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Class of 2018 Difference Makers Event Galleries

A Look at the March 22 Event

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More than 375 people turned out at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House on March 22 to honor BusinessWest’s 2018 Difference Makers. Launched in 2009, the program recognizes groups and individuals across the region that are making a difference in their community. The honorees this year were: Bob Bolduc, CEO of Pride Stores; Bob ‘the Bike Man’ Charland, founder of Pedal Thru Youth; Girls Inc. of Holyoke; Evan Plotkin, president of NAI Plotkin; Crystal Senter-Brown, author and adjunct faculty member at Bay Path University; and the WillPower Foundation.

Our 2018 Difference Makers:
Bob Bolduc, CEO of Pride Stores
Bob “The Bike Man” Charland, Founder of Pedal Thru Youth
Girls Inc. of Holyoke
Evan Plotkin, President of NAI Plotkin
Crystal Senter-Brown, Author & Adjunct Faculty at Bay Path University
WillPower Foundation

     

Photography by Leah Martin Photography

From event sponsor Burkhart Pizzanelli, P.C., from

From event sponsor Burkhart Pizzanelli, P.C., from left: Adam Kuzdzal, Deborah Penzias, Josh Messer, Julie Quink, Tom Pratt, Carol LaCour, Rebecca Connolly, Stephanie Tobin, and Sarah Lapolice.

From event sponsor Health New England

From event sponsor Health New England, from left: Peggy Garand, Vivian Williams, Brendaliz Torres, Sandra Ruiz, Ashley Allen, Matt Sturgis (guest of HNE), and Jessica Dupont.

Gina Kos (left) and Michelle Depelteau from event sponsor Sunshine Village.

Gina Kos (left) and Michelle Depelteau from event sponsor Sunshine Village.

Sr. Kathleen Popko (left) and Sr. Mary Caritas from the Sisters of Providence, a 2013 Difference Maker.

Sr. Kathleen Popko (left) and Sr. Mary Caritas from the Sisters of Providence, a 2013 Difference Maker.

Bob Bolduc, founder of Pride Stores and a 2018 Difference Maker.

Bob Bolduc, founder of Pride Stores and a 2018 Difference Maker.

From 2018 Difference Maker the WillPower Foundation, from left: Sabrina Aasheim, Jeff Palm, and Maria Burke.

From 2018 Difference Maker the WillPower Foundation, from left: Sabrina Aasheim, Jeff Palm, and Maria Burke.

From left: Kate Kane of Northwestern Mutual, a 2009 Difference Maker, with Nick LaPier, CPA and BusinessWest Associate Publisher Kate Campiti.

From left: Kate Kane of Northwestern Mutual, a 2009 Difference Maker, with Nick LaPier, CPA and BusinessWest Associate Publisher Kate Campiti.

Bill Ward, a 2009 Difference Maker, with Joanne Lyons

Bill Ward, a 2009 Difference Maker, with Joanne Lyons of the Regional Employment Board of Hampden County.

Carol Leary, a 2016 Difference Maker, with 2018 Difference Maker Evan Plotkin

Bay Path University President Carol Leary, a 2016 Difference Maker, with 2018 Difference Maker Evan Plotkin, president of NAI Plotkin.

Tricia Canavan of United Personnel with Scott Foster of Bulkley, Richardson and Gelinas and also Valley Venture Mentors, a 2016 Difference Maker.

Tricia Canavan of United Personnel with Scott Foster of Bulkley, Richardson and Gelinas and also Valley Venture Mentors, a 2016 Difference Maker.

Sandra Ruiz, left, and Brendaliz Torres, from event sponsor Health New England.

Sandra Ruiz, left, and Brendaliz Torres, from event sponsor Health New England.

Bob Bolduc, left, with Bob ‘the Bike Man’ Charland, two of 2018’s Difference Makers.

Bob Bolduc, left, with Bob ‘the Bike Man’ Charland, two of 2018’s Difference Makers.

Representing event sponsor Sunshine Village

Representing event sponsor Sunshine Village, front row: Gina Kos (left) and Michelle Depelteau; back row: Peter Benton, Chicopee Mayor Richard Kos, Kelly Chmura, Maria Laflamme, Amie Miarecki, Colleen Brosnan, and Michael Siddal.

Tanzania Cannon-Ecklerle from event sponsor Royal, P.C. with Joe Ecklerle of Pelican Products and Brew Practitioners.

Tanzania Cannon-Ecklerle from event sponsor Royal, P.C. with Joe Ecklerle of Pelican Products and Brew Practitioners.

From 2018 Difference Maker Girls Inc. of Holyoke

From 2018 Difference Maker Girls Inc. of Holyoke, from left: Johana (Stella’s mother), Stella, Haley, Kylie (Haley’s mother), Emhanie, Brandy Wilson, Becky Bouchard, and Suzanne Parker.

Staff from NAI Plotkin turn out to celebrate 2018 Difference Maker Evan Plotkin.

Staff from NAI Plotkin turn out to celebrate 2018 Difference Maker Evan Plotkin.

Patrick O’Neil and Katie O’Neil from 2018 Difference Maker the WillPower Foundation.

Patrick O’Neil and Katie O’Neil from 2018 Difference Maker the WillPower Foundation.

Chicopee Mayor Richard Kos.

Chicopee Mayor Richard Kos.

Crystal Senter-Brown, left, and Suzanne Parker

Crystal Senter-Brown, left, and Suzanne Parker of Girls Inc. in Holyoke, both 2018 Difference Makers.

Bob Perry, retired CPA, a 2011 Difference Maker.

Bob Perry, retired CPA, a 2011 Difference Maker.

Kim Lee of the Center for Human Development.

Kim Lee of the Center for Human Development.

Evan Plotkin, president of NAI Plotkin, accepts his award as a 2018 Difference Maker.

Evan Plotkin, president of NAI Plotkin, accepts his award as a 2018 Difference Maker.

Will Burke, the namesake and inspiration for the WillPower Foundation, a 2018 Difference Maker.

Will Burke, the namesake and inspiration for the WillPower Foundation, a 2018 Difference Maker.

Stella and Emhanie, two of the girls from Girls Inc. of Holyoke, a 2018 Difference Maker.

Stella and Emhanie, two of the girls from Girls Inc. of Holyoke, a 2018 Difference Maker.

Bob Charland celebrates his 2018 Difference Maker award with fiancée Joanne Hansmann.

Bob Charland celebrates his 2018 Difference Maker award with fiancée Joanne Hansmann.

George O’Brien hands the 2018 Difference Maker award to Crystal Senter-Brown

BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien hands the 2018 Difference Maker award to Crystal Senter-Brown.

The WillPower Foundation

The WillPower Foundation’s Jeff Palm, Maria Burke, Sarah Aasheim, Will Burke, and Craig Burke accept their 2018 Difference Maker award from BusinessWest Editor George O’Brien (right).

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Chamber Corners Departments

1BERKSHIRE
www.1berkshire.com
(413) 499-1600

• March 21: Chamber Nite, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Lee Bank, 75 North St., Pittsfield. Bring your business card to enter to win our door prize. Register online at www.1berkshire.com.
• March 28: Career Fair, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., hosted by Berkshire Community College, Paterson Field House, 1350 West St., Pittsfield. Get in front of Berkshire-based businesses at this annual event. Connect with employers looking to hire. You may also choose to exhibit, and recruit new employees, grow your business, and get in front of hundreds of job seekers. The event is free and open to the public. If you are interested in exhibiting or attending, visit www.1berkshire.com.

