Daily News

CHICOPEE — David Barszcz has joined Polish National Credit Union as vice president of commercial lending, according to an announcement made by James Kelly, president and CEO.

Barszcz joins the Polish National Credit Union management team with immediate past experience as commercial loan officer with Southbridge Credit Union and more than 30 years of earlier career experience with financial institutions including North Brookfield Savings Bank, Berkshire Bank, Hampden Bank, and United Savings Bank.

He holds a degree from Northern Virginia College in Alexandria, Va. He is also a graduate of the University of New Hampshire School of Finance and a former member of the U.S. Marine Corps.

Active in the community, Barszcz chairs the audit committee of the Ludlow Lodge of Elks, and is a past trustee. He has also served as exalted ruler of the Northampton Lodge of Elks. He has served as sponsorship chairman for Relay for Life of Quaboag Valley and as a corporator of the Ludlow Boys and Girls Club. He has also served on the Belchertown Industrial Development and Financing Authority, as a member of the Belchertown Finance Committee, and as president of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Western and Central Massachusetts.

“David has a solid, successful background in commercial finance that will be extremely beneficial to our business members,” said Kelly, adding that Barszcz shares the credit union’s strong belief in giving back to the community. “It’s a perfect combination, and we are extremely pleased to welcome David to our team.”

Daily News

HOLYOKE — The stock market is up, and soon, so might be interest rates. The Trump administration wants to make historic budget cuts, and unemployment rates are at historic lows. While these are much better than the worst of times for local businesses, are they going to turn into the best of times?

Business leaders, who do not like uncertainty, will get some insights into the economic future at the PeoplesBank Economic Outlook, a free luncheon featuring James Hartley, professor of Economics at Mount Holyoke College. The luncheon is slated for Thursday, April 20 from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Willits-Hallowell Conference Center, Mount Holyoke College, 50 College St., South Hadley. It is open to the public, but space is limited, and registration is required.

“The economy is improving, and business owners want to know where it is going,” said David Thibault, first vice president, Cash Management at PeoplesBank, who will introduce Hartley. “At this luncheon, we hope to give them some of the data necessary to help with business planning for this year and next.”

Registration information can be found at bit.ly/pb-register.

Daily News

AMHERST — The noted linguist, philosopher, author, and political activist Noam Chomsky will speak at the Mullins Center at UMass Amherst on Thursday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, with seating available on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

Chomsky’s presentation is titled “Prospects for Survival.” His visit is sponsored by the UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute and is being presented as part of the celebration for the inauguration of the newly constructed Crotty Hall. Crotty Hall is the new home of the UMass Amherst Department of Economics. It is also the first net-zero-energy building to be constructed at UMass Amherst.

Institute professor emeritus at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Chomsky is the author of hundreds of books, essays, and articles on topics such as linguistics, war, politics, and mass media, including the seminal 1967 essay “The Responsibility of Intellectuals” and his most recent volume, “Who Rules the World?”

Daily News

WEST SPRINGFIELD — Modern Salon Media has named the 2016 class of Excellence in Education honorees in its sixth annual program recognizing leadership and best practices among cosmetology schools. DiGrigoli School of Cosmetology of West Springfield was chosen to represent excellence in the category of Community Involvement, Marketing Innovation, and School Culture. Modern Salon Publisher Steve Reiss announced the honorees during November’s 2016 convention of the American Assoc. of Cosmetology Schools in Orlando, Fla.

Honorees were determined based on key criteria in each category, and grouped according to number of locations. Honorees were chosen in each category — one individual school location, and a multi-location school organization.

“We received applications from cosmetology schools across the country and look forward to celebrating all the 2016 Excellence in Education honorees and sharing their stories. It is truly a great time to pursue a beauty education and career, and the program at DiGrigoli School of Cosmetology exemplifies that fact,” Modern Salon Editorial Director Michele Musgrove said.

Added Paul DiGrigoli, president and CEO of the DiGrigoli School of Cosmetology, “I’m so grateful to have such a stellar faculty and team. They have supported and created an environment of positivity and energy that constantly and continuously helps take our students’ minds and careers to another altitude. I am proud to say that the future professionals who graduate from the DiGrigoli School of Cosmetology have received jobs from some of the best salons in our area. We will continue to reach for greater heights to provide all of our students with higher education. We are thrilled to be an honorary Excellence in Education recipient for five years in a row, and are extremely proud of the prestigious national recognition award in 2016.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bay Path University will hold its 22nd annual Women’s Leadership Conference (WLC) on Friday, March 31 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the MassMutual Center in Springfield. This year’s event will explore empathy, how it empowers people individually and as teams, and how it can help them become better, stronger, and more compassionate leaders. Keynote speakers include Nicholas Sparks, Nely Galan, and Shiza Shahid.

In today’s workplace, a successful bottom line is defined by how much an organization values and cultivates human capital. Leaders need to understand not only their business, but also their people. At the 2017 conference, attendees will discover how becoming a more empathetic leader builds strong teams and relationships in the workplace and at home. Empathy creates connection between socio-economic, ethnic, and geographic lines, allowing people to influence, inspire and help others achieve their dreams and goals. Keynote speakers will share their own perspectives on the subject, motivating and inspiring attendees to engage empathy in their daily lives.

Sparks, author of 20 New York Times #1 bestselling books, storyteller, and producer, will give the afternoon keynote address. Before he was a world-famous novelist, Sparks worked a variety of jobs, including real-estate appraisal, waiting tables, selling dental products by phone, and starting his own small manufacturing business, which struggled from the beginning. In 1994, at the age of 28, he wrote The Notebook over a period of six months, and in October 1995, Warner Books bought the rights. He has gone on to write and publish a novel every year, all of them domestic and international bestsellers.

A Latina media dynamo and women’s empowerment advocate, Galán was dubbed the “Tropical Tycoon” by New York Times Magazine. An immigrant and self-made media mogul, Galán was the first Latina president of Entertainment for a U.S. television network (Telemundo). She is an Emmy Award-winning producer of more than 600 episodes of television in Spanish and English. After becoming self-made on her own terms, Galán has made it her mission to teach women — regardless of age or background — how they, too, can become entrepreneurs. Her New York Times bestselling book, SELF MADE: Becoming Empowered, Self-Reliant, and Rich in Every Way, was published in 2016.

Shahid is co-founder and former CEO of the Malala Fund. She’s also a social entrepreneur, television personality, speaker, and women’s-rights advocate. Shahid co-founded the Malala Fund with Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, and led the organization as founding CEO. She is now focused on supporting startups, innovators, and entrepreneurs, particularly women, who are creating positive global impact. She is an advocate for women entrepreneurs, and hosts Women’s Story-telling Salons, bringing together leading female entrepreneurs to collaborate. She is the host of the new show ASPIREist, which airs on Flipboard, Facebook, and YouTube, reporting on the suicide epidemic.

Bay Path’s Women’s Leadership Conference is attended by approximately 2,000 women and men annually. For further information on the conference and to register, visit www.baypathconference.com.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Beginning in August, the UMass Amherst College of Nursing’s accelerated bachelor’s in nursing program will be taught at the UMass Center at Springfield in Tower Square.

The 17-month program, designed for students with bachelor’s degrees in other subjects or people interested in a career change, will enroll 80 students each year. Courses will be taught by UMass Amherst College of Nursing faculty using state-of-the-art teaching technologies in newly renovated and expanded classrooms to allow for the intensive clinical work that nursing education demands.

“Moving these students, who come to us with prior experiences and education, to an urban campus perfectly poises us to take advantage of all the teaching and service opportunities among diverse communities in the Springfield area. This was also an exciting opportunity to expand and renovate our technologies, simulation center, and health laboratories to be ahead of a rapidly changing healthcare environment,” said Maeve Howett, clinical professor and assistant dean of Undergraduate Nursing Education.

The Springfield location will put students in close proximity to two of the busiest medical facilities in Western Mass., Baystate Medical Center and Mercy Medical Center, as well as a wide range of other clinical learning opportunities.

Less than three years old, the 26,000-square-foot space features 10 classrooms and clinical simulation areas specifically designed for the needs of the nursing program. In addition, a simulation lab is designed and furnished to resemble an apartment, offering the opportunity for students to practice at-home care. Cameras throughout the space allow student performance to be recorded and played back in any of the classrooms, conference rooms, or breakout spaces to be reviewed with instructors and peers.

Telehealth facilities will allow students to practice this technology and become leaders in its use as it is increasingly implemented in healthcare facilities. Whether giving patients in remote locations access to top healthcare experts or allowing elderly patients to remain in their homes during health visits, nurses will know how to listen to a heartbeat through a stethoscope, thousands of miles away, and recognize symptoms via high-definition video.

“Incorporating telehealth and other technologies into our nursing students’ education will give them new insights into providing health care for Massachusetts residents and will also help shape the future of healthcare for our nation and globally,” said Stephen Cavanagh, dean of the UMass Amherst College of Nursing.

Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — Healthcare marketing professionals are invited to Union Station in Northampton on Friday, April 7 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a day of learning and seeing what is possible in healthcare marketing from those who are breaking the mold of the conventional. Leading organizations, hospitals, and health systems will be in attendance.

The Western New England Healthcare Marketing Symposium will provide attendees with opportunities to hear what’s new in this ever-changing and evolving industry, hear about best practices from healthcare-marketing thought leaders, and learn how those best practices were successfully implemented.

Sessions and speakers will include “The Digital Future of Physician Relations Marketing” from Dan Dunlop, president and CEO, Jennings Healthcare Marketing; “It’s a Brand Journalism World; We’re Just Living in It” from Michael O’Farrell, director of Communications, Lawrence & Memorial Hospital; “The Role of Video in Content Marketing” from Jason Stepanek, web content/video manager, Jennings Healthcare Marketing; “Doctor, Doctor, Give Me the News: Insights from Three Decades of Research with Referring Physicians” from Julie Pokela, president, Market Street Research; and “Engaging with Patients: How to Create Valuable Personas that Drive Digital Consumer Success” from Samantha Maltais, senior digital strategist, SilverTech Inc.

To view the agenda, sessions, and speakers and to register, visit www.jenningshealthcaremarketing.com/wnehms.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Holyoke Community College recently welcomed the fourth and final cohort of educators from Pakistan as part of the Community College Administrator Pakistan project.

The group will be visiting HCC for six weeks, learning about the U.S. higher education system with a focus on Massachusetts’ community colleges.

HCC is the lead community-college partner on the three-year initiative, which is funded by the U.S. Department of State, and collaborating on the project with the the nonprofit Institute for Training and Development in Amherst and UMass Amherst.

During the coming weeks, participants will meet frequently with their HCC staff mentors, attend classes and workshops, engage with students and faculty, develop personal projects, and bring those lessons home with the goals of promoting higher education in Pakistan and fostering sustained engagement with their U.S. counterparts and institutions.

Last Wednesday, the delegation toured the HCC campus after a welcome from HCC president Christina Royal and a panel discussion focusing on HCC women leaders. Later that week, they spent a morning at Springfield Technical Community College and took a guided bus tour through Holyoke, narrated by Jeffrey Hayden, HCC’s vice president of Business and Community Services.

Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — Last April, Click Workspace moved its co-working community from an office suite in Hampton Court to its new multi-story home at 9 1/2 Market St. in Northampton. In that freshly renovated space, Click has greatly expanded its services to the community, offering meeting and event spaces, membership plans for local organizations, and cultural events. Now Click is celebrating the first anniversary in its long-term home by giving back to the community.

On Thursday, April 13 from 6 to 8 p.m., Click will host “Feed the Soul,” a private art opening featuring original paintings by artist Pam Carter, the proceeds of which will benefit the Northampton Survival Center.

At the opening reception, guests will savor food by Pengyew Catering, sip drinks, and enjoy the music of saxophonist Ted Levine and pianist James Argiro, while taking in more than two dozen paintings by Carter. Guests will be able to claim their favorite artwork by making a donation directly to the Survival Center in the amount of the painting’s listed value. In addition, net proceeds from event ticket sales will be donated to the Survival Center, and additional donations may be made directly to the organization at the event.

Carter is a longtime painter, and when the idea arose to exhibit her work at Click for its anniversary, she suggested the exhibition benefit a local organization. For more than 30 years, the Northampton Survival Center has been dedicated to improving the quality of life for low-income individuals and families throughout Hampshire County by providing nutritious food and other resources in an atmosphere of dignity and respect.

The public opening for Carter’s exhibition will follow on Friday, April 14 during Northampton’s Arts Night Out, and donations for artwork will continue to be accepted throughout the exhibition’s two-month run at Click.

Tickets to the “Feed the Soul” opening on April 13 are $35. Complete information and tickets are available at clickworkspace.org/feedthesoul.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Jessica Chapin, American International College’s (AIC) assistant athletic director of compliance and senior woman administrator, has been appointed to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II Management Council through January 2021. As part of her commitment, Chapin will serve on two committees: the NCAA Research Committee and the Committee on Infractions.

The Management Council is charged with recommending administrative policy and regulations that govern the division. It reports directly to the President’s Council and implements the policies adopted by the association’s Board of Governors and Division II President’s Council. The Management Council may sponsor legislative proposals, make interpretations of Division II’s bylaws, and may also handle resolution of Division II issues and recommendations from other committees and working groups throughout the division’s substructure.

The Council is comprised of Division II chief executive officers, faculty athletics representatives, athletic directors, senior woman administrators, conference representatives, and student-athletes. At least two members, except student-athletes, represent each Division II geographical region. Chapin joins the council, currently 29 members strong, as a senior woman administrator.

“Not only am I honored to have been appointed … AIC will now be featured on a national level. I look forward to being part of positive change in Division II as the NCAA looks to further enhance the student-athlete experience,” Chapin said.

According to AIC President Vince Maniaci, “Jess Chapin is a tremendous young administrator with an extremely bright future. Serving on the NCAA Management Council will be an excellent opportunity for her to assist in impacting Division II collegiate athletics in a positive way. Jess will represent AIC with grace and professionalism and will prove to be a critical member of each committee on which she serves.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Department of Health and Human Services has released its 2016 performance summary for nursing education in Massachusetts, with American International College (AIC) showing a 90% pass rate, exceeding pass rates for all other registered-nurse programs at four-year colleges in Western Mass. In addition, AIC surpassed the state average pass rate of 83.6% and the national pass rate of 84.5%.

The National Council for Licensure Examination (NCLEX) is a nationwide examination for the licensing of registered nurses in the U.S. and Canada. To ensure public protection, each board of nursing requires candidates for licensure to pass the appropriate NCLEX examination. NCLEX examinations are designed to test the knowledge, skills, and abilities essential for the safe and effective practice of nursing at the entry level.

According to AIC Director of Nursing Karen Rousseau, “we are very proud of the dedication, motivation, commitment, and diversity of our nursing students who strive to be the very best.”

The American International College School of Health Sciences offers nursing-degree programs including RN to BSN, BSN, and MSN with three concentrations: family nurse practitioner, nursing administration, and nursing education. In addition, the School of Health Sciences offers an undergraduate degree in public health and undergraduate and graduate degree programs in occupational therapy and physical therapy.

Daily News

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito Administration recently awarded Green Communities designation grants totaling $1,446,675 to Agawam, Blandford, Chicopee, Granville, Ware, Warren, and Westfield. The awards will fund clean-energy projects and were presented by Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Matthew Beaton and Department of Energy Resource (DOER) Commissioner Judith Judson in a recent ceremony at Chicopee City Hall.

Earlier this year, 30 Massachusetts cities and towns were designated by DOER as Green Communities, committing to an ambitious renewable-energy agenda to reduce energy consumption and emissions. Currently, more than half of the Commonwealth’s municipalities have earned the Green Communities designation, and 64% of residents live in a Green Community. Since the program began in 2010, DOER’s Green Communities division has awarded more than $65 million in grant funding to the Commonwealth’s cities and towns through designation and competitive grant rounds.

“The Green Communities program is an excellent example of how state and local governments can work together to save taxpayer money and promote responsible energy policies,” said Gov. Charlie Baker. “Our newest Green Communities will now have additional resources to invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy, locking in energy savings for residents and reducing their carbon footprints.”

Added Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito, “our municipal partners continue to help us lead the way on renewable energy by adopting practices that allow them to reduce energy consumption, while saving money that can be directed to vital municipal functions, like public safety and education. We look forward to continuing to provide cities and towns across the Commonwealth the tools they need to reduce energy costs, usage, and emissions.”

The funding amounts include $207,970 to Agawam, $138,425 to Blandford, $367,160 to Chicopee, $139,280 to Granville, $169,535 to Ware, $157,740 to Warren, and $266,565 to Westfield.

The Commonwealth’s 185 Green Communities range from the Berkshires to Cape Cod. Under the Green Communities Act, cities and towns must meet five criteria to be designated a Green Community and receive funding, including reducing municipal energy consumption by 20% over five years. The 30 newly designated Green Communities have committed to reducing their energy consumption amounting to savings of $6,241,862 of energy costs and 2,234,090 MMBtu in five years, the energy-use equivalent to heating and powering nearly 2,718 homes, and reducing greenhouse-gas emissions by 27,641 metric tons, equivalent to taking 5,819 cars off the roads.

