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ACCGS Lunch ‘n’ Learn
Jan. 28: The November election has passed, and the voters have spoken, approving ballot question #4 approving of mandated sick leave, making Massachusetts only the third state in the nation to guarantee paid sick days for workers. Timothy Murphy, Esq., partner with Skoler, Abbott & Presser, P.C. and leading expert on the subject for the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield (ACCGS) Legislative Steering Committee, will explore the impact of the law at the ACCGS Lunch ‘n’ Learn from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Dodge Room of the Flynn Campus Union at Springfield College, 263 Alden St., Springfield. Murphy will discuss what the law entails for both large and small businesses, how the law will impact companies already providing sick leave or those that provide personal time off incorporating sick leave, which workers are eligible and which are not, what it means for a company and its workforce, and the subtle nuances of the law. Murphy joined Skoler, Abbott & Presser in 2001 after serving as general counsel to an area labor union. He represents and advises both union and non-union employers in a wide range of labor and employment matters. He regularly represents employers in matters before state and administrative agencies and courts. His work includes assisting employers to remain union-free, defending unfair labor practices, negotiating collective-bargaining agreements, and handling grievance arbitrations. Murphy is on the executive committee of the Springfield Chamber of Commerce and, is the former chair of the ACCGS Legislative Steering Committee, and is the go-to resource for the ACCGS on the issue of mandated sick leave. Reservations for the January Lunch ‘n’ Learn are $25 for members, $35 for general admission.  Registration includes lunch and one-on-one discussions with Murphy. Reservations may be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com or by e-mailing Sarah Mazzaferro at [email protected].
 
ACCGS Breakfast
Feb. 4:
Shriners Hospitals for Children will be among the honorees at the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield’s (ACCGS) [email protected] on Wednesday, Feb. 4 from 7:15 to 9 a.m. at Crestview Country Club, 281 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam. Shriners Hospital for Children will be honored for its 90th anniversary. The hospital provides medical care to children with orthopaedic, neuromusculoskeletal, cleft-lip, and palate disorders and diseases. As well, GZA GeoEnvironmental Inc., a professional-services consulting firm focused on geotechnical, environmental, water, ecological, and construction-management services, will be saluted for its 50th anniversary, and FIT Solutions, a leader in IT staffing, will be honored for its 10th anniversary. The breakfast will feature Dr. Steve Sobel, humorist and motivational speaker. Sobel will present “You’re a Piece of Work! Celebrate Joy, Passion, and Influence.” Sobels’s presentation will use humor to illuminate life’s possibilities and provide attendees with the tools needed to help them bring their ‘A’ game to their companies and customers. Sobel, a speaker, educator, success coach, and trainer throughout the U.S. and Canada, blends humor with targeted and inspirational messages to companies, businesses, athletic teams, and professional groups. He is a former award-winning school principal and continues to teach part-time at the college level, including many courses on entrepreneurship and visionary leadership. Reservations are $20 in advance for ACCGS members in advance ($25 at the door) and $30 for general admission. Reservations can be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com.

Chicopee Chamber CEO Luncheon
Feb. 11: The Greater Chicopee Chamber of Commerce will present its first CEO luncheon of 2015 from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Collegian Court Restaurant, 16 Park St., Chicopee. The speaker will be Elizabeth Barajas-Román, CEO of the Women’s Fund of Western Mass. Barajas-Román has been a leader in progressive movements, including advocating at the national level for the health and rights of immigrant women and their families. Most recently, she was a manager at the Pew Charitable Trusts, where she directed a portfolio of partners that campaigned for state and federal policy change to improve government performance on issues that impact children’s health. Barajas-Román brings a background in impactful philanthropy, data-driven strategy design, fund-raising through philanthropic partnerships, creating coalitions, and mobilizing partners. Previously, she served as the director of Policy at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health and directed the organization’s Washington, D.C. office. Barajas-Román was frequently invited to be a voice in national-policy discussions at the White House and on Capitol Hill. She is a graduate of Oberlin College and received her master’s degree in international policy from Harvard University. To register for the luncheon, visit ‘Upcoming Events’ on the chamber’s website, www.chicopeechamber.org. The cost is $25 for chamber members and $30 for non-members.

‘Pink in the Rink’
Feb. 21: Noble Hospital is the major sponsor the Springfield Falcons’ “Pink in the Rink” event against the Portland Pirates. This annual event helps to raise funds for and awareness of breast cancer. Falcons players wear special pink jerseys that will be autographed and auctioned off after the event. Visit www.ebay.com/usr/springfieldfalcons to bid on the pink jerseys after the game. In addition to the hockey game, breast-cancer survivors will be honored, there will be giveaways and raffles, and Noble Hospital will provide an information booth. Members of a support group, the Pink WAY, will also attend. Noble Hospital’s Center for Comprehensive Breast Health, under the direction of Dr. Steven Schonholz, provides a wide range of options and services in a single location. Pink bracelets will be available for donations at the Noble table; funds raised will go towards Noble’s breast-cancer awareness programs and to help local patients going through treatments. Area residents can support Noble Hospital by purchasing tickets to the game at give.noblehospital.org/pinkintherink. For more information, contact the hospital’s Community Development Office at [email protected] or (413) 568-2811, ext. 5520.

West of the River Chamber Legislative Breakfast
Feb. 25: The West of the River Chamber of Commerce announced that it will stage its Legislative Breakfast, an event that brings members and non-members together for a morning of breakfast and legislative updates, from 7 to 9 a.m. at the Storrowton Tavern Carriage House in West Springfield. Attendees will have the opportunity to connect with local business people over breakfast, and later will enjoy an informational session presented by a panel of legislators including state Sens. Donald Humason and James Welch, state Rep. Michael Finn, Agawam Mayor Mayor Richard Cohen, and West Springfield Mayor Edward Sullivan. Political consultant Anthony Cignoli will emcee the event and offer economic updates. Sponsors for the event are Health New England, OMG, the Insurance Center of New England, Ormsby Insurance, and Spherion. The cost is $25 for members, $30 for non-members. For more information, call the chamber office at (413) 426-3880.

PAWSCARS Fund-raiser
Feb. 28: Dakin Humane Society will present a fund-raising event at the MassMutual Center in Springfield that will affectionately spoof Hollywood, the Oscars, and red-carpet fashion. Dubbed “The PAWSCARS & Red Carpet Fashion Parade,” the show will be emceed by Ashley Kohl and Seth Stutman, hosts of Mass Appeal on WWLP-22News. Beginning with a VIP Reception at 6 p.m. and a plated dinner at 7 p.m., the evening will also include a red-carpet fashion parade featuring local people of prominence, accompanied by rescue dogs (among them former Dakin dogs, now adopted). Short videos of animals recreating iconic moments in cinematic history, created by members of the public, will also be screened during the evening. “We’re looking forward to presenting a one-of-a-kind event with the PAWSCARS,” said Dakin Executive Director Leslie Harris. “We’re blending fashion, fun, and film with a healthy dose of humor for an unforgettable night. Plus, as our major fund-raising event of the year, it will be a terrific opportunity for our supporters to come together and enjoy themselves while providing much-needed aid for the many animals in our care.” With a targeted audience of 500, The PAWSCARS is Dakin’s most ambitious fund-raising event in its 45-year history. Tickets for the event are available at www.dakinhumane.org for $125 per person (dinner and show) or $50 (show only). Corporate sponsors for the PAWSCARS include Baystate Health, Piepul’s Camera Center, Clinical & Support Options, United Personnel, C.A.R. Data Management and Program Evaluation Services, Hampden Bank, and Robinson Donovan. Visit www.dakinhumane.org for more information about the event.

Difference Makers
March 19: The sixth annual Difference Makers award program, staged by BusinessWest, will be held at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. Details on the event will be published in upcoming issues of the magazine. Difference Makers is a program, launched in 2009, that recognizes groups and individuals that are, as the name suggests, making a difference in this region. The class of 2015 will be unveiled and profiled in the upcoming Feb. 9 issue. Tickets on sale for $60 each. Table of 10 available. Call (413) 781-8600.

40 Under Forty
June 18: The ninth annual 40 Under Forty award program, staged by BusinessWest, will be held at the Log Cabin Banquet & Meeting House. Details on the event, which honors the region’s most accomplished and civic-minded professionals under age 40, will be published in upcoming issues. Nominations are now open for the class of 2015, and are due by the end of the day (5 p.m.) on Feb. 6. The nomination form can be found at HERE.

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

CHICOPEE DISTRICT COURT
Stewart Staffing Solutions, LLC v. Spic n Span Cleaning Company, LLC
Allegations: Non-payment of services rendered: $9,846.11
Filed: 12/30/14

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
Ellen Simes v. Drug Stores II, LLC d/b/a Innovo Specialty Compounding Solutions
Allegations: Breach of contract: $435,000
Filed: 11/26/14

Maurice Christopoher Chin v. Garda CL New England Inc.
Allegations: Negligence, libel, and defamation: $93,000
Filed: 11/24/14

SPEC Process Engineering and Construction Inc. v. Vertrolysis, LLC and Ricar, LLC
Allegations: Breach of contract: $341,467.96
Filed: 12/3/14

VIP Physical Therapy Inc. v. Elco Administrative Services
Allegations: Breach of contract and unfair and deceptive practices: $1,000,000
Filed: 11/24/14

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Christian A. Fitzgerald, personal representative of the estate of Rebecca A. Turner v. Richard Romano, M.D., Jena Marie Comeau, R.N., and Baystate Mary Lane Hospital
Allegations: Medical negligence resulting in pain, suffering, and death: $5,075,000
Filed: 12/30/14

Miranda Design Studio Inc. v. Flat World Knowledge Inc.
Allegations: Failure to pay for services rendered: $46,288
Filed: 12/9/14

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
Denise Lussier v. Bob’s Aluminum Supply and Robert Lamy
Allegations: Failure to complete proposed three-season room in accordance with contract: $29,484
Filed: 12/15/14

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Liberty Mutual Insurance Company v. SMP Real Estate Investment & Development Company, LLC d/b/a SMP Realty Development, LLC
Allegations: Balance owed for insurance premiums: $7,778.56
Filed: 12/23/14

Ted Ondrick Company, LLC v. GML Construction Inc. and Victor R. O’Brien Jr.
Allegations: Non-payment of construction materials and landscaping services rendered: $20,768.19
Filed: 12/16/14

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
W.W. Grainger Inc. v. Odd Job Doctor Inc.
Allegations: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $9,448.90
Filed: 11/13/14

Daily News

LUDLOW — The Westmass Area Development Corp. announced that it will begin Phase I of its riverwalk project this month, part of the approved Ludlow Mills Preservation and Redevelopment Comprehensive Master Plan.

Westmass will begin construction on the riverwalk with a planned completion of Phase I this July. The initial phase of construction will cost $600,000 and is being funded through a partnership between HealthSouth and Westmass.

The riverwalk is one of the early commitments that Westmass made to the town of Ludlow and its residents to promote public health and recreation along the river. The riverwalk will offer public space for pedestrian use and passive recreation, opening up the Chicopee River to the Ludlow Mills businesses and to residents of the community.

Westmass has selected a local contractor, Gomes Construction Co., for this phase of the project. Phase I will feature a loop design and will start near Center Street, just east of the Town Common, run along the river toward the new HealthSouth Hospital, and then return through the proposed future park and reconnect with the recently installed municipal sidewalk system on State Street.

The length of this phase of the riverwalk will span 3,575 feet and will incorporate the use of recycled brick materials, historic timeline markers and river observation areas along the walk. Together, the proposed riverwalk and future public park will cover approximately 52 acres, or nearly one-third of the Ludlow Mills site.

Westmass seeks to convey that open space to the town so that it will remain in protected public use. The open space is intended to integrate the Ludlow Mills project into the neighborhood and community as well as support the many existing and new businesses that are attracted by the revived vibrancy of the Ludlow Mills.

Daily News

HOLYOKE — The American Assoc. of Community Colleges has selected HCC professor emerita, alumna, and major donor Elaine Marieb for its 2015 Outstanding Alumni awards.

Marieb taught anatomy and physiology at Holyoke Community College for 25 years after receiving her Ph.D. in zoology from UMass. While teaching, she enrolled in HCC’s Registered Nursing program, earning her associate degree. Her teaching and education led her to write a series of anatomy and physiology textbooks that have gone on to become international bestsellers.

Last year, Marieb donated $1 million toward HCC’s Building Healthy Communities fund-raising campaign, which is supporting two building projects at the college, a new Center for Health Education on Jarvis Avenue, and the Center for Life Sciences on campus. The AACC award recognizes community-college alumni for their career achievements, philanthropic contributions, and inspirational impact.

“We are incredibly grateful and fortunate not only to have Elaine Marieb as an alum but as a professor emeritus,” said Erica Broman, vice president of Institutional Development. “Her work in the classroom was exemplary, and she has continued to foster a relationship with students at the college, where she has been enormously generous with both her time and resources. She certainly deserves this recognition.”

Marieb grew up in Northampton and now lives in Sarasota, Fla. She will receive her award at the AACC’s annual convention in San Antonio, Texas, on April 21.

When it opens for the fall 2015 semester, the Center for Health Education will be the new home of HCC’s Nursing and Radiologic Technology programs. After that project is complete, HCC will begin construction on the Center for Life Sciences, which will be located on the first floor of the school’s main science building, the Marieb Building, which was named for Elaine Marieb, who over the years has been one of the school’s most significant benefactors.

Marieb’s financial support led to the creation of HCC’s Marieb Chair for Teaching Excellence, which is awarded annually to one member of the HCC faculty. Through the HCC Foundation, she has endowed numerous scholarships for students in HCC’s Nursing and New Directions programs. The study lounge used by the HCC Pathways program was named the Marieb Center in recognition of her support.

Last March, Marieb issued a challenge gift as a way to spur participation in the HCC Foundation’s Building Healthy Communities campaign: if 1,000 donors contributed gifts of any amount by Dec. 31, Marieb said she would donate $1 million. Thanks to that incentive, dubbed “Mission: Marieb,” the campaign had exceeded its $5.3 million goal by June, raising a total of $5.5 million — the most successful fund-raising effort in HCC history.

Daily News

HADLEY — Westmass Area Development Corp. announced that American River Nutrition, founded by former UMass Amherst Professor of Food Science and Nutrition Barrie Tan, has begun construction of a 25,000-square-foot office and manufacturing building at the Hadley University Business Park. With the coordinated permitting efforts of the Hadley Planning Board and Conservation Commission, construction is able to commence.

American River Nutrition manufactures vitamin E, a dietary supplement, from plant material through a proprietary distillation process that produces no toxic or harmful byproducts. Its vitamin E product is known as DeltaGold. The company is also involved in research that may lead to the introduction of pharmaceutical versions of its products. The company was launched in 1998 in Hadley in response to the market need for innovative products that are natural, have little to no known side effects, and positively affect conditions associated with age-related and/or degenerative disease states.

Many people take vitamin E in the rapidly-growing vitamin and supplement industry in hopes that the vitamin’s antioxidant properties will help to prevent diseases and build a strong immune system. American River Nutrition has also recently qualified its vitamin E product as a food supplement, opening new avenues for this growing company. American River Nutrition currently employs nine people, and, according to Tan, up to 20 people will be employed when the company opens its new manufacturing operation later this year on its 16-acre site at Hadley University Business Park.

“We are happy to be able to bring our manufacturing operations to Hadley, where our home office has been located since we began the company,” said Tan. “And we look forward to a continuing role as a strong member of the local business community.”

According to Westmass President Kenn Delude, “Westmass is pleased to make this announcement today. We believe that American River Nutrition is on an exceptional growth track and is exactly the type of innovative company that our region needs to support and retain. It is the combination of the quality job growth that the company offers coupled with the extraordinary focus and purpose of their efforts to promote good health that makes Westmass proud they chose the Hadley University Business Park for their new facility.”

Delude said one site remains available for new development in the Hadley Park. The remaining site can accommodate a 20,000- to 25,000-square-foot building on a 3.5-acre, developable parcel. Westmass is seeking interested businesses for that parcel. In addition to Hadley University Business Park, Westmass is developing available business sites at Chicopee River Business Park, Deer Park Industrial Center in East Longmeadow, and its latest development at the Ludlow Mills.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — American International College (AIC) is embarking on an $8 million renovation of its dining commons.

The new, state-of-the-art facility will occupy the existing dining-commons space and include a building expansion, a wider variety of seating, and a more abundant variety of food options and services, including customized food preparation, an exhibition kitchen featuring hands-on cooking classes, a wood-fired oven, and more, presented in a contemporary, dynamic, and open setting.

Construction is expected to be completed in time for the beginning of the fall semester. In the interim, the existing dining commons will be closed for the spring semester, and transitional dining has been set up in the Schwartz Campus Center. Chartwells, AIC’s dining-services vendor, will continue to provide the same quality of food and service throughout the process. AIC will provide additional benefits and flexibility to those students with current all-access meal plans that will allow them to expand food venues and options to include the Hive and the Yellow Jackets Express food truck in addition to the transitional dining commons.

While there was a cosmetic remodel of the dining room in 2007, the last complete renovation of the dining commons took place in 1966, nearly 50 years ago. The new facility will be a place for students to come together in a much more comfortable and modern setting. A groundbreaking ceremony is planned for early spring.

Community Spotlight Features
In Holyoke, Municipal Investments Pay Dividends

Mayor Alex Morse

Mayor Alex Morse says Holyoke has been a leader among area communities in efforts to build a creative-economy sector.

When Alex Morse was elected mayor of Holyoke in 2011, he was determined to revitalize the city and alter the way people thought about it.

“My number-one job was to change the perception that Holyoke’s best days were behind us,” he said.

His efforts have been largely successful, and dedicated planning and teamwork have led to major investments in infrastructure and noteworthy projects.

“Good things have happened in the last year, and there are a lot of shovels in the ground. People can see things moving forward, which is a sign that the economy in Holyoke is getting better, and we will continue to put more shovels in the ground this year,” Morse said. “The city is on a positive trajectory.”

The most significant undertaking is the new, $3.5 million passenger-rail platform being built on Dwight and Main streets. “We broke ground on Dec. 22, and when it is finished in September, it will be the first completed rail platform in Western Mass.,” the mayor said.

The project is a reflection of foresight, because when Morse took office, there were no plans for a commuter-rail stop in Holyoke. “But it was a huge economic-development opportunity, and although there were times when funding was short, we were able to get $4 million in state and federal funds for it through MassWorks grants; it has been paid for without taking any money from local sources,” Morse said, adding that Marcos Marrero, the town’s Planning and Economic Development director, worked closely with the state Department of Transportation, “and we made it a priority project, as it is integral to the revitalization of our downtown.”

In addition, Morse said new businesses have opened and apartments are under construction (more about that later) that will help to reinvigorate the city.

“We see ourselves as part of the Springfield/Hartford metro area, and have a lot of space available that is very affordable. People are recognizing that, and folks from as far away as San Francisco are investing here,” he told BusinessWest, citing the purchase of the Wauregan building on 384 Dwight St., which is co-owned by San Francisco artist Scott Reilly, and adding that Vertitech IT moved its national headquarters to Holyoke last year, and the city helped the company work with Holyoke Community College to find employees.

Expanding the creative-arts community has been a cornerstone of the city’s economic-development strategy, and Morse hired a creative-economy coordinator shortly after he took office. “We’re the first community in the state to have a full-time person dedicated to bolstering the creative economy. It is a job creator that generates a lot of revenue, and we have seen an uptick of artists moving here, and a spike in the development of makers spaces,” he said.

They include Gateway City Arts on 91-114 Race St., which was founded in 2012 by artists Lori Divine and Vitek Kruta with a cash incentive from the city. “The business provides space in which craftspeople work, teach, and hold events. It has become an incubator space for artists,” Morse said.

“People are amazed at the amount of talent we have in Holyoke, and on any given night, you can see cars parked on Race Street for an art gallery, opening show, or performance,” he added. “We’ve taken it very seriously.”

He also pointed to the Brick Co-workshop Co. on Dwight Street as another example of success. Artists representing 10 different trades have made it their home and are helping to promote the city as a center for arts and crafts. Plus, the Holyoke Creative Arts Center, which provides classes at a minimal cost, has plans to move from 400 South Elm St. into the three-story, red-brick Wauregan Building, located in the newly designated Art and Innovation District, later this month.

Time and effort has also been spent to encourage people in the community to open businesses, and Holyoke was one of six cities named as a winner of the Working Cities Challenge. It was sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, which identified 21 working cities whose median income was lower than the state average, then challenged them to create innovative proposals that would help provide employment.

Holyoke’s winning program is called the Stimulating Potential and Accessing Resources or Knowledge Initiative (SPARK). Its goal is to link the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center with the city’s innovation-economy strategy and increase the number of businesses owned by Latinos. The initiative is being led by the city in partnership with the Greater Holyoke Chamber of Commerce, and is supported by other partners in the public, private, and nonprofit realms.

Morse said the idea is to create a pipeline that will help Latinos who are interested in the creative arts see themselves as entrepreneurs and open businesses. “We want to continue to build on our local talent and have hired a director for the program,” he said, adding that the city will receive $250,000 over three years to implement the program.

Plethora of Projects

When a city invests in itself, Morse said, it sends a message that it is willing to partner with businesses to grow the economy.

To that end, Holyoke boasts a new library and senior center, and also kicked off Phase 2 of a $4.3 million Canal Walk project on Race Street over the summer. Phase 1, which runs between Dwight and Appleton streets, is complete, and the second section of the walkway will include a foot bridge over the canal.

“This is just one of the improvements we’ve made to catalyze retail businesses along the canal and make our downtown walkable,” Morse said.

Vibrant metropolises also contain residential living space, he added, noting that the city is making progress on this front as well. A groundbreaking ceremony was held in August for a $20 million project that will transform the former Holyoke Catholic High School into 55 one- and two-bedroom apartments. The city has been working with Denis Walsh, who owns Weld Management, for several years on his vision to create the new residences in the 74,000-square-foot building, which is set on 2.3 acres.

“The prospect of getting more people to live downtown is exciting, and this is a great example of a public/private partnership,” Morse said, noting that the city contributed $750,000 toward the project. He added that a $1.4 million renovation of Veterans Park, which can be seen from the building, was completed last year.

The Holyoke Transportation Center also overlooks the park and contains a café on the first floor operated by the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House. Holyoke Community College holds classes in the building, and it is also home to a Head Start program.

“The conversion of Holyoke Catholic High School will complete that block and bring more life to the neighborhood,” Morse said, adding that Walsh is also developing high-end, market-rate apartments on the upper floors of a few other buildings.

One challenge the city faces, however, is a lack of eateries downtown. Attracting restaurateurs has been difficult because liquor licenses have not been available. In order to mitigate the problem, Morse put together a proposal that received approval from the City Council and the state, which will give Holyoke 13 additional liquor licenses.

“The caveat is that they can only be used for full-service restaurants in the downtown urban-renewal district,” the mayor said. “Although a liquor license can go for upwards of $100,000 on the open market, these will only cost $10,000 because they’re being offered as an economic incentive. We plan to hold an event later this month to explain what is involved, and have invited people in town as well as restaurant operators from places that include Worcester, Hartford, Amherst, and Pittsfield.”

Plans have also been made to address the former Parsons Paper Co. site, which has been an eyesore since a fire devastated the property in 2008. Northeast Utilities has provided $250,000 to assess the contamination, demolish what remains of the buildings, and clean up the brownfields, as part of a mitigation agreement connected to a former electric plant near the dam and canal.

When the work is complete, the property will be put on the market, and Morse said a business has already expressed interest in the site.

Meanwhile, Divine and Kruta, who opened Gateway City Arts, also purchased the Steam Building on Race Street last year and are turning it into office space.