AMHERST AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.amherstarea.com
(413) 253-0700

• March 15: Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce and Young Professionals of Amherst After 5 Networking, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Country Nissan, 40 Russell St., Hadley.

GREATER CHICOPEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.chicopeechamber.org
(413) 594-2101

• March 8: Business After Hours, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Mill 180 Park, 180 Pleasant St., Easthampton. Multi-chamber event sponsored exclusively by CHH Engraving Inc. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. Sign up at chicopeechamber.org/events.
 n March 21: St. Patrick’s Day Salute Breakfast, 7:15-9 a.m., hosted by the Delaney House, 1 Country Club Road, Holyoke. Chief greeter: John Beaulieu, city of Chicopee and St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee. Keynote speaker: Sean Cahillane, Irish Cultural Center. Sarah the Fiddler will perform. Sponsored by United Personnel, Westfield Bank, Holyoke Medical Center, Polish National Credit Union, Gaudreau Group, Sunshine Village, Spherion Staffing Services, and PeoplesBank. Cost: $23 for members, $28 for non-members. Sign up at chicopeechamber.org/events.

GREATER EASTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.easthamptonchamber.org
(413) 527-9414

• March 8: Multi-Chamber Networking Event, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Mill 180 Park, 180 Pleasant St., Easthampton. Sponsored by Interland Real Estate, LLC. In addition to the Easthampton Chamber, the chambers of Northampton, Springfield, Holyoke, Westfield, Chicopee, and West of the River are all involved. For more information, visit www.easthamptonchamber.org or call the chamber office at (413) 527-9414.
• March 16: St. Patrick’s Day Luncheon, noon, hosted by Northampton Country Club, 135 Main St., Leeds. The main speaker will be Easthampton City Councilor Dan Carey. For more information, visit www.easthamptonchamber.org or call the chamber office at (413) 527-9414.
• March 27: “Strength-based Leadership” featuring Colleen DelVecchio, certified Clifton Strengths Coach. The second of a two-part series (see Feb. 27 listing above). For more information, visit www.easthamptonchamber.org or call the chamber office at (413) 527-9414.

GREATER HOLYOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.holyokechamber.com
(413) 534-3376

• March 7: The Chamber Coffee Buzz Morning Networking, 7:30-9 a.m., sponsored and hosted by Loomis House, 298 Jarvis Ave., Holyoke. Jump-start your day with the opportunity to meet business and community leaders while enjoying coffee and a light breakfast. Coffee sponsored by Manage Your Health and Wealth. Free to the business community. Sign up online at holyokechamber.com or call (413) 534-3376.

• March 7: “Women in Leadership: Leadership in Your Future,” 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., hosted by HCC Culinary Arts Institute, 164 Race St., Holyoke. Join us from March through June to learn from area CEOs while networking with peers from the region. An elegant lunch prepared by the Holyoke Community College Culinary Arts program will provide the setting, which will create the opportunity for a meaningful dialogue on some key leadership issues for those building their careers. Each month, your table will join one of the region’s leading CEOs. Future leadership luncheons will take place on April 4, May 2, and June 5. Cost: $125 for all four sessions.

• March 8: Networking by Night Multi Chamber Event, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Mill 180 Park, 180 Pleasant St., Easthampton. An evening of networking with several regional chambers, plus food and a cash bar. Chamber partners include Holyoke, Easthampton, Springfield, Westfield, West of the River, Chicopee, and Northampton. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. Pre-registration required.

• March 14: St. Patrick’s Day Business Breakfast 2018, 7:30-9 a.m., hosted by the Log Cabin, 500 Easthampton Road, Holyoke. Sponsored by PeoplesBank; Holyoke Mall at Ingleside; Resnic, Beauregard, Waite and Driscoll; and the Republican. Coffee bar sponsored by Marcotte Ford and Holyoke Medical Center. Connect with friends over a hearty Irish breakfast. The 2018 St. Patrick’s Parade Committee award winners, the Grand Colleen and her court, local business milestones, and new chamber members will be recognized. Register by March 8 for a discounted price of $35; cost is $40 after that. Marketing tables are available. Door prizes are welcome. The deadline to register is March 12. Visit holyokechamber.com to sign up, or call (413) 534-3376.

• March 21: Chamber After Hours, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Slainte Restaurant, 80 Jarvis Ave., Holyoke. Sponsored by Expert Staffing. Meet up with your business associates for networking and food. Cost: $10 for members, $15 for non-members. Sign up online at holyokechamber.com. Call the chamber at (413) 534-3376 if you would like to bring a door prize or if you’re interested in a marketing table for $25.

GREATER NORTHAMPTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.explorenorthampton.com
(413) 584-1900

• March 8: March Arrive @ 5, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Mill 180, 180 Pleasant St., Easthampton. Sponsored by Applied Mortgage. The Northampton, Easthampton, Holyoke, Springfield, Westfield, West of the River, and Chicopee chambers will participate in this networking event. Cost: $10 for members.

• March 15: Introduction to Pivot Tables, 9-11 a.m., hosted by Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Presented by Pioneer Training. Also called a Cross-Tab, a Pivot Table lets users easily apply various functions to data and separate the data by various criteria in rows and columns. Designed for users of Excel who have used Excel for six months or more and who need to analyze data. Participants are encouraged to bring laptops and follow along with the instructor, but this is not required. Pre-registration is required, and space is limited. Cost: $25 for members, $35 for non-members. To register, visit goo.gl/forms/pX8YUuC25YdMsLjD2.

• April 11: Protecting Your Data from Security Risks, 9-11 a.m., hosted by Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Presented by Pioneer Training. CyberSafe is a two-hour workshop for non-technical users that focuses on using technology without compromising personal or organizational security. Students will learn the skills they need to protect digital data on computers, networks, mobile devices, and the Internet. They will learn how to identify many of the common risks involved in using technology, such as phishing, spoofing, malware, and social engineering, and then learn how to protect themselves and their organizations from those risks. Pre-registration is required, and space is limited. Cost: $25 for members, $35 for non-members. To register, visit goo.gl/forms/pX8YUuC25YdMsLjD2.

• June 21: Microsoft Word: Advanced Tips, Tricks & Shortcuts, 9-11 a.m., hosted by Northampton Chamber of Commerce, 99 Pleasant St., Northampton. Presented by Pioneer Training. This workshop will go beyond the basics and explore some of Word’s more advanced features. Pre-registration is required, and space is limited. Cost: $25 for members, $35 for non-members. To register, visit goo.gl/forms/pX8YUuC25YdMsLjD2.

GREATER WESTFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.westfieldbiz.org
(413) 568-1618

• March 5: March Mayor’s Coffee Hour, 8-9 a.m., hosted by Mercy Continuing Care Network at Westfield Adult Day Health, 24 Clifton St., Westfield. Cost: free. Call the chamber office at (413) 568-1618 to register for this event so we may give our host a head count.

• March 14: March After 5 Connection, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Spotlight Graphics, 9B Whalley Way, Southwick. Refreshments will be served, and a 50/50 raffle will benefit the chamber scholarship fund. Bring your business cards and make connections. Cost: $10 for the general public (cash or credit paid at the door). Register online at www.westfieldbiz.org. For more information, call Pam Bussell at (413) 568-1618.