“When Massachusetts’ cities and towns invest in renewable energy and energy-efficiency programs, everyone wins, from taxpayer savings to a statewide reduction in emissions,” Beaton said. “With these designations, DOER’s Green Communities program continues to prove an effective tool in building a clean, renewable-energy future for the Commonwealth.”

Added Judson, “DOER is proud to work with cities and towns across Massachusetts as they take important steps in embracing renewable energy and energy efficiency at the local level. These designations are simply the beginning of an important relationship between the Commonwealth and our municipal partners as we work towards our shared clean-energy goals.”

Daily News

GREENFIELD — Greenfield Savings Bank announced that Yogesh “Yogi” Malik has joined the bank as a premier banker and also joined the bank’s GSB Investments and Insurance Division as an Infinex Investments executive.

Malik will assist customers with identifying opportunities to increase their earnings on their savings at the bank and through the investment opportunities offered by the GSB Investments and Insurance Division, through Infinex Investments Inc. He is based at the bank’s main office located at 400 Main St. in Greenfield.

“We are very excited to have Yogi join our team,” said Denise Coyne, senior vice president and chief operating officer of Greenfield Savings Bank. “Yogi’s knowledge of our bank’s deposit choices and his ability to clearly evaluate other options available through the investments division is helping our customers make more informed decisions and optimize their earnings.”

Malik came to the bank with more than four years of experience and has a bachelor’s degree in finance from Bentley University. He has passed the Series 6, Series 63, Series 65, and Series 7 examinations, which are required for individuals who sell certain investment products. In the fall, he is planning to begin working on an MBA.

Daily News

PHILADELPHIA — CRRC, the Chinese rail-car manufacturing giant currently building a plant in Springfield, was awarded a $137.5 million deal this week to build 45 new train cars for SEPTA, Philadelphia’s transit system. Its bid was $34 million less than the nearest competitor, according to philly.com. The deal includes an option to buy 10 additional cars for another $23.5 million.

The announcement comes on the heels of another deal, announced in December, to manufacture new subway cars for Los Angeles. The Los Angeles contract is worth $178.4 million for the manufacture of 64 new subway cars, with an option to buy 218 more cars.

CRRC is building its Springfield facility on Page Boulevard to manufacture 284 subway cars for the MBTA’s Boston-area Red Line and Orange Line, a deal worth $566 million. Production is expected to last five years. Late last year, the MBTA awarded CRRC another $277 million contract to build 120 additional cars after the initial run is complete.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Springfield College will host the second annual Sports and Social Justice Symposium on Friday, March 31 from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Flynn Campus Union. The event features sports and social-justice pioneer and Springfield College graduate Justine Siegal. The event is free and open to the public, and is supported by the Dr. Tom Waddell ’59 Fund.

Siegal earned her PhD in sport and exercise psychology from Springfield College in 2013, and, most recently, she served as the mental-skills coach for team Israel in the 2017 World Baseball Classic. Siegal served as an assistant coach from 2006 to 2009 for the Pride baseball team. She will talk about her experiences in making the national pastime an iconic place for inclusion.

Siegal made Major League Baseball history in September 2015 when the Oakland A’s hired her to be a guest instructor for its Instructional League club, making her the first woman to coach in big-league history. In 2011, she became the first woman to throw batting practice to a Major League team when she assisted the Cleveland Indians during spring training.

Through her nonprofit organization, Baseball for All, Siegal provides opportunities through a number of initiatives for girls to play, coach, and lead in baseball.

Following Siegal’s presentation, a current Springfield College student-athlete will be recognized with the Tom Waddell Level the Playing Field Award. Waddell is a Springfield College Athletic Hall of Fame member who devoted his life to issues of social justice. This annual award goes to a student-athlete who has worked diligently to build a more fair and just world.

If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation to fully participate in this event, contact the Office of Inclusion and Community Engagement at (413) 748-3050 or e-mail [email protected] to discuss your accessibility needs. Springfield College is a smoke-free/tobacco-free campus.

Daily News

GREAT BARRINGTON — Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation and the Nonprofit Center of the Berkshires invite nonprofit executive directors, development staff, and board members to attend “Planned Giving Basics: What Every Nonprofit Should Know.” Led by planned-giving consultant Ellen Estes of Estes Associates and attorney Virginia Stanton Smith of Smith Green & Gold, LLP, the workshop will be held on Thursday, April 20 from 1 to 4 p.m. at Saint James Place, 352 Main St., Great Barrington, Mass.

This training will explore the various elements of planned giving, including how to launch a planned-giving program, identify prospects for planned giving, discuss giving options, and build personal relationships with donors and prospects.

This event is part of Berkshire Taconic’s popular annual “Seminars in Nonprofit Excellence” series. Tickets cost $40 per person, and light food and beverages will be provided. Registration is now open at www.berkshiretaconic.org/pgbasics.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — Conklin Office Furniture recently installed an array of solar panels atop its Appleton Street manufacturing facility, reducing its carbon footprint. Owner Franco Arnold, has taken many steps to reduce his company’s emissions of carbon usage and bettering its environmental impact; his Appleton Street location now produces enough renewable energy to offset all the company’s energy needs.

“Conklin is continuing with our business plan by doing all that we can to help the environment. We started in 1981 recycling office furniture and, over the years, refined our manufacturing processes to limit waste and use environmentally-friendly materials. This solar project is a big step in meeting our long-term environmental goals,” Franco said.

Conklin’s newly installed solar panels offset the amount of CO2 sequestered by 81 acres of forest, or represent the ability to charge 67 million smartphones, continuously power 7,000 lightbulbs; annually power 76 homes, or displace the CO2 emissions of 120 cars.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Skoler, Abbott & Presser, P.C. invites business owners, managers, and human-resource professionals to an informative webinar outlining ways to review compensation practices to address gender pay-gap issues and minimize legal liabilities. The webinar will be held Wednesday, April 5 from 1:30 to 3 p.m. and hosted by attorney Amelia Holstrom of Skoler, Abbott & Presser, P.C.

“The National Committee on Pay Equity has declared April 4, 2017 ‘National Equal Pay Day,’ and the time has never been better to look at how your organization determines employees’ pay rates and identify any gender or other disparities that could put you at legal risk,” Holstrom said.

The Department of Labor recently issued a final rule for government contractors directing them to eliminate secrecy about pay. The purpose of the rule is to help level the playing field when it comes to equal pay and eliminate discrimination, particularly with women who generally earn less on the dollar than their male counterparts.

The Department of Labor is not the only agency taking steps to eliminate pay disparities. Massachusetts passed pay-equity legislation in 2016 that, among other things, bars employers from screening applicants based on their past salary history. A similar regulation was passed by the City Council in Philadelphia. Although a pay-equity bill in New Jersey was vetoed by Gov. Chris Christie, the national trend appears to be toward pay-equity regulation.

Holstrom will discuss federal and various state laws relating to pay; the current status of pay-equity laws at the federal level, and how these laws and new developments are likely to affect organizations’ compliance obligations going forward; how organizations can examine and evaluate their own pay practices to determine if there are gender or other compensation gaps that need to be remedied; how sex discrimination and the gender gap in compensation can undermine the company, increase turnover, and erode trust; why transparency can be a good thing, and how to communicate effectively regarding wage determination; legal issues that can arise around pay disparities; and how to avoid a sex-discrimination lawsuit by getting the company’s compensation practices in order.

Those interested in registering for the course can do so online at HR Hero Store (click here) or by calling (800) 274-6774.

Holstrom has assisted employers in remaining union-free, represented clients at arbitrations, and defended employers against claims of discrimination, retaliation, harassment, and wrongful-termination claims, as well as actions arising under the Family Medical Leave Act and wage-and-hour law. In addition, she frequently provides counsel to management regarding litigation-avoidance strategies.

Daily News

GREAT BARRINGTON — Wheeler & Taylor Insurance of Great Barrington announced it has purchased the Great Barrington office of GoodWorks Insurance. Chad Yonker, chairman of GoodWorks Insurance, will become a shareholder and chairman at Wheeler & Taylor. George A. Ryan Jr. president of Wheeler & Taylor, will continue in his role as president indefinitely and remains the company’s majority shareholder.

“We’ve formed a strategic alliance,” Yonker said. “We’ll work together on all aspects of each other’s businesses, allowing us to better serve our clients and creating more opportunity for growth at both organizations.”

Added Ryan, “working with a progressive organization like GoodWorks will be great for our business, our employees, our community, and our clients. The resources at the disposal of this partnership will be tremendous. We’re already using our combined strength to pursue large commercial accounts that may not have been possible for either organization to attract independently. The feedback has been very positive.”

Both organizations have a long history of supporting their communities through charitable giving, and will continue to do so going forward. Wheeler & Taylor will license the GoodWorks Insurance charitable-giving program to continue to support local organizations and charities in Massachusetts.

GoodWorks and Wheeler & Taylor are neighbors in Great Barrington. When GoodWorks closes its local office at 343 Main St., its customers will go next door to 333 Main St. to be served by Wheeler & Taylor. All the GoodWorks staff in Great Barrington have been offered positions at Wheeler & Taylor.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — The public is invited to the second annual Art Show at LightHouse Holyoke on Friday, April 7 from 4 to 7 p.m.

The lobby of the STEAM Building at 208 Race St. in Holyoke will be once again transformed into a professional gallery space, complete with delicious offerings from Whole Foods. Thanks to the support of the STEAM Building, this is a free event, and is not a fund-raiser — just a chance to connect and appreciate the work of LightHouse’s many talented students.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — The Western New England University (WNEU) School of Law continues its series of national policy discussions, “Trump: First 100 Days,” on Thursday, March 23 with a focus on the Trump administration’s business policies and, in particular, how the administration’s policies may impact small businesses and entrepreneurs.

The Trump administration has a pro-business reputation, and some of its early policy choices reflect preferences of certain industries over others. ‘Business’ is a broad term, however, and the impact of policies that may benefit one type of business may not have the same effect on other businesses.

The event, scheduled to take place from noon to 1 p.m. in the Blake Law Center at WNEU, will be moderated by Professor Art Wolf, director of the Institute for Legislative and Governmental Affairs in the School of Law. The forum is free and open to the public.

Daily News

CHICOPEE — Pope Francis High School, a faith-based college-preparatory school serving grades 9-12, announced W. Paul Harrington Jr. as its new head of school following a lengthy nationwide search. Michele D’Amour, Pope Francis High School board chair, shared the news with faculty, staff, students, and parents this week.

“Working in conjunction with our independent search counsel, Boston-based Partners in Mission School Leadership Search Solutions — a national retained search and recruiting firm devoted exclusively to developing excellence in Catholic school executive leadership — the search committee vetted, interviewed, and evaluated an extensive pool of credible candidates excited to lead our school community into its promising future,” said D’Amour. “The search committee included representatives of our clergy, faculty, parent, board, legacy alumni, and community constituencies.”

Harrington was one of two “exceptional” candidates that were considered for the next head of school, said D’Amour. A native of Holliston, Harrington holds a bachelor’s degree in biology with a minor in economics from Fairfield University, and a master’s degree in school administration from Loyola Marymount University. He received his doctorate in educational leadership at the University of Southern California. He received the unanimous recommendation of the search committee, approval by the Pope Francis High School Board of directors, and the affirmation of Springfield Bishop Mitchell Rozanski.

“I am very pleased and excited that Dr. Harrington has accepted the position as the new head of school for Pope Francis High School,” said Rozanski. “Having personally met with him, I believe he has the vision that will help us realize the full potential for this new school, both academically and spiritually.”

The creation of Pope Francis High School was announced in the spring of 2015 when Rozanski revealed that Cathedral High School and Holyoke Catholic High School would be merging into a new school, named in honor of the current pope. The two schools officially merged in July 2016 with students starting the school year in the former Holyoke Catholic building on Springfield Street in Chicopee. Construction on the new, 127,000-square-foot facility in Springfield is now underway, and the installation of structural steel is expected to be completed within the next month. As Harrington begins the transition into the head-of-school role, construction crews will begin to button up the building, installing exterior brick and stone veneer, roofing system, aluminum windows, and more.

In a statement to the Pope Francis High School Community, Harrington said he was inspired by the school’s passion for mission and commitment to excellence in Catholic education.

“I am humbled by this incredible opportunity to honor the rich traditions of Holyoke Catholic and Cathedral High Schools while inspiring a future filled with innovation, faith formation, and academic excellence as Pope Francis High School,” said Harrington. “I would like to thank the search committee, board of directors, and Bishop Rozanski for entrusting me with this opportunity to lead Pope Francis High School.”

Harrington will work with interim Head of School Thomas McDowell to ensure a smooth transition into the position. A welcome ceremony and reception with current students and their families, faculty, and staff will be planned to welcome Harrington and his family to Greater Springfield.

“The time has come for all of us to come together in Christian charity and humbly commit ourselves 100% to our exciting future,” said D’Amour. “Building trust and encouraging interdependence will prayerfully assure our survival and growth. I know that Dr. Harrington is personally committed to working with all of us in nurturing the souls of the young men and women who are entrusted to our care.”

Banking and Financial Services Sections

Expanding the Profile

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The planned new Greenfield Savings Bank branches in Northampton (top) and Amherst.

The planned new Greenfield Savings Bank branches in Northampton (top) and Amherst.

Denise Coyne says one of the most important tenets of customer service is listening to the customers. And an even more critical one, she went on, is acting on what is being heard.

Adherence to both parts of that equation sums up, quickly and efficiently, Greenfield Savings Bank’s recent announcement that it will open two new branches in Amherst and Northampton, thus putting another exclamation point on the institution’s expansion into Hampshire County.

In short, the bank listened, and it acted.

“We have a great relationship with our customers, and we talk with them a lot,” said Coyne, the bank’s executive vice president and chief operating officer. “Over the past year or so, what we kept hearing about was location. We have great branches in those communities, and we’re going to keep those branches — they’re great locations. But customers wanted us to be on Main Street.”

In Northampton, that meant literally — the city’s bustling Main Street. In Amherst, it meant what amounts to the main thoroughfare for retail and foot traffic (which is not actually Main Street).

Thus, the bank will augment its large, full-service branches in those communities — 6 University Dr. in Amherst and 325 King St. in Northampton — with smaller, almost full-service branches in the heart of those downtowns. There will soon be a branch at 207 Main St. in Northampton, and another at 108 North Pleasant St. in Amherst.

 

Over the past year or so, what we kept hearing about was location. We have great branches in those communities, and we’re going to keep those branches — they’re great locations. But customers wanted us to be on Main Street.”

 

The new branches are being undertaken in direct response to customer need for convenience — “parking is at a premium in Amherst and Northampton, and once you get a spot in those communities, you don’t want to move,” said Coyne — but also as part of the bank’s ongoing efforts to grow market share in communities several exits to the south on I-91 from its base in Greenfield.

And that growth has come across the board, she went on.

“We have a trust department … we’ve seen an increase in wealth-management services,” she explained. “And as far as deposits go, since we opened our branch in Northampton in 2012, we’ve seen 16% growth in deposits annually.”

But perhaps the most profound growth has come on the commercial side of the ledger, said Mark Grumoli, senior vice president and director of Commercial Lending for the nearly 160-year-old institution.

“One of the factors that spearheaded our look to establish another branch in Northampton has been from the commercial-loan growth we’ve experienced,” he said. “Over the past nine years, we’ve generated in excess of $400 million in loan volume, and a large percentage of that has come in Hampshire County; the loan portfolio has grown almost three-fold over those nine years.”

Elaborating, he said that, to better serve that growing number of commercial customers, the additional branches were a necessary strategic initiative.

And the new additions have come after a lengthy search for sites that would meet customers’ needs for more convenience, but also give the bank needed visibility and the desirable space it needed.

“We’ve been looking for locations for more than a year now,” said Coyne, adding that, in Northampton, especially, there were many options to consider, but not many that would allow the bank to accomplish its primary mission. So it waited for such an opportunity to develop.

The Northampton site, located favorably near a Starbucks and across the street from City Hall, was previously home to a clothing store, and covers nearly 700 square feet. The Amherst site, meanwhile, near a CVS and across the street from Judie’s Restaurant, had been occupied by a bookstore and was vacant for some time.

Thus, both sites will require extensive renovation, said Coyne, adding that they will feature most of the traditional services, other than safe-deposit boxes and drive-thru facilities.

Both are slated to open their doors in June, and both are needed additions in those communities, Coyne noted.

“These are ‘walking’ communities,” she stressed. “And we wanted to bring that additional convenience to our customers.”

—George O’Brien

Banking and Financial Services Sections

Avoiding Identity Theft

By Cheryl M Fitzgerald, CPA, MST

 

Identity theft has become an increasing concern for all. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) estimates that as many as 9 million Americans have their identities stolen each year. According to a Jan. 26, 2015, FTC press release, tax-related identity theft was the most common form of reported identity theft in 2014.

Personal information (including Social Security numbers) is stolen by using various methods (including dumpster diving, skimming, and phishing). The people stealing identities have become very adept and strategic in the ways that they are obtaining this information.