“The city and Holyoke Community College recently announced that HCC is moving its entire culinary-hospitality department downtown, and the Steam Building is being considered as one of the potential sites,” Morse said. “We are hoping to pair the college program with a full-service, privately owned restaurant.”

Private-sector growth is also occurring, and Marcotte Ford on Main Street recently broke ground on an $8 million expansion. “We worked hard to keep them here,” Morse said. “They were landlocked, but were able to purchase an old dealership next to them. We’re working to help them get some city land between the properties as well as negotiating a tax incentive.”

Bright Future

Morse said a number of other projects are on the horizon, among them the redevelopment of the old Lynch Middle School.

The project was put out to bid last spring, and the city chose Frontier Development from the firms that responded. It will create 25,000 square feet of retail space in the building with the opportunity for expansion, which will lead to jobs and turn a non-taxpaying property into one that generates taxes, Morse told BusinessWest. “Plus, we think it will bring people to the city, as it’s right off the highway.”

In addition, the recently decommissioned Mt. Tom coal plant will be assessed to determine what it would take to clean it up and reuse the property.

The mayor said the projects that have come to fruition have not happened overnight, and the effort and thought that have gone into them will continue.

“Today,” he concluded, people see Holyoke as a city on the rise.”

Holyoke at a glance

Year Incorporated: 1850
Population: 40,135 (2012)

Area: 22.8 square miles

County: Hampden

Residential Tax Rate: $19.04
Commercial Tax Rate: $39.74
Median Household Income: $33,030
Family Household Income: $36,262
Type of government: Mayor, City Council
Largest Employers: Holyoke Medical Center; Holyoke Public Schools; Holyoke Community College; Amica Mutual Insurance Co.
* Latest information available

Departments Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

BERNARDSTON

259 South St.
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $345,700
Buyer: Beverly A. Allard
Seller: Mary R. Lightner
Date: 12/02/14

COLRAIN

15 Calvin Coombs Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Jacob R. Coburn
Seller: Clayton R. Dodge
Date: 12/02/14

29 Dwight Cross Road
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $175,871
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Paul A. Bonneville
Date: 12/04/14

GREENFIELD

770 Country Club Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Benjamin A. Foberg
Seller: Norman W. Morris
Date: 12/05/14

110 Hastings St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $223,500
Buyer: Gretchen Zwart
Seller: Angela Recchia
Date: 12/01/14

58 Lincoln St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $145,500
Buyer: Shaun M. Coughlin
Seller: Kelleigh A. Weld
Date: 12/01/14

LEVERETT

48 Cave Hill Road
Leverett, MA 01054
Amount: $255,000
Buyer: Mark L. Roch
Seller: Eva L. Claeson
Date: 12/03/14

MONROE

95 North Road
Monroe, MA 01350
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: William F. Phelps
Seller: Ryan RT
Date: 12/03/14

MONTAGUE

181 Turners Falls Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $305,900
Buyer: Robert R. Stockwell
Seller: Joseph E. Landry
Date: 12/05/14

NORTHFIELD

65 Saint Mary’s St.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Elizabeth J. Knapp
Seller: May L. Hnath
Date: 12/05/14

ORANGE

174 Pleasant St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $127,445
Buyer: Athol Savings Bank
Seller: Carey, Navarette S. M., (Estate)
Date: 12/04/14

SUNDERLAND

160 Old Amherst Road
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Kuei L. Lo
Seller: Paul J. Dauenhauer
Date: 12/02/14

WARWICK

808 Orange Road
Warwick, MA 01378
Amount: $212,500
Buyer: Corey M. Lafrenier
Seller: James C. Goodwin
Date: 12/01/14

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

Agawam Terrace
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $127,000
Buyer: William P. O’Hare
Seller: Donald Blanchard
Date: 12/05/14

113 Channell Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Ryan Chisholm
Seller: Saw Construction LLC
Date: 12/05/14

74 Kosak Ct.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $282,000
Buyer: Brian F. Leavy
Seller: Joseph M. McDonald
Date: 12/05/14

723 North Westfield St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Gina M. Williams
Seller: Francis A. Mancini
Date: 12/05/14

18 Phil St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Heather C. Mansur
Seller: Daniel L. Sullivan
Date: 12/05/14

BRIMFIELD

Little Alum Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Daniel A. Baillargeon
Seller: Christine M. Ronan
Date: 12/01/14

15 Prospect Hill Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $161,748
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Cynthia Macgowan
Date: 12/05/14

CHICOPEE

41 Bristol St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Tricia M. Viafara
Seller: Edward A. Como
Date: 12/04/14

729 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Munsing Ridge Realty LLC
Seller: Timothy J. Driscoll
Date: 12/05/14

64 Dulong Circle
Chicopee, MA 01022
Amount: $238,350
Buyer: 64 Dulong Circle LLC
Seller: Christopher P. Lapinski
Date: 12/04/14

98 Edgewood Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: James Hogan
Seller: Joseph R. Hogan
Date: 12/05/14

914 Front St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $117,400
Buyer: Lisa A. Bessette
Seller: Kim E. Cournoyer

777 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Brian Fournier
Seller: Dennis K. Francis
Date: 12/05/14

27 Helen St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $119,104
Buyer: Nationstar Mortgage LLC
Seller: Daniel J. Salamon
Date: 12/04/14

169 Jacob St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $179,000
Buyer: Cesar Liriano-Tolentino
Seller: Roy Properties LLC
Date: 12/02/14

35 Lafayette St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $178,400
Buyer: Naomi Reyes
Seller: Gerald R. Coderre
Date: 12/02/14

26 Loretta Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Chang X. Jiang
Seller: Jeanne E. Bennis
Date: 12/05/14

43 Pendexter Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $134,900
Buyer: Sreymom Suong
Seller: Kerri A. Labonte
Date: 12/02/14

833 Pendleton Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $117,500
Buyer: Kenneth E. Towsley
Seller: Jarid C. Cusson
Date: 12/04/14

8 Riverview Place
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Brandy Magdalino
Seller: Alfred G. Laflamme
Date: 12/01/14

25 Stedman St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $166,018
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Jonathan H. Pope
Date: 12/04/14

EAST LONGMEADOW

74 Elm St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Ersilia Sarno
Seller: Thomas D. Stevens
Date: 12/03/14

22 Indiana St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Eric Hirschberg
Seller: Dawn A. Sanel
Date: 12/01/14

5 Redin Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Nathan J. Martin
Seller: Christopher L. Calcasola
Date: 12/03/14

104 Stonehill Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Christopher L. Calcasola
Seller: Charles E. Hulton
Date: 12/03/14

HAMPDEN

93 Sessions Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $159,900
Buyer: Bruce Coolidge
Seller: Lawrence R. Bauer
Date: 12/03/14

246 South Monson Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $214,500
Buyer: Jennifer R. Daviau
Seller: Katelyn R. Marcelina
Date: 12/05/14

HOLLAND

11 Lakeview Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $117,000
Buyer: Laura Small
Seller: Alice H. Hunt
Date: 12/05/14

HOLYOKE

140 Allyn St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Kathleen M. Fahy
Seller: Aldis B. Cauley
Date: 12/02/14

209 Beech St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $175,500
Buyer: Melissa A. O’Connell
Seller: Neftali Cruz
Date: 12/02/14

71 Davis St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Travis M. Wells
Seller: Isaac Santana
Date: 12/03/14

12 George Frost Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Joshua C. Rickman
Seller: Maria H. Knoller
Date: 12/03/14

34 Lower Westfield Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $1,495,000
Buyer: Mont Marie Property LLC
Seller: Sisters of Saint Joseph
Date: 12/02/14

109 Madison Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Michael G. Washut
Seller: Richard A. Charpentier
Date: 12/05/14

42 Mount Tom Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $243,000
Buyer: Gregg J. Harrison
Seller: Christopher J. Cabrini

141 Saint Jerome Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $116,000
Buyer: Carolyn D. Roberts
Seller: O’Donnell, Helen, (Estate)
Date: 12/04/14

LONGMEADOW

76 Barrington Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Lauren E. Wundt
Seller: Ashley A. Grant
Date: 12/03/14

80 Mill Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $445,000
Buyer: Daniel P. Yerrington
Seller: Susan McFarlin
Date: 12/04/14

43 Wildwood Glen
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $228,500
Buyer: Kenneth R. Holt
Seller: William S. Whittlesey
Date: 12/05/14

LUDLOW

40 Brunelle St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $209,900
Buyer: Melody L. Fontaine
Seller: Scott Stuckenbruck
Date: 12/05/14

348 Chapin St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Kelly R. Boudreau
Seller: Andrew V. Panek
Date: 12/05/14

MONSON

102 Stebbins Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Samantha M. Cummings
Seller: Brian A. Scansaroli
Date: 12/05/14

3 Stewart Ave.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Glen D. Johnson TR
Seller: AJES Enterprises LLC
Date: 12/03/14

PALMER

1156 South Main St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $157,000
Buyer: Rebecca J. Kelly
Seller: Albin Les
Date: 12/03/14

RUSSELL

883 General Knox Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Jamie Desormier
Seller: Douglas B. Mayhew
Date: 12/01/14

SPRINGFIELD

118 Arthur St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $124,900
Buyer: Elisamuel Camacho
Seller: Francis L. Crogan
Date: 12/03/14

14 Colorado St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Cornelius L. Blyther
Seller: William M. Hickson
Date: 12/01/14

128 Duggan Circle
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $127,500
Buyer: Tahir M. Graham
Seller: Laura A. Graves
Date: 12/05/14

240 Garnet St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: Joshua C. Florence
Seller: David P. Chapdelaine
Date: 12/05/14

256-260 Laconia St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Michael S. Freitas
Seller: Walter L. Black
Date: 12/05/14

57 Lyndale St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Patrice M. Gresham
Seller: William R. Vershon
Date: 12/01/14

27 Lynwood Terrace
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $146,000
Buyer: Liana Rivera
Date: 12/01/14

10 Mill St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $2,300,000
Buyer: Blue Tarp Redevelopment
Seller: Orr Realty Co.
Date: 12/01/14

420 Parker St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $142,500
Buyer: Nuntana Savanorke
Seller: Josephine F. Banas
Date: 12/05/14

47 Sierra Vista Road
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $144,000
Buyer: Michael R. Sears
Seller: John P. Ballcok
Date: 12/05/14

3 South Longyard Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $179,900
Buyer: Mikaela M. Spence
Seller: Norwich Properties LLC
Date: 12/05/14

2175 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $137,000
Buyer: Elizabeth P. Lancaster
Seller: Paul Duquette
Date: 12/03/14

499 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Franco Fomuki
Seller: Home Equity Assets Realty
Date: 12/02/14

1062 Worthington St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Lisa Orenstein
Seller: Anthony Wray
Date: 12/02/14

SOUTHWICK

11 Fred Jackson Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Elias N. Baenziger
Seller: James P. Hannon
Date: 12/02/14

WEST SPRINGFIELD

84 Clarence St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Raymond J. Barbieri
Seller: Darlene E. Woolson
Date: 12/05/14

32 Glenview Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Jason D. Leary
Seller: James R. Manley
Date: 12/05/14

52 Lancaster Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Kenneth A. Grass
Seller: Judith G. Pashko
Date: 12/05/14

11 Piper Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Old Oak Holding Co. LLC
Seller: Gail Terranova
Date: 12/03/14

WESTFIELD

40 Arnold St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $1,875,000
Buyer: Vandeusen Apts. LLC
Seller: Sonjack Realty LP
Date: 12/03/14

42 Arnold St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $1,875,000
Buyer: Vandeusen Apts. LLC
Seller: Sonjack Realty LP
Date: 12/03/14

54 Arnold St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $1,875,000
Buyer: Vandeusen Apts. LLC
Seller: Sonjack Realty LP
Date: 12/03/14

55 Beverly Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: John J. Pretola
Seller: Karl Baush
Date: 12/04/14

91 Elm St.
Amount: $2,825,000
Buyer: Chalmers Enterprises LLC
Seller: William Foggle
Date: 12/03/14

25 King St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Roger Eaton
Seller: Earl Smith
Date: 12/04/14

15 Kylie Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Raina A. Patel
Seller: Richard W. Perigord
Date: 12/03/14

11 Monroe St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $1,850,000
Buyer: Pilgrim Apts. LLC
Seller: William Foggle RET
Date: 12/03/14

8 Monroe St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $1,850,000
Buyer: Pilgrim Apts. LLC
Seller: William Foggle RET
Date: 12/03/14

600 Montgomery Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Kyle E. Konrad
Seller: Robert J. Burke
Date: 12/01/14

34 Orange St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Victor L. Vela
Seller: Nicolos C. Sanabria
Date: 12/05/14

8 Woodside Terrace
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $118,900
Buyer: Jpmorgan Chase Bank
Seller: Charles W. Medeiros
Date: 12/03/14

WILBRAHAM

17 Scenic Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $259,000
Buyer: Kathleen E. Moriarty
Seller: Kirstin M. Joyce
Date: 12/04/14

21 Warren Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $370,000
Buyer: Robert M. Wallace
Seller: James M. Moriarty
Date: 12/04/14

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

18 Birchcroff Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $366,000
Buyer: Joshua F. Lombard
Seller: James G. Geiger
Date: 12/05/14

65 Harlow Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Kenneth W. Barber
Seller: Frank S. Sottile
Date: 12/05/14

35 Kestrel Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Harry J. Flood
Seller: R. K. Fradet
Date: 12/01/14

1401 Sourth East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $339,000
Buyer: Thomas E. Johnson
Seller: Stephen S. Hixson
Date: 12/04/14

BELCHERTOWN

334 Bardwell St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Kevin R. Beaulieu
Seller: Erika L. Grundstrom
Date: 12/05/14

275 Hamilton St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Chad L. Rose
Seller: Roger F. Hitchcock
Date: 12/05/14

35 Spring Hill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $399,900
Buyer: Carl W. Shafer
Seller: Vance P. Walberg
Date: 12/02/14

420 State St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $248,500
Buyer: Daniel A. Barroso
Seller: Joseph E. Wojnas
Date: 12/05/14

EASTHAMPTON

15 Garfield Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Philip P. Smith
Seller: Betsy M. Ducharme
Date: 12/01/14

28 Golden Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Christopher J. Cabrini
Seller: Marcel A. Boisvert
Date: 12/01/14

126-128 Northampton St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $1,860,000
Buyer: Denmark Property Group LLC
Seller: H. Fitzgerald LLC
Date: 12/02/14

29 Paul St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $329,000
Buyer: Franklin D. Anglin
Seller: David Garstka Builders
Date: 12/01/14

31 Plymouth Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $136,000
Buyer: Christopher M. Soutra
Seller: Susan B. Brion
Date: 12/03/14

16 West St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $197,500
Buyer: Adam M. Fox
Seller: Joshua C. Stearns
Date: 12/01/14

GRANBY

12 Aldrich St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $499,500
Buyer: Doest G. Ter
Seller: Ernest R. Tremblay IRT
Date: 12/05/14

130 Amherst St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Michael J. Breault
Seller: David M. Bessette
Date: 12/02/14

235 Carver St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Noah Clock
Seller: Joseph E. Clark
Date: 12/04/14

HATFIELD

68 Prospect St.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $270,697
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Jeffrey A. Ranney
Date: 12/01/14

HUNTINGTON

11 Mountain View
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Holly B. Whitaker
Seller: Bates, Gordon F., (Estate)
Date: 12/05/14

NORTHAMPTON

80 Barrett St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $1,212,741
Buyer: Aster Associates LLC
Seller: Betandri LP
Date: 12/05/14

95 Barrett St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $246,000
Buyer: Sunwood Development Corp.
Seller: Veronica Lap
Date: 12/05/14

18 Bright Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $314,000
Buyer: Franz Pedit
Seller: Justin M. Wheatley
Date: 12/03/14

137 Clement St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Jeanne M. Borfitz
Seller: Richard S. Kueny
Date: 12/02/14

43 Hatfield St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Daniel G. Gonzalez
Seller: John M. Grab
Date: 12/01/14

41 Lincoln Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: John G. Gibbons
Seller: Barbara Morgan
Date: 12/04/14

217 Prospect St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $317,500
Buyer: Marylou Dodge
Seller: Jeanne M. Borfitz
Date: 12/02/14

91 Round Hill Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $1,495,000
Buyer: A. K. Saal
Seller: Edgecliff TR
Date: 12/01/14

511 Sylvester Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Anthony A. Vacchelli
Seller: Zawalick, Timothy P., (Estate)
Date: 12/05/14

17 Vernon St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Glenn Alper
Seller: John J. Meehan
Date: 12/02/14

SOUTH HADLEY

97 Ferry St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $460,000
Buyer: Joseph E. Clark
Seller: Melinda M. Costello TR
Date: 12/02/14

20 Hillside Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $164,000
Buyer: Michael J. Slater
Seller: Robert F. Caselden
Date: 12/01/14

1 Valley View Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Nabish RT
Seller: Edward L. Schwalm
Date: 12/05/14

SOUTHAMPTON

11 Jonathan Judd Circle
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $264,900
Buyer: Joshua C. Stearns
Seller: Theodore A. Midura
Date: 12/01/14

WARE

113 Glendale Circle
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $159,000
Buyer: Julie N. Boucher
Seller: Paul F. Russell
Date: 12/04/14

2 Gwen Circle
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Steven M. Spano
Seller: Timothy P. Lagrant
Date: 12/04/14

16 Pinecrest Circle
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $244,000
Buyer: Crystal L. Russell
Seller: Mathew A. Biron
Date: 12/04/14

18 Prospect St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: N. M. St.Laurent
Seller: Forrant, Allan M., (Estate)
Date: 12/03/14

Briefcase Departments

$5 Million Allocated to UMass Amherst for R&D Center at Westover
CHICOPEE — Gov. Deval Patrick recently released a business plan on growth opportunities at Westover Airport, outlining numerous steps the Commonwealth and Greater Chicopee region can undertake to grow the economy in Western Mass. and to support the mission of Westover Air Reserve Base (ARB), the joint user of the military and civilian airfield. As a result of the plan’s findings, Patrick announced four initiatives to benefit the Westover region, including the proposed creation of a UMass Amherst Research, Development, and Training Center in Chicopee. “Westover Airport and Westover Air Reserve Base are two stellar assets with so much potential for smart growth,” said Patrick. “To support the region’s economy and potential for more private and commercial air service, I commissioned this report to look at a wide variety of options. I’m pleased with the team’s effort and with UMass Amherst’s plan to open a research, development, and training center in Chicopee to tap into the innovative minds in the city and region.” Patrick has allocated up to $5 million to UMass Amherst to support the creation of a research and development partnership program at Westover ARB. This funding would be used to lease and renovate a vacant Westover ARB building to establish a National Aeronautics, Research, Development, and Training Center with UMass Amherst as the lead institution. UMass Amherst is in the process of partnering with NASA on several innovative research projects leveraging promising new technologies to promote efficiencies, safety, and economic growth in aviation. This research would be performed at the proposed center by UMass Amherst and its industry partner M2C Aerospace, a Massachusetts-based, woman-owned small business. The Commonwealth’s funding leverages $15 million in private investment and sponsored research to be conducted by UMass Amherst and benefiting federal agencies. This site would also host a school to train air-traffic controllers and pilots and provide aviation-related courses for the next generation of researchers and engineers to develop future technologies. The proposed aeronautics center will also serve as a nexus for government and industry to collaborate on future aviation initiatives. The Westover site will house state-of-the-art laboratories, including a high-fidelity, 3-D, simulation-based training capability that meets the FAA’s requirements for certifying air-traffic controllers at U.S. aviation facilities. A significant number of air controllers in the New England region are expected to retire in the next 10 years, which will increase the demand for a modern educational facility. This approach could be adapted for new civilian controllers, which — in combination with the transitioning military controllers — would help alleviate the FAA’s shortage of certifiable controllers and allow for joint military training with Westover’s staff. It is estimated that this partnership could generate millions of dollars annually in research, education, and training from a combination of government agencies, such as the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, NASA, the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Federal Aviation Administration, as well as the aviation industry. This fall, Patrick celebrated the grand opening of the UMass Center in Springfield, and the Chicopee site will add to its already-strong educational assets in Western Mass. “This partnership involving UMass Amherst, NASA, and industry will address vital national needs in the aviation sector and help revitalize the Western Massachusetts economy,” said UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy, who also serves as a member of the Military Task Force. “This is a perfect match for our role as one on the country’s top research universities, applying our expertise to enhance the safety of air travel and foster economic opportunity.”

Feb. 6 Deadline Set for 40 Under Forty Nominations
BusinessWest is currently accepting nominations for the 2015 class of its 40 Under Forty program. Launched in 2007, the initiative identifies 40 rising stars in Western Mass., individuals excelling in business, nonprofit management, and service to the community. The process begins with nominations, which will later be sent to a team of five judges for scoring. Nominations should be thorough and essentially answer the question, ‘why is this individual worthy of a 40 Under Forty plaque?’ The winners (those with the highest total scores from those five judges) will be announced in BusinessWest’s April 20 edition, and they will feted at the annual gala on June 18 at the Log Cabin Banquet and Meeting House. Nomination forms can be found in the next few issues of BusinessWest and also online HERE.

Festival of Trees Breaks Fund-raising Record
SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Boys & Girls Club’s 14th annual Festival of Trees had a record-breaking year, drawing more than 13,000 visitors and raising more than $116,000 to support the club’s mission. Featuring 141 trees in 2014, the hallmark holiday event for families and children raises much-needed funds for after-school and summer programs that serve 1,500 inner-city youth each year. The 2014 Festival of Trees officially kicked off on Nov. 28 and closed its doors for the season on Dec. 14. After the final viewing, volunteers made 141 phone calls to the lucky winners of the fully decorated trees that were raffled off as part of the event. All of the trees were donated by businesses, organizations, families, and individuals. The majority of the festival’s visitors participated in the raffle hoping to win one of the trees, valued between $200 and $2,000. The Springfield Boys & Girls Club provides youth-development programs for more than 1,500 children each year in the areas of recreation, educational enrichment, technology training, career development, substance-abuse prevention, health and fitness, and leadership. All of the proceeds from the Festival of Trees directly fund the club’s operations. For more information, visit www.sbgc.org or call (413) 785-5266. The names of all sponsors, and tree winners, can also be found on the website.

Unemployment Up Slightly in November, Down for Year
BOSTON — The state Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development reported that the seasonally unadjusted unemployment rates for November were up in 20 labor market areas and two areas remained unchanged over the month, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Over the year, unemployment rates were down in all the labor market areas. The preliminary statewide unadjusted unemployment rate estimate for November was 5.2%, up 0.1% from October.  Over the year, the statewide unadjusted rate was down 1.5% from the November 2013 rate of 6.7%. During November, eight of the 12 areas for which job estimates are published recorded job gains. The largest job gains were in the Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, Framingham, New Bedford, Peabody, Worcester, Brockton-Bridgewater-Easton, Lowell-Billerica-Chelmsford, and Leominster-Fitchburg-Gardner areas. Losses occurred in the Barnstable, Springfield, Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, and Pittsfield areas. Since November 2013, all 12 areas added jobs, with the largest percentage gains occurring in the Lowell-Billerica-Chelmsford, Worcester, Barnstable, Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, and Peabody areas. 