• March 16: St. Patrick’s Day Breakfast, 7-9 a.m., hosted by Westfield State University, 577 Western Ave., Westfield. Event sponsor: Westfield State University; bronze sponsor: Republic Services; in-kind flower sponsor: Flowers by Webster. Keynote speaker: Bo Sullivan, executive director of the Irish Cultural Center of Western New England. A 50/50 raffle will support the chamber scholarship fund. Cost: $25 for chamber members, $30 for the general public. Register online at www.westfieldbiz.org. For tickets, sponsorship opportunities, or additional information, contact Pam Bussell at (413) 568-1618 or [email protected]

SPRINGFIELD REGIONAL CHAMBER
www.springfieldregionalchamber.com
(413) 787-1555

• March 7: [email protected], 7:15-9 a.m., hosted by Chez Josef, 176 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam. Cost: $25 for members ($30 at the door), $35 general admission ($40 at the door).

• March 8: After Hours with Springfield Regional, Greater Easthampton, Westfield and West of the River Chambers, 5-7 p.m., hosted by Mill 180, 180 Pleasant St., Easthampton. Cost: $10 for members, $15 general admission.

• March 9: Outlook 2018, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., hosted by the MassMutual Center, Springfield. Featuring keynote speaker Gov. Charlie Baker and Eric Rosengren, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Cost: $60 for members in advance; $80 general admission in advance.

• March 13: Lunch ‘n’ Learn, details to be announced.

• March 20: C-Suite Conversations & Cocktails, 5-7 p.m., hosted by CityStage, One Columbus Center, Springfield. Members-only event featuring MGM President Mike Mathis. Cost: $25.

• March 29: Speed Networking, 3:30-5 p.m., location to be determined. Cost: $20 for members in advance ($25 at the door), $30 general admission in advance ($35 at the door).

Reservations for all chamber events may be made by visiting www.springfieldregionalchamber.com, e-mailing [email protected], or calling (413) 755-1310.

WEST OF THE RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.ourwrc.com
(413) 426-3880

• March 6: Business Breakfast with MGM, 7-9 a.m., hosted by Storrowton Tavern, West Springfield. Join fellow members and non-members for a business breakfast with MGM. We will provide an update as well as one-on-one sessions with MGM representatives for the bidding process. Sponsorships are available for this event. Register at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

• March 15: Networking Lunch, noon to 1:30 p.m., hosted by Crestview Country Club, Agawam. You must be a member or guest of a member to attend. Enjoy a sit-down lunch while networking with fellow chamber members. Each attendee will get a chance to offer a brief introduction and company overview. The only cost to attend is the cost of lunch. Attendees will order off the menu and pay separately that day. We cannot invoice you for these events. Register at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

• April 4: Wicked Wednesday, 5-7 p.m., hosted by CHD Cancer House of Hope, West Springfield. Wicked Wednesdays are monthly social events, hosted by various businesses and restaurants, that bring members and non-members together to network in a laid-back atmosphere. For more information about this event, contact the chamber office at (413) 426-3880, or register at www.westoftheriverchamber.com.

YOUNG PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY OF GREATER SPRINGFIELD
springfieldyps.com

• March 10: Eighth annual YP Cup Dodgeball Tournament, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., hosted by Springfield College, Dana Gymnasium, 263 Alden St., Springfield. Cost: $35 for individuals, $275 to $1,000 for teams and sponsorships. More information and registration available at springfieldyps.com.

Autos Sections

On the Move — Always

The new car wash in West Springfield is the latest addition to an ever-growing portfolio of facilities for the Balise Auto Group.

The new car wash in West Springfield is the latest addition to an ever-growing portfolio of facilities for the Balise Auto Group.

As he talked about the very latest addition to the already-expansive portfolio for the Balise Auto Group, a car wash just off Riverdale Street in West Springfield, Jeb Balise said it was a capital-intensive, very necessary supplement to the collection.

Capital-intensive because car washes, as some might know but others might not, are now very sophisticated, computer-operated facilities offering an ever-greater array of wash options. And necessary because … well, consumers are becoming ever-more demanding, and, likewise, the auto business is ever-more competitive.

So auto groups like Balise need to respond with the proverbial ‘more’ and ‘better.’ ‘More,’ as in more products and services to offer those customers, and ‘better,’ as in better than the competition.

And this mindset reflects itself in everything from the company’s growing stable of car washes (there are now three, including two in Western Mass.) to the ongoing work to replace or renovate the group’s large roster of dealerships, including the Balise Nissan store a half-mile east of the car wash on Riverdale Street, to an insurance agency in Rhode Island as part of the mix.

“We’re making sure we’re giving the customer everything they want for support instead of just selling them a car,” said Balise as he talked about additions to the number of collision centers, used-car facilities, and more. “So if someone buys a car from us, they don’t have to worry about collision repair or getting their car cleaned or insurance; we can pretty much provide holistically everything they need for the life of that car.”

He offered those thoughts in an interview in one of the sales offices at Balise Nissan, the latest of the company’s dealerships to be replaced, or, in this case, given a huge makeover. Long operated under the name Jerry Rome Nissan, the facility now bears the Balise name.

Open for just over two months, the ‘new’ dealership was essentially gutted and rebuilt from the ground up, said Balise, adding that it is the first store selling this brand to incorporate new imagery and design elements developed by the carmaker.

The Nissan dealership on Riverdale Street now carries the Balise name. It’s the latest of the company’s dealerships to undergo extensive renovations or new construction.

The Nissan dealership on Riverdale Street now carries the Balise name. It’s the latest of the company’s dealerships to undergo extensive renovations or new construction.

“There was nothing left of the showroom — we stripped it right down to columns and roof, basically,” he explained. “We really rebuilt it, and you can feel it; you would never know it was a retro.”

That’s the word he chose for a dealership built in the ’80s and ’90s — before they became far more spacious (50,000 square feet in the case of the Toyota dealership, also on Riverdale Street), comfortably equipped, and customer-friendly.

As he talked about the Nissan store and offered a quick tour, pointing out its larger, revamped showroom and well-appointed service waiting area, Balise said there are a few minor touches to be completed before a grand opening can be staged — probably later this month.

And as those final touches are made, thoughts are already turning to what’s next, said Balise, adding that the company embarked on a massive campaign to make over facilities for all the brands it sells more than a decade ago, and there are still a few projects left to undertake.

One is the Balise Mazda facility on the other (north) side of Riverdale Street. Built in 1984, it is certainly showing its age, said Balise, adding that plans will be on the drawing board soon for either new construction or another extensive renovation.

Meanwhile, another nameplate in line to have a new home is Kia, which became part of the Balise stable in 2015 and has been housed in a small facility that was once a Mercedes dealership a decade ago.

Kia is a rising star in the auto galaxy, said Balise, adding that it has an attractive mix of cars, vans, and SUVs, and it will soon have a home befitting that status. Various options are currently being reviewed, and no formal plans have been announced, he went on, noting that both the Kia and Mazda facilities will be upgraded within the next 24 months.

“Our plans will be really impressive,” said Balise in reference to both projects, still in the developmental stage. “These will be either brand-new buildings or significant renovations — total change.”

As for the car washes, Balise said they are part of broader efforts to serve the full gamut of customer needs and provide additional layers of value.

The company started with a facility in Hyannis, where it also has several dealerships, then added one on East Columbus Avenue in 2016; the West Springfield location opened in January.

There are two more car washes on the drawing board for the next 24 months, said Balise, adding that the specific markets have not been identified.