According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), tax-related identify theft occurs when someone uses your Social Security Number (SSN) to file a tax return claiming a fraudulent refund. Taxpayers are usually unaware of this until they receive a notice from the IRS indicating that multiple returns have been filed using the same SSN. The IRS uses your SSN to make sure your filing is accurate and complete, and that you get any refund you are due.

Cheryl M Fitzgerald

Cheryl M Fitzgerald

Remember to be extremely cautious when you receive unexpected e-mails or phone calls from the IRS. If no written correspondence preceded it, there is reason to be suspicious.”

 

Identify theft can affect how your return is processed. An unexpected notice or letter from the IRS could alert you that someone else is using your SSN; however, the IRS does not start contact with a taxpayer by sending an e-mail, text, or social-media message that asks for personal or financial information.

Some of the things that you can do to in the event that identify theft (not just with the IRS) has occurred are as follows:

• Call your credit-card companies if you believe fraud has occurred;
• Place a fraud alert on your credit reports and get copies of the report;
• Report identify theft to the FTC;
• File a report with your local police department; and
• Contact your financial institutions and close any financial or credit account opened without your permission.

If your SSN is compromised and you know or suspect you are a victim of a tax-related identify theft, the IRS recommends these additional steps:

• Respond immediately to any IRS notice. Call the number provided or, if instructed, go to idverify.irs.gov;
• Complete IRS Form 14039 (identity-theft affidavit) if your e-filed return rejects because of a duplicate filing under your SSN or you are instructed to do so. Use a fillable form at IRS.gov, print, then attach the form to your paper filed return and mail according to the instructions; and
• Continue to pay your taxes and file your tax return, even if you must do so by paper.

According to the IRS, some suggestions that you can do in order to help reduce your risk are as follows:

• Always use security software with firewall and anti-virus protections, and use strong passwords;
• Learn to recognize and avoid phishing e-mails, threatening calls, and texts from thieves posing as legitimate organizations such as your bank, credit-card companies, and even the IRS;
• Do not click on links or download attachments from unknown or suspicious e-mails; and
• Protect your personal data; do not routinely carry your Social Security card, and make sure your tax records are secure.

These steps should be followed because, if an identity theft does occur, the situation can typically take many months to correct. Some identity-theft victims have experienced a year or more wait before receiving their appropriate refund. The IRS will typically tell taxpayers who inquire about the status of their identity-theft case that cases are resolved within 180 days; however, it has typically taken longer than that time frame.

In conclusion, the single most important takeaway is that the IRS will always send a written correspondence first. Remember to be extremely cautious when you receive unexpected e-mails or phone calls from the IRS. If no written correspondence preceded it, there is reason to be suspicious. With the increased occurrence of identity theft, it is especially important this tax season (and throughout the year) to be diligent with your information and take proper measures to secure it.

Cheryl M Fitzgerald, CPA, MST, is senior manager at Holyoke-based public accounting firm Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C.; (413) 322-3500; [email protected]

Education Sections

Dollars and Sense

financialaidart

Attaining a college degree is a stern challenge. These days, paying for one is probably an even bigger challenge, for both students and their families. Area colleges are responding proactively with programs and initiatives that put information into the hands of those who need it and help students and families understand all the options and opportunities available to them.

Springfield College students Olivia Otter and Emily Giardino are well aware of the cost of higher education.

Although Springfield College (SC) was Otter’s first choice and she was thrilled to be accepted, she needed to see the financial-aid package the school offered her before she could commit to entering the freshman class.

“This year I signed up to be an RA [resident assistant] so I won’t have as much debt when I graduate,” said the 20-year-old sophomore, explaining that the job provides her with free housing and a reduced rate on her meal plan.

Giardino, meanwhile, is a junior and has a merit scholarship and a grant. Her mother, Trish Giardino, found the financial-aid process daunting but said that, at one point, their financial needs changed, and they were able to benefit from the college’s appeal process.

Families have very different financial situations, but they are faced with common denominators: the cost of higher education continues to climb, and the amount of student debt is reaching new, alarming heights.

Springfield College students Emily Giardino (left) and Olivia Otter

Springfield College students Emily Giardino (left) and Olivia Otter say the amount of financial aid students receive can play an important role in the school they choose to attend.

Studies show 44.2 million Americans owe $1.28 trillion in college debt, and the average class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loans, which is 6% more than 2015 graduates owed. Graduate students incur even more responsiblity, with an average of $57,000 in loans because there isn’t much financial help available for them.

Although some people question why higher education is so costly, Stuart Jones says the demand for amenities such as great food, health and counseling services, and advanced technology continues to rise, and these are certainly factors.

“We call it the arms race,” said Springfield College’s vice president for Enrollment Management. “When families visit us, they judge our buildings and compare them to what they see at other schools. Plus, today’s students want to have fun and want to know whether the school holds events like movie nights and carnivals. They want a great education, but also want a great experience, and that comes with a price tag.”

Full tuition at SC is $36,000 annually, or $43,000 with room and board, but 85% of its students receive financial aid. “We have a responsibility to help families get the help they need, so we really work hard to keep costs down; for six consecutive years, our tuition has remained lower than the national averages for colleges of the same size,” Jones said.

Kathleen Chambers said Western New England University (WNEU) is tuition-driven: the majority of the price it charges pays for the school’s operating budget, and 90% of its students receive some sort of financial aid.

“It’s our job to help parents and students meet the bottom line,” said WNEU’s director of financial aid, adding that the school’s tuition plus room and board is $49,000.

We have a responsibility to help families get the help they need, so we really work hard to keep costs down; for six consecutive years, our tuition has remained lower than the national averages for colleges of the same size.”

Public schools tend to be less expensive, but families still typically need help to pay for schooling. Suzanne Peters, director of Financial Aid Services for UMass Amherst, said 80% of the school’s full-time undergraduate students have loans, grants, or other forms of aid. Tuition at UMass Amherst is $30,000, which includes room and board, books, and transportation, and www.umass.edu/umsa contains forms, information, and search engines for a wide range of scholarships which students are urged to explore.

“Part of going to college is learning to advocate for yourself, but we give families as much information as we possibly can and things to think about, such as interest rates and repayment terms,” Peters said, noting that private schools usually have more scholarship money to award students than public schools.


List of Colleges in Western Mass.


For this issue and its focus on education, BusinessWest looks at what public and private schools do to help students and their parents access the help they are eligible for so they can earn a degree that will lead to a satisfying and well-paid career.

Variable Factors

Guidance counselors at high schools have information about financial aid and can steer prospective college students and their parents to appropriate resources. Most high schools also hold financial-aid information nights, while colleges and universities hold similar sessions during annual open houses.

Peters said UMass Amherst goes out into the community and puts on 100 presentations every year for prospective students and their parents, as well as panel discussions for guidance counselors, programs for incoming families, and financial-literacy sessions on campus that remind students about the debt they are accumulating.

Stuart Jones

Stuart Jones says Springfield College is unique in the amount of money it awards to graduate students.

Catherine Ryan, director of Financial Aid at Westfield State University, said that school also gives presentations and works closely with community colleges because many students transfer there after completing two years of schooling.

In general, private schools are the most costly form of higher education. State schools are less expensive, and their price tag is determined by a tiered system: community colleges are the least expensive, state universities cost more, and the UMass system is at the top of the tuition-cost pyramid.

Ryan said Westfield State costs $9,275 without room and board and $20,000 with it.

“Some students expect to be able to borrow the full amount of the cost of their education, but that’s not possible,” she noted, explaining that there are limits to federal loans. “It’s important for families to research the cost of each college the student is interested in because there are a lot of different price tags. I tell them to be organized and look at a wide range of schools.”

There are three main sources of funding for higher education. The first comes from the government via federal loans, Pell grants, state grants, and work-study programs.

The second source is scholarships or awards from a college or university, and the third is independent scholarships that are given out by a wide array of local and national groups.

“It’s our job to educate students about where they can find scholarships and grants,” Jones said, adding that millions of dollars of scholarship money goes unclaimed every year, and students should visit www.fastweb.com, the nation’s largest scholarship clearinghouse.

“We give families the tools they need to explore options and tell them what they need to know about private loans,” he went on. “But we are very honest about the amount of debt the student is likely to incur, and although some really want to come to Springfield College, we know they can’t afford it and have to help them face that reality.”

Chambers agreed, and said 90% of students at WNEU receive financial aid, and the admissions office gets in touch with students after they receive their financial-aid package to answer any questions. But they have also had to tell some students it is not realistic for them to attend the school.

However, experts say every student should fill out the Free Application for Student Aid, or FAFSA, which automatically qualifies them for low-interest and forgivable federal loans if they meet eligibility standards. It is also the first step needed to qualify a parent for a federal PLUS loan, which can be used to help pay college costs.

Catherine Ryan, director of Financial Aid at Westfield State University

Catherine Ryan, director of Financial Aid at Westfield State University

Experts say the form is important even for the wealthiest families because students may qualify for merit scholarships or other forms of aid if they don’t meet the benchmarks for federal programs. In addition, the most generous private colleges have awarded need-based aid to some students from families earning more than $200,000 a year.

However, Peters noted that it’s critical to read the FAFSA directions carefully. For example, it’s important to understand where to include the student’s tax information and where to use the parent’s.

The U.S. Department of Education recently announced new income-reporting rules for FAFSA beginning with the upcoming 2017-18 school year. Instead of using prior-year income as ‘base year’ income, it will now use what it refers to as ‘prior-prior year income.’ For example, the FAFSA will report 2015 calendar year income to schools the student designates on the form for the 2017-18 ‘expected family contribution’ determination instead of 2016 calendar-year income.

In addition, for the first time, families were able to fill out the FAFSA in October instead of having to wait until Jan. 1. Students who did so right away and were accepted at colleges received financial-aid packages early, which gives them more time to consider their options.

Ryan cautions that the FAFSA should be filled out as soon as possible each year because students who file after March 1 may lose out on help, as a college may have allocated all of its resources by that date.

Different Circumstances

Although every family is expected to contribute toward their child’s education to fill the gap between what can be borrowed and what is given to them in grants, sometimes this is not possible. “The amount is often double or triple what parents expected to pay,” said Ryan. “Middle-class families don’t quality for a lot of aid at public schools, so they should start conversations about affordability long before the student is ready to enroll in college.”

Although most schools don’t have an extra pool of money to help students beyond their initial offer, experts say if a family’s circumstances change, they should alert the financial-aid office, because special situations are taken into consideration. If extra aid is not available, private loans can be an option, but a student needs a credit-worthy co-signer, and interest often begins accumulating as soon as the loan is processed.

“But if a parent lost their job, or there is a death, divorce, or other significant change in the family, they should contact us,” Ryan noted.

Jones said some families try to negotiate the amount of aid the student will receive. “Some don’t really need our help and simply want a bargain, while others really do need assistance,” he noted, adding that, in some instances, SC is able to offer them more grant money.

Ryan said Westfield doesn’t have a reserve fund, but it looks at individual situations, and students sometimes opt to attend classes part-time while they work or help their family.

But most schools offer payment plans, and if parents request a meeting with the financial-aid office, they will be advised about their options.

“We have our own scholarship program, but it is only for upperclassmen,” Chambers noted.

Ryan said Westfield State may offer the neediest students a package that includes federal loans, a Pell grant, a state grant, and grant money from the school, which in some cases equates to the majority of the cost.

Kathleen Chambers

Kathleen Chambers says 90% of students at Western New England University receive financial aid.

But when it comes to helping graduate students, most colleges and universities don’t have much to offer.

“Most graduate students who receive financial aid receive it in the form of a job as a teaching assistant or research assistant,” said Patrick Callahan, a spokesperson for UMass Amherst. “When they apply for admission to a graduate program, they are considered for this type of aid, which is typically based on qualifications rather than financial need.”

He added that some graduate students receive fellowships that help with the cost of living or scholarships that reduce their tuition cost. Fellowships can come from university sources or outside sponsors, such as the National Science Foundation.

UMass Amherst has a robust assistance program that offers tuition credits as well as health benefits, and Westfield State offers its own programs.

Springfield College awards scholarships for excellence as well as associateships that provide students with free or discounted tuition and a living stipend in exchange for work on campus that does not exceed 20 hours a week.

Chambers said WNEU’s School of Law offers merit money based on a student’s undergraduate academic record and their results on the Law School Admission Test, but noted that graduate students can get an unsubsidized federal loan of up to $20,500 for their first year of study, which is considerably higher than the amount an undergraduate can borrow.

Countdown Begins

Time is of the essence, and most colleges send out financial-aid packages by March 1 because students must decide by May 1 which school they will attend.

The amount they borrow is a very important factor, but Chambers noted that higher education is an investment. “Unlike a car or house, a degree can’t be taken from you.”

Jones added that, although affordability and financial aid are critical factors in decision making, many parents say support services, the safety of a campus, and whether the school is student-focused also weigh into the equation.

“They want to know if the school is going to give their son or daughter the greatest chance at success,” he said.

When they finish their schooling and settle into careers, the amount of debt they owe may well figure into that definition, so it is indeed a situation that deserves serious consideration — because it will affect their lives for years to come.

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the months of February and March 2017.

CHICOPEE

Emrullah Durmaz
20 Johnson Road
$58,000 — Build exterior egress canopy

Jick LLC
1535 Memorial Dr.
$60,000 — Remove cladding and replace with metal panels and EIFS system, remove and replace signage, painting

EASTHAMPTON

Autumn Properties LLC
184 Northampton St.
$22,000 — Demolition of office building

Moushabeck Properties Inc.
119-121 Main St.
$3,000 — Install nine replacement windows

EAST LONGMEADOW

Baystate Dental
250 North Main St.
$2.5 million — New commercial building

Eyesight & Surgery Associates
382 North Main St.
$14,980 — Commercial alteration

Powerclean Fitness
45 Baldwin St.
$70,000 — Commercial alteration

GREENFIELD

409 Federal St. LLC
407-409 Federal St.
$1,978 — Fire protection

Greenfield Corporate Center LLC
101 Munson St.
$11,000 — Rework existing fire sprinkler to new tenant office space

Town of Greenfield
125 Federal St.
$1.7 million — Replace windows and doors at Federal Street Elementary School

Mark Valone
319 Wells St.
$1,500 — Outfit temporary space in existing main building

HADLEY

Amherst Development Partners
300 Westgate Center Dr.
$10,950 — Remove one interior non-bearing wall

GNC
344 Russell St.
$9,000 — Shelving and interior tenant buildout

Pearson NCS
300 Venture Way
$135,000 — Toilet room additions and office renovations

LONGMEADOW

Colvest Longmeadow, LLC
471 Longmeadow St.
$29,280 — Demo interior space of former Hampden Bank

Leavitt Family Jewish Home
770 Converse St.
$42,000 — Roof replacement

NORTHAMPTON

American Tower Corp.
327 King St.
$19,865 — Remove three existing antenna panels and replace them with three upgraded panels and related equipment on existing telecommunications tower

Chicopee Kendall, LLC
129 Pleasant St.
$162,500 —Installation of fire sprinkler system

Colvest/Northampton LLC
327 King St.
$732,000 — Tenant fitout for Baystate Health

Cooley Dickinson Hospital Inc.
30 Locust St.
$1,263,329 — Create a comprehensive breast center

Gretna Green Development Corp.
118 Conz St.
$5,000 — New built-in express counter in main lobby

Smith College
41 West St.
$2,000 — Repair damaged roof

PALMER

Baystate Wing Hospital
40 Wright St.
$225,000 — Construct new exterior module block site retaining wall

Steve Sathis
1313 Park St.
$500 — Sign installation

SOUTHWICK

King Brothers Decorating Center
615 College Highway
$35,600 — Roofing

SPRINGFIELD

Bridge Hillman LLC
315-333 Bridge St.
$2,000 — Modify existing fire-alarm system

Crown Castle
20 Birnie Ave.
$7,000 — Remove and upgrade six antennas and six remote radio heads on Verizon telecommunications tower

GBS Realty
676 Dickinson St.
$5,150 — Add walls to interior and ceiling, move bathroom in building housing insurance agency and pizzeria

Islazul Realty LLC
2559 Main St.
$208,208 — Convert 4,744 square feet of commercial space to four separate office spaces

Kentucky Fried Chicken
1780 Boston Road
$1,000 — Repair roof

Raj Rayonia
1116 St. James Ave.
$4,179.93 — Install fire-protection system to monitor hood-suppression system

Trinity Methodist Church
361 Sumner Ave.
$10,000 — Remove and replace four existing cellular antennas

UniFirst Corp.
281 Parker St.
$1,412,480 — Entry addition and existing officr renovations

WARE

Charter Foods North LLC
118-124 West St.
$488,000 — Construction of new Taco Bell restaurant with a drive-thru

Give Them Sanctuary Inc.
1 Canal St.
$3,000 — Install Harman P43 pellet stove

WEST SPRINGFIELD

City of West Springfield
39 Golden View
$20,000 — Modify existing telecommunications facility, remove and replace three antennas

Eighty Congress St. LLC
900 Memorial Ave.
$22,160 — Remove wall to enlarge room, paint, carpeting, install mag-lock on fire door

Sears Property Management
1179-1189 Westfield St.
$38,000 — Attic renovation

West Springfield Housing Authority
Grove Street
$48,132 — Replace 21 metal doors, wood frames, and hardware with new fiberglass doors in wood frames