State to Strengthen Manufacturing Industry
AMHERST — Building on the Patrick administration’s historic commitment to strengthening the advanced-manufacturing industry in Massachusetts, Housing and Economic Development Secretary Greg Bialecki recently joined Labor and Workforce Development Secretary Rachel Kaprielian and State Senate Majority Leader Stan Rosenberg to announce nearly $2 million in funding to support manufacturing workforce training across the Commonwealth. The announcement was made at the Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative (AMC) Pioneer Valley Summit, held at UMass Amherst. “I am proud of the work the AMC has accomplished over the years, creating opportunities for workers with a range of skill levels that will strengthen our economy for years to come,” said Bialecki. “Collaborative efforts like this are a critical reason why Massachusetts is leading the nation in growing a 21st-century advanced-manufacturing sector.” Nearly $1.5 million of the total funding was awarded through the Advanced Manufacturing Pipeline Training Grants Program to support five regional workforce-investment boards throughout Massachusetts. This funding will help recruit and train approximately 280 unemployed or underemployed participants for careers in advanced manufacturing. The grants program is a cross-secretariat initiative between the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development and the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development. Two Western Mass. organizations are among those receiving funding:
• The Hampden Regional Employment Board received $219,960 to conduct the Advanced Manufacturing Training Program, in partnership with the Western Mass. Chapter of the National Tooling and Machining Assoc. The Hampden Regional Employment Board will contract with local community colleges, part-time instructors from two vocational technical high schools, and an advanced-manufacturing company to train unemployed or underemployed adults of Hampden County.
• The Franklin/Hampshire Regional Employment Board received $276,705 to continue collaboration with employers from across the region, as well as community partners such as Greenfield Community College (GCC), the two area vocational-technical schools, and two adult-education sites, to enable the Regional Employment Board and GCC to offer three additional cycles of entry-level precision-machine training over the next two years in Franklin County. This will expand it from 220 hours to 300 hours and add skill building in the areas of blueprint reading, metrology, grinding, and lean manufacturing.
“The quick turnaround in awarding these grants reflects the urgency the Patrick Administration has adopted in scaling up these pipelines to help fill current job openings in advanced manufacturing all over the state,” said Kaprielian. “These awards will allow the grantees to build upon their proven successes and their capacity to work collaboratively through industry partnerships to increase the number of seats in their existing pipelines.” Through a separate grant program, the Industry Training Capital Equipment grant program, also aimed at supporting the manufacturing industry in Massachusetts, Smith Vocational and Agricultural High School in Northampton was awarded $400,000 to rebuild its precision-manufacturing training program. With the support of more than 25 regional manufacturing and workforce leaders in Hampshire County, the rebuilt training program will be a site for daytime students and evening adult learners, in partnership with the Franklin-Hampshire Regional Employment Board.

EDC Sounds Alarm on Rising Energy Costs
CHICOPEE — The Economic Development Council of Western Mass. recently voiced its concerns regarding the rising costs of natural gas and electricity in the region. “More expensive energy affects all of us negatively. All of us need to be concerned. Individuals face a reduction of disposable income and increased hardship,” the agency said in a prepared statement. “Businesses face reduced competiveness that threatens job growth and retention. Municipalities face increased energy costs while facing decreasing revenues. Hospitals and higher-education institutions must divert more resources to energy purchases, thus diverting resources from their core missions. Shrinking business and consumer spending reduces investments in those things that define quality of life in Western Massachusetts.” Through a series of meetings and discussions with entities familiar with the issues, the EDC infrastructure committee released the following findings:
• Recent and future closings of oil- and coal-fired plants have boosted, and will continue to increase, Massachusetts’ dependency on natural gas for electric power generation. Nearly 50% of all electricity in Massachusetts is generated by natural gas, and that proportion is rising. These conditions, when combined with inadequate supplies of natural gas, are resulting in dramatically increased power costs during the winter.
• Gas companies serving this region are reaching the limits of their capacity to serve new customers. Berkshire Gas will stop adding customers in Greenfield at the end of 2014, and in Amherst in 2016. Columbia Gas is reaching the end of its capacity to serve Northampton and Easthampton. It could serve 10,000 more customers in the region if it had additional capacity. The inability to serve new customers will negatively affect economic growth in the region.
• Kinder Morgan is proposing a pipeline-extension project through Northern Mass. that will increase natural-gas supply to Berkshire, Franklin, and Hampshire counties as well as Eastern Mass.
• NU/Spectra proposes an expansion of the Algonquin Pipeline that would increase natural-gas supplies available to the Springfield area and Eastern Mass.
• Several New England states have been working to bring electricity generated by Hydro Quebec to the region.
EDC Infrastructure Committee Chair Paul Nicolai summarized the committee’s work, suggesting that “supplying cost-effective, responsibly clean energy for our people and businesses is a complicated problem requiring balanced approaches and moderate thinking. EDC has struck that balance and encourages policymakers to do so as well.” At a recent meeting, the EDC board of directors approved a resolution supporting the following actions, which, if implemented, will help to provide an adequate, stable supply of energy at competitive prices:
• Increase natural-gas supply by permitting both natural-gas pipeline-expansion projects proposed for the region and state;
• Increase the sources of power generation by enabling the purchase of hydro-generated electricity from the north;
• Continue support of conservation and renewable-energy technologies; and
• Encourage a regulatory environment that promotes market stability and competitive outcomes.

Leaders Celebrate Springfield Park and Recreation Investments
SPRINGFIELD — State Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Maeve Vallely Bartlett and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno recently celebrated Camp STAR Angelina, Mary Troy Park, and Balliet Park, all park projects reflecting the more than $7.7 million invested in parks and open space in Springfield by Gov. Deval Patrick’s administration. “Open space and outdoor recreation investments are a critical component of building robust, healthy communities,” said Bartlett. “Gov. Patrick has made urban neighborhoods a top priority, and the evidence of that is clear today in Springfield and across the Commonwealth.” Sarno thanked Patrick and Bartlett “for your continued vision in providing funding to increase and revitalize recreational and green spaces in urban areas. The legacy you are leaving here in Springfield is one of inclusion and opportunity, which is evidenced by the $3.5 million investment made here in Springfield, which demonstrates the Patrick administration’s commitment in creating strong and healthy communities.” Located in Springfield’s Forest Park and operated by the city, Camp STAR Angelina offers inclusive recreational programs for youth and young adults with and without disabilities, medical concerns, and hearing and visual impairments. EEA provided more than $1.325 million in capital funding to help fund the construction of a nearly complete, fully accessible pool and accessible bath house, as well as a universal outdoor amphitheater, construction of which will begin soon. As part of Monday’s celebration, Sarno announced that the pool and bath-house facility would be named after Gov. Patrick, in recognition of his efforts to increase access outdoor recreation for all children. North Riverfront Park sits along the northern end of Springfield’s portion of the Connecticut River Walk and Bikeway, a proposed 20-mile corridor that would run through Agawam, Springfield, West Springfield, Chicopee, and Holyoke. EEA invested $1.2 million in North Riverfront Park to transform a property surrounded by barbed wire into a welcoming, vibrant site that will better connect Springfield’s North End to the riverfront. The city’s design features a reduction of pavement, installation of picnic tables, and an increase of pervious lawn areas, plant beds, rain gardens, and additional trees to provide shade. The city is contributing an additional $300,000 toward the project, and construction will be beginning shortly. Mary Troy Park, a new park in the densely populated Liberty Heights neighborhood, will provide green space and access to outdoor recreation for residents. The park, set to be completed next spring, was made possible by a $400,000 Parkland Acquisition and Renovations for Communities (PARC) grant from the Patrick administration. The city will use this funding to design and build a new park, including a universally accessible series of free-standing play structures, including a water-spray feature and exercise equipment along a central pathway, as well as park amenities like drinking fountains and trash receptacles. The city of Springfield is contributing $380,000 in federal Community Development Block Grant funding toward the project. Balliet Park received a $400,000 PARC grant to renovate the baseball diamond and tennis courts, install a playground and swingset equipment, establish a picnic area, and improve access to park entrances and walkways. Springfield is using its Our Common Backyards Grant to construct a splash pad at the park, which will be completed by the year’s end. Springfield is one of seven cities to receive funding through the governor’s Signature Urban Parks program.

Construction Employment Expands in Most Areas
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Construction employment expanded in 224 metro areas, declined in 64, and was stagnant in 51 between November 2013 and November 2014, according to a new analysis of federal employment data by Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials said contractors in many parts of the country were benefitting from growing demand, yet labor shortages threaten to undermine the sector’s recovery. “It is good news that construction employment is now rising in two-thirds of the nation’s metro areas,” said Ken Simonson, chief economist for the association. “But now that the unemployment rate for construction workers has fallen to a seven-year low, it has become a major challenge to find qualified workers in many fields.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Shriners Hospitals for Children will be among the honorees at the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield’s (ACCGS) [email protected] on Wednesday, Feb. 4 from 7:15 to 9 a.m. at Crestview Country Club, 281 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam.

Shriners Hospital for Children will be honored for its 90th anniversary. The hospital provides medical care to children with orthopaedic, neuromusculoskeletal, cleft-lip, and palate disorders and diseases. As well, GZA GeoEnvironmental Inc., a professional-services consulting firm focused on geotechnical, environmental, water, ecological, and construction-management services, will be saluted for its 50th anniversary, and FIT Solutions, a leader in IT staffing, will be honored for its 10th anniversary.

The breakfast will feature Dr. Steve Sobel, humorist and motivational speaker. Sobel will present “You’re a Piece of Work! Celebrate Joy, Passion, and Influence.” Sobels’s presentation will use humor to illuminate life’s possibilities and provide attendees with the tools needed to help them bring their ‘A’ game to their companies and customers.

Sobel, a speaker, educator, success coach, and trainer throughout the U.S. and Canada, blends humor with targeted and inspirational messages to companies, businesses, athletic teams, and professional groups. He is a former award-winning school principal and continues to teach part-time at the college level, including many courses on entrepreneurship and visionary leadership.

Reservations are $20 in advance for ACCGS members in advance ($25 at the door) and $30 for general admission. Reservations are suggested and can be made online at www.myonlinechamber.com.

Daily News

Construction employment expanded in 224 metro areas, declined in 64 and was stagnant in 51 between November 2013 and November 2014, according to a new analysis of federal employment data released today by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials said contractors in many parts of the country were benefitting from growing demand, yet labor shortages threaten to undermine the sector’s recovery. “It is good news that construction employment is now rising in two-thirds of the nation’s metro areas,” said Ken Simonson, chief economist for the association. “But now that the unemployment rate for construction workers has fallen to a seven-year low, it has become a major challenge to find qualified workers in many fields.” Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas added the largest number of construction jobs in the past year (16,200 jobs, 9%), followed by Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas (11,000 jobs, 10 %), Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, Ill. (9,100 jobs, 7%) and Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Wash. (8,900 jobs, 12%). The largest percentage gains occurred in Pascagoula, Miss. (24%, 1,500 jobs), Fargo, N.D. (19%, 1,600 jobs), Crestview-Fort Walton Beach-Destin, Fla. (18, 700 jobs) and York-Hanover, Pa. (18%, 1,700 jobs). The largest job losses from November 2013 to November 2014 were in Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick, Md. (-3,600 jobs, -11%), followed by Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, Ariz. (-3,000 jobs, -3%), Edison-New Brunswick N.J. (-2,700 jobs, -6%), Gary, Ind. (-2,500 jobs, -14%) and Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Fla. (-2,500 jobs, -4%). The largest percentage decline for the past year was in Steubenville-Weirton, Ohio-W.Va. (-39%, -900 jobs), followed by Cheyenne, Wyo. (-17%, -600 jobs), Fond du Lac, Wis. (-15%, -400 jobs) and Gary, Ind. Association officials noted that most contractors report they are having a hard time finding qualified workers to fill key positions as demand rebounds. They cautioned that if labor conditions get even tighter, contractors will have to pass on new projects, and possibly delay existing ones, because of a lack of workers. Indeed, 25% of contractors reported over the summer they were already declining to bid on certain projects because of the lack of available workers. “It is time to start rebuilding the once robust career and technical education programs that used to exist in most school districts around the country,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “Without a solid network for preparing future workers, we are likely to spend much of 2015 talking about how the construction industry is failing to keep up with demand.”

Community Spotlight Features
In Enfield, Growth Efforts Focus on Thompsonville

Peter Bryanton

Peter Bryanton says Thompsonville was a thriving center in its heyday, but may be on its way back.

Enfield town officials have had a revitalization plan for the village of Thompsonville for more than two decades now. It was created in 1992 after the former Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co. was transformed into a 470-unit apartment complex.

Community Development Division Director Peter Bryanton said that Thompsonville was a thriving center in its heyday, with stores, eateries, and businesses that benefitted from the people who lived in the neighborhood and worked in the Bigelow factory. But after the mill closed in 1971, the area began to languish, and many neighborhood businesses closed their doors.

However, when construction on Bigelow Commons began, small businesses began to open again. “Town officials thought Bigelow Commons was a new starting point and formed a committee to work toward revitalizing the village. The Thompsonville Revitalization Strategy Plan was created as a result of their effort, and although it was a good plan, it was never implemented due to a lack of funding and resources,” Bryanton told BusinessWest, adding that updates were made in 2010.

But over the past year, a great deal of progress has occurred, and what was once a dream is fast becoming a reality. In fact, the town held a recent breakfast for commercial real-estate investors, developers, consultants, and other interested parties, which was attended by more than 100 people. The goal was to let them know about projects and new initiatives that have drawn residents and tourists into Thompsonville, and why it is has become a desirable investment.

“We told people what we’ve done and where we are headed, and we also created a book for them that shows every piece of property available in Enfield,” said Courtney Hendricson, assistant town manager of Development Services, adding that the impetus behind the recent initiatives was the announcement that a commuter rail line linking New Haven, Hartford, and Springfield will begin operating in 2016.

“Our plan revolves around building a new, multi-modal transit center that will include commuter rail and bus service; we know that many people want to live near these stations,” she said. “Rail service will make it easy to get to different places without owning a car, and surveys show that people in their 20s and 30s overwhelmingly want a walkable lifestyle. There is generally a 30% increase in property values within a half-mile of a transit station.”

Bryanton agreed. “Revitalization is finally happening; five years ago it was just an idea, but now it’s a reality. Once Enfield has commuter rail service, it will become a destination for people looking for a lifestyle based around public transit — we just need to get the transit center built,” he said, adding that it will be located in the former Westfield Casket Hardware building on 33 North River St.

He added that the four-story structure, which sits on the Connecticut River, is owned by Enfield Community Development Corp. and is in good shape.

“The ground floor will be used as the entranceway to get upstairs to the second floor, where the rail platform will be located. The third and fourth floors will be turned into loft apartments,” Bryanton said, adding that a portion of space on the first and second floors will also be designated for mixed use, which will allow people to shop, eat, and do business at the station.

However, land is needed to build a parking lot and a bus turnaround, and the town has been negotiating with Northeast Utilities about a plot adjacent to the building that was once home to a power plant. It is contaminated, so the negotiations are focused on who will pay for the cleanup, which will likely be a joint effort financed with brownfield grant money and funds from NU.

“In addition to the parking lot and bus turnaround, we also plan to build a new riverfront park on the property,” Bryanton said.

Town officials are lobbying the state and federal government to get funding to build the transit platform. “State officials told us they will build it after the rail service begins, but that means it would not stop in Enfield when it starts up, which is key to our development focus,” Hendricson said.

However, work is progressing, and Connecticut recently launched the Hartford Line. The commuter rail service will use Amtrak’s New Haven–Springfield Line and supplement existing intercity rail services between the two cities. The project is a joint venture between Connecticut and Massachusetts, with support from the federal government.

Once the line is operational and the transit platform has been built, Enfield officials say, they plan to focus their efforts on promoting public transportation, which will help spur private investment in the village.

Multi-faceted Approach

Hendricson said the town’s economic-development efforts rest on five pillars.

The first is an initiative called Riverfront Recapture, which involves capitalizing on access to the Connecticut River. “It’s our greatest natural resource and borders many of our neighborhoods as well as downtown Thompsonville, so we feel it has a lot of potential,” she explained, adding that the town plans to build a hiking and bicycling trail along the river, extending from Fresh Water Pond to the business corridor and down to the river. It is currently in the design stage.

The second and most important pillar is the revitalization plan for Thompsonville. “But we don’t want to ignore our other neighborhoods, which include Hazardville,” Hendricson said, noting that lessons learned from a successful streetscape plan implanted there, as well as from projects completed in other areas of town, will be employed in Thompsonville’s revival.

She also stressed that town officials feel it is important to celebrate the businesses that stayed open after the Bigelow carpet factory closed and have done well.

The fourth pillar is to continue to attract new businesses and retain the 3,000 companies that make Enfield their home. “They include many Fortune 100 companies,” said Hendricson. “We share the headquarters for MassMutual and are home to the headquarters for the North American and South American branches of Lego. The Hallmark Distribution Center and Advanced Auto Distribution Centers for the entire East Coast are also in Enfield, and we have many small, mom-and-pop businesses and home-based operations.”

Finally, town officials also plan to take advantage of the traffic that the MGM casino in Springfield will generate. “We believe Enfield could serve as a secondary destination because we have so many retail businesses and restaurants,” Hendricson said, discussing how the commuter rail platform in Thompsonville will play into the equation.

The revitalization of that village is being done in stages. The infrastructure around Fresh Water Pond, located in the center of the neighborhood, has been upgraded with new lighting, benches, planters, and trash receptacles. “We are also working to improve a walking path around the lake,” Hendricson said. “It is an ongoing effort.”

Engaging the interest of businesses and residents is another element in the plan. “It’s critical to make sure the neighborhood meets their needs,” she went on.

Hendricson noted that Thompsonville contains many multi-family homes, and although officials hope new residences will be built, they want to retain the character that was established when the carpet mill was thriving. “We’re not looking to change the proportion of multi-family housing. But we are looking to increase the number of housing options, so people can choose to live in a loft apartment, a multi-family residence, or a single-family home,” she told BusinessWest.

Town officials have staged new events over the past year to attract people to the center. The signature event was a Community and Farmer’s Market, staged from June through October on Wednesdays from 4 to 8 p.m. in front of Fresh Water Pond. There were 30 to 40 vendors each week, including artisans, farmers, food trucks and community groups, said Hendricson, adding that the market was a great success and went far beyond expectations.

Festivals were also held for families on Earth Day and Halloween, which generated positive feedback, while a presentation for business owners allowed officials to share their vision for the future. “We gave awards to businesses who have been in Thompsonville for years; we wanted to recognize and thank them. We plan to do this annually,” Hendricson said.

In addition, land was set aside to create a community garden. “There were 50 plots, and we asked people to pay $25 to become a member. They received soil and seeds, and they shared equipment. The town provided water, porta-potties, and security cameras, and a master gardener from the University of Connecticut gave a weekly seminar,” Hendricson said. “The garden was run by volunteers, and people are already asking if we are going to do it again next summer. We’ve been really working to engage the community.”

Another initiative, which focused on the use of alternative transportation, proved highly successful. Called the Magic Carpet Shuttle, it’s a bus service that takes people through the town with a number of dropoff spots. It connects to the Hartford Express (run by the Connecticut Department of Transportation) in the Macy’s parking lot.

“We started the shuttle to prove that residents will use other modes of transportation, but it has taken off beyond our expectations,” said Hendricson. “We expanded the route and the hours because 100 to 150 people ride on it every day.”

The success of these programs is being used to show investors that the outlook for Thompsonville is bright. “We’ve been meeting with developers in Greater Hartford and Springfield who are looking for opportunities,” she went on.

The town is also in the process of changing the zoning in the village, Bryanton added. It is mostly residential, but will soon have more areas designated for mixed-use development.

Moving Forward

Town officials believe their vision for Thompsonville will be realized over the next few years.

“We’ve done our homework and are making it into a desirable destination by bringing back its economic vitality,” Hendricson said. “There is so much potential, and I can easily picture it becoming a walkable, safe, attractive downtown for tourists and residents. I have no doubt it will happen.”

Bryanton agreed. “It’s been a long process to get where we are today, but we are finally on the doorstep,” he said. “We have a vision, and we know that, once the transit center is in place, people will come here.”

Enfield at a glance

Year Incorporated: 1683 in Massachusetts; annexed to Connecticut in 1749
Population: 44,654 (2010)
Area: 34.2 square miles
County: Hartford
Residential Tax Rate: $29.13 (plus fire district tax)

Commercial Tax Rate: $29.13 (plus fire district tax)
Median Household Income: $69,356
<strong>Family Household Income: $80,997
Type of government: Town Council; Town Manager
Largest Employers: MassMutual; Hallmark Cards Distribution Center; the Lego Group

* Latest information available

Opinion
Five Reasons to Be Optimistic About 2015

As the curtain comes down on 2014, a memorable year in many respects and one that produced large doses of momentum across the region, there are many reasons for optimism when it comes to the year ahead.

No one can truly predict what will happen regionally, nationally, or internationally in the months to come, but most signs are pointing to new levels of properity and vibrancy for the region. Here are five reasons for the business community to welcome the new year with its head up.

• An Improving Economy. Granted, not all businesses or business sectors saw bottom-line improvements in 2014, but many did, and both hard and anecdotal evidence reveals that something approaching real recovery may finally visit this region after steering clear of it since the Great Recession officially ended in 2009.

Indeed, jobless rates have improved, the housing market is slowly inching its way back up, and business confidence, as measured by Associated Industries of Mass. and other groups, has been steadily rising.

Even gasoline prices are cooperating in a big way. While they scare investors because of their potential to stifle the all-important energy industry, cheaper gas and oil are boons for consumers and business owners alike, and they amount to a huge stimulus package that puts money into the economy.

• The Casino. It will be at least two and a half years before anyone pushes the buttons on a slot machine, doubles down at the blackjack table, or brings a convention to the hotel being built by MGM. But one can already sense that the $800 million facility soon to rise in the South End is generating not only excitement, but opportunity.

Downtown Springfield’s commercial real-estate market is finally picking up steam; the long-suffering construction sector will soon have some long-term, lucrative work; and the tourism sector is aglow with expectation about what the casino will mean for the convention business. Meanwhile, the casino’s promise is spurring action on some long-delayed projects like the Court Square revitalization.

• Subway Cars. As we’ve written before, the announcement that Changchun Railway Co. will be building subway cars at the former Westinghouse site in East Springfield is positive news on several levels. It will bring jobs, and the kinds of well-paying jobs that everyone wants, but it has also brought a sense of accomplishment, a feeling that, yes, things like this can really happen here. And sometimes, developments like this one can give a region and its economic-development leaders a huge boost of confidence.

• A Surging University of Massachusetts. President Robert Caret announced recently that he will be leaving the university to take the helm at the University of Maryland. While that’s a setback in some ways — Caret brought strong direction to the school — UMass has in many ways reached a critical turning point when it comes to being the economic engine the state and this region always hoped it would be, and there seems little chance of it falling back.

While many of the recent developments at the school have involved Springfield, the impact is truly region-wide, with projects ranging from the High Performance Computing Center in Holyoke to the recently announced plans to establish a National Aeronautics Research, Development, and Training Center at Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee, with UMass Amherst as the lead institution. Expect more of the same in the months and years to come.

• A Focus on Entrepreneurship. This may well be the most compelling reason for optimism in the region, because this area will need much more than a casino to recover. It will need thousands of new jobs and opportunities to retain the young people who grew up here or attended college here. And the recent focus on fostering entrepreneurship — best exemplified by Valley Venture Mentors, its new accelerator program, and MassMutual’s Springfield Venture Fund — has the potential to provide both.

Springfield is not going to turn into Boston or Cambridge overnight, or even in a decade, most likely, but it will become a hub of entrepreneurial activity, and thus it can become home to dozens and perhaps hundreds of new startup companies.

For all these reasons and many more, 2015 is worthy of the growing sense of optimism this region is experiencing.

Architecture Sections
Caolo & Bieniek Associates Has Designs on Innovation

Curtis Edgin

Curtis Edgin, principal with Caolo & Bieniek Associates.

It’s not easy being green, but for today’s architects, it’s necessary.

