lawyers — just 16, compared to 42 today. The other striking thing was how many of those 16 are still practicing at Bacon Wilson today.

“Every lawyer except a few is still here,” said the firm’s managing partner, noting that he’s been at Bacon Wilson for 31 years, while the other two partners who spoke with BusinessWest for this story, Hyman Darling (38 years) and Donna Wexler (a relatively brief 17 years), have also built quite a bit of history with the firm.

“It says a lot about the fabric of the firm, that people stay here as long as they do.”

It says a lot about the fabric of the firm, that people stay here as long as they do,” Albano went on. “We have lawyers like Mike Katz and Paul Rothschild, who have been here 40-plus years and are still working hard every day.

“When we interview for associates, they always bring that to the top of the discussion, because it’s important for people to feel stability,” he noted. “With Millennials these days, it’s tough to get a straight answer as far as commitment, but we try to impress upon them that this can be your work family and your home for years to come. That’s what we bring to the table, and it’s been successful over the years.”

That stability has no doubt contributed to the firm’s growth, but so have a series of strategic mergers, which have led to Bacon Wilson establishing offices over the years in Northampton, Amherst, Westfield, and Hadley in addition to Springfield, where it has maintained a State Street address for almost 125 years.

“These are not offices where you call a phone number get a receptionist covering all the shared space,” Albano said. “These are standalone facilities with partners, associates, paralegals, and receptionists.”

At a time when it’s more difficult to find young talent (more on that later), the key has been smart expansion — not hiring just to hire or merging just to merge, he added. And those mergers have essentially been achieved through relationship building.

“We don’t buy practices,” he said. “So if you were looking to retire, you wouldn’t come to me and say, ‘I want X amount of dollars for my practice,’ because it’s a lose-lose situation for us. The win-win is, ‘sure, let’s talk, come be part of the Bacon Wilson family for three or four years, allow your clients to meld into our practice groups, and allow our lawyers to get to know your clients, and have a slow exit strategy.’ That’s how it’s worked in the past.”

Last year, Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly ranked Bacon Wilson as the 42nd-largest law firm in Massachusetts, but it’s the largest in Western Mass. — and well-positioned, Albano said, to continue to tackle what has become an increasingly complex and demanding legal landscape.

Time to Change

Long-timers like Albano, Darling, and Wexler have seen their share of changes in the legal world, too.

“When I first came here, if somebody came in for an estate plan, it was a will,” said Darling, who has built a reputation as a premier authority in the region on estate planning. “Now, it’s a will, health proxy, power of attorney, homestead declaration, maybe a trust … we talk about things like end-of-life decisions and organ donors and cremation and anatomical gifts. Pet trusts, gun trusts. It’s evolved into things that none of us ever learned in law school.”

Donna Wexler and Hyman Darling

Donna Wexler and Hyman Darling have seen plenty of changes in their fields of real estate and elder care/estate planning, respectively.

That’s why he has gone from working with one shared secretary to leading a team of six estate-planning attorneys and 20 total staff, with responsibilities ranging from asset-protection planning and pet trusts to having his picture taken with a big check for the Massachusetts Lottery wall in Braintree when a winner decides to establish an anonymous trust.

“There’s special-needs planning that we didn’t do before,” he went on. “There was nothing called elder law when I came to the practice. And 10,000 people turn 60 every day — and we have a lot of them in Massachusetts.”

Technology has changed the way lawyers work as well, said Wexler, who specializes in real estate.

“When I started practicing, I would fill out forms in pen and the secretary would type them, then there were years when I typed them, then it evolved into the banks actually preparing them and e-mailing them. Now we’ve got cloud-based things,” she said, adding that increased government regulation, especially since the financial crisis in 2008, has led to new complexities to her work. “There’s more we need to know about what the regulations are and what we’re required to do.”

Then there’s the culture of constant communication — and the resulting rise in client expectations — that has shrunk timelines on projects in industries like construction, printing, and, yes, law. Albano recalled the days when he’d come back from lunch and hope to see a phone message on one those classic pink slips of paper waiting for him. Now, he returns to a couple dozen e-mails.