WILBRAHAM

Wilbraham & Monson Academy
43 Faculty St.
$500 — Rebuild deck

Wing Memorial Hospital Corp.
2344 Boston Road
$8,000 — Repairs to wall after vehicle accident

Departments Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

BERNARDSTON

164 Parmenter Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Peter E. Hyrne
Seller: FNMA
Date: 02/10/17

COLRAIN

64 Stetson Brothers Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: James L. Martin
Seller: Carl J. Michels
Date: 02/14/17

DEERFIELD

45 Graves St.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Lisa L. Herringshaw
Seller: Lorralyn Fitzgerald
Date: 02/10/17

16 Settright Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $134,059
Buyer: Anthony D. Martino
Seller: US Bank
Date: 02/06/17

GREENFIELD

482 Leyden Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $142,000
Buyer: Gerald J. Farmer
Seller: Joan D. Richardson
Date: 02/10/17

473 Main St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: David B. Russell
Seller: Antebellum Beauty LLC
Date: 02/06/17

40 Union St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Robert W. Killay
Seller: Erich Price
Date: 02/17/17

MONTAGUE

27 Industrial Blvd.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $1,710,000
Buyer: River Bluff Realty LLC
Seller: Miller Falls Road LLC
Date: 02/14/17

38 Prospect St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $136,500
Buyer: Steven G. Williams
Seller: Louis S. Corbiere
Date: 02/07/17

19 Unity St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $286,534
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Rene Moreno
Date: 02/06/17

ORANGE

150 Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $116,500
Buyer: Michael Shaw
Seller: FHLM
Date: 02/10/17

170 Wheeler Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Its A. Pleasure Training
Seller: Gary E. Haueisen
Date: 02/06/17

ROWE

43 Middletown Hill Road
Rowe, MA 01367
Amount: $123,000
Buyer: Dennis W. Kuehl
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 02/06/17

SUNDERLAND

55 Montague Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Tessa L. Doubleday
Seller: Mark A. Felix
Date: 02/17/17

WENDELL

22 Checkerberry Lane
Wendell, MA 01379
Amount: $182,500
Buyer: Abigail R. Shapiro
Seller: Charles Bado
Date: 02/08/17

174 West St.
Wendell, MA 01379
Amount: $169,500
Buyer: Michael L. Skerry
Seller: Mark A. Dearborn
Date: 02/07/17

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

325 Adams St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $273,000
Buyer: Nicholas J. Dion
Seller: Roger L. Perruse
Date: 02/15/17

85 Alhambra Circle North
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $179,100
Buyer: Jonathon Mach
Seller: Shane Dunbar
Date: 02/14/17

74 Broz Terrace
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Briana M. Solek
Seller: Radwilowicz, Karen, (Estate)
Date: 02/08/17

75 Highland St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Roy E. Tatro
Seller: Gary A. Polacco
Date: 02/13/17

21 Joseph St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Peter & Anna Montessi LT
Seller: Julia Montessi
Date: 02/06/17

BLANDFORD

Bassett Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

Pomeroy Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

Strong St.
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

BRIMFIELD

82 1st St.
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Amber M. Ditomasso
Seller: Sharon S. Carty
Date: 02/14/17

CHICOPEE

138 Artisan St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Zachary E. Nummy
Seller: Vasily Morozov
Date: 02/17/17

23 Bessette Lane
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Andrew R. Serrenho
Seller: Lynne M. Serrenho
Date: 02/10/17

32 Felix St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $139,300
Buyer: Laura M. Cloutier
Seller: Pauline C. Hamel
Date: 02/14/17

555 Front St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $177,400
Buyer: Mark J. Arcott
Seller: Max Pienkos
Date: 02/07/17

52 Julia Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $184,900
Buyer: Alexander Sotomayor
Seller: Leclerc Properties LLC
Date: 02/10/17

97 McKinstry Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $139,200
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Anthony M. Windoloski
Date: 02/07/17

235 Meadow St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: HRES Meadow LLC
Seller: Michael Robare
Date: 02/13/17

749-755 New Ludlow Road
Chicopee, MA 01075
Amount: $857,915
Buyer: Gen 2 Realty LLC
Seller: SDK Realty Corp.
Date: 02/17/17

45 Stebbins St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Diane M. Fernandes
Seller: Scanlon, Elaine A., (Estate)
Date: 02/15/17

135 Stebbins St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Donald R. Chapdelaine
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 02/08/17

EAST LONGMEADOW

34 Anne St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Natalya Kuznetsova
Seller: FNMA
Date: 02/06/17

132 Porter Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Shane R. Dunbar
Seller: Christopher D. McKinnon
Date: 02/14/17

18 Woodlawn St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $124,000
Buyer: Jeremy Douglas
Seller: Liberty Home Equity
Date: 02/17/17

GRANVILLE

215 Silver St.
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $232,500
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Charles A. Fortin
Date: 02/07/17

HAMPDEN

179 Allen St.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Norman W. Mackinnon
Date: 02/07/17

9 Brookside Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: PD Developments LLC
Seller: Deutsche Bank
Date: 02/13/17

135 Raymond Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $148,000
Buyer: Fletcher & Maple LLC
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 02/14/17

234 South Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $234,000
Buyer: Richard J. Bertheaud
Seller: Isham, Daniel R., (Estate)
Date: 02/17/17

HOLLAND

65 Union Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $138,600
Buyer: Allen J. Czamara
Seller: FNMA
Date: 02/16/17

HOLYOKE

5 Central Park Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Brian W. Anderson
Seller: David F. Magri
Date: 02/06/17

Country Club Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

17-19 Gates St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $133,500
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Ayten Mesecher
Date: 02/10/17

5 Glen St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Danielle M. Ryan
Seller: Frances M. Bach
Date: 02/10/17

650 High St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: 650 High Street LLC
Seller: Della Ripa Real Estate
Date: 02/16/17

79 Memorial Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Robert E. Dennison
Date: 02/14/17

1238 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: Wilmington Savings
Seller: Marie S. Lauzon
Date: 02/15/17

1965-1967 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $232,900
Buyer: Andrew M. Vega
Seller: Jessica Laureano
Date: 02/10/17

19 Norwood Terrace
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Daniel A. Millette
Date: 02/10/17

402 Pleasant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Yamil Acosta
Date: 02/16/17

Southampton Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

LONGMEADOW

85 Franklin Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: 1066 Granby Road LLC
Seller: FNMA
Date: 02/07/17

124 Franklin Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Robert H. Dunn
Seller: Zevidah Vickery
Date: 02/17/17

225 Twin Hills Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Thomas M. Anthony
Seller: Jon P. Dana
Date: 02/17/17

214 Wimbleton Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $262,000
Buyer: Lisa A. Martin
Seller: Alissa Teta-Bachelor
Date: 02/07/17

MONSON

56 May Hill Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $218,000
Buyer: Jesse L. Allen
Seller: Peter J. Ross
Date: 02/15/17

165 Palmer Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Jennifer Lamotte
Seller: Jessica L. Allen
Date: 02/15/17

MONTGOMERY

53 Old House Road
Montgomery, MA 01085
Amount: $242,250
Buyer: Peter King
Seller: Alfred J. Albano
Date: 02/14/17

PALMER

41 Forest St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Kari A. Gracie
Seller: David A. Carter
Date: 02/13/17

68 Jim Ash Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Jacob P. Stokowski
Seller: Stacey Vogel
Date: 02/07/17

38 Riverview Pkwy.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Adam V. Hageman
Seller: Edward Hageman
Date: 02/15/17

SOUTHWICK

10 Dairy Lane
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Kevin Meder
Seller: James M. Papai
Date: 02/07/17

SPRINGFIELD

97 Amore Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $173,500
Buyer: Andrea Liranzo
Seller: Saroun C. Ouk
Date: 02/07/17

56 Balis St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $119,000
Buyer: Thu T. Vo
Seller: Suong T. Vo
Date: 02/13/17

784 Bay St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Argenis Ramos
Seller: Joseph A. Whitton Properties
Date: 02/17/17

17-19 Beauchamp St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Ana C. Quiles
Seller: Forest Beach LLC
Date: 02/13/17

40 Bissell St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $144,000
Buyer: Flagstar Bank FSB
Seller: Hannah A. Wachira
Date: 02/07/17

40 Bulat Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Felecia Griffin
Seller: Carlos A. Vitorino
Date: 02/07/17

78 Chalmers St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kiet T. Quach
Seller: Eric L. Johnson
Date: 02/15/17

64 Church St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $134,900
Buyer: Arnaldo Gomez-Lugo
Seller: Saw Construction LLC
Date: 02/17/17

154 Darling St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $143,000
Buyer: Jose R. Marquez-Vargas
Seller: Johaim Santiago-Ayala
Date: 02/10/17

36 Frontenac St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $119,500
Buyer: Aimee L. Reyes
Seller: Adam J. Wheeler
Date: 02/14/17

74 Gresham St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $236,205
Buyer: HSBC Bank USA
Seller: Charles R. Gordon
Date: 02/07/17

94 Harmon Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Nicorn LLC
Seller: Ruby Realty LLC
Date: 02/17/17

63 Hope St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $131,398
Buyer: 63 Hope Street RT
Seller: NSP Residential LLC
Date: 02/15/17

Ingersoll Grove (ES)
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Regina B. Tillery-Jenkins
Seller: Charles R. Nathan
Date: 02/17/17

41-43 Langdon St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Enrique L. Santiago
Seller: Marisabel Agosto
Date: 02/15/17

42 Lumae St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $152,310
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: David M. Lafountain
Date: 02/14/17

116 Narragansett St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Melvin Oquendo
Seller: Thomas R. Connors
Date: 02/10/17

54 Oak Hollow Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Corliss Watson
Seller: Dean T. Godek
Date: 02/14/17

1349 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Samuel M. Duboise
Seller: Willis M. Schoof
Date: 02/17/17

103 Spikenard Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $147,500
Buyer: Elvin Blanco
Seller: Kari-Ann Gracie
Date: 02/10/17

374 Springfield St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Pedro Perez
Seller: FNMA
Date: 02/08/17

93 Sunapee St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Kyle Lorenz
Seller: Leonel C. Pereira
Date: 02/06/17

135 Tamarack Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Michael Donato
Seller: Jeffrey A. Kiratsoulis
Date: 02/10/17

547 Tiffany St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Deng FT 2017
Seller: Nu Way Homes Inc.
Date: 02/06/17

37-39 Virginia St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $144,000
Buyer: Dashira S. Torres
Seller: Matteo Maida
Date: 02/10/17

90 Welland Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: William N. Shipwash
Seller: Domingos D. Fernandes
Date: 02/16/17

1500 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $143,250
Buyer: Elton W. Miller
Seller: James Santaniello
Date: 02/10/17

115 Woodside Terrace
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Natasha Polite
Seller: Enid Astacio
Date: 02/10/17

1355-1357 Worcester St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Chris Graham
Seller: Valiantsin Zhmaidziak
Date: 02/15/17

WESTFIELD

Angelica Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: CIL Realty Of Mass Inc.
Seller: Angelica Development LLC
Date: 02/07/17

136 Elm St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Westfield Bank
Seller: Chapin-Bailey LLC
Date: 02/17/17

6 Evergreen Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $244,800
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Richard P. Brown
Date: 02/07/17

88 Highland View St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Sergey Yusenko
Seller: US Bank
Date: 02/17/17

100 Honey Pot Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: William J. Brown
Seller: Nardone, Anthony J., (Estate)
Date: 02/15/17

17 Jeanne Marie Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $408,545
Buyer: Joseph H. Potts
Seller: Belco Construction Co. Inc.
Date: 02/10/17

167 Joseph Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $153,000
Buyer: Tiffani Huynh
Seller: US Bank
Date: 02/13/17

4 Linda Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: Patriot Living LLC
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 02/17/17

30 Nicholas Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $365,500
Buyer: Dale Villar
Seller: Richard W. Yerdon
Date: 02/17/17

66 Orchard St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $206,500
Buyer: Candice S. Olszewski
Seller: David L. Weatherhead
Date: 02/15/17

461 Southwick Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Levgenii Gusiev
Seller: FNMA
Date: 02/10/17

91 Wildflower Circle
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $381,500
Buyer: Erin E. Gauthier
Seller: Robert G. Hoffman
Date: 02/17/17

WILBRAHAM

6 Brooklawn Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $120,277
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Olga S. Sears
Date: 02/14/17

7 Pidgeon Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $277,000
Buyer: Jered S. Sasen
Seller: Scott Barrus
Date: 02/10/17

8 Severyn St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Bridgette Adams
Seller: Matthew S. Barkyoumb
Date: 02/10/17

WEST SPRINGFIELD

89 Baldwin St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Zak Smith
Seller: Chesapeake Holdings
Date: 02/07/17

50 Belle Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $156,450
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Tracy R. Tolbert
Date: 02/16/17

100 Virginia Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Robert J. Colson
Seller: Frances E. Demont
Date: 02/10/17

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

235 East Hadley Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: German O. Cruz-Urias
Seller: Florence M. Boynton
Date: 02/07/17

BELCHERTOWN

2 Rimrock Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $192,500
Buyer: Kenneth Line
Seller: Wells Fargo Bank
Date: 02/08/17

CUMMINGTON

24 Main St.
Cummington, MA 01026
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Chrisoula I. Roumeliotis
Seller: Richard M. Zaaft
Date: 02/15/17

EASTHAMPTON

1 Burt St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

Burt St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

30 Lyman St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Thomas B. Stone
Seller: Nancy D. Gwinner
Date: 02/17/17

10-22 Nashawannuck St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $2,362,500
Buyer: Laurel Ridge Apartments
Seller: Pleasant Realty Apts. LLP
Date: 02/17/17

Pomeroy St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

Strong St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

GOSHEN

41 Main St.
Goshen, MA 01032
Amount: $158,500
Buyer: Hilltown Community Development
Seller: Goshen Cong Church
Date: 02/16/17

GRANBY

92 Kendall St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $299,000
Buyer: Johaim Santiago-Ayala
Seller: William Sullivan
Date: 02/13/17

66 Lyman St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Michael A. Sicard
Seller: James E. Downing
Date: 02/10/17

32 Pleasant St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $244,000
Buyer: Cassandra M. Os
Seller: Michael A. Sicard
Date: 02/10/17

206 School St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Kurissa Stefaniw
Seller: Harold Woodworth
Date: 02/17/17

HADLEY

88 Comins Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Joseph J. Czajkowski
Seller: Czjakowski FT
Date: 02/10/17

28 Middle St.
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $565,000
Buyer: James H. Wallace
Seller: Donald R. Dion
Date: 02/17/17

HATFIELD

6 Prospect St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $243,407
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Edward J. McCarthy
Date: 02/06/17

HUNTINGTON

15 East Main St.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $151,900
Buyer: David J. Prats
Seller: Gary E. Ellinger
Date: 02/10/17

57 Old Chester Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Jeffrey R. Jorritsma
Seller: Laura Shubert
Date: 02/13/17

7 Rockybrook Dr.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $174,800
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Frank R. Ortiz
Date: 02/08/17

NORTHAMPTON

99 Blackberry Lane
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $430,000
Buyer: Isaac C. Fleisher
Seller: Barbara B. King RET
Date: 02/08/17

132 High St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Jonathan S. McFadden
Seller: Lisa S. Bachand
Date: 02/15/17

Holyoke St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Valley Community Development Corp.
Seller: Gail M. Labarge
Date: 02/08/17

17 Mountain St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $250,500
Buyer: Dawn J. Striker
Seller: Susan E. Walker
Date: 02/06/17

256 Pleasant St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Valley Community Development Corp.
Seller: Gail M. Labarge
Date: 02/08/17

20 Rockland Heights Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $229,000
Buyer: Norma Roche
Seller: David S. Clark
Date: 02/10/17

227 South St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Black Sheep Development
Seller: Northampton Vet Clinic
Date: 02/15/17

101 Vernon St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $625,000
Buyer: Serena Kabat-Zinn
Seller: Julie E. Hooks
Date: 02/13/17

Westhampton Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: City Of Northampton
Seller: JPST LLC
Date: 02/06/17

PLAINFIELD

372 West Main St.
Plainfield, MA 01070
Amount: $127,000
Buyer: Duane B. Meehan
Seller: Seth Martin
Date: 02/10/17

SOUTH HADLEY

82 Abbey St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $169,500
Buyer: Sokharun Yim
Seller: Eric T. Cestero
Date: 02/13/17

14 Benger Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $161,500
Buyer: Stephen A. Romeo
Seller: Javeria Mir
Date: 02/17/17

28 Bridge St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $450,000
Buyer: Katie M. Malloy
Seller: Kevin Malloy
Date: 02/13/17

43 Lexington Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $180,500
Buyer: Jonathan D. Trudeau
Seller: Alfred J. Albano
Date: 02/10/17

749 New Ludlow Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $857,915
Buyer: Gen 2 Realty LLC
Seller: SDK Realty Corp.
Date: 02/17/17

13 Normandy Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $420,000
Buyer: Diana A. Steward
Seller: Katherine L. Bechtold
Date: 02/17/17

9 Overlook Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Adam C. Baker
Seller: Andrzej Rochalski
Date: 02/08/17

8 Skinner Lane
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: Joseph G. Lugo
Seller: Gelinas, Bruce P., (Estate)
Date: 02/17/17

SOUTHAMPTON

Burt St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

377 College Hwy.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: James B. Nutter
Date: 02/06/17

44 Line St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $161,000
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Eric Gralenski
Date: 02/16/17

73 Middle Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $322,000
Buyer: Daniel J. Niejadlik
Seller: Robert G. Orlando
Date: 02/10/17

Pomeroy Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

1 Strong St.
Southampton, MA 01027
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Aaron Newton
Seller: Christine Coe
Date: 02/10/17

Woodmar Lane #D
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Margaret J. Szostak
Seller: Chester J. Kellogg
Date: 02/17/17

WARE

14 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $152,040
Buyer: Jonathan D. Meyer
Seller: Schworer, Larry B., (Estate)
Date: 02/17/17

10 Clifford Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Maximilian C. Delpino
Seller: John A. Chabot
Date: 02/15/17

274 Monson Turnpike Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: John V. James
Seller: Sandra C. Ryder
Date: 02/07/17

32 Park Ave.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: Samantha Gancorz
Seller: Suzanne Gomes
Date: 02/14/17

15 School St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Deutsche Babk
Seller: Festus N. Kinvanjui
Date: 02/16/17

WESTHAMPTON

22 Main Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Douglas P. Ferrante
Seller: Jessie M. Cole TR
Date: 02/08/17

Bankruptcies Departments

The following bankruptcy petitions were recently filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Readers should confirm all information with the court.