The car washes offer ample evidence of consumers taking better care of their vehicles, but also of the value that auto groups are trying to provide.

Indeed, the car washes are strategically located to serve customers at the Balise dealerships (there are three on Columbus Avenue and a half-dozen on Riverdale Street), he noted.

Those who buy a car at any of the Balise dealerships get 60 days of free washes, he went on, and they also get special pricing on both everyday washes and the hugely popular ‘unlimited plans,’ whereby consumers can wash their car as often as they want for one monthly fee.

As for new dealerships, the company is always looking for new opportunities — in this market and others, he went on, adding that, despite an ongoing wave of consolidation within the industry, there are still a number of single dealerships and small groups that could be added to the portfolio if the conditions were right.

“Even with all the consolidation, it’s still a fragmented business,” he told BusinessWest. “The majority of facilities are owned by someone who might have two or three stores, or one store.

“We’re just focusing on the best-location, best-franchise philosophy,” he went on, and then making sure our facilities exceed the customers’ expectations.”

— George O’Brien

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the months of January and February 2018.

CHICOPEE

J. and N. Salema Family
480 Burnett Road
$6,000 — Replace water-damaged sheetrock and ceiling tiles

U-Haul Real Estate Co.
878 Memorial Dr.
$4,000 — Demolish partition walls

EASTHAMPTON

Autumn Properties, LLC
161-165 Northampton St.
$8,850 — Add interior partitions to create extra offices

Cumberland Farms
2211 Northampton St.
$1,022,350 — Construct convenience store with fuel stations, canopy, and parking

Keystone Enterprises
122 Pleasant St.
$18,500 — Install HVAC system for Float Therapy Spa

U.S. Bank
13 Sterling Dr.
$24,500 — Remove and replace existing roof covering; interior renovations

EAST LONGMEADOW

The Arbor’s Kids
126 Industrial Dr.
$177,755 — Renovations

East Longmeadow Wellness Center
250 North Main St.
$18,000 — Sheet metal

Fairview Extended Care
305 Maple St.
$5,000 — Construction trailer

Irina’s Décor
100 Shaker Road
$3,000 — Sheet metal

HADLEY

220 Russell Street, LLC
220 Russell St.
$615,000 — New steel building for Wagging Tail, a new canine daycare center

Gibbs Oil Co., LP
110 Russell St.
$2,175 — Reface two signs

Town of Hadley
15 East St.
$15,000 — Verizon Wireless to replace antennas with new models and install remote radio heads to existing cell tower

LONGMEADOW

Longmeadow Country Club
400 Shaker Road
$15,900 — Demo and removal of walk-in coolers

Mario Davis Magnani
791 Maple Road
$2,550 — Add two illuminated signs to roof

LUDLOW

Country Bank
64 Cherry St.
$6,500 — Demolition

Country Bank
64 Cherry St.
$12,000 — Illuminated sign

Country Bank
64 Cherry St.
$2,100 — Illuminated sign

NORTHAMPTON

City of Northampton
6 Water St.
$5,688 — Reroof building for Water Department

City of Northampton
125 Locust St.
$11,368 — Reroof storage building at Department of Public Works

City of Northampton
23 Center St.
$664,350 — Concrete and masonry repair and waterproofing at Police Department; new plaza deck drain installations

Cumberland Farms Inc.
53 Main St.
$800 — Reface ground-mounted illuminated sign

Five College Realtors
92 Main St.
$2,800 — Illuminated wall sign

Five College Realtors
92 Main St.
$2,800 — Illuminated wall sign

O’Connell Oil Associates Inc.
506 Pleasant St.
$6,000 — Two illuminated canopy signs at Shell gas station

P + Q, LLC
110 Main St.
$1,000 — Non-illuminated wall sign

Saga Communications of NE Inc.
15 Hampton Ave.
$12,500 — Install new drop ceiling in conference room and install refrigerator in break room

SOUTHWICK

Westfield River Brewing Co.
707 College Highway
$20,000 — Lighting and windows on second floor

SPRINGFIELD

3640 Main St., LLP
3640 Main St., Suite 101
$289,934 — Interior renovations for use as an MRI center

Baystate Health
3350 Main St.
$988,766 — Renovate existing suite into infusion space

Mike Bergdoll
1271 Page Blvd.
$53,000 — Renovate Swift Trip gas station and convenience store

F.L. Roberts
275 Albany Ave.
$25,000 — Concrete pad for new building

GF Enterprises
633 Liberty St.
$202,000 — Upgrade building exterior of Taco Bell restaurant with new paint and signage, upgrade dining room, and ensure bathrooms are ADA-compliant

Liberty Medical Associates, LLP
125 Liberty St.
$14,820 — Construct wall to enclose future break room, add door, and remove sink in Suite 408; construct closet and add door in Suite 402

MassDevelopment Finance Agency
1550 Main St.
$55,580 — Renovate area into two conference rooms for Alekman DiTusa

Mercy Medical Center
271 Carew St.
$35,732 — Demolish casework, wall, and doors; install new finishes, new wall configuration, millwork, and doors

Mercy Medical Center
271 Carew St.
$17,107 — Build wall and hard ceiling to set back a door which is currently an egress/safety issue

Monarch Enterprise
1414 Main St.
$173,700 — Remodel existing space into a new Starbucks coffee shop

VIP Nail Salon
1704 Boston Road
$7,400 — Electrical and plumbing

WESTFIELD

City of Westfield
25 Dartmouth St.
Renovation to existing building

Governor’s Center RE, LLC
66 South Broad St.
Construct new bathroom and kitchenette

Rosow Westfield, LLC
66 South Broad St.
$36,900 — Install new garage door, construct new load-bearing walls, and construct new offices

Rosow Westfield, LLC
66 South Broad St.
$13,700 — Steel beam and support columns

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Century Investment Co.
219 Memorial Ave.
$54,400 — Interior tenant remodeling for purpose of retail sales

Crosslight Gospel Church
2611 Westfield St.
$10,000 — Construct storage area on side of building

General Equities
884 Westfield St.
$82,155 — Renovations, including new ceiling tiles, bathroom remodel, interior painting, new storefront glass, and siding

Drew Moyes
958 Riverdale Road
$2,000 — Alterations to interior space for Agri-Mark Inc.

Northern Rail Services Inc.
175 Circuit Ave.
$28,000 — Add dimising walls and two bathrooms

WILBRAHAM

75 Post Office Park, LLC
75 Post Office Park
$25,000 — Create interior office space for Proshred

Meetings & Conventions Sections

Brick by Brick

Erin Witmer says her goal was to preserve the history of the Keystone building while creating flexible spaces that can be crafted to the mood of each event.

Erin Witmer says her goal was to preserve the history of the Keystone building while creating flexible spaces that can be crafted to the mood of each event.

It’s a different wedding photo, to be sure.

Their names are Kyle and Liz, and they’re standing, decked out in formal clothes, in front of a 110-year-old mill, with boarded-up windows on the top floor and chipped bricks at their feet. It’s a striking scene, and it’s not for everyone, Erin Witmer said.

“It is part of the charm here,” she said of the environs of the Boylston Rooms, her new event space located in the Keystone building on Pleasant Street in Easthampton, next to another notable restored mill, Eastworks. “If you’re looking for a ‘perfect,’ new kind of space, you’re probably not going to look here. We definitely have some of the charm and character of the original space.”

The engaged couples and others who book the venue for a broad variety of events, however, immediately ‘get’ it, she added.