“There’s an expectation of immediate response, and it’s changed the pace of the practice tremendously,” Wexler said, to which Darling noted he’s had clients call asking to set up a will before they flew off on vacation. Tomorrow.

They all recognize, however, that those constant e-mails and calls represent something important: individuals who need help, and often at a difficult time in their life.

“I always tell people, if I get a call from someone I haven’t heard from in a while, they’re not calling to say, ‘how are you doing? Have a great day.’ They have a problem.”

“There’s an expectation of immediate response, and it’s changed the pace of the practice tremendously.”

As all three mentioned, those problems continue to evolve. Cannabis law in Massachusetts, for example, has unfurled an entire new world of issues that cross several practice areas. For instance, Albano represents a few municipalities seeking guidance on what kinds of restrictions they can place on marijuana businesses. Wexler has handled transactions for clients looking to purchase land for growing, while some of Darling’s clients have sought to invest in these facilities.

In fact, the sheer scope of Bacon Wilson’s expertise is a plus for clients, Albano said. “We don’t do high-end criminal work or security work. Everything else, we do. And we cross-sell each other to clients. The clients appreciate that.”

Wexler added that the attorneys tend to collaborate for the sake of clients, whether it’s seeking advice from a different department on a case or hearing a potential client’s request for services and recommending colleague with more specialized knowledge.

“When you hire Ken, you’re not just hiring him, you’re hiring 40 lawyers,” Darling said. “The firm is your lawyer. They’re all available.”

Well Suited

Albano said the three-legged stool holding up Bacon Wilson has always been litigation, real estate, and estate planning. “That’s always been with us. But when this firm was founded back in 1895, it was a commercial law firm, and we’ve maintained that commercial group from day one, representing so many Western Mass. banks. We survived all the mergers and all the new banks coming in. The key to our success is maintaining relationships. Relationships are so big in this market.”

So is staying educated and up to date on quickly evolving trends in a practice area.

For instance, even before the #metoo movement — but certainly in the wake of it — employment lawyers have seen a steep rise in harassment and discrimination cases, as well as thorny handbook issues to help clients sort out.

“We’ve had specialists come in here and give seminars on preventing those types of harassment claims,” he noted. “You have to stay up on it.”

In turn, Bacon Wilson’s attorneys are active in the community, writing articles (for publications such as BusinessWest) and conducting workshops on hot issues. That’s in addition to the many ways the firm’s lawyers support their favorite charities and volunteer on their boards.

“Everybody gives back,” Darling said. “We don’t have to ask them; they just realize it’s important.”

Wexler agreed. “When we bring new associates in, the ones I work with seem very excited. And most of them come in with a passion for one organization or another, and we encourage them to take the time to give to that organization. It’s catchy. And it’s exciting to be a part of that.”

That said, it can be a challenge to attract young talent to the firm in a competitive marketplace in an era when law-school enrollment is significantly down from where it was 20 years ago. But Bacon Wilson has developed a relationship with Western New England University School of Law, interviewing students for clerk positions and often hiring them full-time later on, while building similar pipelines with institutions like Bay Path University to find paralegals.

“The tough part is getting young lawyers to stay in Springfield, as opposed to Boston or New York,” Darling said. “But we’ve done a good job. The quality of life here is pretty good. They can make a living and have a house they can afford and be able to pay their school debt.”

Not to mention working at a firm that continues to rack up accolades each year — including “Best Law Firm” in the Valley Advocate Readers’ Poll every year since 2012, “Best Law Firm” in the Daily Hampshire Gazette Readers’ Choice poll every year since 2014, plenty of attorney citations in Best Lawyers in America, the 2018 Firm Impact Award from the Hampden County Bar Assoc. for pro bono work, and a raft of others — and, as Albano noted, a stable, venerable firm to call home for many years to come.

“We’ve grown in bits and pieces over the years,” said Albano, who would like to see the firm grow to more than 50 attorneys during his tenure. “It’s been a great run so far. We’ve had some hiccups along the way, as with any business, especially when the economy was bad. But the reason we’ve grown as well as we have is because the people who work here really enjoy coming to work.”

Joe Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

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