Binette, Carl E.
125 Simonds St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/14/17

Blondin, Eric John
242 Russellville Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/17

Bonneville, Rhonda G.
52 Regency Park Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/10/17

Bouvier, Bernard J.
44 Day St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Burnias, Manuel C.
11 Flynt Ave.
Monson, MA 01057
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/02/17

Deanne Worldwide Ventures
Pfister, Deanne J.
111 Adelaide Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Deauseault, Kelly Anne
20 Boulay Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/07/17

Diaz, Starling N.
a/k/a Diaz Agramonte, Starling N.
101 Lowell St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Downer, Edward Robert
103 Cottage St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Fernandez, Edgardo L.
31 Delaware Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/07/17

Gamache, Timothy M.
23 Cypress St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Grabowski, Timothy Matthew
24 Cedar Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/08/17

Hafner, Robert C.
Hafner, Melodie A.
181 North Washington St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/17

J&M All Season Work
Mikalunas, John Richard
Mikalunas, Laurie Ann
31 Maine Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Kenneway, John F.
184 Podunk Road
Sturbridge, MA 01566
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/15/17

Kline, Bryan Michael
18F Pleasant St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/07/17

Langone, Christine M.
16 North St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/04/17

Lindberg, Pamela Kristine
a/k/a Jordan, Pamela
333 Tremont St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/13/17

Lucia, Deborah Ann
538 East St.
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Macaluso, Janet J.
P.O. Box 813
Barre, MA 01005
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/08/17

Maldonado, Justin
Maldonado, Ana
1292 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/14/17

McCabe, Michael T.
56 Perrine Ave.
Pittsfield, MA 01201
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/09/17

McHendry-Biron, Jennifer Lee
80 Hadley Village Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Melemed, Amanda L.
48 School St., Apt. C
South Hadley, MA 01075
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Morales, Andres E.
776 Belmont Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/02/17

Oasis 7 Pictures
North/South Pictures
Hahn, William J.
PO Box 704
Monterey, MA 01245
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Patterson, Timothy P.
28 Anzio Road
Athol, MA 01331
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/07/17

Perez, Angel G.
125 Rochford Circle
Springfield, MA 01128
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/15/17

Podsiadlo, Virginia C.
62 Fairview Ave., Apt. 1
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/17

Roncarati, Philip L.
17 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Saez, Ana L.
11 Bayonne St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/03/17

Sakowicz, Catherine E.
a/k/a Sakowicz, Katie
a/k/a Winston, Catherine E.
605 Berkshire Trail
Cummington, MA 01026
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Stowell, Richard A.
9A Main St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/17

Suzor, Louis P.
22 Salli Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Chapter: 13
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Thompson, Scuelin W.
a/k/a Forde, Scuelin N.
24 Old Brook Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Toczek, Lana A.
99 Ducharme Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/17

Walkowski, James A.
55 Gregory Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/04/17

Weise, Melissa D.
17 Church St.
Ware, MA 01082
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/06/17

Western Mass Off-Road Rec
LaCombe, Eric
P.O. Box 1245
Southwick, MA 01077
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/14/17

Winn, John C.
3 Hedgerow Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Chapter: 7
Filing Date: 02/08/17

DBA Certificates Departments

The following business certificates and trade names were issued or renewed during the months of February and March 2017.

AGAWAM

J.N. Duquette Construction
215 Barry St.
Jean Duquette

NewsMatch.com
200 Silver St., Suite 201
Kenneth Vincunas

Vintage Couture Interiors
525 Springfield St.
Crystal Dukes

Vintage PTS Inc.
40 Bowles Road
Christopher Bignell

AMHERST

Gil’s Auto Repair & Performance Inc.
40 Belchertown Road
Gilberto Rivas

The Red Barn of Hampshire College
893 West St.
Mike McKenna

Terrill Productions
629 Main St., Apt. 2
Alex Terrill

CHICOPEE

Absolute Motors Inc.
245 East St.
Mahmoud Awkal

ACM Décor
32 Harding St.
Tatyana Rotar

Day Lumber Co.
70 Orange St.
Samuel Fortsch

Have a Heart Dog Training
59 College St.
Kelli-Marie Malke

Kin’s Auto Glass & Repair
628 Center St.
Joaquin Rodriguez

EASTHAMPTON

Aldeia
116 Pleasant St., Studio 232
Lillianna Pereira

Baystate Boards
6 Cood Dr.
Joseph LaBonte

Bulldog Transport & Recycling
21 Wright St.
David Meunier

D & L Cleaning
25 Franklin St., Apt. C
Daniel Bond

Haircuts by Jessy at Lisa’s Hair Shop
54 A Northampton St.
Jessy Kaminski

Head Ease
49 Union St.
Nicole McCorkindale

John Brelsford Psychotherapy
123 Union St., Suite 204
John Brelsford

Liberty Tax Service
53 Union St.
Saqib Tasneem

EAST LONGMEADOW

B & L Landscape
219 Kibbe Road
Brian Booth

Embrace Home Loans
48 Center Square
Embrace Home Loans

Frank’s Auto Service
528 North Main St.
Frank Vecchiarelli

The Salon at Bluebird Estates
1 Appleblossom Lane
Mary Rosso

GREENFIELD

All About the Promo
13 Cedar St.
Susan Brulotte

Amy’s Hair Salon
466 Main St.
Amy-Jo Kostanski

LenSocial
298 Deerfield St.
Celinda Scott

Montague Webworks
20 River St.
Montague Webworks Inc.

Spiritual Counseling
221 Main St.
Cheri Evans

HADLEY

Simmons Masonry, LLC
5 Cemetery Road
Greg Simmons

STC
269 Bay Road
Soccer Tournament Centers, LLC

Tiny House, Giant Lif.com
204 River Dr.
Susan Kuc

Verizon Wireless
360 Russell St.
Cellco Partnership

HAMPDEN

West One International Inc.
160 Chapin Road
Brent Bertelli

HOLYOKE

G & M Enterprises
740 High St., Suite 2
Mark Feinbein

Holyoke Kenpo and Fitness
208 Race St.
Lizabeth Rodriguez

Journeys #1470
50 Holyoke St., F-389
Robert Dennis, et al

Rosa de Saron Creation
223 Maple St.
Myriam Diaz, Jorge Diaz

West on Jade Photography
79 George St.
Juliet Cannici

LUDLOW

A E D Moving and Enterprises
41 Bruni Ave.
Angelo DiRosa, Ewa DiRosa

A. Martins & Sons Construction Inc.
679 Moore St.
Antonio Martins

John’s Corner
204 Sewall St.
Tony Esoo

Meadowbrook Shopping Center
7-265 Fuller St.
Elizabeth Salvador

Mill’s Tavern & Grille
14 Worcester St.
Paulo Marques

Renaissance Advisory Services, LLC
733 Chapin St., Suite 202
Werner Maiwald

Sosa Barber Shop
85 East St.
Antonio Sosa

T Fiorentino Roofing
201 Cady St.
Thomas Fiorentino

NORTHAMPTON

Andy’s Spaceworks
142 Riverside Dr.
Ann Dollard

Electric Eye Records
52 Main St.
Andrew Crespo

Grace Notes Doula Services
21 Maple Ave.
Emma Roderick

HealthLens Inc.
378 Pleasant St.
Joyce Miga

Krantz Wellness
92 Main St.
Stefanie Krantz

Laladales
33 Aldrich St.
Margaret Robbins, Thomas Riddell

The Living Art Studio
219 Main St.
Scot Padgett

Northampton School of Dance
141 Damon Road
Jennifer Peterson

PALMER

Palmer Agway
1515 Park St.
Stacey Kelly, Brian Kelly

Trio Salon at Images
1207 South Main St.
Karen Kozlik

SOUTHWICK

Backcountry Tackle
13 Ed Holcomb Road
Nathan Dudek

Housefly Aerials
11 Ham Hill Road
Todd Servis

SPRINGFIELD

Ackilli’s Dance Studio
481 Carew St.
Linda Ackilli

Art for the Soul Gallery
235 State St.
Rosemary Woods

Belmont Human Resources
465 Belmont Ave.
Subash Majhi

Charles Buy N Sell
29 Verge St.
Carlos Pena

Clip & Go Barber Shop
2625 P Main St.
Ronald Lopez

Dupre Finish Carpentry
13 Delano Dr.
Louis Dupre

Everything Window Tint
100 Lucerne Road
Victor Delgado

Garcia Deli Mini Market
142 Dickinson St.
Darlin Dionicio

Hamid Hallums
233 Center St.
Hamid Hallums

Ike’s Maple Street Deli
155 Maple St.
Isaac Alvarez

Infinite Interpretations
117 Bremen St.
Melanie Daly

London Monet Salon & Spa
475 Sumner Ave.
LaTonya Renee

Ludenberg Store Inc.
349 Allen St.
Sawkat Wally

Maple Mart
155 Maple St.
Shamin Qureshe

Milan Menswear
1655 Boston Road
Ahmed Mostafa

Noor Mini Mart
431 White St.
Yaser Abughiad

People’s Dental, P.C.
239 Bridge St.
Craig Saltzman

Real McKoy Trucking LLC
155 Laconia St.
Mark McKoy

Rich Herbert Law
413 Main St.
Rich Herbert

Sherwin-Williams Co.
670 Boston Road
Paul Koch

T W Construction
986 Berkshire Ave.
Timothy Walsh

Thanh Thuy Fashion & Video
407 Dickinson St.
Yen Nguyen

U.N.I.T.Y.
685 State St.
Vyeluv Nembhard

Zyana’s Market
11 Dorset St.
Jorge Perez

WARE

Healthy Paws Lifestyle
40 East Main St.
Robin Bujnis

M & R Concentrates
54 Greenwich Plains Road
Lori Sinclair, Megan Sinclair, Ryan Sinclair

WESTFIELD

Bill’s Repair Service Inc.
530 Pochassic Road
Bill’s Repair Service Inc.

Center City Arts Space
62 School St. East
Jonathan Adams

Easter Touch Bodywork
79 Main St.
Douglas Cotton

Edward Jones
20 Elm St., Suite A
Edward Jones

Kirby Productions
77 Mill St., Suite 112
Alexander Liptak

Safety Restore Inc.
45 Meadow St.
Artem Martynyuk

Yola’s Caring Touch Massage
10 C Union Ave.
Jolanta Abramczyk

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Alterations Unlimited
197 Union St.
Trindade Agostinho

Carol at Debron’s Salon
242 Westfield St.
Carol McGurn

Elm’s Cleaners & Expert Alterations
245 Elm St.
Urzula Matysiak

Kaboom Booth
130 Elm St.
Josue Jimenez

On the Border
33 Border Way
OTB Acquisition LLC

Paper Delivery Services
41 Irving St.
Yelisei Rakhubenko

Quality Renovations
74 Elm St.
Leah McCarthy

Restless Auto Repair
11 Lowell St.
Emmanuel Soto

WILBRAHAM

Club Z! In-Home Tutoring Services
5 Lodge Lane
Zbigniew Kielczewski

CSR Lab
4 Briar Cliff Dr.
Phillip Clawson

Daisy Door LLC
2040 Boston Road
Samantha Macero, Daniel Macero

East Coast Design Services, LLC
8 Bruuer Ave.
Matthew Blanchard

KDT Associates
9 Nokomis Road
Kevin Magilc

Papa Gino’s Inc.
1876 Boston Road
Linda Bythrow

Reliable Insurance Agency
2133 Boston Road, Unit 7
Cynthia Lajzer

Departments Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AMHERST

Hands for Life Amherst Corp., 462 Main St., Amherst, MA 01002. Breanna Werme, 1703 Northampton St., Holyoke, MA 01040. Nonprofit organization whose purpose is to provide natural health care through chiropractic along with educational programs designed around wellness and prevention for less-fortunate people.

CHICOPEE

First Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Cavalry Inc., 10 Harvey St., Chicopee, MA 01020. Nicolette R. Meola, 64 Myrtle St., Weymouth, MA 02189. Nonprofit organization designed to promote a general interest in the history of the Civil War.

EAST LONGMEADOW

Healthy Choice Vending Inc., 62 Pembroke Terrace, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Tracy L. Martin, same. Own and operate healthy choice vending machines.

INDIAN ORCHARD

DNA Corp., 1295 Worcester St., Indian Orchard, MA 01151. Orlando Ovalles, 67 Brown Ave., Holyoke, MA 01040. Real estate.

LONGMEADOW

Hampshire County Light Sport Flying Club Inc., 95 Glenbrook Lane, Longmeadow, MA 01106. William I. Morey Jr., same. Nonprofit organization whose purpose is to own, lease and maintain one or more aircrafts for educational, transportation and general use of its members or their families to carry on all businesses and activities.

LUDLOW

Fastlane Transport Inc., 99 Southwood Dr., Ludlow, MA 01056. Lyubov Titar, same. Transportation company.

PITTSFIELD

Fahey Home Improvement Inc., 82 Wendall Ave., Suite 100, Pittsfield, MA 01201. Theresa Fahey, 36 Pinecone St., Middle Island, NY 11953. Chimney cleaning and repairs.

SPRINGFIELD

Enuff Inc., 97 Hadley St., Springfield, MA 01118. Veronica McNair, same. Nonprofit organization whose purpose is to advance the public interest by providing social services and access to resources for underprivileged, at-risk members of the community, including those involved in the criminal justice system and recovering addicts.

WARE

Charles River Farmers’ Market Association Inc., 3684 Greenwich Road, Ware, MA 01082. Marie Louise Hills, 15 Worcester Road, Hollis, NH 03049. Nonprofit organization whose purpose is to operate and promote a farmer’s market in the city of Cambridge.

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Cretecrew Concrete Service Inc., 20 Warren St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Yevgeniy Y. Rudenko, same. Concrete contractor.

Del Composites Inc., 410 Elm St., West Springfield, MA 01089. Victor Archakov, same. Manufacturing of composite aircraft parts.

Briefcase Departments

Massachusetts Tops U.S. News Ranking of States

BOSTON — The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has been named the best overall state in U.S. News & World Report’s inaugural report. This best-state ranking evaluates all 50 states in various categories, with Massachusetts ranked the top overall state, first in healthcare, second in education, and among the top 10 for economy and crime and corrections. Massachusetts was recognized for having the most accessible healthcare and is ranked third for pre-K through grade-12 education. “Massachusetts is a great place to live, work, and raise a family because of the strength and character of all those who call the Commonwealth home,” said Gov. Charlie Baker. “Everyone should be proud that Massachusetts continues to lead the nation in healthcare access and public education for all citizens, and our administration will continue to build on these accomplishments to bring more economic success to every corner of Massachusetts.” Massachusetts ranked well above the national average as number one in enrollment for Medicare Advantage plans, higher-education educational attainment, and college readiness, and number two in patents granted and populations with fast download speed.

Connecticut River Watershed Council Applauds Clean-water Legislation

BOSTON — Gov. Charlie Baker recently introduced legislation that — if signed into law along with his budget proposal to begin increasing staffing at the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) — will start a several-year process of rebuilding and significantly changing the state’s clean-water program. The immediate focus of the announced legislation is to begin the process of delegating Clean Water Act permitting, enforcement, and compliance authority to the state. Massachusetts is currently one of three states in the country that does not have this authority. “The Connecticut River Watershed Council supports creating a top-notch water-quality program that administers the federal Clean Water Act at the Mass. DEP. The governor’s budget proposal combined with this legislation is a first step to begin creating such a program,” said CRWC Executive Director Andrew Fisk. “We stand ready to work with the administration and the Legislature to enact additional legislation that will create a program based on strong and achievable standards, timely and fair permitting, robust enforcement, and widely available technical assistance.” The Connecticut River Watershed Council works to protect the watershed from source to sea by collaborating, educating, organizing, restoring, and intervening to preserve its health for generations to come.