“Last year was pretty tremendous. The first couples that booked their weddings here, they looked at it when it was just an empty warehouse space, and were able to see what it could be. And it’s been incredibly positive since then.”

Witmer and her husband bought the historic Keystone building in 2015 with the goal of opening an event space that offered something memorable and different from more traditional venues, she told BusinessWest.

“I first started in events at the Inn at Northampton, before it was the Clarion, doing banquet and event work there,” she recalled. “It was a very traditional banquet hall, and it got me thinking about what I valued in an event space and what I’d like for my own event space. I really wanted a space where people could personalize it, a blank canvas where people can bring in their own ideas and dreams and design thoughts, and could create whatever space they’d like to create. It’s a very flexible place, and you can make it whatever you want it to be.”

The venue includes two main areas — the 3,800-square-foot West Room, which can accommodate 300 seated guests or 600 standing, and can be divided into two smaller spaces; and the 2,700-square-foot East Room, with space for 200 seated or 500 standing — as well as an outdoor patio. Weddings often use all of it, with perhaps a ceremony in one of the two large rooms and a reception in the other.

Event bookers, like Kyle and Liz

Event bookers, like Kyle and Liz, appreciate the quirky photos and unique memories the Boylston Rooms provide.
West On Jade Photography

Since opening in September, Witmer said, the Boylston Rooms have hosted many weddings, with plenty of positive response from the couples and guests alike, and bookings for 2018 are pouring in even faster. “We’re super blessed interms of response from the community.”

But the space accommodates many other events as well, from the inaugural ball for Easthampton’s new mayor to a fund-raiser for the town’s Fire Department; from a TEDx talk in November to upcoming events like an awards banquet and a play reading — all of them surrounded by the original wood columns, exposed brick, and visible ductwork that gives the building, as Witmer said, its considerable charm.

History Lesson

The Keystone building traces its history to the turn of the 20th century, when the West Boylston Co., a textile manufacturer incorporated in 1814, was forced to leave its namesake town when the Wachusett reservoir, which would have completely submerged the mill site, was in its planning stages.

In 1899, the company decided to dismantle the mill brick by brick and send it by train to Easthampton, where those same bricks were used to build Eastworks in 1908, and Keystone between 1907 and 1912.

“People enjoy the sense of history here, and we tried to keep as many historical elements of the space intact,” Witmer said. “When we purchased it, this was a gigantic, empty warehouse.”

But there was plenty of potential in the hardwood floors, the floor-to-ceiling windows, and the views of the Holyoke Range outdoors. She purposely kept her restoration plan simple, from incorporation of original fixtures as much as possible to the white-centric color design, which complements whatever palette each event booker wants to incorporate.

Parties have used string lights, LED uplighting, and other touches. “And you can hang things from the beams,” Witmer said. “We had a bride who made wreaths, which are amazing. Another bride made hundreds of paper cranes, which we hung from the beams; they were really spectacular, and something I never would have thought of. People can bring in their own ideas and their own dreams for the space, and we can make it happen.”

Meanwhile, Keystone is bustling with other activity, with its east wing fully tenanted by a range of businesses, its west wing quickly approaching full capacity, and plans to develop residential units on the third floor starting this spring. “So there’s a lot happening,” she added.

So it’s a busy time in the old mill, but not so much that service suffers; Witmer likes being a hands-on partner to groups that rent the Boylston Rooms, and has a special place in her heart for weddings.

“It’s a really special day, and on a very simple level, I love being able to make people happy — even in the smallest things, from having complementary champagne to making sure the DJ is playing the music they want to hear, or that every hanging thing is perfect, or that they’ve got all their gifts in the car at the end of the night,” she explained.

“A lot of times, the bride will turn to me before coming in — ‘do I look OK?’ And I can say, ‘yes, you look beautiful, and straighten their necklace, and they go in. Those little moments are incredibly important and special.”

The Big Day

‘Special’ is what Witmer was looking for when she and her husband invested in a run-down building that has become an economic engine on Pleasant Street — and a place where people can celebrate events large and small in a space that’s anything but the same old venue. People like Kyle and Liz.

“I love being a part of somebody’s wedding day,” Witmer said. “Every time the doors open and I see a bride and her father walking in, I tear up — every single time. It’s such an important day in someone’s life, and to be a part of it is such an honor.”

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the month of December 2017.

AGAWAM

EG Partners, LLC
646 Springfield St.
$84,375 — Interior renovation of existing administrative office space

Town of Agawam
128 Southwick St.
$69,250 — Roofing at Agawam Golf Course

CHICOPEE

American Tower Corp.
645 Shawnigan Dr.
$20,000 — Install six replacement antennas

Elms College
291 Springfield St.
$33,000 — Update and renovate two bathrooms

Matthew 11:28 Church of God
16 Bolduc Lane
$4,556 — Air-seal attic and basement

EASTHAMPTON

On the Hill, LLC
100 Mountain Road
$6,500 — Interior wall framing, drywall

EAST LONGMEADOW

Cartamundi
443 Shaker Road
$168,000 — Roofing

Jet Auto Service
40 Shaker Road
$11,900 — Roofing

Lenox
301 Chestnut St.
$115,052 — Curtain wall

GREENFIELD

First Congregational Church
43 Silver St.
$25,995 — Roofing

Jimbob Realty, LLC
36 Hope St.
$11,780 — Roofing

John Lowe
192-200 Main St.
$1,500 — Repair fallen metal panel

Town of Greenfield
14 Court Square
$69,062 — Roofing at Town Hall

HADLEY

Chamisa Corp.
31 Campus Plaza Road
$2,980 — Disconnect miles of flex and install hard pipe from supply and return ducts to grills

Justin Killeen
231 Russell St.
$5,000 — Remove seven non-bearing walls, rebuild bathroom walls, new finish work and flooring

MDGR Holding Corp.
322 Russell St.
$32,000 — Build two-car garage

Pyramid Mall of Hadley Newco, LLC
367 Russell St.
$11,000 — New sign for Planet Fitness

Pyramid Mall of Hadley Newco, LLC
367 Russell St.
$17,000 — Install hood, fans, and stainless-steel exhaust ductwork; fabricate and install make-up air ductwork at Pinz

Pyramid Mall of Hadley Newco, LLC
367 Russell St.
$50,000 — Relocate freezer, add new refrigerated cases and new display shelving, demo existing semo room, expand and relocate utility sink, and construct new pre-fab bridge with door at Trader Joe’s

Pyramid Mall of Hadley Newco, LLC
367 Russell St.
$22,000 — Two new wall signs

Shipman Realty Trust
142 Russell St.
$10,000 — Fabricate and install ductwork fir new HVAC system and install hoods at Dunkin’ Donuts

Vertical Assets, LLC
165 Russell St.
$6,500 — Install ductwork for heating and AC units to feed new space

LONGMEADOW

Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph
92 Oakwood Dr.
$31,500 — Kitchen renovation, remove interior wall

Genesis Lifecare Corp.
832 Converse St.
$141,210 — Roof replacement

Rinaldi’s Realty, LLC
398 Longmeadow St.
$171,400 — Renovate existing space into bagel shop

LUDLOW

Ludlow Dentistry & Braces
433 Center St.
$7,200 — Illuminated sign

Julian Popko
438 Center St.
$7,100 — Reshingling

NORTHAMPTON

City of Northampton
300 North Main St.
$165,000 — Renovate existing toilet rooms at Look Park with new partitions, accessories, sinks, paint, and lighting