“We’ve definitely had a mix of sustainable-design projects,” said Curtis Edgin, one of the principals of Caolo & Bieniek Associates in Chicopee, noting that some of them have been certified by the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program, but not all.

“Some of our clients seek to pursue that,” he added, “but whether or not they go for that official recognition, they tend to pursue the same design practices.”

LEED, a federal program that lays out stringent, and often costly, guidelines by which new buildings can earn ‘points’ toward different levels of sustainability, has been a driving factor in making construction and renovation projects more environmentally friendly. It involves everything from air quality to the paints and furniture used; from ventilation to energy efficiency, and much more.

The emphasis on green design has seeped so thoroughly into the design and construction industries that even developers who aren’t seeking LEED status are demanding many similar elements, and this is certainly true for Caolo & Bieniek, which is no stranger to sustainable design, including the new Easthampton High School, which features bigger windows to maximize daylight, a photovoltaic array on the roof to harvest solar power, and LED lighting.

“Codes are getting more and more stringent, and continue to evolve,” Edgin said. “Plus, people are more concerned about energy use and will take a long view of things — sometimes pay a little more to have a more cost-effective building throughout its life. That’s what sustainable design is all about. It’s not just about recycling materials and conserving energy; there’s a whole list of things we can do that utilize those defining practices in all our projects.”

Caolo & Bieniek will celebrate 60 years in business next year, providing architecture, planning, and interior-design services across the Pioneer Valley. And Edgin understands the need to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to trends like sustainable design.

“It’s a more long-term view, rather than what’s cheapest on bid day,” he said. “Energy use is the first thing people think of, but it’s much more than that. You can insulate, insulate, insulate, but you still need to get ventilation into it, get fresh air into a very tight envelope.”

Then there’s long-lasting LED lightbulbs, which have become standard practice, replacing fluorescent bulbs. But green design and building extends to the work site itself, from efforts to reduce water runoff from the site to how materials are disposed of.

“When you’re doing demolition, does the debris end up in a landfill, or does it get separated?” Edgin said. “It used to be that everything got pushed off and sent to a landfill. Nowadays, we’re much more careful about what’s going on with these projects. Steel is sent off to be recycled, and maybe masonry is crushed and used for fill.”

The UMass police facility

The UMass police facility, designed by Caolo & Bieniek, was the first LEED-certified building on campus.

In theory, he added, a project like Easthampton can even turn its green features into an outdoor learning experiences, teaching students about bioswales and solar energy. “You can put a lot of technology into the building.”

For this issue’s focus on architecture, Edgin sat down with BusinessWest to talk about the going-green movement and also other challenges and opportunities posed by what has become a fiercely competitive, fast-moving industry.

Broad Palette

Although it has remained active in private development, Caolo & Bieniek wins about 75% of its work in the public sector, which includes plenty of public school construction and renovation. Besides the completed Easthampton project, Edgin said, “the old Chicopee High School is converting to a middle school, and we’re working with the Mass. School Building Authority on that. We also have a project with Phoenix Academy, a charter school in Springfield, up at the Tech Park, and a handful of smaller school projects for various communities.”

In addition, the firm has long been active with area municipalities, from the ongoing construction of the West Springfield public library to a number of public-safety jobs. “Police, fire, public safety … we have several projects ongoing, some in the study phase, some in the early construction phase,” he noted. Area colleges, including UMass, Westfield State University, and STCC, have also been a reliable source of work, from the UMass police station — the campus’s first LEED-certified project — to renovation and repair work on residence halls.

“We’ve also done projects for local public-housing authorities, and also some private, multi-family development in the Northampton area,” Edgin said. “And we’ve been keeping busy with work for financial institutions — banks and some investment companies.”

The sheer diversity of Caolo & Bieniek’s workload is a hedge against recessions, but Edgin admitted that the scale of the average project has decreased slightly over the past several years. That means more, smaller jobs, “which keeps you very busy meeting schedules, juggling multiple projects, and serving clients. We were very blessed to stay busy over the past 10 years. We attribute that to a good staff and good service. We continually strive to satisfy our clients.”

Caolo & Bieniek has taken jobs as far away as Ohio for a Veterans Affairs hospital, and conducted some far-flung work for the U.S. Postal Service, but most of its signature projects have been in or not far from the Pioneer Valley — from the aforementioned schools and colleges to work for MassMutual, Spalding, Raymour & Flanigan, Polish National Credit Union, Rocky’s, Boys and Girls Club of Chicopee, Subway, IHOP, and many others.

“We don’t go long distances away — generally within an hour or hour and a half radius,” Edgin said. “You can’t give good service in the car, so we stay close to home, and wind up seeing clients in the supermarket, in the hardware store, or out to buy a cup of coffee.”

The auditorium inside Easthampton High School

The auditorium inside Easthampton High School, a recent Caolo & Bieniek project with many ‘green’ features.

The firm has also performed historic-preservation work, which comes with two distinct, and often competing, challenges: restoring buildings according to a client’s demands, or working with a client who doesn’t care about a structure’s historical elements, but local and state historical commissions do.

“Phoenix Academy has been reviewed by the National Park Service, the Springfield Historical Commission, and the Mass. Historical Commission,” Edgin said. “Some of the challenges with these projects is getting everyone on the same page. It’s often about balance, what’s practical.”

Older buildings pose myriad questions, he added. “What are the requirements of the building code in order to reuse or renovate historic properties? What is the use? It may have been built at a time when the code requirements — what the building has to withstand from a seismic perspective, especially — were much different than what they are now. And, of course, what does it cost? There are a lot of noble gestures you can make, but somebody has to fund them.”

Issues with historic buildings have come to the forefront at a time when renovation is more popular than new construction, and investors are taking a hard look at older properties they can rehab, as opposed to building from the ground up. “Not everyone wants new construction or can afford it,” Edgin said. “Sometimes there’s value in older buildings, but you have to weigh the cost of meeting present needs, and that goes back to building codes and what the long-term cost is going to be.”

Old and New

Architects and contractors have long told BusinessWest that clients are more demanding than ever before, and time windows are often compressed. On the other hand, technology has improved project planning and communication.

“With the computers these days, the visualization tools we can use now, we’re no longer showing just flat plans. People often can’t read two-dimensional plans, but now we’re showing them three-dimensional images, what it will really look like,” Edgin said. “But you have to keep up with the technology and the new software, and so does your staff.”

It helps that most of Caolo & Bieniek’s 10 employees have been with the firm for many years, bringing consistency to operations. The same goes for customers. “A lot of our clients are long-standing. Even cities and municipalities, we’ll do multiple projects — it might be a school, a public-safety project, and a library project in the same city or town.”

Customer loyalty is critical at a time when firms from Boston and Connecticut are raiding the Pioneer Valley for work, a trend that has developed and intensified over the past 10 to 15 years.

To keep those clients happy, “you have to plan ahead. Everything moves so much faster these days, but you still have to allow time for the process. It doesn’t just happen. If you want a successful project, sometimes it takes years of foresight, and hopefully clients are thinking in the long term, too, rather than just today, what the present need is. Ultimately, that should shape your decision making.”

That forward thinking is one driving force behind sustainable building, but Edgin said it’s important in any project.

“You have to manage expectations, understand what’s possible and what’s not; you have to be honest,” he added. “People have very lofty goals, but cost is often the driving factor. You try to bring your experience — communicate your knowledge and understanding of the process — as early as possible to the client to determine what the end result will be.”

The goal, of course, is something everyone can live with — both literally and figuratively.

Joseph Bednar can be reached at [email protected]

Architecture Sections
Gillen Collaborative Architects Offers a Unique Approach

William Gillen

Several years ago, William Gillen changed his business model to one where architects work independently but market themselves as a team.

When William Gillen created Gillen Collaborative Architects Inc. in Amherst, he based his business model on decades of honed experience. “There is no payroll here, so there is no pressure to generate a bill. If one of us wants to spend 24 hours working with a group, we do it,” he said, noting that the two registered architects under his umbrella are self-employed and can work independently on their own projects, or collaboratively as a group, while sharing resources and information from their own areas of expertise.

The trio, which includes Gillen, Carol Vincze, and John Krifka, have more than 100 years of combined experience, and venture into territory that most architects don’t have the time or interest to explore.

For example, when Krifka began working on a contract to renovate the Berkshire Family and Probate Court in Pittsfield and restore its north façade, he came up with an idea to create a documentary that would benefit the public, the city, the state, and groups interested in historic restoration.

After he spoke to city officials about obtaining a grant to pay for a detailed video production of the restoration and renovation, UMass graduate student John Dickson heard about it from the Pittsfield Historical Commission and received permission to document the work as part of his thesis. In addition to a written document, he created a seven-minute video with Pittsfield Community Television titled “Conserving the Old Berkshire Athenaeum,” which can be seen on YouTube.

Since the work on the courthouse is not yet complete, he is also working on another version, which he expects will be at least an hour in length. The finished product will be shown on public-access TV and will serve as a tribute to the artisans who created the 1876 building as well as those who painstakingly matched intricate patterns on the crumbling stone.

“City officials feared the project would disrupt parking and traffic to and from local business, so the idea was born partially to help to help establish liaisons,” Krifka said, explaining that he met with the Town Council and businesses owners to promote the video because he believed it would generate a lot of interest. “Stone structures aren’t built anymore, and I knew this was something that wouldn’t happen in Pittsfield again, so I really wanted it to succeed.”

A photograph was taken of every stone that was removed from the building, and Dickson interviewed a number of artisans about their restoration techniques, including a stained-glass specialist who described the process of reconditioning and replacing missing glass from original windows.

“People will learn many interesting things from the video, such as the fact that you can take a damaged stone with a decorative pattern and build up the missing part with modern materials,” Krifka said, adding that Dickson shared his work with the Western Mass. Historical Commission Coalition at its meeting in July.

“Bill, Carol, and I like to generate ideas,” he added. “But if we were just employees, it wouldn’t be in our interest to do things like this.”

Carol Vincze (right, with John Krifka)

Carol Vincze (right, with John Krifka) says the freedom she has at Gillen Collaborative Architects serves her well in her work.

Vincze agreed and said sharing space with co-workers is a growing trend that allows people to socialize while working independently or in collaboration with each other.

She explained that the freedom she has at Gillen Collaborative Architects served her well when she redesigned the Amherst Survival Center. It serves more than 4,400 needy individuals each year, and Vincze was determined to see firsthand how it used its existing space before she began forming ideas for a design.

“I visited the center at least six times and ate lunch there. I also watched people come and go, and interviewed members of the staff who told me it was important to build a feeling of community,” Vincze said. “They thought they needed six rooms for activities, but it quickly became clear which areas could be combined.”

As a result, she was able to create a workable design, assist with the client’s fund-raising efforts, oversee the bidding and construction administration, and do everything else required to finish the project on time and on budget.

Business Changes

Gillen, who farms 20 acres and owns several real-estate firms in addition to his architectural company, changed his business name several times and had a number of partners in the course of more than five decades of work.

In 1969, the Boston architectural firm that employed him asked him to move to Amherst to take over a satellite office, and all went well until the recession of 1975.

“A moratorium was placed on most state projects, and it knocked the wind out of our sails,” he recalled. “There was not enough work for the architectural firm to keep its Amherst office, so they allowed me to take it over.”

He named his new business William Gillen Architects, finished the projects started by his previous employer, and began paying the employees’ salaries.

A short time later, he formed a partnership with architects John Kuhn, Christopher Riddle, and Dennis Gray, and the business was renamed Gillen, Kuhn, Riddle and Gray Inc.

The firm grew quickly, and although Kuhn and Riddle left in 1988, Gillen and Gray stayed together and kept 10 of 30 employees. In the early ’90s, they were joined by former classmate Kevin Omarah, and the firm’s name changed to Gillen, Gray and Omarah Architects Inc.

“But Omarah died, and Gray moved to Salem, and I became Gillen Architects again; by that time, I knew I needed to be more than a one-man band to do sizeable projects,” Gillen said, explaining that it is risky for a client to do a project with only one architect.

In the late ’90s, Kathleen Ford joined him from New York City, and Ford Gillen Architects was born. The duo worked together for a decade, but after she left and Gillen found himself on his own again, he began collaborating with Vincze because he needed help to complete some large state projects.

“Several years ago, I changed my business name and model again to better reflect what I was doing and market more effectively,” Gillen said, adding that he formed a collaborative because he wanted to eliminate the stress of constantly having to meet payroll. “I created a model where we are all independent, but can also work together and market ourselves as a group.”

However, each of the architects has their own niche.

Gillen specializes in historic preservation and unpretentious architecture that is harmonious with a neighborhood. Meanwhile, Vincze is LEED-certified, and Krifka has done a number of institutional and commercial projects for nonprofit organizations.

Gillen provides space inside a building he owns on Main Street as well as a full-time receptionist who acts as an administrative manager and does all of the paperwork.

“We share resources and networking, but since each architect has their own business, there is no set time for any of us to arrive or leave. But we’ve been very fortunate; architecture is very competitive, and we’ve been awarded several half-million-dollar contracts,” he told BusinessWest, outlining projects that include renovations and updates to buildings at UMass Amherst and county courthouses.

A year ago, the trio was hired to create a master plan for St. John’s Episcopal Church in Northampton, which is located in the Elm Street Historic District.

“We marketed ourselves as a group, but Carol is the project manager,” Gillen said, noting that the renovation plan is in the design stage and includes adding an elevator, a social hall, and office space.

Vincze spent untold hours at the church, helping members of the building committee generate ideas.

“We work really well with committees made up of lay people. In fact, we spend more time figuring out what people need and how much it will cost than any architectural firm I have ever worked for,” she said, adding that she is also involved with a design for a new, large mixed-use building in South Amherst that is under construction.

Gillen’s project history is storied and includes the conversion of the former Northampton railroad station in 1980 into restaurants, as well as the 2002 design of the Strong Avenue shops and condominiums in Northampton, which won accolades from the city. Meanwhile, Krifla’s previous employment included stints with three architectural firms in New York.

Their combined experience has served them well. In fact, over the past three years, the trio has undertaken at least 100 projects.

“Many of them were small, but they were punctuated by the $3.5 million Pittsfield District Courthouse renovation and restoration and a $2.5 million upgrade to the Gardner District Courthouse,” Gillen said. “We also just completed the preliminary work to put a new boiler room in the Pittsfield Superior Courthouse, which will provide heat for the entire district.”

He added that he and designer Lisa Lindgren, who has also begun working collaboratively with him, are creating plans for a house in Hadley.

Attention to Detail

Vincze said one thing that sets Gillen Collaborative Architects apart from other firms is that the architects see their projects through from start to finish.

“We maintain continuity with our clients from the time of the first interview to opening-day ribbon-cutting ceremonies and the years beyond,” she told BusinessWest.

Gillen added that the architects take pride in being accessible, even when it involves little or no notice. “Yesterday at 7:48 a.m., a masonry contractor called me and asked if I could meet him at St. John’s in 40 minutes. I wasn’t dressed, but I got there on time. Then I was told a general contractor was going to remove the staging on the courthouse in Pittsfield over the weekend and needed our architects to take a close look at it, so I volunteered to go there on Friday so the contractor could meet his schedule.

“The bottom line,” he stressed, “is that, if one person is successful, we are all successful.”

Departments Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

ASHFIELD

25 West Road
Ashfield, MA 01330
Amount: $326,500
Buyer: Henry A. Kaminski
Seller: Edward V. Callahan
Date: 11/14/14

BERNARDSTON

75 Merrifield Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $226,000
Buyer: Joseph E. Gruszkowski
Seller: Paul S. Fisher
Date: 11/20/14

49 Shedd Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Christopher J. Ament
Seller: Russell J. Woods
Date: 11/14/14

COLRAIN

13 Griswoldville St.
Colrain, MA 01340
Amount: $131,250
Buyer: Jade L. Mortimer
Seller: Aaron S. Cusimano
Date: 11/14/14

DEERFIELD

56 Boynton Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $319,000
Buyer: 56 Boynton Road NT
Seller: Noyes, Edna J., (Estate)
Date: 11/10/14

18 Meadow Wood Dr.
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Stephanie Purington
Seller: Gretchen D. Burdick
Date: 11/25/14

ERVING

22 Wheelock St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $212,500
Buyer: Elinor L. Britt
Seller: Ursula J. Kersavage
Date: 11/21/14

GREENFIELD

918 Bernardston Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $164,000
Buyer: Joseph D. Stafford
Seller: Joseph E. Gruszkowski
Date: 11/20/14

55 Cleveland St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Chani Craig
Seller: Richard A. Caracciolo
Date: 11/13/14

201 Davis St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Jakob T. Conway
Seller: Richard D. Larsen
Date: 11/25/14

182 Fairview St. West
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $149,900
Buyer: Brian T. Lafave
Seller: Meagan L. Veith
Date: 11/21/14

41 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $158,000
Buyer: Chelsea Bailey
Seller: Timothy M. Gorts
Date: 11/26/14

43 Highland Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $380,000
Buyer: Oliver W. Steele
Seller: Gretchen Zwart
Date: 11/10/14

12 James St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Louis K. Barlow
Seller: Stephen M. Amidon
Date: 11/26/14

38 Spruce St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Vladimir Gheorghita
Seller: Kimberly A. Purvis
Date: 11/21/14

8 Woodard Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Fenwick LLP
Seller: Dougosz, Josephine M., (Estate)
Date: 11/13/14

HEATH

64 8 A S
Heath, MA 01346
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Sandra I. Oyola-Pike
Seller: FNMA
Date: 11/21/14

12 Town Farm Road
Heath, MA 01346
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Lee Griswold
Seller: Peter J. Bernard
Date: 11/25/14

LEYDEN

39 Frizzell Hill Road
Leyden, MA 01337
Amount: $304,935
Buyer: Flagstar Bank
Seller: Daniel R. Murley
Date: 11/10/14

MONTAGUE

58 Oakman St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Allyson A. Greene
Seller: Makarewica, Alice A., (Estate)
Date: 11/12/14

26 X St.
Montague, MA 01376
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Diane M. Morrison
Seller: Stephen Fishman
Date: 11/13/14

5-7 Church St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Richard J. Widmer
Seller: Shelley B. Kick
Date: 11/25/14

168 Montague City Road
Montague, MA 01301
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Pamela J. McNamara
Date: 11/26/14

NORTHFIELD

40 Highland Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $149,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Sheridan
Seller: Callahan, John T., (Estate)
Date: 11/28/14

95 Hinsdale Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $140,333
Buyer: USA VA
Seller: Sean M. Klay
Date: 11/10/14

282 Millers Falls Road
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $470,000
Buyer: Andrew R. Campbell
Seller: Thomas A. Sheehan
Date: 11/20/14

ORANGE

176 East Main St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $146,219
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Matthew C. Kimball
Date: 11/26/14

59 High St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $127,420
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Mignonne D. Davis
Date: 11/20/14

47 Shelter St.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $124,000
Buyer: Workers Credit Union
Seller: Wilfred J. Bolduc
Date: 11/19/14

Wheeler Ave.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: DVK LLC
Seller: Wheeler Avenue RT
Date: 11/21/14

ROWE

6 Kings Hwy.
Rowe, MA 01367
Amount: $480,000
Buyer: Paul E. Hurtig
Seller: Helene S. Glass RET
Date: 11/13/14

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

74 Bessbrook St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Henry E. Alvarado
Seller: Wisam Yacteen
Date: 11/21/14

10 Columbus St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $253,500
Buyer: Jiwan K. Chuwan
Seller: Gayle Akumianakis
Date: 11/21/14

39 Fordham Ave.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: James M. Monteith
Seller: Robert W. Perry
Date: 11/21/14

26 Hemlock Ridge
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Robert G. Rowe
Seller: David A. Kraus
Date: 11/14/14

11 Highland Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $157,500
Buyer: Anthony B. Torino
Seller: Lisa N. Wild
Date: 11/12/14

47-49 James Ave.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $262,500
Buyer: Muhammad A. Razzaq
Seller: Francesco R. Depergola
Date: 11/21/14

60 James St.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Alexis K. Simmons
Seller: Francis B. Liebel
Date: 11/21/14

41-43 Ley St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $204,000
Buyer: Baldwin Street Realty LLC
Seller: 253 Center St Props Inc.
Date: 11/18/14

30 Logan Place
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Andrew J. Fox
Seller: John J. Martin
Date: 11/14/14

455 Main St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $166,400
Buyer: Paula S. Wittenberg
Seller: Stephen Labun
Date: 11/25/14

1410 Main St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $189,500
Buyer: Denis M. Lachapelle
Seller: William A. Saltman
Date: 11/14/14

Mark Dr. #12A
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Langone Realty Corp
Seller: Norman A. Pelley
Date: 11/13/14

104 North St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $156,000
Buyer: Alan E. Boissonneault
Seller: Suzanne Griffin
Date: 11/26/14

32 Oak Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Michael Lyman
Seller: Lee J. Simmons
Date: 11/21/14

111 Pineview Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Michael E. Crean
Seller: Robert G. Rowe
Date: 11/14/14

41 Stewart Lane
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Edward Lisouski
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 11/24/14

BRIMFIELD

110 John Haley Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $187,655
Buyer: Michael C. Egan
Seller: Pelletier, Brian P., (Estate)
Date: 11/14/14

6 Saint Clair Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $257,000
Buyer: Bank New York
Seller: Michelle Cox
Date: 11/10/14

295 Sturbridge Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $149,900
Buyer: Brian S. Sacerdote
Seller: FNMA
Date: 11/20/14

151 Warren Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $272,450
Buyer: Lauryn N. Fennell
Seller: Benjamin J. Kreft
Date: 11/25/14

CHESTER

102 Old State Hwy.
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Joseph M. Alos
Seller: Robert E. Hohenberger
Date: 11/25/14

CHICOPEE

100 Angela Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $249,000
Buyer: Jeremy Redmond
Seller: Donoghue, Kahtleen, (Estate)
Date: 11/21/14

99 Beaumont Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Joshua T. Malone
Seller: Marzena K. Samek
Date: 11/14/14

60 Beech St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $169,500
Buyer: Shaun R. Cote
Seller: DGL Properties LLC
Date: 11/14/14

90 Cambridge St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: John M. Mikkola
Seller: Wayne J. Conti
Date: 11/17/14

22 Cherryvale St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Cecelia A. Devine
Seller: Jonathan J. Cassella
Date: 11/12/14

465 Chicopee St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Paul S. Greene
Seller: Jeffrey K. Toler
Date: 11/25/14

34 Clairmont Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $161,900
Buyer: Roger G. Williams
Seller: Donna M. Rowe-Scott
Date: 11/25/14

58 Clarendon Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $140,274
Buyer: Bank of America
Seller: Wesley C. Drum
Date: 11/24/14

23 Cochran St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $189,900
Buyer: Brian W. Farnsworth
Seller: Michael Minkos
Date: 11/21/14

9 Deslauriers St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $161,000
Buyer: Alexander J. Rock
Seller: Shirley A. Gibson
Date: 11/25/14

48 Edward St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Philip M. Donnelly
Seller: Diane M. Lapite
Date: 11/26/14

23 Farmington St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $159,900
Buyer: Joshua D. Provost
Seller: John J. Florek
Date: 11/18/14

247 Grove St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $144,500
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Christine K. Racette
Date: 11/28/14

40 High St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $641,000
Buyer: Double D. Investments LLC
Seller: KV Properties LLC
Date: 11/10/14

16 Jacob St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $219,170
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Shannon M. Gaud
Date: 11/20/14

77 Labelle Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $231,500
Buyer: Rafael Santos
Seller: Ellen M. Pray
Date: 11/25/14

37 Lapa Farm Road
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $235,625
Buyer: Christine M. Halama
Seller: Maria Koziol
Date: 11/17/14