Survey: Most Businesses That Chose Massachusetts Would Do So Again

WATERTOWN — A large majority of companies that chose Massachusetts as a place to expand their business would do it again, primarily based on its innovative economy, industry clusters, and skilled workforce, according to “Choosing Massachusetts for Business: Key Factors in Location Decision Making,” an 18-month study commissioned by MassEcon, a non-partisan economic-development organization, and conducted by the UMass Donahue Institute’s Economic and Public Policy Research group. A statewide survey of businesses that had expanded within Massachusetts found that more than three out of four (77%) would choose to locate or expand here again, if faced with the same decision, and 64% rated the state as a “good” or “very good” place to do business. Nearly all of the surveyed companies (96%) cited the state’s high-quality workforce as a key factor in choosing Massachusetts. According to survey respondents, the top three strengths of doing business in Massachusetts were workforce, superior industry clusters, and the community environment. “This report is a valuable tool for us to use to measure our successes in creating a business environment that supports employer growth and uncover opportunities to strengthen collaboration across the state to help our cities and towns increase jobs and investment,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash. “I look forward to the solutions that we can implement with our partners across business, nonprofit and government sectors to improve the business environment for the benefit of all Massachusetts residents.” The comprehensive study was drawn from a multi-faceted survey and in-depth interviews of nearly 90 companies that had expanded or relocated within Massachusetts over the past 10 years. “We are heartened by the validation of Massachusetts as an outstanding location for business expansion,” said Susan Houston, executive director of MassEcon, “but equally important, this study tells us that we can’t be complacent. For Massachusetts to maintain — and grow — its leadership position, we must continue to nurture our key assets and address the challenges that could undermine our economic competitiveness.”

Pioneer Valley Home Sales Down Slightly in January

SPRINGFIELD — The Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley reported that single-family home sales in January were down 0.6% in the region compared to the same time last year. The median price was up 5.9% to $195,000. In Franklin County, sales were up 2.9%, while the median price rose 8.2%. In Hampden County, sales were down 11.4%, while the median price was up 0.6%. And in Hampshire County, home sales rose by 41.3%, while the median price fell by 1.9%.

Commonwealth Adds 13,000 Jobs in January

BOSTON — The state’s total unemployment rate increased to 3.2% in January from the revised December rate of 3.1%, the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development announced Thursday. The preliminary job estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicate Massachusetts added 13,000 jobs in January. Over-the-month job gains occurred in trade, transportation, and utilities; financial activities; construction; leisure and hospitality; education and health services; information; and government. From January 2016 to January 2017, BLS estimates Massachusetts has added 65,100 jobs. The January state unemployment rate remains lower than the national rate of 4.8% reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Massachusetts continues to experience low levels of unemployment with the largest year-over-year percentage gains in jobs in the construction, education, and health services sectors. We remain focused on fostering an employment environment where businesses can grow and create jobs while having access to workers with the skills and training needed to fill them,” Labor and Workforce Development Secretary Ronald Walker II said. The labor force increased by 1,600 from 3,561,700 in December, as 9,800 more residents were employed and 8,200 fewer residents were unemployed over the month. Over the year, the state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped 1.1% from 4.3% in January 2016. There were 40,400 fewer unemployed people over the year compared to January 2016. The state’s labor-force participation rate — the total number of residents 16 or older who worked or were unemployed and actively sought work in the last four weeks — increased to 64.9% over the month. The labor-force participation rate over the year has decreased 0.1% compared to January 2016. The largest private-sector percentage job gains over the year were in construction; education and health services; financial activities; professional, scientific, and business services; and leisure and hospitality.

State Expands Residential Substance-use Treatment Programs for Women

BOSTON — The Baker-Polito administration recently announced it is awarding contracts to programs in Pittsfield, Lowell, and Salisbury to support and expand residential substance-use-disorder treatment for women in Massachusetts. The contracts will fund 60 long-term, residential treatment slots that, when operational, will provide services to approximately 240 women each year. “The opioid and heroin epidemic has tragically impacted too many people and communities in our Commonwealth, and we are committed to helping those struggling with addiction,” said Gov. Charlie Baker. “Support for these residential treatment slots underscores not only our comprehensive approach to addressing the opioid epidemic, but also adds to the investment we’ve already made to strengthen our treatment and recovery infrastructure.” Since coming into office in 2015, the Baker-Polito administration has increased spending on addiction services by 50%, from $120 million to $180 million, and has added more than 500 substance-use treatment beds to the system. “As the Commonwealth continues to fight the opioid and heroin epidemic from all angles, our administration is pleased to announce these contracts for communities in need,” said Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito. “We will keep investing in this public-health crisis and partnering with communities in every corner of the state to offer resources and treatment for those struggling with this horrific epidemic.” The $1.75 million in annual funding awarded to the three programs was based on a competitive procurement and will support expansion of one existing and two new programs. The funded programs are:

• The Brien Center/Seymour House, Pittsfield: funding to create a new, 17-bed program serving the needs of pregnant or post-partum women.

• Megan’s House, Lowell: funding to support 28 beds in its existing program serving the needs of young women, ages 18-25. This new funding will ensure greater access to treatment for women without health insurance.

• John Ashford Link House/Seacoast Recovery Home for Women, Salisbury: funding to create a new 15-bed program with a focus on serving the needs of women on the North Shore, some of whom are criminal-justice-involved.

Residential treatment programs provide a highly structured and supportive environment to assist each resident’s recovery from substance-use disorders. Programs include individual and group counseling, comprehensive case management, and assistance with skills necessary to maintain a drug- or alcohol-free lifestyle. Work on each of the funded programs will begin immediately and are expected to be fully operational by the end of June.

Company Notebook Departments

Hogan Technology Invited to Technology Assurance Group Convention

EASTHAMPTON — Hogan Technology announced that Sean Hogan, the company’s president, has been invited to attend the 17th annual Technology Assurance Group Convention, an organization of dominant unified-communications companies in North America representing $350 million in products and services. The event, to be held in Houston on April 2-5, brings together the most successful leaders in the unified-communications sector in order to elevate the industry as a whole, through the sharing of best business practices, CEO-to-CEO collaboration, and exchange of viewpoints as the future of technology. The theme of this year’s convention is “teamwork drives success.” It will focus on the power of teamwork, and is fittingly situated at the nation’s epicenter for space exploration. “We’re proud to have Sean Hogan attend our event,” stated Brian Suerth, president of Techology Assurance Group (TAG). “Sean brings a tremendous amount of insight, and we’re thrilled to have him share his views with our membership. His contributions throughout the year to his fellow members have raised the bar for every company in the technology space. In sum, we’re honored to have Sean in attendance.” One of the keynote speakers at the TAG Convention is Col. Richard “Mike” Mullane, a former pilot and astronaut who developed his expertise in leadership and teamwork through an array of combat reconaissance missions in Vietnam and space-shuttle missions for the U.S. Mullane will share his insights and collaborate with TAG members in order to help advance their leadership and teamwork abilities. Also in attendance will be some of North America’s elite technology manufacturers. These providers will deliver futuristic technology to TAG members in order to accelerate the technological proficiency of small to mid-sized businesses. With their new software, cloud computing, and auxilary equipment, businesses will be better-positioned for strong growth in 2017. “I look forward to attending this year’s event and coming back with new ideas to improve our customer experience,” Hogan said. “The better we understand teamwork, leadership, and technological expertise, the more profitable our customers will become. We consider this event a privilege to attend, especially because of the high-caliber peers, and it also serves as a very effective way to keep our customers miles ahead of their competitors, sustaining their competitive edge through our delivery of futuristic technology.”

Health Program at STCC Wins Accreditation

SPRINGFIELD — The Health Information Technology program at Springfield Technical Community College was awarded accreditation, a big step forward for an area of study that can help hospital workers like Pamela Rau advance in their careers. Rau, 53, of Southampton, worked at Shriners Hospitals for Children in Springfield for more than 20 years when she decided to seek an associate degree in health information technology from STCC. She needed the diploma to continue working as a supervisor in health-information management. Rau was part of the first graduating class in June. “It was interesting because what I learned on the job coincided with what I learned in school,” she said. “And the things I learned in school helped me grow in this position in my job.” Her next step is to take a certification exam to become a registered health-information technician. She also hopes to earn a bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration. But her academic journey started with STCC’s Health Informatics and Information Management (HIIM) program, which awards degrees in health-information technology. On Dec. 20, the two-year-old program received accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). Accreditation, a tool for assuring academic quality, shows that the program meets a certain minimum standard. A graduate of the accredited HIIM program at STCC becomes eligible to take professional certification exams. Tracey McKethan, department chair and professor of Health Information Technology, said the program went through a rigorous process involving an on-site review by accreditors and met 33 standards. “There are no other programs like this in Western or Central Mass. or in Northern Conn.,” McKethan said, noting that STCC’s program has a 100% graduation rate. The HIIM program prepares students, who are awarded degrees in health-information technology, for certification and practice as registered health-information technicians. The program has transfer agreements with four-year institutions, which means students can apply their credits from STCC to pursue bachelor’s degrees. Master’s programs also are available. The technicians typically work at hospitals, nursing homes, long-term-care facilities, mental-health centers, or large medical practices. As the custodians of patient medical records, the technicians must be able to translate complex data into understandable, simplified information for the general public. For more information, call the admissions office at (413) 755-3333 or visit www.stcc.edu/apply. Fall applications are due by April 30.

Rick’s Place Wins Grant from New York Life Foundation

WILBRAHAM — Rick’s Place recently received a $10,000 Grief Reach grant from the New York Life Foundation, which will enable the organization to make significant improvements to its technological capacities, including major website enhancements. The New York Life Foundation created the Grief Reach program to help providers overcome barriers to bringing grief-support services to youth not served by existing bereavement programs. One hundred and ninety-five Grief Reach grants totaling nearly $6 million have been awarded since the program’s inception in 2011. The New York Life Foundation has been one of the leading funders in the childhood-bereavement field, investing more than $30 million to date in support of grieving children and their families.

Departments People on the Move

Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C. (MBK) announced the following:

• Kara Graves, CPA has been promoted from audit and accounting senior associate to Manager. Graves, who has been with MBK since 2011, has spent the past six years developing a diversified technical skill set with a focus in the company’s commercial audit niche. She has also had the opportunity to develop a leadership skill set, serving as the in-charge accountant on a variety of large-scale projects. During that time, she has demonstrated her ability to lead teams through challenging projects, all while delivering a quality client service experience. Before coming to MBK, Graves worked as an associate at a regional public accounting firm in Westwood. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Roger Williams University and a master’s degree from Western New England University;

• Joe Vreedenburgh has been promoted from from audit and accounting associate to Senior Associate. Vreedenburgh, who was promoted to senior associate in the audit and accounting niche, has been with MBK since 2014. His promotion is the result of his continued commitment to technical development, excellent client service, and team-oriented approach. As a senior associate, he will be leveraging his 10 years of accounting experience to help lead teams in conducting the audit process. He specializes in commercial audits and accounting, employee-benefit plans, not-for-profit entities, and individual and business taxation. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Washington and holds an master’s degree from UMass Amherst. He is a member of the AICPA and MSCPA and treasurer of the Hitchcock Center for the Environment;  and

• The company welcomed Nathan Nicholson to the firm as a Tax Senior Associate. Nicholson comes to MBK from the Ayco Company, L.P., a subsidiary of Goldman Sachs in Latham, N.Y., where he worked as a tax associate, handling individual, trust, and gift-tax returns for high-net-worth individuals. He has a range of experience working with governmental, nonprofit, and for-profit entities, including banking, manufacturing, healthcare, real estate, and small family-owned businesses. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Siena College. He has mentored high-school business classes on the basics of tax preparation and financial planning.

“Kara and Joe have worked hard to develop themselves technically and as leaders within our organization,” said partner Howard Cheney, CPA. “Our succession plan demands that our next generation be not only technically competent, but ready to deliver premier service and value our clients have come to expect. We are confident in Kara and Joe’s ability to provide that exceptional experience, and Nathan’s addition to our team only serves to strengthen our next generation.”

•••••

Bert Gardner

Bert Gardner

Caolo & Bieniek Associates Inc., a full-service architecture, planning, and interior-design firm located in Chicopee, announced that Bert Gardner has become a principal. A graduate of Roger Williams University, Gardner is a registered architect in Massachusetts and New Jersey. Since joining Caolo & Bieniek Associates in 1999, Gardner has served in key roles on numerous project teams with increasing levels of responsibility. Most recently, he has been the project architect for projects at Westfield State University, UMass, and the Dupont Middle School in Chicopee (former Chicopee High School), and is currently overseeing the Maple Street Elementary School project in Easthampton. He has been an active board member for the Chicopee Boys & Girls Club, serving as president in 2013 and 2014. Caolo & Bieniek Associates has been providing architectural services since 1955. Its design process integrates a creative approach to problem solving with a sustained commitment to client needs. The firm’s scope of services includes renovations, adaptive reuse, new construction, facilities assessment, feasibility studies, master planning, interior design, historic preservation, and sustainable and ‘green’ design expertise.

•••••

Elizabeth Daley

Elizabeth Daley

Elizabeth Daley, a 20-year veteran in the public and private accounting sector and a 10-year employee of Webber and Grinnell Insurance, has been named Finance Manager at the agency. Daley is also concurrently pursuing her SHRM-CP certification in human resources from Westfield State University School of Graduate Studies. She will oversee accounting, finance, and human resources. “Elizabeth has been a great asset to our organization for many years, and it’s nice to fill this position from within the agency,” said company President Bill Grinnell. “The fact that Elizabeth has chosen to earn her Society for Human Resource Management certification is a professional distinction that sets her apart and further elevates both her own and the agency’s credentials.”

•••••

Blair Robidoux

Blair Robidoux

Elise Kowal

Elise Kowal

Melissa Mann

Melissa Mann

Country Bank announced that Blair Robidoux has been appointed Branch Manager of the West Street Office. It also welcomed two new branch managers to its Retail Banking division — Elise Kowal and Melissa Mann. Robidoux has been with the bank for 12 years and began her career as a teller before working her way up to branch manager. Robidoux’s strong operational and management skills, along with her desire to help people, provides leadership at one of the bank’s busiest offices. Kowal is located at the West Brookfield office and has been in banking for more than eight years. She began her career at Country Bank as a teller and worked her way to a teller supervisor position before moving to the bank’s Corporate Risk Department. She will graduate this summer from Western New England University, where she is studying for her bachelor’s degree in business administration. “I love working with people, educating others, and providing encouragement and guidance in reaching their professional and financial goals,” she said. Mann will work in the Belchertown office. She has been in the banking industry for 14 years in various positions in Western Mass. and Central Conn., most recently at PeoplesBank in Sixteen Acres. She is a graduate of Belchertown High School. Relocations, family needs, and professional development have brought her back to Belchertown. “As a branch manager, I’m most proud of the personal connections that my team builds with our customers,” she said. “We want our customers to know just how much we appreciate them.”

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Robert Cummings

Robert Cummings

Robert Cummings, CEO and founder of American Benefits Group (ABG), has been nominated for the 2017 EBN Innovator Award by Employee Benefit News, a leading national benefits-industry publication serving 106,800 senior-level benefits decision makers across all platforms. This audience includes human-resources executives and benefits directors, whose sphere of responsibility and influence spans health and retirement plans, voluntary benefits, legal and regulatory compliance, employee training and development, benefits procurement, technology, strategic direction, and finance. Cummings founded ABG in 1987 and was an early adopter and innovator of flexible spending accounts in the late 1980s. The company added COBRA administration services and commuter benefit accounts in the 1990s, and health savings accounts and health reimbursement arrangements when they came into being in the early 2000s. For decades, ABG focused exclusively on working with Western Mass. employers, providing full benefits strategy, funding, communications, and administrative solutions. The company began to focus on a national expansion of its specialty employee-benefits administrative services beginning in 2007. Today, ABG serves a diverse base of more than 1000 employer clients nationwide from its home offices near downtown Northampton. ABG’s employer clients range from small and mid-size businesses to high-profile Fortune 1000 employers and global organizations, covering all of the continental U.S. Recognition on the national stage is not new for ABG. In 2014, the Institute for Health Care Consumerism presented the company with a Superstar Innovator Award, and in 2015 ABG was recognized by its platform provider, consumer account technology giant Alegeus Technologies, as its national Customer Service Champion. ABG also serves as the preferred platform partner for consumer-account-based plans and COBRA administration services for NFP, one of the largest global insurance and corporate benefits brokers and consultants. Cummings has been on the leading edge of technology innovation since before the Internet, as ABG was one of the first benefits administrators in the nation to adopt debit-card payment technologies. The ABG debit card allows consumers to pay expenses from their consumer pre-tax accounts directly at the point of service, and auto-substantiates the majority of their transactions. ABG was one of the first adopters of web-based participant portals and mobile applications that offer instant account access and management anytime, anywhere. In 2010, ABG was again at the forefront of the market with its introduction of a live participant-feedback review portal, where participants could rate their experience and post live reviews that are shared online. Basically a private Yelp review and rating portal for its own clients, the company has leveraged this to garner thousands of five-star feedback reviews. Working with the top global benefits consulting and brokerage organizations like Mercer, Lockton, HUB, Gallagher, and NFP, as well as leading independent benefits consulting and brokerage firms from across the country, ABG has been able to achieve consistent growth. In 2016, the company grew revenue by a record 35%, and it has achieved compound annual growth since 2010 of more than 20% per year.