Hampshire Regional YMCA
286 Prospect St.
$45,750 — Roofing

Northampton Historical Society
46 Bridge St.
$2,500 — Cover cinderblock with paneling

ServiceNet
91 Grove St.
$37,386 — Install 39 solar panels

Smith College
4 Tyler Dr.
$42,150 — Classroom renovation, including new flooring, paint, and lighting

SPRINGFIELD

Avid Ironworks
17 Rose Place
$64,000 — Pre-engineered building addition

Brian Hamill
915 Plumtree Road
$12,600 — Remove and reinstall gutters and downspouts, repair columns, install 28 windows

Devine Holdings, LLC
111 Carando Dr.
$291,000 — Alter tenant office space

Mercy Medical Center
271 Carew St.
$63,142 — Replace kitchen hoods

Mercy Medical Center
271 Carew St.
$375,785 — Renovate and relocate operating rooms

WESTFIELD

Chapel Street Realty, LLC
9 Chapel St.
$40,936 — Demo walls and construct new walls for office space, new bathroom on second floor

Westfield Court Associates, LLC
224 Elm St.
$75,688 — Add new toilet fixtures to renovated bathrooms, provide new office space

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Nicholas Katsoulis
865 Memorial Dr.
$45,135 — Install rooftop solar array

The Morgan Group, LLC
1126 Elm St.
$500,000 — Construct new commercial office building

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the month of November 2017.

AGAWAM

Grand Run Holdings 1, LLC
4-28 Southwick St.
$25,000 — Roofing at shopping center

CHICOPEE

280 Springfield Street
280 Springfield St.
$10,100 — Extend existing bath, handicap accessibility

Raymond Duquette
99 Ducharme Ave.
$4,850 — Roof replacement

Lorraine’s Soup Kitchen
170 Pendexter Ave.
$1,450 — Addition to landing deck

Max Cap Properties, LLC
116 School St.
$5,000 — Electrical repair, minor roof repair, décor, change upstairs ceiling tiles

Moose Creek Realty, LLC
40 High St.
$28,850 — Remove existing siding material, install new vinyl siding system

Moose Creek Realty, LLC
42 High St.
$28,850 — Remove existing siding material, install new vinyl siding system

Rivoli Inc.
43 Springfield St.
$2,200 — New accessible entrance to existing tenant space

Karen Romano
685 Grattan St.
Demolish existing building

DEERFIELD

Berkshire Brewing
12 Railroad St.
$6,000 — Renovate handicap-accessible bathrooms

Ideal Movers
247 Greenfield Road
$50,000 — Foundation

EASTHAMPTON

Easthampton Mahadev, LLC
37-43 Union St.
$150,000 — Repair fire-damaged roof, ceiling, and flooring; reconfigure floor space

Easthampton Mahadev, LLC
37-43 Union St.
$16,500 — Replace fire-damaged duct system

Massachusetts Audubon Society
127 Coombs Road
$11,000 — Install replacement windows

EAST LONGMEADOW

Century Fitness
491 North Main St.
$7,600 — Remove wall, commercial renovation

Pioneer Gymnastics
45 Maple St.
$3,500 — Awning

GREENFIELD

Abercrombie Greenfield, LLC
56 Bank Row
$60,000 — Install new NFPA 13 compliant system

Baystate Franklin Medical Center
164 High St.
$18,249 — Install new cross-corridor door with smoke wall to deck, remove existing door frame, and repair wall and ceiling

Baystate Franklin Medical Center
164 High St.
$16,717 — Core drill for installation of new hot-water and sprinkler piping on third floor and attic of north building, miscellaneous drywall repairs and painting

Franklin Medical Center
48 Sanderson St.
$128,750 — Roofing

David Johnson
102 Federal St.
$3,900 — Install pellet stove

Jones Properties, LP
21 Mohawk Trail
$21,000 — Construct partitions to configure two offices and a small kitchen for law office

David Kalinowski
5 Conway Dr.
$2,999 — Construct roadside farm stand

Lisa Underwood
571 Bernardston Road
$9,700 — Roofing

LUDLOW

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts
5 Ravenwood Dr.
$159,000 — Roofing

NORTHAMPTON

1924, LLC
50 Round Hill Road
$30,000 — Select demolition, roof removal, interior mechanical removal

Alloy, LLC
209 Earle St.
$249,350 — Install 300 solar panels on roof

The Brush Works, LLC
221 Pine St.
$35,000 — Install six new remote radio heads to replace six antenna panels wuth new models, run new hybriflex line to existing smokestack

Coca-Cola Co.
45 Industrial Dr.
$500,000 — Interior renovation

Cumberland Farm, LLC
55 Main St.
$14,000 — Demolish house

New England Deaconess Assoc.
25 Coles Meadow Road
$28,000 — Remove kitchen cabinets and countertops, install new flooring, paint room

P & Q, LLC
112 Main St.
$24,550 — Remodel interior for real-estate office

Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield
10 Hawley St.
$24,900 — Strip and shingle roof

PALMER

S & S Properties
1240 Park St.
$6,000 — Replace lettering on sign

SOUTHWICK

Tribe Life Athletics
809 College Highway
Sheet metal

Worldwide Turbines
512 College Highway
$4,000 — Install windows

SPRINGFIELD

Baystate Health
3400 Main St.
$254,700 — Relocate non-bearing partitions, relocate plumbing and electrical, renew finishes for existing medical practice

Blue Tarp reDevelopment
94 Union St.
$1,177,000 — Renovation and reconstruction of building interior to change from church to retail use, including new HVAC, electrical, plumbing, fire sprinkler, restroom, food service, and exits

Mason Wright Foundation
74 Walnut St.
$703,475.37 — 1,291-square-foot addition to existing building, addition of four-seasons room above existing maintenance garage

Primera Iglesia Christina
25 Torrance St.
$5,000 — Remove non-bearing wall between structural columns

Related Springfield Associates, LP
75 Dwight St.
$167,500 — Interior fit-up for Springfield Police substation

WARE

Baystate Mary Lane Hospital
85 South St.
$11,000 — Remove and replace grease ducts

National Grid
52 Gilbertville Road
$44,300 — Strip and re-roof

North Brookfield Savings Bank
40 Main St.
$16,000 — Remove existing timber retaining wall and replace with interlocking concrete blocks

Quabbin Wire and Cable
10 Maple St.
$15,000 — Replace 13 windows

Weir River Social Club Inc.
6 East St.
$2,400 — Remove back stairs, install new stairs

WEST SPRINGFIELD

St. Thomas the Apostle School
47 Pine St.
$99,400 — Replace HVAC rooftop unit and add one HVAC rooftop unit

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — DevelopSpringfield was presented with a 2017 Massachusetts Historical Commission Historic Preservation Award by Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin at a ceremony on Nov. 2.

“The Massachusetts Historical Commission is proud to recognize the extraordinary accomplishments of this year’s awardees,” Galvin said. “The projects the commission is recognizing this year are particularly diverse and represent the many creative ways that significant historic resources are being preserved across the Commonwealth. With this project, the Merrick-Phelps House will now be an important contributor to Springfield’s economic future.”

Constructed in 1841, the Merrick-Phelps House, located at 83 Maple St., is one of Springfield’s most significant historic buildings. The house was built by Solymon Merrick, inventor of the monkey wrench and a key player in Springfield’s history of industry and innovation. The house was then sold in 1847 to Ansel Phelps, who later became the city’s mayor. Many residents still refer to this as the ‘Mayor’s House.’ After Phelps’s death in 1860, the building continued to house families of the Springfield elite well into the 20th century.