28 Lucretia Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $300,300
Buyer: MJT Properties LLC
Seller: Rooftop Properties Inc.
Date: 11/25/14

68 Mandalay Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Alyssa M. Os
Seller: Sharon E. Doucette
Date: 11/14/14

42 Monroe St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Alan L. Beaudry
Seller: James M. Roy
Date: 11/19/14

542 Montgomery St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Kelly R. Ryan
Seller: Lori A. Stpierre
Date: 11/19/14

10 Myrtle St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Anthony Resnick
Seller: Dorothy Randall
Date: 11/18/14

25 Myrtle St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $132,170
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Marc E. Chevalier
Date: 11/20/14

N/A
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Michael S. Poggi
Seller: GKRR Assocs.
Date: 11/20/14

162 Narragansett Blvd.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Oleksiy Zhyboyedov
Seller: Dennis J. Dunigan
Date: 11/14/14

12 Paradise St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $151,900
Buyer: Maria Maziarz
Seller: Gerald J. Carney
Date: 11/21/14

20 Park St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Daniel Branco
Seller: Alda M. Carreira
Date: 11/20/14

36 Rivers Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $345,000
Buyer: Helen Properties LLC
Seller: 36-38 Rivers Ave. Realty LLC
Date: 11/25/14

216 Rolf Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $139,000
Buyer: Robert J. Czajka
Seller: Paul Kreminec
Date: 11/28/14

46 Saint James Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Seller: Yellowbrick Management Inc.
Date: 11/20/14

4 Searles St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $123,500
Buyer: Bruce A. Benson
Seller: Nicki M. Brunetti
Date: 11/20/14

51 Sunnyside St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Sandra Mosher
Seller: Cheryl Boissonnault
Date: 11/14/14

14 Westport Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Christopher M. Dawson
Seller: Stoner FT
Date: 11/26/14

57 White Birch Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $186,712
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Steven Gonet
Date: 11/13/14

EAST LONGMEADOW

100 Franconia Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Ryan T. Morton
Seller: Gary O. Metzger
Date: 11/21/14

40 Mapleshade Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Jeffrey S. Zuccalo
Seller: Hall, Phyllis, (Estate)
Date: 11/10/14

216 Mapleshade Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Stephen Bilia
Seller: Latourelle, Robert L., (Estate)
Date: 11/26/14

11 Savoy Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: John F. Benjamin
Seller: Mark J. Hardy
Date: 11/10/14

143 Windham Dr.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Lynn M. Rowland
Seller: Ned S. Schwarz
Date: 11/26/14

77 Wood Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Jung Kang
Seller: Jambazian, Barbara F., (Estate)
Date: 11/14/14

GRANVILLE

421 Main Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Ashley N. Rescigno
Seller: Jay C. Goguen
Date: 11/24/14

133 South Lane
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Paula J. Cross
Seller: Judith M. Smith
Date: 11/14/14

HAMPDEN

548 Glendale Road
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $232,500
Buyer: David J. Nadeau
Seller: Jenifer P. Fasano
Date: 11/21/14

9 River Park Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $178,900
Buyer: Jeffrey P. Jones
Seller: Joan E. Gentile
Date: 11/17/14

HOLLAND

17 Brandon St.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Lee M. Vaillancourt
Date: 11/28/14

28 Forest Dr.
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $214,700
Buyer: Vanessa Suarez
Seller: Bruce N. Laprade
Date: 11/17/14

4 Maybrook Road
Holland, MA 01521
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: William J. Fonner
Seller: Mackenzie E. Langley
Date: 11/21/14

HOLYOKE

43 Arden St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kristen A. Shea
Seller: Terrance W. Leary
Date: 11/17/14

10 George St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Todd A. McGee
Seller: Kathleen Plasse
Date: 11/26/14

22 Knollwood Circle
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Connor M. Dooley
Seller: Robert J. Rose
Date: 11/21/14

653 Northampton St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Melinda S. Couture
Seller: Joan M. Archambault
Date: 11/24/14

12 Roosevelt Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Jessica Rosario
Seller: John Henriques
Date: 11/26/14

226-230 Sargeant St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: 228 Sargeant Street LLC
Seller: Warren T. Barnshaw
Date: 11/21/14

31 Sheehan Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $154,500
Buyer: Joseph Zurheide
Seller: Roger W. Fournier
Date: 11/12/14

44 Taylor St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $194,500
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Cynthia A. Ward
Date: 11/13/14

6 Upland Road
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: James Brunelle
Seller: Richard C. Page
Date: 11/24/14

276 Whitney Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Elaine A. Pluta
Seller: Lisa P. Thomas
Date: 11/12/14

LONGMEADOW

104 Albemarle Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $227,200
Buyer: Christopher E. Distefano
Seller: George B. Ackley
Date: 11/21/14

21 Ashford Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Michael A. Waterhouse
Seller: Anna M. Camerota
Date: 11/14/14

105 Edgewood Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $277,500
Buyer: Daniel B. Waterman
Seller: I Buysellhomes LLC
Date: 11/25/14

52 Fairway Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $209,000
Buyer: Ryan Lee
Seller: Thomas C. Corbett
Date: 11/21/14

22 Falmouth Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $329,900
Buyer: Rolland M. Combe
Seller: Daniels, Margaret P., (Estate)
Date: 11/10/14

256 Laurel St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $252,500
Buyer: Peter M. Stearns
Seller: Cecelia I. Braica
Date: 11/21/14

154 Lawrence Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $510,000
Buyer: Daniel E. Blakesley
Seller: David L. Dambrov
Date: 11/21/14

951 Longmeadow St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $673,930
Buyer: Aaron D. Kugelmass
Seller: Cynthia A. Pratt
Date: 11/21/14

207 Lynnwood Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Donald J. Collins
Seller: Kurt S. Rachdorf
Date: 11/24/14

128 Meadow Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Penguin Realty Inc.
Seller: Ralph A. Merullo
Date: 11/12/14

183 Meadowbrook Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $269,467
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Cynthia J. Kulle
Date: 11/24/14

70 Shady Side Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $277,500
Buyer: Mark A. Camossi
Seller: Michael J. Pistrich
Date: 11/18/14

48 Willett Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Sharon A. Hart
Seller: Michael N. Taniwha
Date: 11/18/14

LUDLOW

845 East St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Ryan P. Moran
Seller: Qualahnia K. Suggs
Date: 11/25/14

49 Essex St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Christine Casagrande
Seller: David M. Garcia
Date: 11/12/14

50 Maple St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $127,500
Buyer: Katherine M. Charron
Seller: Alain H. Ricard
Date: 11/25/14

15 Richmond Road
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Ryan B. Churchill
Seller: Peter M. Roxo
Date: 11/17/14

258 Sewall St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $192,500
Buyer: Michael T. Stierle
Seller: Robert A. Chrzan
Date: 11/24/14

41 Susan Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Joseph M. Fernandes
Seller: Patrick D. Meffen
Date: 11/10/14

88 Wedgewood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $282,000
Buyer: Joel Marrero
Date: 11/25/14

211 Wedgewood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $268,000
Buyer: Eric J. Lacoste
Seller: David A. Gamache
Date: 11/19/14

111 Williams St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Arlindo M. Alves
Seller: Clara Alves
Date: 11/19/14

26 Wilson St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Laurinda Marques
Seller: Peter W. Leonczyk
Date: 11/24/14

MONSON

55 Brimfield Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Christopher T. Harris
Seller: Diane M. Oppel
Date: 11/28/14

57 Carpenter Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Jessica J. Biron
Seller: Andrew P. Beaulieu
Date: 11/17/14

73 Cote Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Keelin White
Seller: Bank of America
Date: 11/10/14

4 Country Club Heights
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Brandon W. Houle
Seller: Normand M. Evon
Date: 11/14/14

121 Fenton Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $249,900
Buyer: Danielle L. Beaulieu
Seller: James R. Hosey
Date: 11/17/14

270 Silver St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Paul E. Kida
Seller: Kevin M. Brown
Date: 11/12/14

65 Stafford Hollow Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Christopher Lepoer
Seller: JP Morgan Chase Bank
Date: 11/12/14

13 Stewart Ave.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $314,900
Buyer: Jeffrey D. Wicks
Seller: Peter A. Kuselias
Date: 11/13/14

PALMER

196 Breckenridge St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Kyle Gouvin
Seller: Angel S. Santiago
Date: 11/21/14

27 Converse St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $199,000
Buyer: Ronald P. Christensen
Seller: Thomas A. Curtis
Date: 11/17/14

3041 Hillside Dr.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $194,000
Buyer: Tina R. Serrazina
Seller: Elizabeth A. Pobieglo
Date: 11/24/14

11 Holbrook St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: David G. Walker
Seller: Gerald F. Quesnel
Date: 11/14/14

22 Linda St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Joan L. Boudreau
Seller: Carol Pederzani
Date: 11/26/14

21 Norma St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $177,464
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Richard Zwyrbla
Date: 11/19/14

95 North St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Thomas F. Catarino
Seller: Mark A. Maynard
Date: 11/25/14

3005 Prospect St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $191,500
Buyer: Robert W. Manseau
Seller: High Street RT
Date: 11/26/14

RUSSELL

1067 General Knox Road
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $143,000
Buyer: Jeremy M. Donnelly
Seller: Joseph J. Malcovsky
Date: 11/14/14

50 Highland Ave.
Russell, MA 01071
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Joseph T. Walsh
Seller: John L. Berry
Date: 11/24/14

SPRINGFIELD

763 Allen St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Christian R. McCollum
Seller: Robert E. McCollum
Date: 11/21/14

Andrew St. (ES)
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $651,543
Buyer: Hunter Place Apartments
Seller: Hunter Place Associates
Date: 11/13/14

67 Arcadia Blvd.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Claudia Labour
Seller: Melro Associates Inc.
Date: 11/25/14

980 Bay St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: HS Holding LLC
Seller: Quality Properties LLC
Date: 11/21/14

50 Benz St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $134,900
Buyer: Bhola Gautam
Seller: Cheryl A. Stone
Date: 11/28/14

48 Bevier St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Carol J. Flouton
Seller: Kevin R. O’Brien
Date: 11/25/14

36 Bonnyview St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $129,800
Buyer: Marlene Marshall
Seller: KGL Group LLC
Date: 11/20/14

1105 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Margarita Nieves
Seller: JJS Capital Investment LLC
Date: 11/12/14

628 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Kayrouz Realty LLC
Seller: Nicholas Ghaname
Date: 11/20/14

630 Carew St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Kayrouz Realty LLC
Seller: Nicholas Ghaname
Date: 11/20/14

115 Carnavon Circle
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $124,000
Seller: Bonetti, Catherine B., (Estate)
Date: 11/14/14

14 Castle St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Evan Long
Seller: R. S. Cook
Date: 11/28/14

21 Cedar St.
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $181,000
Buyer: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Seller: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Date: 11/12/14

780 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: Baystate Medical Center Inc.
Seller: Seven Eighty Club LLP
Date: 11/20/14

833 Chestnut St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $156,000
Buyer: Meggan M. Meade
Seller: Heriberto Flores
Date: 11/28/14

91-93 Clantoy St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $206,734
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Maritza Tejada
Date: 11/25/14

40 Covington St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Jashon A. Williams
Seller: Richard D. Horne
Date: 11/21/14

45 Duggan Circle
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Wilmarie Crespo
Seller: Juan Valdes
Date: 11/20/14

22 Dunbar St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Tony D. Vo
Seller: Igor Gustev
Date: 11/26/14

8 Ellery St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $147,500
Buyer: Malynda M. Riopelle
Seller: Joseph C. Basile
Date: 11/10/14

146 Endicott St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Adrian Piris
Seller: Jason Balut
Date: 11/17/14

86 Fairfield St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Julia Estela
Seller: Sanyalee Dejesus
Date: 11/25/14

26 Flora St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Joseph P. Raiche
Seller: Calvin P. Richard
Date: 11/14/14

155 Florida St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Joanne O’Connor
Seller: Eagle Home Buyers LLC
Date: 11/12/14

103 Gardens Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Ernestine C. Bess
Seller: Iswald, Tanya, (Estate)
Date: 11/19/14

36 Gates Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Warren L. Barnett
Seller: John P. Jarzabski
Date: 11/20/14

128 Hampden St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $155,500
Buyer: Johanna C. Cecilia
Seller: Jermaine J. Barnett
Date: 11/14/14

33 Hardy St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $152,000
Buyer: Nana Anowuo
Seller: Connie-Jo Russo
Date: 11/19/14

60-62 Hastings St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $120,600
Buyer: Eric D. Gordon
Seller: Robert F. Chalero
Date: 11/13/14

161 King St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $127,000
Buyer: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Seller: Yellowbrick Property LLC
Date: 11/12/14

22-24 Lawndale St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Lawndale Street RT
Seller: William A. Dowell
Date: 11/26/14

83 Mallowhill Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $141,000
Buyer: Brett D. Kalish
Seller: Couture Partners LLC
Date: 11/20/14

60 Marmon St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $172,000
Buyer: Nancie B. Anzivino
Seller: Marek Dybacki
Date: 11/21/14

75 Merida St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $121,500
Buyer: Aniceto R. Reyes
Seller: John W. Bryant
Date: 11/14/14

13 Oak St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $535,000
Buyer: Orange Park Mgmt. LLC
Seller: Roxanna Fredette
Date: 11/26/14

306 Pasco Road
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Best Pizza Inc.
Seller: Elmon LLC
Date: 11/14/14

199 Powell Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $151,500
Buyer: John P. Cadigan
Seller: Paul M. Lafleur
Date: 11/21/14

125 Roanoke Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $163,000
Buyer: Wayne D. Robinson
Seller: Michael T. McNally
Date: 11/14/14

718 Roosevelt Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $137,500
Buyer: Nadine S. Michel
Seller: John B. Young
Date: 11/13/14

105 South Shore Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Joyce Porter-Debose
Seller: Gladys E. Cousineau
Date: 11/12/14

156 Spikenard Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $198,000
Buyer: Easton A. Coffie
Seller: Nancie B. Anzivino
Date: 11/21/14

99 Strong St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Alex Dobiecki
Seller: James F. Moriarty
Date: 11/20/14

501 Sumner Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $1,400,000
Buyer: Petrakis Realty LLC
Seller: David Seaman
Date: 11/24/14

176 Tamarack Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $180,300
Buyer: Juliana F. Castrillon
Seller: Kathleen M. Brenner
Date: 11/17/14

23 Thornfell St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $139,900
Buyer: Anned M. Soto
Seller: Kevin J. Tessier
Date: 11/17/14

471 Trafton Road
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $243,000
Buyer: John W. Zizik
Seller: Kevin M. O’Connor
Date: 11/12/14

40 Westbrook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Jeffrey T. Barbeau
Seller: Sandra J. Moore
Date: 11/20/14

72 Westbrook Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Jason Hansen
Seller: Agnes A. Barber
Date: 11/17/14

62 Westminster St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $175,500
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Tony Anthony
Date: 11/20/14

625 White St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Tuan Truong
Seller: Chuong T. Nguyen
Date: 11/13/14

Williamsburg Dr. #36
Springfield, MA 01101
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Raban LLC
Seller: FNMA
Date: 11/25/14

83 Wilton St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $123,000
Buyer: Victor M. Aguirre
Seller: James F. Fahey
Date: 11/28/14

73 Woodcrest Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Marianne Alvarado
Seller: Josephine C. Muska
Date: 11/21/14

SOUTHWICK

14 Berkshire Ave.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $231,000
Buyer: Nationstar Mortgage LLC
Seller: Gail J. Lariviere
Date: 11/19/14

71 Buckingham Dr.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Bank of America
Seller: Marjorie A. Keating
Date: 11/18/14

114 Feeding Hills Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Joshua D. Bradway
Seller: Glowacki, Jean M., (Estate)
Date: 11/14/14

117 Feeding Hills Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Erin M. Laughlin
Seller: Janet A. Ghareeb
Date: 11/17/14

17 George Loomis Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Larry H. Phillips
Seller: RBS Citizens Bank
Date: 11/21/14

298 Granville Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Matthew J. King
Seller: Paula S. Wittenberg
Date: 11/25/14

28 Grove St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $447,000
Buyer: Donald E. Coffin
Seller: William D. Acquaro
Date: 11/25/14

Mort Vining Road #3
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $118,000
Buyer: Valeriy Solokhin
Seller: B&B Construction Inc.
Date: 11/20/14

27 Pineywood Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Kerri Francis
Seller: New England Remodeling
Date: 11/25/14

124 Point Grove Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $188,000
Buyer: Jeremy R. Becker
Seller: Regina F. Bates
Date: 11/14/14

53 South Loomis St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $177,000
Buyer: Jason M. Derosier
Seller: Mark S. Fletcher
Date: 11/18/14

24 Veteran St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Margaret G. Graveline
Seller: Robert J. Rzasa
Date: 11/12/14

154 Vining Hill Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Irene Roy
Seller: Margaret A. McCool
Date: 11/24/14

33 Woodland Ridge
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $199,719
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Jeffrey A. Stenberg
Date: 11/17/14

WEST SPRINGFIELD

217 Ashley Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $147,500
Buyer: Ann M. Clark
Seller: Maria Villandry
Date: 11/14/14

6 Austin Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $446,500
Buyer: Sanjana Pai
Seller: John D. Eaton

61 Chestnut St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Joseph W. Renaud
Seller: David Gamelli
Date: 11/21/14

30 Cottage St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $134,500
Buyer: Paw Htoo
Seller: KANDC Associates LLC
Date: 11/13/14

674 Dewey St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $202,000
Buyer: Brice W. Herrick
Seller: Scott T. McCoy
Date: 11/14/14

72 George St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Sarupa Rai
Seller: John J. Murphy
Date: 11/21/14

10 Lower Beverly Hills
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $304,000
Buyer: Dzemal Jusufbegovic
Seller: Richard F. Seidell
Date: 11/21/14

16 North St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Christine M. Langone
Seller: David D. Delnero
Date: 11/21/14

76 Old Barn Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $236,000
Buyer: Jeffrey K. Toler
Seller: Robin M. Parent
Date: 11/25/14

14 Orchardview St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Christine M. Amsden
Seller: Cheryl A. Hohmann
Date: 11/26/14

146 Overlook Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: I. Fernandez-Almodovar
Seller: Gerard Desjardins
Date: 11/28/14

55 Partridge Lane
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $262,500
Buyer: Michael N. Beaudry
Seller: Frederick C. Bell
Date: 11/18/14

18-20 Riverdale St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Cumberland Farms Inc.
Seller: Julia Reynoso
Date: 11/14/14

74 Russell St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Parsu R. Sinchuri
Seller: Lilia Dzhenzherukha
Date: 11/28/14

35-A Summit St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $158,500
Buyer: TEL Properties LLC
Seller: Thomas J. Alouise
Date: 11/26/14

39-41 Summit St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $158,500
Buyer: TEL Properties LLC
Seller: Thomas J. Alouise
Date: 11/26/14

WESTFIELD

35 Bowdoin St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $131,000
Buyer: Derek Burdick
Seller: William T. Daley
Date: 11/28/14

7 Brentwood Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: William F. Carlin
Seller: Luiz, Bernardino Jr., (Estate)
Date: 11/21/14

15 Briarcliff Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $156,052
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Patrick J. Flynn
Date: 11/12/14

48 Brookline Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $159,900
Buyer: Albert D. Bakalis
Seller: Henry E. Rivera
Date: 11/10/14

40 Butternut Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $266,500
Buyer: Scott McCoy
Seller: William J. Persch
Date: 11/14/14

34 Cross St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $248,000
Buyer: Jason R. Fiore
Seller: Brian S. Winters
Date: 11/21/14

27 Crown St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $116,900
Buyer: Scot A. Lambert
Seller: Killips, Robert J., (Estate)
Date: 11/21/14

40 Darby Dr.
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: William Lemanski
Seller: Alcide E. Galarneau
Date: 11/24/14

32 Denise Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $149,330
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Jeffrey A. Emken
Date: 11/25/14

14 Grandview Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $174,500
Buyer: Phoebe L. Harris
Seller: David G. Carpenter
Date: 11/25/14

498 Loomis St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $244,900
Buyer: Benjamin A. Lisheness
Seller: Ian A. Scott
Date: 11/14/14

191 Munger Hill Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Alyssa M. Goodreau
Seller: Joseph F. Rizza
Date: 11/14/14

49 Old Farm Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: William Daley
Seller: Michael J. Callahan
Date: 11/28/14

209 Pochassic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Maureen A. Phelon
Seller: Sandra J. Oliver
Date: 11/25/14

466 Pochassic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $241,000
Buyer: Carl M. Schwarzenbach
Seller: Leah R. Swords
Date: 11/13/14

167 Prospect St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $278,500
Buyer: David S. Prouty
Seller: Kathryn V. Roberts
Date: 11/26/14

60 Riverside Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Sonia Aube
Seller: Edward J. Barrett
Date: 11/13/14

538 Southampton Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: Robert E. Calsetta
Seller: Susan M. Tatro
Date: 11/13/14

28 Southgate Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $166,000
Buyer: Brian G. Chen
Seller: Scott A. Spear
Date: 11/21/14

20 Stephanie Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $245,900
Buyer: Christopher Wiggs
Seller: Aspen Props Holdings LLC
Date: 11/19/14

WILBRAHAM

5 Beechwood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $323,000
Buyer: Blake H. Gelonese
Seller: Bronislaw L. Sajdak
Date: 11/20/14

2 Brooklawn Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: William F. Brenner
Seller: Edward C. Coffey
Date: 11/26/14

2 Carla Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Patrick Meffen
Seller: AC Homebuilding LLC
Date: 11/10/14

77 Cherry Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $329,605
Buyer: Bronislaw L. Sajdak
Seller: 2301 Boston Road LLC
Date: 11/20/14

35 Decorie Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $233,000
Buyer: Willard W. Boss
Seller: Ronald C. Nobbs
Date: 11/21/14

151 East Longmeadow Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Juan C. Rodriguez-Lopez
Seller: Joseph P. Raiche
Date: 11/14/14

1 Manor Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Julie A. Russell
Seller: Richard S. Stamm
Date: 11/12/14

11 Merrill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $213,000
Buyer: Megan R. Buckley
Seller: Andrew E. Litowitz
Date: 11/26/14

7 Red Gap Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Scott Kertenis
Seller: H&L Tassinari Builders Inc.
Date: 11/20/14

34 Sandlewood Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $419,779
Buyer: Joseph R. Kennedy
Seller: Mile Oak Land Holdings
Date: 11/21/14

Sandlewood Dr. #36
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $406,746
Buyer: Joanne Mary Guadio TR
Seller: Mile Oak Land Holdings
Date: 11/14/14

180 Stony Hill Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Peter Goodale
Seller: Annie C. Zheng
Date: 11/10/14

1 Winterberry Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $405,000
Buyer: Gary D. Poehler
Seller: Winterberry LLC
Date: 11/13/14

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

7 Bayberry Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $344,000
Buyer: Mary V. Dougherty
Seller: Paul E. Drummond
Date: 11/20/14

66 Bridge St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $168,500
Buyer: Zachary B. Fried
Seller: Fina, Angela C., (Estate)
Date: 11/21/14

16 Edge Hill Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $247,000
Buyer: Lei Lian
Seller: Kimberly Y. Chicone
Date: 11/24/14

40 Elf Hill Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $271,300
Buyer: Ramin Soltani
Seller: Matthew J. Pogoda
Date: 11/21/14

Harris St. #69
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: UFP Eastern Division Inc.
Seller: Harris Milk Transport Co.
Date: 11/12/14

25 Merrick Circle
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $160,155
Buyer: Dennis Cavaliere
Seller: David H. Glassberg
Date: 11/10/14

29 Mill Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $1,000,000
Buyer: 29 Mill Lane TR
Seller: Mill Lane NT
Date: 11/14/14