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Springfield College Assistant Professor of Physical Education Tan Leng Goh recently received the 2017 Hally Beth Poindexter Young Scholar Award presented by the National Assoc. for Kinesiology in Higher Education (NAKHE). The award was presented at the annual NAKHE Conference in Orlando, Fla. “Tan Leng Goh’s recent award from NAKHE is a true testament to her commitment to her scholarly work,” said Springfield College School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Dean Tracey Matthews. “I look forward to her continued scholarly successes at Springfield College.” During the 2017 NAKHE’s annual conference, Goh presented her paper titled, “Children’s Physical Activity and On-task Behavior Following Active Academic Lessons.” Goh’s presentation focused on the amount of hours a day children remain sitting when receiving academic instruction. Goh’s presentation hypothesizes that sitting for an extended amount of time is detrimental to children’s physical health, and may cause off-task behavior in the classroom. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of active academic lessons on children’s physical activity and on-task behavior. The NAKHE organization provides a forum for interdisciplinary ideas, concepts, and issues related to the role of kinesiology subdisciplines in higher education with respect for social, cultural, and personal perspectives. Kinesiology is an academic discipline that involves the study of physical activity and its impact on health, society, and quality of life. It includes, but is not limited to, such areas of study as exercise science, sports management, athletic training and sports medicine, socio-cultural analyses of sports, sport and exercise psychology, fitness leadership, physical-education teacher education, and pre-professional training for physical therapy, occupational therapy, medicine, and other health-related fields.

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Berkshire Bank Foundation Inc., the philanthropic arm of Berkshire Bank, announced the appointment of Thomas Barney to its board of trustees. Barney, a certified financial planner, is a senior vice president and wealth advisor with Berkshire Bank Wealth Management in Lenox. Barney has spent more than 19 years with Berkshire Bank, rejoining the wealth group out of retirement to work on all aspects of client relationships, including financial planning and strategy implementation. He previously served as an officer of the foundation. “While Berkshire Bank has grown as a successful company, serving the community has always been at the forefront,” he said. “The Berkshire Bank Foundation was established to demonstrate the bank’s dedication to its communities and neighbors. I am honored to join their board and support the foundation’s work.” The mission of the Foundation is to strengthen and improve quality of life in communities where Berkshire Bank or its affiliates have offices. The foundation supports programs that enhance opportunities for children and adults, specifically in the areas of community and economic development, education, and meeting the needs of low- and moderate-income individuals. The foundation also administers the bank’s comprehensive volunteer program, called the X-Team, in addition to a scholarship program for high-school seniors. Barney has more than 40 years of experience working on investments, trusts, and planning, including tenures at Michigan Avenue Financial Group of Chicago, Bank of Boston’s Private Bank, Fleet Investment Services, and the First National Bank of Geneva. He is a member of the Estate Planning Council of Hampden County, recently serving as its treasurer, vice president, and president. He is a graduate of Monmouth College, Loyola University of Chicago, the National Trust School, and the Trust Management School at Northwestern University. “We are so pleased to welcome Tom to the foundation’s board as he shares our vision to support the many community needs throughout our growing footprint,” said Lori Gazzillo, director of Berkshire Bank Foundation. “Tom’s close community ties and breadth and depth of knowledge will serve as a valuable asset to our talented board.”

Chamber Corners Departments

GREATER CHICOPEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.chicopeechamber.org

(413) 594-2101

• April 7: Seminar, “Microsoft Word: “Tips, Tricks & Shortcuts,” 8:30-10:30 a.m., at Hampton Inn Chicopee, 600 Memorial Dr., Chicopee. Presented by Pioneer Training. Cost: $40 for members, $50 for non-members

• April 12: Table Top Expo & Business Networking Event, 4:30-7 p.m., at the David M. Bartley Center for Athletics & Recreation, Holyoke Community College, 303 Homestead Ave., Holyoke. Presented by the Greater Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, Greater Easthampton, and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce. Parking available on site. Admission: $10 pre-registered; $15 at the door.

• April 19: Salute Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., at the Willits-Hallowell Center, Mount Holyoke College, 50 College Street, South Hadley. Cost: $23 for members, $28 for non-members. Sign up online at www.chicopeechamber.org.

GREATER NORTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.explorenorthampton.com

(413) 584-1900

• April 5: April Arrive @ 5, 5-7 p.m., at Degrees of Comfort & VNA, 168 Industrial Dr. # 2, Northampton. Sponsors: BusinessWest, Center for EcoTechnology, and Northeast Solar. Networking event. Cost: $10 for members.

• April 12: Table Top Expo & Business Networking Event, 4:30-7 p.m., at the David M. Bartley Center for Athletics & Recreation, Holyoke Community College, 303 Homestead Ave., Holyoke. Presented by the Greater Chicopee, Greater Holyoke, Greater Easthampton, and Greater Northampton chambers of commerce. Parking available on site. Admission: $10 pre-registered; $15 at the door.

• May 5: Spring Swizzle Auction, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Hosted by Eastside Grill, Strong Ave., Northampton. Cost: $75. Purchase tickets at www.chamberspringswizzle.com.

• May 10: May Arrive @ 5, 5-7 p.m., at Goggins Real Estate, 79 King St., Northampton. Sponsors: Applied Mortgage, Greenfield Community College Foundation, MassDevelopment, and Northeast Solar. Networking event. Cost: $10 for members.

• May 11: “Google Analytics,” 9-11 a.m., at the Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Presented by SCORE of Western Mass. What is Google Analytics? A free, powerful analytics tool that provides reports showing how visitors found your website and what they did when they got there. It measures the effectiveness of your online and offline marketing campaigns. Pre-registration is required; space is limited. Cost: free.

• May 18: “Intro To QuickBooks,” 9-11 a.m., at the Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Presented by Pioneer Training. This is an introduction to the popular accounting program QuickBooks. This session will cover setting up a new company, invoicing and receiving payments, writing checks, and paying bills. The session will end with a brief introduction to and overview of reports.  It is suitable for those who have recently started using QuickBooks and those planning to use it. This session is taught on the PC desktop version, but the basic principles of QuickBooks remain the same for the Windows, Macintosh, and online versions of the program. Be aware that specific details of how to accomplish a task or available features may differ on the different versions, and these differences will not be covered. It is not required, but if you have a laptop or tablet and have QuickBooks installed, you may bring it and follow along. Note: this workshop is designed for training on the basics of QuickBooks and is not intended to troubleshoot problems individuals may currently be experiencing. Those types of questions are better suited to a one-on-one consulting session. Cost: $25 for members, $35 for non-members.

• June 7: June Arrive @ 5, 5-7 p.m., at ConVino, 101 Armory St, Northampton. Sponsors: Keiter Builders and MassDevelopment. Networking event. Cost: $10 for members.

• June 23: “Microsoft Excel: Tips, Tricks & Shortcuts,” 9-11 a.m., at the Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Presented by Pioneer Training. This workshop will present our favorite tips, tricks, and shortcuts that we have collected and developed over 15 years of teaching and using Microsoft Excel. Topics will include shortcuts for selecting ranges, using Autofill to create a series of dates or numbers, setting the print area, using page-break preview, adding headers and footers, and using page-layout view. You’ll learn how to group spreadsheets in the same workbook in order to type or format more than one sheet at the same time, as well as how to create 3D formulas that calculate across several spreadsheets in the same workbook. You’ll practice dividing text from one column into two columns, as well as how to concatenate text from two columns into one.  You’ll learn how to use conditional formatting to format cells according to their values, how to protect all or part of a worksheet, and how to paste an Excel spreadsheet into Word as an Excel object that links to the original spreadsheet and updates automatically.  The workshop will also cover a new set of features in Excel 2013 that includes the new Start screen, Backstage View, Flash Fill, the Quick Analysis Tool, and a new set of options related to creating Excel charts.  A set of handy keyboard shortcuts will also be included in the workshop. Participants are encouraged to bring laptops and follow along with the instructor, but this is not required. Pre-registration is required; space is limited. To register, visit [email protected] Cost: $35 for members, $45 for non-members.

GREATER WESTFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.westfieldbiz.org

(413) 568-1618

• March 24: Employment Law Workshop, “Managing Employee Appearance and Religious Accommodations in the Workplace,” 8:30-10 a.m., at the Holiday Inn Express, 39 Southampton Road, Westfield. Join attorney Timothy Netkovick of Royal, P.C. for a roundtable-style seminar to discuss appearance in the workplace and religious accommodations, including an overview of religious discrimination law; dress and appearance standards; body modification (tattoos and piercings); and workplace culture, individual self-expression, and employee retention. Royal, P.C. is a woman-owned firm that exclusively represents and counsels businesses on all aspects of labor and employment law. Netkovick exclusively represents employers in management-side labor and employment-law matters. Cost: free to chamber members, $30 for general admission paid in advance. Online registration will be available at www.westfieldbiz.org. For more information, call Pam at the chamber at (413) 568-1618.

• April 3: April Mayor’s Coffee Hour, 8-9 a.m., at the Forum House, 55 Broad St., Westfield. Join us for our monthly Mayor’s Coffee Hour with Westfield Mayor Brian Sullivan. This event is free and open to the public. Call the chamber office at (413) 568-1618 to register for this event so we may give our host a head count.

• April 6: “Improving Website Visibility with SEO,” 8:30-10 a.m., at the Holiday Inn Express, 39 Southampton Road, Westfield. Join us for a chamber workshop presented by Scott Pierson of the Executive SEO.  This event is free for chamber members and $30 for general admission (cash or credit paid at the door or in advance). Are you looking for a way to optimize your website visibility? Join Pierson and examine current search-engine optimization (SEO) best practices to increase brand awareness, local web visibility, web traffic, organic rankings, and domain authority. Understand how SEO works, why some pages rank highly, and what to do to move the needle. Pierson is a 15-year SEO consultant, speaker, blogger, trainer, and adviser on the subject of search-engine optimization. Register online at www.westfieldbiz.org.  For more information, call Pam at the chamber at (413) 568-1618.

• April 7: 2017 Legislative Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. (please note new date), at Tekoa Country Club, 459 Russell Road, Westfield. Raise your voice and business concerns to your legislators. Come and hear the challenges facing the Commonwealth, our communities, and our businesses. Invited legislators include state Sens. Adam Hinds and Donald Humason Jr. and state Reps. Nicholas Boldyga, Peter Kocot, Stephen Kulik, William Pignatelli, and John Velis. Cost: $30 for members, $40 for non-members (must be paid in advance). Register online at www.westfieldbiz.org. For more information, call Pam at the chamber at (413) 568-1618.

• April 12: April After 5 Connection, 5-7 p.m., at One Arch Road, Westfield. Refreshments will be served, and a 50/50 raffle will benefit our Dollars for Scholars fund. Bring your business cards and make connections. Cost: Free for chamber members, $10 general admission (cash or credit paid at the door). Online registration will be available at www.westfieldbiz.org. For more information, call Pam at the chamber at (413) 568-1618.

• April 21: Employment Law Workshop, “A Transition in the Law: Transgender Discrimination,” 8:30-10 a.m., at the Holiday Inn Express, 39 Southampton Road, Westfield. Discrimination based on transgender status or gender identity is a developing area of the law.  There has been a lot of debate on the local, state, and national levels over access to bathrooms for transgender individuals. As the public debates this issue, legislators, administrative agencies, and courts are shaping the law that prohibits gender discrimination, including discrimination against transgender individuals. Join Attorney Timothy Netkovick of Royal, P.C. for a roundtable-style seminar to discuss how to navigate the legal landscape of an evolving and challenging area of discrimination law. Royal, P.C. is a woman-owned firm that exclusively represents and counsels businesses on all aspects of labor and employment law. Netkovick exclusively represents employers in management-side labor and employment-law matters. Cost: free to chamber members, $30 for general admission (cash or credit paid at the door or in advance). Online registration is available at www.westfieldbiz.org. For more information, call Pam at the chamber at (413) 568-1618.

• April 25: Seventh annual Home & Business Show, 4:30-7 p.m., at Tucker’s Restaurant, 625 College Highway, Southwick. Join us for this annual tabletop event in partnership with the Southwick Economic Development Commission. The event is free to the public. Southwick business owners can have a tabletop for $25 per business — one six-foot table with a tablecloth (you are free to bring your own table covering) and a listing in the show program provided you register by the deadline, April 7. For information and an application, visit southwickma.info or call (413) 304-6100.

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S CHAMBER

www.myonlinechamber.com

(413) 787-1555

• April 11: Professional Women’s Chamber, Ladies Networking Night, 5-7 p.m., at City Stage, One Columbus Center, 150 Bridge St., Springfield.

• April 22: Professional Women’s Chamber, Headline Luncheon Series, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at Storrowton Tavern Carriage House, 1305 Memorial Ave., West Springfield. “Maintaining Sanity: The Journey Toward Work-life Balance” is a panel discussion featuring Patricia Fay, an assistant vice president and actuary of strategic planning and analysis at MassMutual and the insurer’s  2015 Working Mother of the Year.

SPRINGFIELD REGIONAL CHAMBER

www.myonlinechamber.com

(413) 787-1555

• March 29: Pastries, Politics & Policy, 8-9 a.m., at the TD Bank Conference Center, 1441 Main St., Springfield. The speaker is Eileen McAnneny, president of the Mass. Taxpayers Foundation. The topic will be “The Fiscal Health of the Commonwealth.” Cost: $15 for members in advance ($20 at the door), $25 general admission in advance ($30 at the door).

• April 5: [email protected], 7:15-9 a.m., at the Delaney House, 3 Country Club Road, Holyoke. Featuring the Mayor’s Forum with Springfield Mayor Dominic Sarno, Chicopee Mayor Richard Kos, and Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse. Ray Hershel of Western Mass News will moderate.

• April 10: Outlook Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at the MassMutual Center, 1277 Main St., Springfield.

• April 19: After 5, in partnership with the West of the River Chamber of Commerce, 5-7 p.m., at BMW of West Springfield, 1712 Riverdale St., West Springfield.

• April 20: Leadership Institute Graduation, 6-9 p.m., at the Springfield Sheraton, One Monarch Place, Springfield.

• April 26: Beacon Hill Summit, noon to 1 p.m., hosted by the Massachusetts State House, co-hosted by state Sen. James Welch and state Rep. Aaron Vega. Sponsorship opportunities are available. E-mail [email protected] for information.

Reservations for all events may be made online at www.springfieldregionalchamber.com or by e-mailing [email protected]

Agenda Departments

Understanding Gender Identity in the Workplace

March 22: HRMA of Western New England will present a half-day symposium event on understanding gender identity and supporting transgender and gender non-binary individuals in the workplace. This important topic is impacting local employers across the region. This program will help attendees understand the difference between gender identity and sexual orientation, learn ways to foster respectful work environments for all employees, and gain an understanding of the legal protections for the transgender community. Speakers will include Dr. Eunice Aviles, gender specialist and clinical psychologist; Erica Tabias, public speaker, transgender advocate, and life coach; and Jonathan Miller, chief of the Public Protection & Advocacy Bureau for the state Attorney General’s Office. The event runs from noon to 4 p.m., with a buffet lunch included. Tickets are $75. For more information, contact Allison Ebner at (413) 789-6400 or [email protected], or visit www.hrmawne.org.

Mini Medical School

March 23 to May 11: Itching to get out of the house as the winter draws to an end? Consider signing up for a little dose of continuing education as part of Baystate Medical Center’s Mini Medical School, where you can broaden your knowledge of the field of medicine with professors from the teaching hospital. Mini Medical School, which begins its spring session on Thursday, March 23, offers area residents an inside look at the expanding field of medicine, minus the tests, homework, interviews, and admission formalities. The program continues through May 11. Baystate’s Mini Medical School program is an eight-week health-education series featuring a different aspect of medicine each week. Classes this spring will include sessions on various medical topics such as surgery, deep-brain stimulation, emergency medicine, dementia, pathology, and several others. For a full list of topics and instructors, visit www.baystatehealth.org/minimed. While it is not difficult to be accepted into the program, slots are limited, and early registration is recommended. Many of the students, who often range in age from 20 to 70, participate due to a general interest in medicine and later find that many of the things they learned over the semester are relevant to their own lives. The goal of the program, offered in the hospital’s Chestnut Conference Center, is to help members of the public make more informed decisions about their healthcare while receiving insight on what it might be like to be a medical student. Baystate Medical Center is the region’s only teaching hospital, and each course is taught by medical center faculty, who explain the science of medicine without resorting to complex terms. All classes are held Thursday nights starting at 6 p.m. and run until 8 or 9 p.m., depending on the night’s topic. No basic science knowledge is needed to participate. Each participant is required to attend a minimum of six out of eight classes in order to receive a certificate of completion. Tuition costs $95 per person and $80 for Senior Class and Spirit of Women members. To register, call (413) 794-7630 or visit www.baystatehealth.org/minimed.