The Merrick-Phelps House, situated on the corner of Maple and Union streets, is a Greek Revival-style, two-story, single-family house featuring a low hipped roof and an elaborate, two-story portico with fluted Corinthian columns. A one-story porch on the Union Street elevation was added in 1890. The primary entrance on Maple Street is accentuated by a Greek Revival-style door surround and a pair of glass-and-wood-panel doors. The windows are all original wood windows. Notable interior features include a grand center hall with a curved staircase along the wall, a large parlor and dining room with decorative trim, and five original fireplace mantels.

Toward the end of the 20th century, the house began to show signs of neglect, and it was abandoned in 2007. When DevelopSpringfield purchased the house in 2013, it had been vacant for several years and was in an advanced state of deterioration.

DevelopSpringfield worked with a team of experts to assist in the successful rehabilitation of this historic property, including architect Marco Crescentini of Dietz & Co. Architects, general contractor Peter Hamm of Historic Preservation Associates, preservation specialist Gregory Farmer of Agricola Corp., preservation consultant William Young of Epsilon Associates, and Dennis Keefe of Westfield Bank (financing).

Building Permits Departments

The following building permits were issued during the months of August and September 2017.

AGAWAM

Ashakris HNA, LLC
336-344 North Westfield St.
$15,000 — Remove and replace wall, install new acoustic ceiling

Jaffe Family Foundation
45 Tennis Road
$468,500 — Roofing

AMHERST

Amherst Pelham Regional School District
170 Chestnut St.
$13,000 — Demo and remove concrete chimney cap and brick veneer and replace with new chimney at Amherst Regional Middle School

Hampshire College
893 West St.
$8,500 — Interior renovation in bookstore to subdivide space

CHICOPEE

City of Chicopee
110 Church St.
$150,000 — New fire-alarm system at Chicopee Police Department

City of Chicopee
110 Church St.
$438,000 — Masonry, carpentry, and roofing at Chicopee Police Department

Charles Sourmaidis
467 Memorial Dr.
$66,234 — Refinish Denny’s dining room, bring bathroom to code, replace cabinets

Valley Opportunity Council Inc.
35 Mt. Carmel Ave.
$25,300 — Install new demonstration cabinets and countertops

Valley Opportunity Council Inc.
516 Chicopee St.
$28,000 — Renovate existing office space and create additional offices, add new doors

EASTHAMPTON

Autumn Properties, LLC
184 Northampton St.
$103,450 — Install fire-suppression system in three buildings

City of Easthampton
50 Payson Ave.
$6,000 — Remove and replace gazebo roof, replace decking, repair trim and lattice

Keystone Enterprises
122 Pleasant St.
$4,500 — Create roof penetrations, chaseway for duct system

EAST LONGMEADOW

Excel Dryer
355 Chestnut St.
$25,600 — Fire protection

Louis & Clark
436 North Main St.
$11,000 — Commercial alterations

HADLEY

325 Rocky Hill Rd., LLC
325 Rocky Hill Road
$4,200 — Frame, insulate, sheetrock, and new bathroom floor

Lacomb Holdings, LLC
189 Russell St.
$24,050 — Add bathroom with shower, add two sets of double doors, move existing door, add screen wall in reception area

Med Express
424 Russell St.
$10,000 — Illuminated channel letters backlit with LEDs and mounted to building

Pizza Hut of America
424 Russell St.
$58,900 — HVAC; install ductwork, register grills, and diffusers

Pyramid Mall of Hadley Newco, LLC
367 Russell St.
$200,000 — Minor interior remodel on sales floor of JCPenney, add Sephora cosmetic department

Pyramid Mall of Hadley Newco, LLC
367 Russell St.
$693,000 — Fit-out in existing construction for Planet Fitness

The Taproom
1 Mill Valley Road, Suite C
$6,800 — Add divider wall, plumb sink, dishwasher, power outlets, and track lighting

LONGMEADOW

GPT Longmeadow, LLC
714 Bliss Road
$3,000 — New sign for Great Harvest Bread Co.

LUDLOW

Apex Dental
653 Center St.
$2,500 — Illuminated sign

Apex Dental
653 Center St.
$3,100 — Non-illuminated sign

Eversource
Chapin Street
$2,634,740 — Solar panels

NORTHAMPTON

39 Main Street, LLC
33 Main St.
$14,843 — Install walls, door, flooring, and lighting in new second-floor offices

1924, LLC
46 Round Hill Road
$50,000 — Kitchen addition

Chamisa Corp.
25 Main St.
$9,500 — Disassemble and remove existing elevator hoistaway cage and install temporary construction-control barriers in preparation for new elevator

Coolidge Center, LLC
47 Pleasant St.
$18,500 — Install new interior staircase

Cumberland Farms Inc.
43 Main St.
$790,000 — New commercial building for Cumberland Farms store

O’Connell Oil Associates Inc.
506 Pleasant St.
$4,000 — Illuminated ground sign with Shell logo and LED price sign

Rockwell Management Corp.
30 Village Hill Road
$8,600 — Illuminated ground sign for the Columns at Rockwell Place

Smith College
102 College Lane
$175,000 — Reconfigure existing conference room and exercise studio, roofing, decking

Smith College
College Lane
$193,000 — Roofing

Thornes Marketplace
150 Main St.
$34,000 — Remove nine antennas and replace with nine upgraded antenna pabels, add three remote radio heads

Wohl Family Dentistry, LLC
61 Locust St.
$15,000 — Flooring, lighting, section off five offices

SPRINGFIELD

Albany Road
1287 Liberty St.
$25,000 — Replace floors, remove non-beating walls, new bar, electrical, and plumbing at Springfield Plaza

City of Springfield
415 State St.
$5,000 — Add door to provide classroom access to existing closet at Commerce High School

MassMutual Life Insurance Corp.
1500 Main St.
$395,074 — Demolish interior partitions, new partitions and doors, new finishes, hand sinks, headwall units for UMass College of Nursing expansion

Bobby Patel
942 Belmont Ave.
$78,300 — Remove existing roof system at Old Grampy’s building to get ready for new truss design

Shriners Hospitals for Children
516 Carew St.
$249,942 — Renovate space to accommodate new equipment in radiology suite

SIS Center Inc.
1441 Main St.
$230,000 — Interior fit-out for new tenant on 12th floor

Juliette Son
170 Mayflower St.
$5,000 — Rebuild and expand garage

Yukon Group, LLC
119 Fisk Ave.
$4,850 — Add office and restroom

WARE

Aldrich Management Co.
124 West St.
$35,000 — Interior renovations for a takeout pizza kitchen

U.S. Bank Trust/Marty’s Real Estate
21 Robbins Road
$32,000 — Roofing, carpentry, build steps to basement, install new bulkhead