132 Northampton Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $134,000
Buyer: Jeffrey M. Keedy
Seller: Ashley D. Keedy
Date: 11/18/14

80 Pine St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $297,750
Buyer: Killian O’Connell
Seller: Liza A. Bouchard
Date: 11/24/14

89 South East St.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $319,684
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Lewis R. Fleischner
Date: 11/24/14

BELCHERTOWN

202 Bardwell St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $314,900
Buyer: Jonathan J. Cassella
Seller: Daren E. Winckel
Date: 11/13/14

25 Chestnut Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Christine E. Wanat
Seller: Francesco Dellolio
Date: 11/10/14

14 Edelcy Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $278,000
Buyer: Caitlin M. Waskiewicz
Seller: Max W. Bock
Date: 11/21/14

617 Federal St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Jane E. Jalbert
Seller: Stanley H. Libucha
Date: 11/20/14

234 Franklin St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Andrew J. Ferrier
Seller: Elizabeth A. Jekot
Date: 11/25/14

88 Gold St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $132,678
Buyer: USA
Seller: Bruce J. Sibya
Date: 11/13/14

123 Granby Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $383,000
Buyer: Jacqueline M. Fredenburgh
Seller: Jeffrey H. Mckie
Date: 11/26/14

39 Grenwich Hill
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Donald J. Powers
Seller: Thomas A. Ciolek
Date: 11/14/14

24 Nathaniel Way
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $515,000
Buyer: Kimberly A. Pacheco
Seller: Jacqueline Fredenburgh
Date: 11/26/14

Old Enfield Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: LJ Development LLC
Seller: Wilson, Robert A., (Estate)
Date: 11/26/14

29 Old Pelham Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Kate A. Sypek
Seller: Brenda M. Silva
Date: 11/26/14

27 Sherwood Dr.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Rosary M. Blair
Seller: Richard D. White
Date: 11/24/14

64 South St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $265,500
Buyer: Michael T. McNally
Seller: Tadeusz Szadkowski
Date: 11/14/14

60 Summit St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Samuel O. Walker
Seller: David P. Wanczyk
Date: 11/25/14

255 West St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Frank E. Dzwonkoski
Date: 11/25/14

53 Wilson Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $232,500
Buyer: Joseph Baffour
Seller: Maxon, Kathleen, (Estate)
Date: 11/21/14

CUMMINGTON

13 Potash Hill Road
Cummington, MA 01026
Amount: $143,000
Buyer: Carol R. Stevenson
Seller: Judith M. Moore
Date: 11/14/14

EASTHAMPTON

12 Ballard St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $269,910
Buyer: FHLM
Seller: Catherine Newsome
Date: 11/26/14

31 Bayberry Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $368,000
Buyer: Linfei Liu
Seller: Richard J. Shea
Date: 11/17/14

52 Campbell Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Edward J. Parr
Seller: William G. Massey
Date: 11/26/14

8 Clark Lane
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $346,000
Buyer: Mary E. Bowen
Seller: Douglas A. Bowen
Date: 11/17/14

42 Division St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $228,000
Buyer: Sylvia A. Buzzee
Seller: Jacob Schrader
Date: 11/21/14

25 Dragon Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $265,000
Buyer: Michael B. Sundel
Seller: Joseph Wozniak
Date: 11/14/14

27 East Green St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $177,500
Buyer: Allison E. Guidry
Seller: Andrew R. Tilbe
Date: 11/19/14

17 Kingsberry Way
Amount: $410,000
Buyer: Maria A. Colpack
Seller: Czelusniak Custom Homes
Date: 11/18/14

34 Oliver St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $219,000
Buyer: Joseph Wozniak
Seller: Kyle M. Adamski
Date: 11/14/14

32 Treehouse Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $223,000
Buyer: Michelle Meyers
Seller: EH Homeownership LLC
Date: 11/25/14

34 Treehouse Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $244,900
Buyer: Regis Corvee
Seller: EH Homeownership LLC
Date: 11/14/14

15 Truehart Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: William Gnatek
Seller: Krieger, Dolores C., (Estate)
Date: 11/19/14

4 Wendell Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Jesus J. Vega
Seller: Donald E. Macleod RET
Date: 11/25/14

48 Westview Terrace
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Eve S. Eichwald
Seller: Stanley E. Michalski
Date: 11/14/14

29 Zabek Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $227,000
Buyer: Kenneth P. Bachand
Seller: Thomas J. Colpack
Date: 11/14/14

GOSHEN

27 West St.
Goshen, MA 01026
Amount: $219,500
Buyer: Sherri L. Andrews
Seller: Clayton, Jenna, (Estate)
Date: 11/21/14

GRANBY

11 Acrebrook Dr.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Westover Metropolitan Development Corp.
Seller: Jeremy L. Redmond
Date: 11/14/14

1 Greystone Ave.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $159,500
Buyer: Jeffrey J. Labrecque
Seller: James B. Bright
Date: 11/26/14

148 School St.
Granby, MA 01033
Amount: $196,500
Buyer: Kenneth J. Poulin
Seller: William Martin

HADLEY

53 Bay Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $261,000
Buyer: Jason M. Kicza
Seller: Michael H. Spanknebel
Date: 11/24/14

13 Laurana Lane
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $263,700
Buyer: Matthew Olszewski
Seller: Susan A. Scranton
Date: 11/21/14

15 Mount Warner Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Mark R. Moriarty
Seller: Russell, Elizabeth A., (Estate)
Date: 11/13/14

HUNTINGTON

2 Allen Coit Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $225,000
Buyer: Sandra L. Dunn
Seller: Westcott FT
Date: 11/20/14

13 East Main St.
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $227,800
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Joshua M. Noonan
Date: 11/13/14

NORTHAMPTON

68 Bliss St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $325,000
Buyer: Ann S. Knickerbocker
Seller: Ellen T. Miller-Mack
Date: 11/14/14

18 Fairview Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $346,000
Buyer: Susan E. Stebbins
Seller: Kathleen Denning
Date: 11/26/14

78 Hawley St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $249,000
Buyer: Erin A. Moore
Seller: Paul L. Holt
Date: 11/21/14

202 Jackson St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Diane K. Merritt
Seller: Jonathan D. Richmond
Date: 11/12/14

14 Liberty St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $465,000
Buyer: Teresa J. Pianta
Seller: Adam L. Zucker
Date: 11/13/14

56 Lincoln Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Michael E. Staub
Seller: Gabriel T. Cade
Date: 11/14/14

17 Main St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $232,000
Buyer: EZMJ LLC
Seller: Marie L. Papillon
Date: 11/21/14

196 Main St.
Northampton, MA 01053
Amount: $1,050,000
Buyer: 300 Elm Street LLC
Seller: Anne G. Marley
Date: 11/25/14

46 Marshall St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $268,500
Buyer: Rebecca M. Allen-Oleet
Seller: Panayotis Kevrekidis
Date: 11/26/14

127 Overlook Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Netania Shapiro
Seller: James L. Zieminski
Date: 11/25/14

155 Prospect St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $369,000
Buyer: Kathryn I. Dominguez
Seller: Donna M. Riley
Date: 11/14/14

269 Riverside Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Anne W. Hopkinson
Seller: Jane C. Kulis
Date: 11/14/14

242 South St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: Lawson R. Wulsin
Seller: Edward A. Sr. & J. M. Towles TR
Date: 11/20/14

185 Spring Grove Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Jessica L. Engebretson
Seller: Thomas J. Coogan
Date: 11/14/14

305 Westhampton Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $283,000
Buyer: Lisa M. Lococo
Seller: James K. Dimos
Date: 11/21/14

PELHAM

44 Amherst Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $292,075
Buyer: Gregory M. Chilenski
Seller: Ernest D. May
Date: 11/18/14

55 Buffam Road
Pelham, MA 01002
Amount: $395,000
Buyer: Jacqueline Alvarez
Seller: R. Mason Bunker RET
Date: 11/14/14

SOUTH HADLEY

10 Grandview St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $252,445
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Megan Smith
Date: 11/25/14

14 Hunter Terrace
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Devin R. Crawley
Seller: Edward F. Jackson
Date: 11/21/14

1 Lansing Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $342,000
Buyer: Susan Wilson
Seller: Alice H. Haber
Date: 11/14/14

23 Ludlow Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $128,000
Buyer: Michael T. Wimer
Seller: Anthony T. Iannolo
Date: 11/13/14

8 Lyman St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Patricia M. Stefanelli
Seller: Ronald Baldwin
Date: 11/24/14

286 North Main St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Amy L. Galik
Seller: Helen C. Casey
Date: 11/14/14

49 Pearl St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: Angela B. Haggerty
Seller: Anne M. Downey
Date: 11/24/14

6 Pheasant Run
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $378,000
Buyer: Mark R. Marion
Seller: Joseph M. Nolan
Date: 11/20/14

31 Pine Hill Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Mary H. Damato
Seller: Kimberly R. Greaney
Date: 11/18/14

4 Rita Circle
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Ian P. Lariviere
Seller: Stephen C. Scherlin
Date: 11/14/14

21 Spring Meadows
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $435,000
Buyer: Jason S. Balut
Seller: Ruth A. Doyle RET
Date: 11/17/14

36 Summit St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Brandon Adams
Seller: William F. McManus
Date: 11/20/14

3 Woodcrest Lane
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $399,990
Buyer: Timdee Rainey Inv. LLC
Seller: Robert L. Mathieu
Date: 11/26/14

14 Young Circle
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $317,000
Buyer: Ellen Miller-Mack
Seller: Linda S. Samano LT
Date: 11/14/14

SOUTHAMPTON

34 Bissonnette Circle
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Florida Corp.
Seller: Joseph C. Sampson
Date: 11/17/14

113 College Hwy.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Haley E. Pearl
Seller: Andrew P. Murphy
Date: 11/24/14

29 Hillside Meadows Dr.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $405,800
Buyer: Michael Chmura
Seller: David Garstka Builders
Date: 11/26/14

41 Lead Mine Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Keith M. Holbrook
Seller: Charles L. Filkoski
Date: 11/18/14

5 Old County Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Amy R. Adamski
Seller: Theodore H. Blais
Date: 11/14/14

WARE

320 Belchertown Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Aaron M. Sundberg
Seller: Craig S. Harder
Date: 11/21/14

241 Monson Turnpike Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $252,000
Buyer: Lars R. Stanley
Seller: Willard W. Boss
Date: 11/21/14

26 Pulaski St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $182,750
Buyer: Matteo Colletta
Seller: Richard Binns
Date: 11/14/14

27 Sczygiel Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $415,625
Buyer: Bank New York
Seller: Joseph C. Ragno
Date: 11/17/14

WESTHAMPTON

36 Clapp Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $1,775,000
Buyer: Jennifer Milikowsky
Seller: James H. Averill TR
Date: 11/20/14

80 Easthampton Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Meehan Estates Inc.
Seller: Sarah W. Hollis
Date: 11/14/14

51 Main Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Guy B. Delozier
Seller: Sylvia A. Buzzee
Date: 11/20/14

15 Pine Island Lake
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $270,000
Buyer: Benjamin B. Bedell
Seller: Carolyn A. White IRT
Date: 11/18/14

290 Southampton Road
Westhampton, MA 01027
Amount: $280,000
Buyer: Thomas Raschi
Seller: Ricardo Portalatin
Date: 11/14/14

WILLIAMSBURG

77 Hemenway Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $116,000
Buyer: Gregory Kilbride
Seller: Cross, Norman H., (Estate)
Date: 11/17/14

17 Mountain St.
Williamsburg, MA 01062
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Diane M. Lacasse
Seller: Richard A. Nelson
Date: 11/19/14

WORTHINGTON

43 Old Post Road
Worthington, MA 01098
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Gabriel K. Shippee
Seller: Tanya E. Lerose
Date: 11/28/14

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the month of December 2014.

AGAWAM

Bags on the Go
55 Ramah Circle
Chellis Collins

Feeding Hills Wellness Center
567 Springfield St.
Christine Bailey

J & E Repair Service
47 Valentine Ter.
Joseph Catania

JH Walmart Tax
15 Worthington Brook Circle
Meenaxi H. Gada

RST Training
499 Springfield St.
Raymond Boissonault

CHICOPEE

Eric’s Sales
103 Lukasik St.
Eric Ladabouche

Horseshoes and Hand Grenades Tattoo
6 Center St.
Andrew Barrett

Michael J. Ash Construction
30 East Street Ave.
Michael J. Ash

Rogers Auto Body
26 Old James St.
Roger Castonguay

GREENFIELD

Abram Son’s Renovations
111 Beacon St.
Brian Abramson

Chinese Body Work
91 Main St.
Yon Xia

Goodies Restaurant Inc.
256 Federal St.
Idanis Dimitrion

Ken’s Tax Prep
280 Main St.
Kenneth Lang

Meadows Café & Golf Center
398 Deerfield St.
Constant Poholek

The Vocal Artists Studio
38 Alden St.
Eileen Ruby

HOLYOKE

Epic Kids Clothing
134 High St.
Richard R. Rodriguez

Executive Vending
154 Rock Valley Road
John P. Larose

F & M Motor Sales
414 South St.
Michael Gruszka

Goodwill Industries of Pioneer Valley
235 South St.
Steven Mundhal

High Class Cuts
451 High St.
Gamaliel Soto

JGL Truck Sales
27 Jackson St.
Javier Gonzalez

Reyes Auto Sales
100 Main St.
Oscar Reyes

Sears Beauty Salon
50 Holyoke St.
Joni Jacobson

LUDLOW

Angle Home Building & Remodeling
65 Meadowlark Circle
Todd Goncalves

Joseph Testori Electrical Contractor
71 New Crest St.
Joseph Testori

Open Door Café
247 Cady St.
Arlinda Alves

PALMER

Go Mobile
1581 North Main St.
Kevin Elder

On 3 Photography
9 Carriage Dr.
Maryellen Roche

Payless Auto Repair
26 Wilbraham St.
Kelly Doyle

SOUTHWICK

4 Life Entertainment Organization
389 North Loomis St.
Spencer Lavoie

Five Star Transportation
809 College Highway
Theresa Lecrenski

Ger-Pal, Inc.
610 College Highway
Geraldine Bshara

JD Berry Contracting
274 Granville Road
James Berry

Linen Lady Gifts
60 Miller Road
Clara Scott

R2 Prints
22 South Longyard Road
Robert Slate Jr.

Systems Personnel
414 College Highway
Edward Carroll

Tanya Salon
627 College Highway
Tatyana Brathichenko

SPRINGFIELD

Georgie’s Barber Shop
776 Liberty St.
Jorge L. Cruz

Innovative Concepts
29 1st St.
Tiffany Lissa

La Zona Supermarket Corporation
24 Fort Pleasant Ave.
Mindy L. Torres

Millennium Leasing Inc.
622 Cottage St.
Faramarz Bahrehmand

Mindy’s Cleaning Service
132 Mayfair Ave.
Mindy L. Torres

Orange Scarf
677 South Branch Parkway
Diane R. Sabato

Pars, Inc.
622 Cottage St.
Faramarz Bahrehmand

Property Maintenance
56 Gilbert Ave.
Daniel Rivera

Ron Zundell
92 Bairdcrest Road
Ronald K. Zundell

Shelby Motors, LLC
180 Boston Rd.
Khalid Albaghadadi

The Day Spa
78 Maple St.
Jun Sun

United Way of Pioneer Valley
1441 Main St.
Raymond Berry

Vraceworks MA
556 St. James Ave.
Juan E. Maldonado

WESTFIELD

Bertera Chrysler Dodge
167 Springfield Road
Bertera Motors of Westfield

Fisher Health & Wellness
110 Christopher Dr.
Kimberly Fisher

Hair Design by Leah
37 Broad St.
Leah A. Huffmire

Isander Robles
37 Elm St.
Isander Robles

Sunset Oil Company
17 Old Quarry Road
Christopher F. Grady

Your Marketing Place
503 West Road
Gail Roberts

Departments Incorporations

The following business incorporations were recorded in Hampden, Hampshire, and Franklin counties and are the latest available. They are listed by community.

AGAWAM

Global Platform Solutions Corp., 46 Cottonwood Lane, Agawam, MA 01001. Chester Stanley Wojcik, Jr. Sale and lease of equipment.
 
CHICOPEE

Al Lafleur Inc., 467 East Main St., Chicopee, MA 01020. Albert Lafleur, same. Auto repair and sales.
 
FEEDING HILLS

Get Done Cleaning Services Inc., 26 Day Ave., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Leandro De Siqueira, same. Janitorial services.
 
GNG Discount Shop Inc., 662 Springfield St., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Gina Calabria, 61 S. Westfield St., Feeding Hills, MA 01030. Nonprofit organization to collect donations for homeless veterans.
 
GREENFIELD

Deputy Sherriffs Association of Franklin County Inc., 160 Elm St., Greenfield, MA 01301. Joseph Lachance, 440 Leyden Road, Greenfield, MA 01301.
 
HOLYOKE

Dean Nimmer Arts Inc., 146 Allyn Street, Holyoke, MA 01040. Dean Nimmer, same. To create, sell, distribute and provide art related projects, art publications, art books and art material to the general public for public use.
 
LONGMEADOW

CB Leasing Inc., 60 Shaker Road, East Longmeadow, MA 01028. Gerald Coia, same. Derek Rodrigues, same. Equipment leasing.
 
LUDLOW

Global Compass Inc., 116 Warwick Dr., Ludlow, MA 01056. Derek Rodrigues, same. Construction industry with a focus on asbestos, lead, and mold removal.
 
SOUTHAMPTON

Gargan Paint and Paper Inc., 7 Center St., Southampton, MA 01073. Joseph Gargan, same. Painting and wallpapering services.
 
SOUTHWICK

Gardner Aerospace Services Inc., 2 Amberleaf Way, Southwick, MA 01077. Bernard Gardner, same. Aviation consultant providing various services including evaluation, maintenance oversight and damage assessment for new and pre-owned aircraft.
 
SPRINGFIELD

A & M Gas Mart Inc., 1390 Allen St., Springfield, A 01118. Asem Aydah, 68 Grover St., Springfield, MA 01104. Convenience store with gasoline.
 
Dreamz Made True Inc., 20 Rupert St., Springfield, MA 01108. Alycya Raquel Cook, same. The mission of this organization is to empower and encourage young ladies with positive interactions that helps build self-confidence and self-esteem where they are prepared to be successful as women.
 
Excellent Cuts Basketball Organization, 121 Wait St., Springfield, MA 01104. Willie Arthur Evans Jr., same. Basketball team and individual instruction; participation in various basketball leagues and tournaments (local and out of state); mentorship.
 
WEST SPRINGFIELD

EZ Transport Inc., 134 New Bridge St., Second Floor, West Springfield, MA 01089. Shakhmardan Shakirov, same. Business operating specialty and dedicated services of transporting foods, commercial goods, vehicles, and other commodities via flatbed, container, and heavy hauling trailers on a for-hire basis.
 
WESTFIELD

Aliganism Inc., 358 Southwick Road, Westfield, MA 01085. Gani Dinc, 398 Page Blvd., Springfield, MA 01104. Pizza and other fast foods restaurant.
 
Gee Force Trans Inc., 19B Otis St., Westfield, MA 01085. Igor Banar, same. Business operating specialty and dedicated services of transporting foods, commercial goods, vehicles, and other commodities via flatbed, container, and heavy hauling trailers on a for-hire basis.
 
American Colors Inc., 77 George St., Second Floor, Westfield, MA 01085. Dmitriy Kaplyuk, same. Auto body painting.
 

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

FRANKLIN SUPERIOR COURT
Hikaru Taketani, father and next friend of Kazuki Takeni, a minor v. Northfield Mount Hermon School
Allegation: Breach of educational services and wrongful expulsion: $10,000+
Filed: 11/12/14

Roy Varney v. General Motors, LLC
Allegation: Product liability, breach of express and implied warranties. Vehicle airbags did not deploy causing serious injury and permanent injury: $25,000+
Filed: 11/7/14

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
B.S.C. Realty Inc. v. Baystate Gas Co. d/b/a Columbia Gas of MA
Allegation: Explosion caused by negligent puncture of an underground pipe at 91 Taylor St.: $500,000
Filed: 11/13/14

Frances Jacques v. Suburban Propane Gas Co. d/b/a Punderson Oil Co.
Allegation: Negligence in fuel-oil delivery causing release into basement of home: $175,000
Filed: 11/5/14

Gordon L. Goldsmith Jr. v. Axiom Capital, LLC
Allegation: Breach of contract and non-payment of promissory note: $100,017.59
Filed: 11/21/14

Plumbing and Heating Supply Inc. a/k/a Langone Pipeline and Utility Contractors v. Carlysle Engineering Inc.
Allegation: Negligence and failure to follow required job specs causing damage: $31,697.25
Filed: 11/5/14

TerraSmart, LLC v. Sunpin Solar, LLC and Deming Family Nominee Trust
Allegation: Failure to pay under the terms of a construction contract: $196,463.05
Filed: 11/6/14

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Astro Chemicals Inc. v. Lansal Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $3,798.16
Filed: 10/23/14

Lisa Johnson v. M-Scribe Technologies Inc.
Allegation: Failure to pay wages: $3,500+
Filed: 11/7/14

Marlent Johnson v. A.T.C. Home Improvement and Kenton Johnson
Allegation: Confirmation of an award set by arbitrator: $7,824.72
Filed 11/10/14

Olivia Weson v. Briarwood Three, LLC, Madison Square Realty Management, Clark HVAC, Union Mutual of Vermont
Allegation: Negligence and breach of duty to maintain property causing carbon-monoxide poisoning: $13,560.77
Filed: 11/3/14

Robert Billings III v. New Castle Building Products Inc.
Allegation: Failure to pay overtime: $5,633.56
Filed: 11/10/14

Warren Slates v. Hulmes Transportation
Allegation: Negligence in operation and failure to attach restraints: $5,000
Filed: 10/29/14

WMECO v. Associated Building Wreckers Inc.
Allegation: While digging with heavy equipment, Defendant struck plaintiff’s electrical facilities: $12,248.02
Filed: 10/29/14

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Mount Tom Box Co. v. Renz America Co. Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $19,520.94
Filed: 10/20/14

Cover Story Economic Outlook Sections
Region’s Economy Gets a Jolt of Vibrancy

EcoOutlookDPartSince the end of the Great Recession in 2009, economic expansion in Western Mass. — and many other parts of the country as well — has been, in a word, limited.

And these limits have resulted from a host of factors that have stood in the way of more profound recovery. They include everything from lackluster hiring trends to high energy prices and their impact on businesses and consumers alike; from economic turmoil abroad, especially in Europe, to political chaos in Washington, as with the so-called fiscal cliff of early 2013; from a floundering housing market to a persistent lack of confidence among business owners.

But as the new year approaches, say experts we spoke with, much of this whitewater seems to be giving way to smoother conditions that are much more conducive to progress. The coast isn’t clear, they imply, but it is much clearer.

Indeed, Bob Nakosteen, a professor of Economics at the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst, told BusinessWest that he sees positive signs almost everywhere he looks, something he hasn’t been able to say for at least the past seven years.

That includes the latest employment statistics for the Bay State, which show unemployment in Springfield at 8.4% (down from 10.6% a year ago), which he considers a bellwether.

“What’s happening now is that the economic recovery is actually permeating Western Massachusetts, something you couldn’t say over the past several years,” he noted, adding that Boston, Cambridge, and other communities have enjoyed a far-more-robust recovery. “If you look at the employment numbers, we’re adding jobs in this part of the state, and that’s a really good development.”

That also includes the gas pump, where the prices for regular are now below $3 a gallon in all but a few of the 50 states and below $2 in a few (Oklahoma, for example). By all indications, they should stay at those levels, or drop even further, in the weeks ahead.