Cultivate & Nest Open House

March 25: Cultivate & Nest, a collaborative workspace for businesspeople with children, will host Bloom, its annual open house, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in its Hadley office center. Terra Missildine, founder and owner of Cultivate & Nest, said the event will offer talks on the topic of entrepreneurship and parenting. A highlight of the day will be a flower-hat-making craft and a hat parade around the grounds. Face painting, puzzles, and other activities will also be offered. Tours of the workspace will be offered to parents hourly, while children will enjoy story time. In addition, a drawing will be held for a one-month Cultivate & Nest membership, valued at $99. All Pioneer Valley families are invited to take part in the event and bring their children. Registration is not required, and the event is free. Cultivate & Nest is the first membership-based collaborative workspace in the Valley to incorporate a childcare component. Located on the first floor in the Hadley Crossing business park, Cultivate & Nest offers roughly 3,400 square feet of work and community space. Members of Cultivate & Nest pay in cost tiers that range from $100 to $600 per month, depending on amenities and level of office access. Event and workshop space is also available for members and the community at large to host family friendly events. To learn more about Cultivate & Nest, visit cultivateandnest.com or call Missildine at (413) 345-2400.

Mass. Restaurant Day for No Kid Hungry

March 27: Eight Massachusetts Restaurant Assoc. restaurants across the state will participate in Massachusetts Restaurant Day for No Kid Hungry. Inspired by Chef Andy Husbands of Tremont 647, who has hosted a dinner for this cause for the past 20 years, the MRA announced the program’s expansion across Massachusetts. Last year, participating Boston restaurants raised more than $60,000 to end childhood hunger in Massachusetts. This year, Hotel Northampton is hosting the Western Mass. branch of the event, a multi-course meal with wine pairings. The hotel’s culinary team is working alongside and co-sponsoring with four well-known restaurants in town, including Sierra Grille, Spoleto’s, Packard’s, and Union Station. Attendance at this event will not only help to curb childhood hunger in Massachusetts, but will also help local programs that feed children of all ages at school and in the home. The goal is to ensure all children get the healthy food they need, every day. To purchase tickets or provide sponsorship for the event, visit www.eventbrite.com/e/massachusetts-restaurant-day-for-no-kid-hungry-the-hotel-northampton-tickets-31735014282.

Regional Career Fair

March 29: The College Career Centers of Western Massachusetts will hold a career fair from noon to 3 p.m. in the Alumni Healthful Living Center on the campus of Western New England University. Nearly 100 companies will be recruiting college students for paid and unpaid internships, as well as full-time and part-time employment opportunities. This annual event is a unique opportunity for employers and graduate-school representatives to connect with motivated students and alumni who are looking to launch and advance their careers. The College Career Centers of Western Massachusetts is a consortium of career-center professionals representing the eight colleges in Hampden County, including American International College, Bay Path University, Elms College, Holyoke Community College, Springfield College, Springfield Technical Community College, Western New England University, and Westfield State University. These eight institutions of higher education enroll more than 27,000 students from diverse backgrounds, and graduate approximately 5,000 students each year with a wide range of academic degrees.

‘Stay in the Game’

March 29: The community is invited to join staff from the Baystate Wing Hospital Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation team for an education session about staying active and injury-free. The program, “Stay in the Game,” will be held in the Snow Conference Room from 6 to 7 p.m. Participants will learn about the most effective types of stretching, nutrition, and hydration that will help to avoid injury when working out. Physical therapist Dena Plante and physical therapist assistant Karen Kiernan will be on hand to answer questions and offer educational materials. The program is open to student athletes and adults interested in staying active and exercising without injury. The Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation team at Baystate Wing Hospital provides a full range of rehabilitation services to help patients regain function and achieve recovery. For more information or to register, call (413) 370-5254.

Difference Makers

March 30: The ninth annual Difference Makers award program, staged by BusinessWest, will be held at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. The winners, profiled in the Jan. 23 issue and at businesswest.com, are the Community Colleges of Western Mass. (Berkshire Community College, Greenfield Community College, Holyoke Community College, and
Springfield Technical Community College); Friends of the Holyoke Merry-Go-Round; Denis Gagnon Sr., president and CEO of Excel Dryer Inc.; Junior Achievement of Western Mass.; and Joan Kagan, president and CEO of Square One. Tickets to the event, which is nearly sold out, cost $65 per person. To order, call (413) 781-8600, ext. 100. Difference Makers is a program, launched in 2009, that recognizes groups and individuals that are, as the name suggests, making a difference in this region. Sponsors include First American Insurance; Health New England; JGS Lifecare; Meyers Brothers Kalicka, P.C.; Northwestern Mutual; O’Connell Care at Home; Royal, P.C.; and Sunshine Village.

Education Fair & Expo

April 4: Jared James, a national real-estate speaker and trainer, will be the featured speaker at the 24th annual Education Fair & Expo taking place at the MassMutual Center in Springfield. The event is sponsored by the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley. The program features a day of educational presentations including two breakout sessions from James, three continuing-education classes, and two technology classes. A sellout trade show with more than 50 vendors is anticipated. Anyone who is interested in attending as a trade-show vendor should contact Kim Harrison, membership and meetings coordinator at the Realtor Assoc. of Pioneer Valley, at (413) 785-1328 or [email protected]

Art Show Reception

April 5: The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Western Massachusetts (NAMI Western Mass.) will hold an opening reception for its sixth annual art show featuring the work of artists living with mental illness from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Chicopee Public Library, 449 Front St. The reception and parking adjacent to the library are free. The exhibit runs through the end of April. The art show, originated by Karen West, an artist and art teacher at Westfield High School, will feature works for sale to the public, with proceeds going to the artists. Complimentary refreshments will be served and the public is welcome. Headquartered in Agawam, NAMI Western Mass. is an affiliate of the nation’s largest grass-roots mental-health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans who are affected by mental illness.

EANE Management Conference

April 6: The Employers Assoc. of the NorthEast (EANE) announced its 13th annual Management Conference will be held at the Springfield Marriott. With a focus on the power of passion in leadership, the full-day conference will address how managers and supervisors can motivate themselves and their teams to create a culture of high performance. The program will feature keynote speakers Rick Barrera and Bruce Christopher. Barrera, the head of faculty for the Center for Heart Led Leadership, works with Fortune 500 CEOs, world-class mountain climbers, astronauts, professional actors, and SEAL Team Six leaders teaching them how to build high-performance teams. Christopher, a psychologist and humorist, offers cutting-edge content with a mix of comedy, showing audiences how to embrace change and giving them practical skills to apply for success. The cost for the program is $350 per person with discounts for three or more. Register at www.eane.org/management17 or by calling (877) 662-6444. It will offer 6.25 credits from the HR Certification Institute and SHRM. Sponsoring the program are Johnson & Hill Staffing Services and the HR Certification Institute.

‘Mini Golf in the Library’

April 7-8: Friends of the Holyoke Public Library will host its second annual “Mini Golf in the Library” fund-raiser on the weekend of April 7-8. Hole sponsors and event sponsors are now being recruited. At last spring’s event, more than 250 players putted their way through five levels of the Holyoke Public Library building, laughing and enjoying unique obstacles added by enterprising hole sponsors. Funds raised help the Friends of the Library support library programs and resources, especially those for children and youth. Sponsors will be publicized and thanked in local media, social media, and the library’s website in connection with this event. Logos of sponsors will be printed on the scorecard given to each player. Names of sponsors will be displayed in the library, ranked by level of sponsorship. Sponsors will be invited as guests to the Friday-evening cocktail party, with the opportunity to preview (and play through) the course. In addition to event sponsors and hole sponsors, the event planning committee, chaired by Sandy Ward, is seeking donors of in-kind services and items for a silent auction to be held during the Friday cocktail party. Hole sponsorships start at $250. Those who wish to sponsor (and decorate) one of the 18 holes are encouraged to act quickly, as holes are being sold on a first-come, first-served basis. Event sponsorships are available at five levels ranging from $250 to $1,000. An exclusive title sponsorship is possible at $2,500. For more information, visit www.holyokelibrary.org/aboutfriendsgolf.asp or e-mail Sandy Ward at [email protected]

Walk of Champions

May 7: The 12th annual Walk of Champions to benefit the Baystate Regional Cancer Program at Baystate Mary Lane Outpatient Center in Ware will step off at the Quabbin Reservoir. Since 2006, the Walk of Champions, founded by field-hockey coach John O’Neill of Quaboag Regional Middle High School, has served as a tribute to the compassionate care his mother received at the Baystate Regional Cancer Program in Ware during her cancer journey. Over the years, the walk has grown into a collection of teams and individuals, each walking for their own reason. There are friends and family members celebrating victory over cancer. Others are encouraging their loved ones in their personal fight over cancer, while others walk in memory of those who have lost their battle with cancer. The Baystate Regional Cancer Program at Baystate Mary Lane Outpatient Center provides the majority of outpatient cancer services in the Baystate Health Eastern Region, which includes Ware, Palmer, and surrounding communities. Since its inception, the Walk of Champions has raised more than $740,000 to assist, support, and instill hope in those facing cancer. All funds raised remain local to support those cared for in the Baystate Health Eastern Region at the Baystate Regional Cancer Program located at Baystate Mary Lane Outpatient Center in Ware. The route offers a one-mile loop that allows walkers to choose the number of miles they walk among the comfortable walking terrain of the Goodnough Dike. Along the way, walkers will enjoy entertainment and refreshments. Pledge forms, fund-raising resources, giving opportunities, and more are now available at www.baystatehealth.org/woc for businesses, community organizations, and individuals who wish to participate.

Court Dockets Departments

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT

Michael Tuitt v. Pioneer Valley Transit Authority
Allegation: PVTA bus collided with plaintiff causing injury: $6,281.30
Filed: 2/16/17

Philip Rowe v. LeClerc Holdings, LLC and Charles Dauderis
Allegation: Assault and battery causing injury: 5,000+
Filed: 2/15/17

HAMPDEN DISTRICT COURT

Yonad Sierra as parent and next friend of Jeinaly Yanis Sierra v. Family Dollar Stores of Massachusetts Inc.
Allegation: Plaintiff struck in face by falling merchandise causing injury: $2,528.52
Filed: 2/10/17

Shainali Figueroa v. Jill Ann Hockenberry and Metro Jeep
Allegation: As pedestrian, plaintiff struck by motor vehicle owned by Metro Jeep, causing injury: $8,902.27
Filed: 2/13/17

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT

Wendy Lesage v. Town of Palmer
Allegation: Wage and hour claim: $25,000+
Filed: 2/22/17

Mark Lappen v. Northeast Wholesale Lumber Inc. and Michael D. Parker
Allegation: Breach of employment contract: $25,000
Filed: 2/17/17

Laura Russo, individually and as personal representative of the estate of Fernando Russo v. Richard J. Fraziero, DMD, MD
Allegation: Medical malpractice, wrongful death: $50,000
Filed: 2/15/17

Evander Machuca v. 272 Worthington St. Inc. d/b/a Glo Ultra Lounge, Juan Marrero, John Doe, and Jane Doe
Allegation: Negligence in serving alcohol to intoxicated patrons and failing to control them when they became aggressive and violent, causing injury to plaintiff: $26,000
Filed: 2/14/17

Steven Ramsey v. 851 East Columbus Ave., LLC, Allstate Installations LLC, and A.I. Construction and Development, LLC
Allegation: Slip and fall causing injury: $240,000
Filed: 2/16/17

HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT COURT

Gretchen Hendricks v. The Stop & Shop Supermarket Co. LLC and United Natural Foods Inc.
Allegation: Negligence causing injury, plaintiff ate foreign substance in package of pumpkin seeds necessitating dental repair: $18,670
Filed: 2/15/17

Ecograze Services Inc. d/b/a Kegcraft v. High Horse LLC and Jason DiCaprio
Allegation: Monies owed for rental of kegs for bar and brewpub: $8,218.13
Filed: 2/15/17

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT

Elaine Hogan v. D.P.Z. Inc.
Allegation: Negligence resulting in slip and fall causing injury: $122,283.20
Filed: 2/10/17

Eduardo Santos as parent and next friend of Matthew Santos v. Robert A. Spence, MD
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $10,000+
Filed: 2/13/17

Christy Winslow v. Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr. Albert Hung, RN Amanda Ruano, RN Kim Williams
Allegation: Medical malpractice: $35,000
Filed: 2/14/17

HOLYOKE DISTRICT COURT

Marybeth Hodgins v. CVS Caremark Corp.
Allegation: Slip and fall causing injury: $1,018
Filed: 1/26/17

PALMER DISTRICT COURT

East PBE Inc. v. GML Construction Inc. and Victor O’Brien Jr.
Allegation: Monies owed for construction equipment repairs: $7,775.82
Filed: 2/8/17

Departments Picture This

Email ‘Picture This’ photos with a caption and contact information to [email protected]
A photo essay of recent business events in Western Massachusetts March 20, 2017

Good Time, Serious Purpose

Nearly 600 guests turned out at the MassMutual Center on March 11 for the inaugural Caritas Ball, staged by the Sisters of Providence Health System (SPHS) to raise awareness of the addiction crisis facing the region and the nation and to raise money for treatment and prevention programs. Themed “All You Need Is Love” (‘caritas’ means love), the gala featured live and silent auctions, the band Beantown, networking, presentation of the first Caritas Award, and a thought-provoking talk from West Springfield resident Jonah Kirk, who lost his son, Jack, to heroin addiction. Below, top to Bottom: Dr. Robert Roose, vice president of Mercy Behavioral Healthcare, addresses the audience after receiving the Caritas Award for his work on the front lines of the addiction crisis; Kirk addresses the rapt audience with a photo of his son in the background; guests join a singer from Beantown on the dance floor; gala committee chairs John Sjoberg and his wife, Brenda Garton-Sjoberg; and embracing the theme for the night (quite literally) are, from left, guests Lori Miller and Dora Sardinha, Roose, and Allison Gearing-Kalill, vice president of Fund Development for the SPHS, who spearheaded efforts to launch the gala.
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History in the Remaking

U.S. Rep. Richard Neal hosted an elaborate press conference on March 6 to celebrate the soon-to-be-opened Union Station in Springfield. Neal led a host of speakers who detailed the nearly 40-year-long effort to renovate the station as well as the projected key role the facility will play in the revitalization of the city. Other speakers included Mayor Domenic Sarno, Chief Development Officer Kevin Kennedy, Republican Executive Editor Wayne Phaneuf (who is preparing a book on the station), and Edward Pessalano, owner of Design & Advertising Associates, who led the efforts to create murals now on display at the station displaying scenes from the history of the city, Union Station, and regional transportation. One of those murals is pictured bottom.
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unionstationmural

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Survivor Journeys, a community-based cancer-support network based in Western Mass. and Northern Conn., invites the public to attend a breakfast on Saturday, March 25 to learn more about a new, free cancer-survivor mentoring service being offered to support the psychosocial needs of cancer survivors and caregivers in the area.

A cancer-survivor mentor is a cancer survivor or caregiver trained to assist and support others with the initial emotional, psychological, and practical needs that can seem insurmountable after a cancer diagnosis. Through this program, Survivor Journeys will match individuals recently diagnosed with cancer with a mentor who has experienced the same diagnosis and treatment. Similar support is available for caregivers as well, through mentors who have served as caregivers.

The event will be held from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Baystate Medical Center’s Chestnut Conference Center 1A & 1B, located at 759 Chestnut St., Springfield (follow signs to Chestnut Surgery Center). To RSVP, e-mail [email protected] or call (413) 276-6100.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Robinson Donovan, P.C. announced that Partner Carla Newton, in collaboration with Thomas Kenefick III, will co-chair the “Cutting Edge Issues in Western Massachusetts” symposium for family-law professionals as part of the upcoming Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) regional conference. The event, to be held at the Sheraton Springfield on March 22, is expected to gather distinguished family lawyers and judges with substantive knowledge and regional expertise. This will be the third year Newton has co-chaired the event.

“Family law is constantly evolving, and it is imperative to stay abreast of emerging issues,” said Newton. “The symposium will facilitate a thoughtful exchange and will undoubtedly help all of us to better serve the needs of our clients.”

The full-day event will feature discussions on the current state of the probate and family court, including insights on pilot programs; case law and legislative updates; presentations on social-media considerations and alimony obligations; and an information exchange with members of the judiciary.

Newton is a divorce and family-law practitioner, with additional practice areas in corporate and business counseling, commercial real-estate law, and litigation. A member of the American Bar Assoc., Massachusetts Bar Assoc., Hampden County Bar Assoc., International Assoc. of Collaborative Professionals, and the Massachusetts Collaborative Law Council, she has regularly been recognized for outstanding achievements, including selection to the Best Lawyers in America list (2013-present) and the Massachusetts Super Lawyers list (2013-present). Additionally, she was recognized by Best Lawyers as the 2015 family-law Lawyer of the Year in Springfield and among the Top 50 Women Massachusetts Super Lawyers in the same year. She was also a St. Thomas More Society honoree in 2013.

The March 22 event gives qualified attendees the opportunity to earn up to six continuing legal education (CLE) credits. Those interested in in attending are asked to register by calling MCLE Customer Service at (617) 482-2205 or e-mailing [email protected]. More information about the event, including tuition information, is available at mcle.org.

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