WEST SPRINGFIELD

Agri-Mark
964 Riverdale St.
$10,000 — Changes to concrete block wall

Company Notebook Departments

Old Chapel at UMass Earns LEED Gold Certification

AMHERST — The renovation of the historic Old Chapel at UMass Amherst earned LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. The LEED rating system is the foremost program for buildings, homes, and communities that are designed, constructed, maintained, and operated for improved environmental and human health performance. Built in 1885, the Old Chapel is the most iconic and significant historic building on the UMass Amherst campus. Designed by Steven Earle in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, the building originally housed a library, auditorium, natural-history collections, and classrooms. It was later used as a drill hall, departmental offices, and finally as home to the Minuteman Marching Band in the 1960s, before officially closing its doors in 1999 due to structural deterioration. The Old Chapel was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2015, and work began on a $21 million renovation, addition, and preservation effort to restore the building to its original glory. The revitalized Old Chapel now serves students, faculty, and alumni as a campus resource. The first floor provides a flexible layout for student study, gallery exhibitions, and community events, while the Great Hall on the top floor provides a large, open space for performances, lectures, receptions, and weddings. UMass Amherst and the UMass Building Authority hired Finegold Alexander Architects of Boston to design the restoration and demonstrate how aspects of historic preservation and sustainability can work together. The firm deployed an array of sustainability strategies to maintain the integrity of the original design and materials, while adapting the building’s structure and interior to modern use, access, and building-code requirements. The Old Chapel’s original structure consists of local timber and stone such as Pelham granite and Longmeadow sandstone. The design reused 83% of structural masonry, wood columns, beams, trusses, and wainscoting trim, and 82% of new wood products were either locally sourced or certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. The addition of a contemporary glass entry pavilion at the south façade is integrated into a landscaped terrace that provides full accessibility while also incorporating water-efficient landscaping and rainwater management that improves site ecology. Meeting modern indoor environment and energy-efficiency requirements within the original exterior wall assembly was a challenge; the design team used energy modeling to find the correct balance of masonry-wall insulation, energy-efficient glazing, and stained-glass restoration so that sustainability goals were in concert with historic restoration efforts. The building is designed to exceed code energy performance by 21% and to reduce potable water use by 34%, and it will follow a rigorous measurement and verification process that ensures those savings are realized post-occupancy.

The Hub Studio Announces Grand-opening Celebration

FLORENCE — Tracy Roth, who launched the Hub Studio, a fitness studio located at the Nonotuck Mill in Florence, will host a grand opening at the studio on Saturday, Sept. 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The studio will offer spinning, TRX resistance training, mat Pilates, scientifically backed nutrition-coaching programs, outdoor cycling instruction, workshops, special events, and more. The grand opening will include refreshments and snacks from local cafés and restaurants, live music from kid-friendly DJ Quintessential, free chair massage, a raffle, and more. The raffle prizes include classes and a three-month membership at the Hub Studio, as well as other exclusive items from area businesses. The event is free, and the public is welcome. Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz will attend to assist with the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Located in Suite 202 at the Nonotuck Mill, 296-C Nonotuck St., Florence, the studio will be open full-time starting Monday, Oct. 2 and will include group fitness classes for all levels during the morning, afternoon, and evening hours. The studio will also have classes, workshops, and special events on Saturdays and Sundays. For class descriptions, schedule, a blog, and more, visit www.yourhubstudio.com.

BCC Launches New Job-search Website

PITTSFIELD — Berkshire Community College (BCC) announced that its Career Development Center has launched new career-management software with College Central Network (CCN) at www.collegecentral.com/berkshirecc. BCC students past, present, and future now have access to the latest resources and job opportunities at the regional and national level. Additionally, this tool will enhance communication among various departments within the college that routinely collaborate with employers in the community. The new website offers exclusive job postings targeting the BCC student and alumni population as well as access to hundreds of career articles, podcasts, and career-advice resources. Students and any community members can upload or build a résumé on the site as well as register for career-related events around the area and receive alerts for their ideal job. BCC recently sent out registration notifications to local employers, inviting them to create an account. Once confirmed, they may begin uploading job opportunities that they would like to post. BCC’s job-search site is meant to assist local employers and the community in making it easier to post and find jobs. It also helps ensure a smooth transition for BCC students to find local employment with support from the software and the college’s Career Development Center team.

JA of Western Massachusetts Announces Grant Awards

SPRINGFIELD — Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts announced that it received a $10,000 grant from the United Bank Foundation to bring financial-literacy programs to students in East Longmeadow, Westfield, West Springfield, and Springfield. The programs will teach students concepts related to budgeting, saving, and money management with the intent of promoting the development of good financial habits. The partnership includes the involvement of volunteers from United Bank to help deliver the programs to students. Meanwhile, JA of Western Massachusetts also received a $7,200 grant from the UPS Foundation to implement JA “Be Entrepreneurial” classes. The curriculum introduces high-school students to the essential elements of a practical business plan and challenges them to start an entrepreneurial venture while still in high school. Students learn about advertising, competitive advantages, financing, marketing, and product development, all of which are key to being an informed entrepreneur. The program includes seven 45-minute sessions taught by a community or corporate volunteer. Volunteers bring in their own experiences and life lessons to the classroom to enhance the JA program. Schools and organizations participating in “Be Entrepreneurial” include Putnam Vocational Technical Academy, the JA BEE Summer Program, the Center for Human Development, St. Mary’s High School, and East Longmeadow High School.

Tighe & Bond Among Top New England Design Firms

WESTFIELD — Tighe & Bond, a Northeast leader in engineering and environmental consulting, has been ranked ninth in the Engineering News Record’s (ENR) New England Top Design Firms edition. In addition, the firm was named among the Top 200 Environmental Firms by ENR, and appeared for the first time as a Top 60 Engineering Firm nationwide by Building Design + Construction. Other recent rankings for Tighe & Bond include number 154 on ENR’s list of Top 200 Environmental Firms, based on environmental-specific revenue from 2016; number 260 on ENR’s Top 500 Design Firms, based on design-specific revenue from 2016; and sixth on Hartford Business Journal’s list of Largest Engineering Firms in Greater Hartford.

Hogan Technology Receives Cybersecurity Certification

EASTHAMPTON — Hogan Technology, a provider of unified communications, announced that the company is certified to provide cybersecurity solutions to SMBs (small to mid-sized businesses) to protect them from the barrage of cyberattacks that occur every day. Cybercrimes are a serious threat, and most businesses cannot afford to become the victim of malware, ransomware, phishing, password attacks, denial-of-service attacks, or malvertising of any sort for a prolonged period of time, said Sean Hogan, president of Hogan Technology. Recent advancements in preventive technology have helped SMBs safeguard themselves from unnecessary attacks, network vulnerabilities, and company downtime that can often result from such disruptions. Hogan Technology invests heavily in its staff of IT professionals to ensure that everyone is well-trained, certified, and fully equipped to protect customers from cyberattacks.

Bay Path Master’s Degree in Applied Data Science Ranked 12th Nationally

LONGMEADOW — Bay Path University’s master’s of science degree in applied data science was ranked 12th in a list of the top 50 data-science programs nationwide by www.onlinecoursereport.com. Rankings were based on a combination of affordability, flexibility, and student support services. The article highlights the low student-to-faculty ratio of 12 to 1 at Bay Path. It also makes reference to the university’s WiSH (Women in STEM Honors) program, which offers a four-year curriculum consisting of integrated and advanced study and research for women at the undergraduate level dedicated to becoming scientists. The university is also home to the Center of Excellence for Women in STEM, providing professional development, networking, and mentorship opportunities for students and professional women in STEM fields. The program is fully online and open to both women and men. The 36-credit program teaches the fundamental principles, platforms, and toolsets of the data-science profession in an accelerated format that can be completed in as little as one year. This rapidly growing career field is well suited to professionals with backgrounds in mathematics, statistics, and business analysis, with graduates achieving such career outcomes as data scientist, data engineer, and more.