“And this simply puts money in people’s pockets,” Nakosteen explained. “When you pay for gas at the gas station, most if that money leaves the state — some of it stays, but most of it just goes away. Now, that money is staying in people’s pockets, but hopefully not for long; there are some estimates that people will spend at least half of what they save at the pump, and that goes to local businesses.”

The positive trends also include the housing market, the balance sheets of both businesses and families (both are carrying less debt), and consistently rising numbers when it comes to business confidence.

And then, there’s that $800 million casino project in Springfield’s South End. It isn’t officially underway yet — at least in terms of demolition or construction — but it is already generating excitement, movement within the long-stagnant commercial real-estate market, and talk of opportunities in many forms.

“We’ve had two vendor fairs, and they were very well-attended by small and medium-sized businesses who are looking at the possibility of doing business with the casino, and that’s a real positive sign,” said Jeff Ciuffreda, president of the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield, noting that there is anticipation with regard to jobs — both construction and permanent — and the casino’s vast potential for bringing more meetings and conventions to the city and region as a whole.

Meanwhile, the announcement that Changchun Railway Co. will be building subway cars in the former Westinghouse site has spurred anticipation of more than 150 well-paying manufacturing jobs as well as hopes for further growth within the region’s once-prominent manufacturing sector.

Despite all this welcome news, there are some points of global economic concern, said Cliff Noreen, president of Springfield-based Babson Capital Management LLC. He cited everything from a slowing growth rate in China to falling bond rates in many European countries to the fact that, while corporate profits are soaring, that wealth is, by and large, not being shared with employees.

The $800 million MGM Springfield

The $800 million MGM Springfield, due to start taking shape in Springfield’s South End, is one of many sources of optimism across the region.

“In the third quarter, U.S. corporate profits were up 9% on revenue growth of 4%,” he explained. “And this results from a very intense focus on managing expenses, which is to the detriment of employees; wages as a percentage of GDP have dropped to 43%, the lowest level in years.”

But, overall, Noreen and others are generally optimistic about the year ahead, so much so that the adverbs ‘guardedly’ and ‘cautiously,’ which have preceded that term since the recession officially ended nearly six years ago, have been generally dropped from most commentary.

“I do think that the mood of small-business owners is positive — I sense a better buzz, a better feel now than I have in the past several years,” said Ciuffreda. “Some of this is downtown-centric, with UMass here, the progress at 1550 Main Street, NPR’s new facilities, new tenants in 1350 Main St. … the feeling is a lot better; the city is more positive than I’ve ever seen it.”

Fueling Speculation

Like Nakosteen, Noreen called falling gas prices a form of economic stimulus, and he offered some eye-opening numbers to get his point across.

“Every penny that gas drops results in $1.3 billion of additional money or funds for consumers and business in the United States — discretionary spending,” he explained. “Gas has dropped approximately 55 cents from the beginning of the year, which should result in a savings of $73 billion, which is effectively stimulus, which comes out to about four-tenths of 1% of GDP.”

Nakosteen cited estimates that the average family will save perhaps $60 a month due to the falling gas prices. “And if you do the arithmetic, take half that and add that up over a whole lot of households, that’s really money being spent in the region,” he said. “And from all I’m reading, this decline in fuel prices is not going to be short-lived; it’s going to last for a while.”

This windfall — unexpected but in some ways not surprising, given the explosion in the production of shale oil in this country — is just one of many reasons, large and small, for rising optimism regarding the economy, even as those numbers are tempered by the damage done to the energy sector when oil falls to below $70 a barrel.

Nakosteen said the improving employment numbers are equally important, if not moreso.

Cliff Noreen

Cliff Noreen says that, despite general optimism about the economy, there are many factors, here and abroad, that could impact the pace of growth.

Elaborating, he noted that, for the most part, whatever recovery this region has enjoyed over the past several years has been generally of the jobless variety. But recent employment reports show that perhaps that scenario is changing.

“It’s been really a slow slog,” Nakosteen said of employment in the four western counties and especially Springfield. “Maybe the recovery is really gaining traction in this part of the state, and recent developments are only going to help.”

With jobs come disposable income and a resulting trickle-down, said Noreen, noting quickly that optimism does need to be kept in check by the fact that many jobs being created, not only in Massachusetts but nationwide, are part-time in nature, and with wages that are not keeping pace with inflation.

“More than 321,000 new jobs were created on a net basis in November,” he said, citing the most recent jobs report. “Our concern, and we’ve been saying this to clients all year, is that the quality of jobs is not what it used to be, and many of these jobs are part-time jobs, they’re in service-type industries that are very low-wage, and many of the jobs are being taken by workers over 55 years old, either because they want to work or they need to work.”

But, overall, the job growth is being seen as a positive sign for the region’s economy, as is the growing confidence among business owners, said PeoplesBank President Doug Bowen, who cited not only the Associated Industries of Massachusetts’ monthly business confidence index and its recent steady improvement, but also trends and activity he’s noticed locally.

“The Massachusetts economy is on track to strengthen, with solid economic growth, and add more jobs in 2015,” he said. “We have a positive outlook for Western Mass. Companies in our portfolio, in general, are doing well and showing moderate growth. Some of these business owners are selectively investing in capital equipment and, to a lesser degree, new facilities.

“But we are seeing growth,” he went on. “We’re seeing some that are adding additional shifts, which always precedes the actual physical construction of new space.”

One of the sectors where he’s seeing such movement is aerospace, or machine shops, which he considers a positive sign because those jobs are generally well-paying. But he’s also witnessing growth in other manufacturing, healthcare, hospitality, and IT.

He said that most of these expansions are resulting not from speculation, but rather from current backlog and existing orders, which leads some to speculate on how long this might continue. However, Bowen noted that he’s seeing generally forward movement and, overall, less hesitation when it comes to additional hiring.

If there are speed bumps down the road for the region’s and nation’s economy, they will likely result from action — or inaction, as the case may be — in other corners of the globe, said those we spoke with.

“Japan is struggling, the Russian ruble has declined substantially, and China is growing at less than people thought,” Noreen explained, adding that these factors and others add up to less demand for U.S. products and commodities such as oil, iron ore, and concrete, which may eventually slow the pace of growth in this country.

“Over the past three years, China used more concrete than the U.S. used in the last 100 years,” said Jay Leonard, a director with Babson Capital Management. “That’s a stunning number, and it helps explain why, with China’s slower rate of growth, oil prices are down, copper prices are down, and steel is getting crushed.”

Meanwhile, Europe continues to be the biggest disappointment on the global economic stage, said Noreen, pointing to bond rates on 10-year government yields (2% in Spain, 1% in France, and 0.77% in Germany) that he called shockingly low.

Industry Terms

As 2015 approaches, those representing several economic sectors anticipate that this will be a year of change, but also challenge and, in many cases, opportunity.

For the long-suffering construction industry, one of the sectors hardest-hit by the recession and the lackluster recovery that followed, change is almost certainly good, said Dave Fontaine, president of Springfield-based Fontaine Brothers.

Doug Bowen

Doug Bowen says confidence among business owners is growing, and many are making investments in their ventures.

He told BusinessWest that, while 2014 has not been a banner year for his company — “we had work, but it was all booked in 2013” — there has been some improvement in several areas within construction, from home building to infrastructure work (roads and bridges). And the consensus is that 2015 will be better because of what he called “pent-up frustration.”

But easily the greatest source of optimism within the industry is the approaching start of work on the casino.

While the general contractor for this massive project will certainly be a firm from well outside the 413 area code, undoubtedly one with several casino projects in its portfolio, Fontaine said, there will be a trickle-down effect, with many area subcontractors and individual tradesmen (all unionized) in line to win much-needed work.

Just how much work remains to be seen, obviously, but Fontaine expects the project to have a deep impact on the sector and its workforce.

“The casino project is going to be good for the general trades, because I know that, for bricklayers, carpenters, and laborers, their hours were down significantly this past year,” he said. “These types of projects certainly employ a lot of people, and they employ them quickly and for a lot of hours, but then they’re done.”

What the sector will have to guard against, to whatever extent possible, is a shortage of manpower for other projects because of the attractiveness of the casino work in terms of hours, wages, and the opportunity for overtime.

“There’s the potential for some manpower shortages, because everyone would want to be down at the casino because they’re getting overtime and six days a week and whatnot,” Fontaine explained. “But our group of tradespeople that work for us, I don’t see them packing up and abandoning us to give their life to the casino for two years.”

Change is also expected in the banking sector, where Bowen believes the recent spate of mergers and acquisitions will give way to a more stable environment.

Indeed, 2014 saw the completion of the merger of equals between United Bank and Connecticut-based Rockville National, and the announced acquisition of Hampden Bank, the last institution based in Springfield, by Pittsfield-based Berkshire Bank.

“To a large extent, it’s pretty much over,” he told BusinessWest. “There may be one or two more organizations that come into play, but the organizations that positioned themselves for merger or acquisition have pretty much achieved their objective.”

These mergers present opportunities in several forms, especially for community banks like PeoplesBank, said Bowen, noting that, whenever such acquisitions take place and management of the acquired bank shifts away from Greater Springfield, commercial and consumer accounts will be moved to small institutions. Meanwhile, such unions generally result in downsizing, which enables banks to recruit talented individuals that already know the local market.

“As an independent, mutually owned bank with no shareholders, we often become the bank of choice for customers who have experienced some disruption in their banking experience,” he said. “This year alone, we’ve increased deposits by more than $100 million; a typical year might by three-quarters that amount.”

Another sector that bears watching in 2015 is healthcare, which is still struggling to cope with the changes brought on the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) and the ongoing shift from a fee-for-service system to one focused much more on population health.

Such a shift requires providers to make significant investments in equipment, systems, and personnel, said Dennis Chalke, Baystate Health’s chief financial officer, treasurer, and senior vice president of Community Hospitals, adding that these investments come at a time when reimbursements for care are flat or declining and inpatient stays, a major source of revenue, are falling.

Thus, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to make them, especially for stand-alone hospitals, he said, which explains why North Adams Regional Hospital closed in 2014 and why Stewart Health Care System announced that it was shuttering Quincy Medical Center, the largest hospital closing in the state in more than a decade.

“Right now, Medicare is penalizing people if their readmission rates are too high,” he explained. “That means you have to now invest in tools and other things to decrease readmissions, so when patients leave the hospital you have to make sure they follow up with physician office visits and they that they are adhering to their medications and so forth — and that takes investments in things you wouldn’t traditionally invest in.

“That’s a good thing,” he went on. “But we’re not getting paid to do that. We avoid losing dollars when we do that; it’s almost like a negative incentive. And that’s the biggest challenge facing the industry moving forward.”

As for the casino, Ciuffreda said that, overall, apprehension about the gaming facility is diminishing, at least within the business community, and it is generally being replaced with optimism, although some concern remains about its long-term sustainability.

“The mood is very positive — the only slightly gray cloud hanging over the casino is its sustainability 10 years out or so,” he said. “About 95% of the people feel very comfortable about the next five years, and 75% are comfortable about the next 10 years, but some questions start to creep in about what happens after that.”

Money Talks

Challenge and opportunity. Those two words sum up the outlook for each sector and the regional economy as a whole.

But, overall, the emphasis this year seems to be more on opportunity, as it pertains to jobs, growth through additional discretionary spending, expansion, and the many forms of trickledown anticipated from the casino.

As Nakosteen said, it appears that the economic recovery is actually permeating Western Mass.

And it’s about time.

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Economic Outlook Sections
The Planning of 2014 Will Give Way to Construction in 2015

By JEFFREY S. CIUFFREDA

The year now drawing to a close might best be known for all of the planning that went into several projects, and therefore 2015 will likely become known as the year of construction, because many, if not all, of these planned projects entered into the construction phase.

Jeffrey S. Ciuffreda

Jeffrey S. Ciuffreda

Indeed, 2014 saw a fair amount of construction, and some of what took place was rebuilding from the 2011 tornado that ripped through Springfield and the surrounding area. Several schools in Springfield were either repaired or rebuilt, bringing construction volume to more than $100 million. While the construction trades had suffered double-digit unemployment for a few years, these public projects helped keep some of those workers employed.

Some long-time institutions spent considerable money in 2014 to upgrade their facilities, and in some cases add jobs. Mercy Medical Center completed a $20 million addition to its campus, and National Public Radio renovated a downtown building at the cost of $3 million, adding to the rebirth of the downtown that brought some jobs down from their Amherst location. Caring Health Center completed its renovations in the South End, spending $15 million to do so.

Looking ahead to 2015, there is more construction to come, but this time complete with new jobs.

This past year saw an up-and-down planning process with expanded gaming in Massachusetts, culminating in a final vote by the citizens of the Commonwealth to move forward with this concept. That gave the green light to MGM to commence its $800 million project in Springfield’s South End. It is expected that a general contractor will be named, and it will choose its subcontractors by spring, and construction will begin. Roughly 2,000 construction jobs are expected on site once the project is fully underway. The 3,000 permanent jobs this development promises will not be seen until 2017, but the planning for those jobs, including job training, will commence in 2015.

Another project that was in planning during 2014 and will begin construction in 2015 promises to bring 150 jobs to start. Changchun Railway Co., a Chinese firm, won the state’s bid to construct rail cars for the MBTA and chose to do so right here in Springfield. This company is a worldwide entity, yet, until this decision, it had no presence in North America. It hopes to make Springfield its North American headquarters and grow those original jobs to 300 within one to two years. These are good-paying machinist positions as well as countless other support jobs, all of which will greatly add to the economic well-being of our region’s major city and its people.

Adding to the region’s inventory of hotel rooms and, therefore, boosting the tourism sector of our economy is the new $ 5 million Hampton Inn on East Columbus Avenue in Springfield, which will open in 2015. The Silverbrick Co.’s rehabilitation of the old Morgan Square in downtown Springfield will remake those buildings into market-rate housing, and many of those units will be on the market for 2015. While these private-sector jobs are essential to economic development, there are several public-sector projects that will also be underway in 2015, many, again, related in some way to the devastating storms suffered over the past three years.

A new, $8 million South End Community Center, a $12 million senior center, and an $8 million police station will all add up to better facilities and better services. The year ahead will also be marked by the start of the largest infrastructure project the area has seen in a decade — the complete rehabilitation of the elevated section of I-91 that runs through Springfield from the I-291 intersection to just south of State Street.

This $235 million project will begin in late spring of 2015 and continue on for three years. While no project of this magnitude can be done without some inconvenience, it will guarantee the region a safe roadway, which is the crucial economic link to our Western Mass. region.

Meanwhile, the $82 million rehabilitation of Union Station into a transportation hub, complete with amenities and available office space, will be mostly completed in 2015, creating a true anchor for the North End of Springfield.

If 2014 was the planning year, and 2015 the construction year, 2016 will be filled with ribbon cuttings and new jobs, both construction and permanent. The outlook has not been this positive for our region’s major city in quite some time.

Jeffrey S. Ciuffreda is president of the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater Springfield.

Business of Aging Sections
Emeritus of East Longmeadow Caters to Residents’ Requests

Philip Noto

Philip Noto says the Emeritus of East Longmeadow building was carefully designed to accommodate the needs of aging seniors.

Philip Noto says the difference between Emeritus of East Longmeadow and other local assisted-living facilities can be found in the details.

“It’s easy to get the big things right, but small things play a major role in the happiness of residents,” said the facility’s executive director, noting that this is the reason why he fought to get granite countertops and full-size refrigerators installed in every unit when the building was under construction.

“I had managed other assisted-living facilities and listened to complaints from residents who wanted to keep ice cream in their freezers, but couldn’t do so because of their size. It might sound like a small thing, but paying attention to small things is what sets us apart from other communities,” he told BusinessWest, adding that his insistence on granite countertops was based on the knowledge that many people who move into residential communities are leaving upscale homes and don’t want to downgrade their kitchens.

Nathan Grenon, regional director of sales and marketing, agrees that small measures make a significant difference, and says everyone employed at Emeritus does their best to cater to residents’ requests. He cited an example of a 97-year-old woman who had been a gourmet cook who told them she hoped their chef would make homemade cream of carrot soup.

“She told us she had requested it for five years in another facility, but it was never prepared,” Grenon said. “So, we introduced her to our cook, who made it exactly the way she wanted, and today it is the most popular soup on our menu.”

Noto and Grenon cited myriad other examples of resident suggestions that have led to change within the state-of-the art, two-story, 90,000-square-foot building that opened April 21 on 10 acres of land on Parker Street. “Emeritus is a 25-year-old company; we recently merged with Brookdale Senior Living, and we now have more than 1,150 properties across the country,” Noto said, adding that decades of feedback from seniors were incorporated into the design of the East Longmeadow facility.

The building is airy, spacious, and well-lit. Comfortable chairs surround a cozy gas fireplace near the entrance, where residents gather to socialize or take part in activities. There is also an expansive dining room with a cathedral ceiling, a library, several courtyards, a business area equipped with computers with large touchscreens, a private dining room that can be reserved for family functions, a café where residents can prepare foods they like or enjoy snacks throughout the day or evening, a game room, a movie theater that seats up to 20 people in full-size armchairs, and a plethora of other common living spaces.

“We have 71 assisted-living units and one of the largest, most expansive memory-care neighborhoods in Western Mass.,” said Grenon. “There is a nurse on duty from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., and we offer physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy on site.”

In addition to enjoying a full roster of activities, many residents stroll daily on a quarter-mile pathway that circles the building. Benches are set along it so they can stop and relax, and many gravitate to an outdoor gas firepit that burns brightly during inclement weather. In fact, residents enjoy going outside so much that a number of activities scheduled to take place inside are now held outdoors in response to their feedback.

Changing the Landscape

Noto reiterated that seemingly small details, including the food choices on the menu and the daily activities, make a difference in how happy residents feel on a daily basis.

To ensure that staff members know what residents want, Emeritus holds three monthly meetings and invites everyone who resides in the building. One is focused on general suggestions to improve the facility, the second gives people an opportunity to suggest new foods they would like to see served in the dining room, and the third allows them to vote on activities they want to engage in, as well as destinations for day trips.

“This is their home, and we want to get their input so we can adjust our program to meet their needs,” Noto said. “Our residents have a voice. Their concerns are heard, and we change things that are important to them.”

Grenon concurred. “We want to make their experience here as pleasurable as possible.”

Indeed, many changes have been made as a result of the meetings, which range from creating an area in the dining room where male residents can eat together, to rearranging the furniture in a common area and game room.

“The residents wanted to move the poker table into a room of its own, so we did it,” Noto said.

Grenon added that new activities have also been instituted, such as a Bible-study club that meets every Thursday. “The idea came from residents who were interested in spiritual activities,” he noted.

Brittany Sheehan

Brittany Sheehan shows off a life station in the memory unit at Emeritus at East Longmeadow, designed to evoke memories in residents who have children.

The fact that Emeritus does not require people to buy into the facility and residents rent on a month-to-month basis also gives them peace of mind. And although there are scheduled meal times, residents who miss a meal can be served at any time in the dining room. In addition, each unit has its own thermostat, which allows people to adjust the heat or air conditioning to their personal comfort levels.

These factors, combined with the dedication of employees, have led to success, and although the facility has been open only eight months, 45 of the 71 assisted-living units are occupied. Residents range in age from 66 to 99, and the ratio of females to males is about 50-50.

The assisted-living units include one- and two-bedroom suites with one or two baths. Each one contains a microwave, a full-sized refrigerator, and several large closets with a lockbox. The bathrooms have spacious showers with heat lamps and no lips, reducing the risk of tripping. In addition, the transitions between carpeting and wood floors are very smooth, making it easy for people to move through the community.

But Noto said the way residents are treated trumps the beauty and functionality of the real estate, and added that every member of his staff is passionate about their job. “We have an extensive interview process for job candidates. Every employee needs to feel they make a difference in the lives of our residents every day.”

Enhanced Memory Unit

Space has also filled quickly in the Acres, the memory-care unit, and Grenon said having it within the building allows people to “age in place,” giving them the option to move into it if they need extra help or support.

In fact, having assisted-living units and a memory neighborhood under one roof is ideal for some couples, he noted, explaining that one resident who lives in an assisted-living suite visits her husband every day in the Acres, where they stroll down the wide hallways within the secure neighborhood.

The thought that went into the design of the building can be seen in the layout of the shared rooms in the Acres. Although they were built for two people to live in, the only thing they actually share is the bathroom, which is situated between their private suites. Each person has their own door that opens into their living space, and shadowboxes are stationed outside that families fill with photos or mementos to help their loved ones easily recognize their personal entranceway.

Again, Grenon said families appreciate the attention to detail that is part of the program as much as the enhanced real estate.

“An example of this is that, when staff check on the residents every hour throughout the night, they have to enter each person’s bathroom and press a button to signal that they have actually been there,” he noted, explaining that the signals are recorded, which alleviates any anxiety as to whether the hourly checks actually occur.

The Acres also contains unusual ‘life stations,’ designed to promote activities that are familiar to residents. One contains a crib filled with baby dolls, a changing table with doll clothing, and a rocking chair. “Many of our residents are mothers, and when they see the dolls, they pick them up, change them, rock them, and even bring them to meals,” Grenon said.

Another life station contains a map and globe and was created to spark memories about places residents have visited, while a third has a collection of men’s and women’s hats, scarves, and jewelry they can don at a dressing table with a mirror.

“The life stations are part of our effort to keep them engaged and keep their brains stimulated. We don’t want people staying in their rooms,” Grenon said.

A special ‘quiet room’ was also built into the unit. It doesn’t have windows and is used by staff members as a place to bring residents who are agitated or suffering from the confusion that can occur when the sun sets. “They can turn on relaxing music and calm the person down in this quiet, secure place,” he explained.

Memory Care Director Brittany Sheehan says caretakers in the Acres are trained in how to deal with memory loss, and get to know each resident well. She added that the caregivers serve the residents’ meals and help them with daily tasks of living, such as dressing and showering, which allows them to build solid relationships through continuity and familiarity.

“It also helps them learn what each resident likes and dislikes,” Sheehan said. “But before they even move in, I have their families fill out a detailed, six-page questionnaire so we can provide personal touches they would have enjoyed at home. For example, a resident might like a cup of tea every night before going to bed. We do our best to customize our care to fit each individual’s needs.”

She runs a monthly support group for families and meets with them on a regular basis. “I call them if their loved one is having a bad day or a really good day. And every month I mail them ‘A Moment in Time,’” she said, explaining that it is a handwritten letter with pictures of their loved one engaged in activities.

Quality of Life

Grenon said Emeritus has quickly become a valuable community asset.

“Before it was built, many people were apprehensive because they didn’t know what to expect,” he explained. “But officials in East Longmeadow and people in the surrounding towns have been very supportive since we opened, as they appreciate what we have to offer.”

Noto agreed, and said the facility’s staff will continue to focus on improving small things that make a difference.

“Our residents have a voice, and we change things in response to their requests,” he said. “Everything we do is aimed at providing quality care, which is important because this is their home.”

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the months of November and December 2014.
 
AGAWAM

GR33N Lift Skateboards
611 Suffield St.
Jeffrey Auld

Laser Tag Adventures
37 Overlook Dr.
Newton Vezina

Mass Gutter Cleaning
231 Lancaster Dr.
Yuriy Panchelyuga

Tailor Made Paintless Dent Repair
11 Albert St.
Timothy J. Rapa

Tribute Designs
75 Elm St.
Cheryl Terramagra

CHICOPEE

Dependable Daycare
62 Old Fuller Road
David Dunn

John’s Draft Service
56 Montcalm St.
John Martin

Veras Mini Market & Deli
830 Chicopee St.
Santana Veras

View Street Tavern
92 View St.
Aristides Nunes

HOLYOKE

EZ Exchange
324 Appleton St.
Mimi Mai

Jerry’s Auto Repair & Sales
901 Main St.
Victor M. Gomez

JP’s Restaurant
200 Whiting Farms Road
James Lavelle

Maria Gift Shop
252 Maple St.
Maria M. Rondon

Murry’s Ductwork
2103 Northampton St.
Matt McNee

Pelletier Insulation
143 Suffolk St.
Donald W. Pelletier

NORTHAMPTON

King Street Convenience Store
60 King St.
Zahoor Mian

On Point Full Service Salon
1 North Main St.
Deanna Subocz

Pleasant Journey Used Cars
5 Fulton Ave.
John Davey

Straight Up Hair Design
59 Conz St.
Tammis Lander

Uniquely Greener Massachusetts
6 Conz St.
Seth Fischer

Willow Works Construction
16 Plymouth Ave.
Devin Ray

PALMER

Apple Automotive
1205 South Main St.
Raymond Labonte

BJC Realty Trust
2193 Palmer St.
Bernard Croteau

Class Act Events
75 Mason St.
Michael Perkins

J.P. Auto Services
364 Boston Road
Jean Carbonneau

Love & Light Energy Healing
164 State St.
Pamela Hutchins

Palmer House of Fine Jewelry
1512 North Main St.
Nancy Theriault

Stolar Realty, LLC
2001 Calkins Road
Renee Niedziela

SPRINGFIELD

A+ Family Child Care
37 Waldorf St.
Avril Reid

Action Auto Sales
78 Lincoln St.
Frank S. Rocco

Asian Bazaar
607 Dickinson St.
Rizvan Merza

Autobahn Express Motors
501 St. James Ave.
Luz Z. Lopez

Bay Street Barber Shop
318 Bay St.
Joe Morales

Be Attitude
233 Savoy Ave.
Kimberley Renay

Brylo Auto Window Tint
51 Dale St.
Bryan Lora

Cabrera Market
520 Union St.
Adelzo Lantigua

Cape Cod Nutrition Corner
1728 Boston Road
Michael Craven

Foxy’s Gift Baskets
98 Woodside Terrace
Edwin J. Pagan

Gabbidon Tile Works
109 Malden St.
Ian K. Gabbidon

Good Management
590 Main St.
Gustavo Parra

Harley’s Treasurer Trove
30 Parker St.
Michele A. Tarr

Inspired Marketing Inc.
20 Maple St.
Jill C. Monson

JMS Business Services
6 Macomber Ave.
James M. Skarbek

WESTFIELD

Bodywise Physical Therapy, LLC
82 Broad St.
Bodywise Physical Therapy, LLC

Bright Sail Cleaning
51 Southwick Road
Alla Bazukin

Chez Louise
3 Harrison Ave.
Julie L. Duris

Pignature Farm
380 East Mountain Road
Marla J. Pignature

Tangles
43 Union St.
Cinda, Inc.

Tanning Zone
47 Southwick Road
The Tanning Zone

Briefcase Departments

BusinessWest Owner Donates $500,000 to Cathedral High School
SPRINGFIELD — Cathedral High School has received a $500,000 donation from Cathedral alumnus John Gormally, owner of BusinessWest magazine. Cathedral High School President Dr. Ann Southworth said the gift “will be used to provide immediate tuition assistance to students desiring a Cathedral High School education, as well as support faculty.” But the money is more than just a donation. Gormally is also challenging the business community in Western Mass. to “step up to the plate and show their support” like he has done. “I have confidence in Catholic education,” said Gormally, a 1978 graduate of the school. “I think it is important to have a Catholic high school in Springfield. It is my hope and desire that the Springfield Diocese finds a way to rebuild Cathedral on Surrey Road in Springfield. I would also hope that the business community steps up to recognize Cathedral as the important resource it is in the community and financially support it.”

Bay Path Commits to Expand College Access
LONGMEADOW — Bay Path University President Carol Leary joined President Obama, the first lady, and Vice President Biden, along with hundreds of college presidents and other higher-education leaders, to announce new actions to help more students prepare for and graduate from college. The White House College Opportunity Day of Action helped support Obama’s commitment to partner with colleges and universities, business leaders, and nonprofits to support students across the country. “I am honored to participate in this important initiative and to represent the 76.6 million adult women in this country who do not have a baccalaureate degree,” said Leary. “Through the launch of the American Women’s College at Bay Path University, we are making a bold commitment to provide a truly revolutionary model of higher education for underserved adult women. It is time that we as a country focus on this population. Higher education has the potential to transform a woman’s life and, in so doing, positively impact her community, her workplace, and her family. The generational impact of educating adult women is profound: research demonstrates that only 13% of children of women without a degree go on to college. When a woman earns a degree, that figure escalates to 49%. A focus on the education of adult women is critical to President Obama’s goal of restoring our nation as a global leader in college-educated citizenry.” Leary is among the participants being asked to commit to new action in one of four areas: building networks of colleges around promoting completion, creating K-12 partnerships around college readiness, investing in high-school counselors as part of the first lady’s Reach Higher initiative, and increasing the number of college graduates in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Expanding opportunity for more students to enroll and succeed in college, especially low-income and underrepresented students, is vital to building a strong economy and a strong middle class. Today, only 9% of those born in the lowest family income quartile attain a bachelor’s degree by age 25, compared to 54% in the top quartile.

Chief Executives Expect Firms to Keep Growing
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Business Roundtable said Tuesday that 40% of its member CEOs plan to hire more workers, up from 34% in the third quarter. Nearly three-quarters project their sales will rise, roughly the same as the previous quarter. The findings suggest that slowing growth overseas hasn’t caused large corporations to pull back on their hiring plans. Still, the CEOs say they are less likely to invest in new facilities or equipment; 13% say they plan to cut such spending, up from just 10% in the previous quarter. The survey was conducted between Oct. 22 and Nov. 12, and is based on 129 responses from the Roundtable’s 200 member CEOs.

Panel Calls for Changes in State Officials’ Pay
BOSTON — A seven-member advisory commission created by legislation to review compensation for the state’s constitutional officers and the Legislature presented its findings and recommendations Monday in a detailed report to the public and policy makers. The commission, chaired by Ira Jackson, dean of the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at UMass Boston, was established by Section 239 of the state budget and appointed in September 2014 to analyze compensation for public officials, including the governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, treasurer, secretary of state, auditor, and the Legislature. The commission was mandated to issue its report by Dec. 1. “The Advisory Commission conducted a transparent, open, data-driven review of the current compensation of public officials and developed a series of major reforms and recommendations based on its research, as well as input from the public,” said Jackson. “We recommend that the Legislature strongly consider implementing important reforms to the process of calculating compensation, while at the same time making appropriate increases in compensation levels for the governor and other elected officials to more adequately reflect their responsibilities.” Recommended reforms include:
• Eliminating legislative per diem payments;
• Determining the biennial adjustment in legislative pay through a consistent process using 
data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis to measure the quarterly change in salaries and 
wages in Massachusetts for the most recent eight quarters;
• Calculating any increase or decrease in compensation for all constitutional officers and the 
House speaker and Senate president using the bureau’s data on a biennial basis;
• Limiting outside employment through a first-in-the-nation measure precluding the 
constitutional officers, House speaker, and Senate president from earning outside income, other than passive income; and
• Establishing future special advisory commissions on a biennial basis to conduct a thorough 
review of compensation and reforms.
Specific recommendations on compensation include:
• Ensuring that any compensation increases must be cost-neutral to the taxpayer through efficiencies and savings identified by the constitutional officers and Legislature and reported on an annual basis to ensure accountability and transparency;
• Establishing the salary for the governor at $185,000, which, when adjusted for cost of living, would rank 10th among the 50 states. Massachusetts is one of only six states that does not provide a governor’s residence or a housing allowance. The commission recommends that the governor receive a housing allowance of $65,000;
• Providing a salary of $175,000 for the attorney general and the treasurer and receiver general;
• Setting a salary of $165,000 for the lieutenant governor, the secretary of state, and the state auditor;
• Establishing compensation for the House speaker and Senate president at $175,000 annually; and
• Increasing the legislative office expense to $10,000 for legislators whose districts are within a 50-mile radius of Boston, and to $15,000 for legislators located outside that radius.
“While any recommendation to increase compensation for state leaders may be controversial, the commission believes these increases are appropriate based on the data we reviewed, and the recommended reforms are important foundations for public trust,” said Jackson. “The commission’s recommendations were guided by a thorough review of data comparing Massachusetts with other states, a strong desire to ensure that the state attracts and retains highly talented individuals regardless of means or geography, and the principle that officials should be fairly compensated based on the significant responsibilities of the offices they hold.”

Christopher Heights Project Breaks Ground
NORTHAMPTON — Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Undersecretary Aaron Gornstein recently joined representatives of the Grantham Group, Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz, MassDevelopment President and CEO Marty Jones, and state and local officials to break ground on the Christopher Heights assisted-living community in Northampton. “Christopher Heights is an important step toward the goal of expanding our supply of affordable housing for all of our citizens in the Commonwealth,” said Gornstein. “DHCD is pleased to assist with this development that will not only provide new housing opportunities for the elderly, but will stimulate local economic activity. We congratulate Grantham Group and appreciate the leadership of Mayor Narkewicz and other local, state, and federal officials who have helped make this project a reality.” Christopher Heights will be the newest development in Village Hill, a 126-acre mixed-use community located on the site of the former Northampton State Hospital. Christopher Heights is expected to open in the fall of 2015 and will have 83 assisted-living units, of which 43 are designated for low-income seniors. Seventeen of the 43 affordable units will be reserved for households earning less than 30% of the area median income. Christopher Heights also has locations in Worcester, Webster, Attleboro, and Marlborough. “We are excited to bring our expertise in assisted-living development and management to the Northampton State Hospital redevelopment known as Village Hill,” said Grantham Group Managing Director Walter Ohanian. “We look forward to serving the senior population who will benefit from the housing and services of an affordable assisted-living community.” The Grantham Group estimates that the project will create 65 construction jobs for the area. Once built, there will be another 40 permanent jobs at the facility. “This exciting new addition to the Village Hill community will provide affordable assisted-living housing for our local seniors,” said state Rep. Peter Kocot. “I want to congratulate the Grantham Group, Undersecretary Gornstein, and Gov. Patrick for their leadership and commitment to developing affordable housing for people of all ages.” Since 2007, the Patrick administration has invested more than $1 billion in state and federal resources to create 24,000 units of housing, of which approximately 22,000 are affordable. In Northampton, DHCD has invested more than $7.6 million to preserve or create 98 units of housing, 95 of which are affordable, for veterans, those who are institutionalized or at-risk of institutionalization, and low-income households.

Funding Awarded for Environmental Projects in Berkshire County
LENOX, PITTSFIELD — Gov. Deval Patrick recently joined state environmental officials and local officials to announce $1.2 million in capital funding to support environmental projects at Baker’s Pond in Lenox and Berkshire Community College in Pittsfield, enhancing existing natural habitats and improving recreational opportunities for residents. “Growth requires investment, and creating and upgrading recreational parks and open spaces while also providing important community resources will help create growth and opportunity across the commonwealth,” Patrick said. “This investment will improve the lives of Massachusetts children and families now and for generations to come.” The administration’s $125,000 investment in Baker’s Pond will assist in the final phase of restoration of the pond. The removal of invasive species and water-quality improvements will preserve the habitat for wildlife species and make it a more appealing destination for visitors to Kennedy Park. Berkshire Community College’s Life Sciences Department will work with the town to ensure proper removal of any invasive species and the complete restoration of the pond. “Safe, reliable drinking water has always been a critical need. In the 21st century, we will need to develop new technologies to meet growing demand,” said U.S. Rep. Jim McGovern. “I’m pleased that the federal government is joining with the Commonwealth and UMass Amherst in this promising effort.” Baker’s Pond has a history of recreational use, but, after a small dam breach, the pond fell into disrepair, resulting in the growth of invasive plant and animal species. With ongoing improvements, the pond is once again becoming an attraction for tourists and hikers, as well as a habitat for endangered amphibian species. The city of Pittsfield was also awarded $1.1 million to ensure proper drainage and wetland protection as Berkshire Community College works to construct an athletic field on campus, the first of its kind in Berkshire County. The athletic-field location is north of a vernal pool, certified by the Natural Heritage Endangered Species Program, making it important for the project to be environmentally sensitive in order to preserve habitat for plants and animals. “Gov. Patrick has demonstrated a strong commitment to Pittsfield an Berkshire County,” said Mayor Daniel Bianchi. “The city of Pittsfield is pleased to join the governor in a financial commitment for the environmental restoration and construction of the new Berkshire Community College turf field. The new field will provide an athletic hub from Berkshire County and beyond. I look forward to the new events that the BCC turf field will bring to Pittsfield.”

Construction Spending Increases in October
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Construction spending increased in October amid growing public-sector demand for construction and continued modest growth in residential work, according to an analysis by Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials said the new spending figures underscore the need for measures to increase the supply of qualified construction workers as firms worry about growing labor shortages. “Today’s data shows that construction growth remains volatile,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “While overall construction spending jumped by more than 1% in October, the gain followed two months of stagnation. Public construction was the fastest-growing segment for the month but the slowest-growing over the past year and for the first 10 months of 2014 combined. Conversely, private, non-residential construction inched down from September to October but has risen at double-digit rates — 11% — for the combined January-through-October period. And private residential construction continues to grow very modestly, with multi-family construction taking the lead on an annual basis.” Construction spending in October totaled $971 billion at a seasonally adjusted annual rate, up 1.1% from the September total and 3.3% higher than in October 2013, Simonson noted. Private residential spending edged up 1.3% from September and 1.9% from a year earlier, while private non-residential spending dropped 1.0% for the month but rose 6.4% year-over-year. The third component of the total — public construction spending — increased 1.5% from September and 2.3% from a year ago. Single-family home construction gained 1.8% for the month and 13.2% over 12 months, and multi-family work increased 1.0% from the September level and jumped 27.2% from a year earlier. The largest private non-residential type, power construction — which includes oil and gas fields and pipelines as well as electric power — slumped 1.9% in October but rose 0.3% from the prior year. Commercial construction — comprising retail, warehouse, and farm projects — decreased 2.6% for the month but increased 9.3% for the year. Manufacturing construction increased 3.4% for the month and 23% year-over-year. Among the largest public segments, highway and street construction inched up 1.1% for the month and declined 0.1% from October 2013. Public-education construction inched up 2.2% and 6.1%, respectively. “For 2014 as a whole and 2015, private non-residential spending and multi-family spending should be the strongest segments, followed by single-family construction, with very limited prospects for public construction,” Simonson said. Association officials said the spending increases come as many firms report growing labor shortages. They urged elected and appointed officials to act on a series of measures the association has identified that will help expand the supply of qualified construction workers. “We need to make sure there are enough workers available to meet growing demand for construction,” said Stephen Sandherr, the association’s CEO.

Unemployment Rates Down in Massachusetts

BOSTON — The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) reported that seasonally unadjusted unemployment rates for October were down in 20 Massachusetts labor market areas and up in two areas, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Over the year, unemployment rates were down in all the labor market areas. The preliminary statewide unadjusted unemployment rate estimate for October was 5.1%, down 1.1% from September. Over the year, the statewide unadjusted rate was down 1.8% from the October 2013 rate of 6.9%. During October, 10 of the 12 areas for which job estimates are published recorded job gains. The largest job gain was in the Boston-Cambridge-Quincy area, followed by the Worcester, Springfield, Brockton-Bridgewater-Easton, Lowell-Billerica-Chelmsford, Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, Peabody, New Bedford, Leominster-Fitchburg-Gardner, and Framingham areas. The Pittsfield area had no change in its jobs level over the month, while the Barnstable area recorded a seasonal loss. Since October 2013, all 12 areas added jobs, with the largest percentage gains in the Lowell-Billerica-Chelmsford, Worcester, Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, Springfield, and Pittsfield areas. The seasonally adjusted statewide October unemployment rate, released on Nov. 20, remained unchanged over the month at 6.0% and down 1.2% over the year. The rate was 0.2% above the 5.8% national unemployment rate. The statewide seasonally adjusted jobs estimate showed a 1,200-job gain in October and an over-the-year gain of 52,600 jobs. The labor force, unemployment rates, and job estimates for Massachusetts and every other state are based on several different statistical methodologies specified by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unadjusted unemployment rates and job estimates for the labor market areas reflect seasonal fluctuations and therefore may show different levels and trends than the statewide seasonally adjusted estimates.

ABC Forecasts Continued Growth in Construction Sector
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) forecasts a steady and ongoing economic recovery for the U.S. commercial and industrial construction industries in 2015. The reasonably brisk industry recovery in 2014 should continue in 2015, with momentum especially growing in segments closely related to the current American energy and industrial production resurgence. “ABC forecasts non-residential construction spending will expand by roughly 7.5% next year,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “The segments that will experience the largest growth in construction spending in 2015 include power (e.g. natural-gas-related construction), lodging (leisure and business spending), office space (professional-services employment creation), and manufacturing (rebounding industrial production). The public sector will see far more sluggish growth in construction spending; however, this fits a multi-year pattern with private non-residential spending exceeding public non-residential spending by 28% in 2014, up from 15.6% in 2013.”

DevelopSpringfield Buys 77 Maple St.
SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Preservation Trust (SPT) announced the sale of 77 Maple St. to DevelopSpringfield for $35,000. The property, built in 1832 as the Springfield Female Seminary, had fallen into a state of disrepair and near-collapse in 2009 when the trust intervened to save the property from demolition. “Today’s sale represents the completion of the trust’s important preservation work and the transfer of the property to a responsible owner who is doing great things next door at 83 Maple St.,” said Don Courtemanche, president of the Springfield Preservation Trust. “We believe having these properties together under single ownership will ultimately be in both properties’ best interests in terms of preservation and marketability.” Added Jay Minkarah, president and CEO of DevelopSpringfield, “we are thrilled to add this wonderful property to our portfolio. It makes so much sense for us to include the rehabilitation of this building in our plans for rehabilitation of the Ansel Phelps House at 83 Maple St.” Since purchasing the property, SPT has made significant structural repairs, including the critical rebuilding of a collapsed wall as well as foundation repairs, roof and trim repairs, and the repair and restoration of 24 of the building’s large, historic windows. The project has been the beneficiary of a great deal of public support, including contributions from the Springfield CDBG Program, the Massachusetts Historical Commission, the 1776 Foundation, MassMutual Financial, the Hampden Bank Foundation, Bob McCarroll, and a vast number of SPT members and friends through year-round SPT special events. “We are an all-volunteer organization and could not have saved this building without the support of the community and funders,” said Courtemanche. “This truly was a community effort.” In addition to the Ansel Phelps House, DevelopSpringfield also owns a former carriage house and row of garages on an abutting parcel and an adjacent vacant lot that will provide parking, access, and green space to support both buildings. For information on leasing opportunities, contact Minkarah at (413) 209-8808 or [email protected]

Leadership Pioneer Valley Launches Leadership 2.0
SPRINGFIELD — Leadership Pioneer Valley (LPV) is offering offering a new series of bite-sized training sessions beginning in January to enhance leadership skills and understanding of the region. The sessions are open to LPV alumni and other emerging and established leaders. LPV recognizes that leadership is a lifelong process, and the Leadership 2.0 series features six two- to three-hour training sessions on a variety of topics with the goal of deepening leadership skills, creating new and diverse connections, and making an impact on the region. The sessions are open to LPV alumni who want to continue their learning or others who are unable to be part of LPV’s 10-month program. The intent is to diversify Leadership Pioneer Valley’s offerings and create new opportunities. Workshop topics include “Effective Communications,” “Becoming a Superhero Board Member,” and a field experience to explore the Agawam area. The series sponsors include Sisters of Providence Health System/Mercy Hospital, Appleton Corp., the Beveridge Family Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts.

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
A.J. Virgilio Construction v. Big Y Foods, Alteris Renewables, Inc. d/b/a RGS Energy, and Hudson Solar Corp.
Allegation: Breach of contract: $244,472.24
Filed: 10/16/14

Hanover Foods Corp. v. Hot Mama’s Food Acquisition Corp.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $134,386.30
Filed: 10/20/14

Premier Source Credit Union v. Berkley Regional Insurance Co.
Allegation: Breach of insurance contract: $63,000
Filed: 10/12/14

Ramona Benbow v. Medeiros Williams Inc., General Motors, LLC, and Drive USA 2
Allegation: Product liability causing injury: $5,091,185.28
Filed: 10/14/14

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Amy Jennings and Walter Jennings v. Russell Realty Partnership and G&M Enterprise d/b/a Mr. Gutter
Allegation: Negligence in property maintenance causing personal injury: $52,412.85+
Filed: 9/29/14

Safety Insurance Co. a/s/o Mary Edith Granlund v. Cory Kibbe d/b/a Adirondack Heating and W.E. Donavan & Co. Inc.
Allegation: Property damage caused by release of fuel oil into home: $329,000
Filed: 10/31/14

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
Weslee Sicard v. Wildwood Barbeque
Allegation: Gross negligence leading to smoke inhalation: $5,000
Filed: 10/29/14

PALMER DISTRICT COURT
Empire Distribution v. George Dubois d/b/a Turnpike Acres Stove Shop
Allegation: Non-payment for services and merchandise provided: $7,977.18
Filed: 10/10/14

Ronald Jansen v. Esis/Ace Insurance
Allegation: Failure to make fair, prompt, equitable offer to a demand for settlement: $4,493.97
Filed: 10/6/14

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Comcast Spotlight Inc. v. Michael Boden d/b/a Michael’s Motor Co.
Allegation: Non-payment of advertising services provided: $3,243.73
Filed: 10/1/14

Olivia Wilson v. Briarwood Three, LLC, Madison Square Realty Management, Clark HVAC Services, LLC, and Union Mutual of Vermont Cos.
Allegation: Negligence in property maintenance causing carbon-monoxide poisoning: $13,560.07
Filed: 11/3/14

Western Mass Electric Co. v. Maddox Realty, LLC
Allegation: Non-payment of electric services provided: $2,138.01
Filed: 10/7/14

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Capital One Bank v. Gerard Mongeau and Target Restoration
Allegation: Unpaid credit balance: $5,771.75
Filed: 8/29/14

Granite City Electric v. Southwick Electric Co. and Louis Berrelli Jr.
Allegation: Breach of contract and failure to pay: $7,902.17
Filed: 9/19/14

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — On Monday, state Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Maeve Vallely Bartlett and Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno celebrated Camp STAR Angelina, Mary Troy Park, and Balliet Park, all park projects reflecting the more than $7.7 million invested in parks and open space in Springfield by Gov. Deval Patrick’s administration.

“Open space and outdoor recreation investments are a critical component of building robust, healthy communities,” said Bartlett. “Gov. Patrick has made urban neighborhoods a top priority, and the evidence of that is clear today in Springfield and across the Commonwealth.”

Sarno thanked Patrick and Bartlett “for your continued vision in providing funding to increase and revitalize recreational and green spaces in urban areas. The legacy you are leaving here in Springfield is one of inclusion and opportunity, which is evidenced by the $3.5 million investment made here in Springfield, which demonstrates the Patrick administration’s commitment in creating strong and healthy communities.”

Located in Springfield’s Forest Park and operated by the city, Camp STAR Angelina offers inclusive recreational programs for youth and young adults with and without disabilities, medical concerns, and hearing and visual impairments.

EEA provided more than $1.325 million in capital funding to help fund the construction of a nearly complete, fully accessible pool and accessible bath house, as well as a universal outdoor amphitheater, construction of which will begin soon. As part of Monday’s celebration, Sarno announced that the pool and bath-house facility would be named after Gov. Patrick, in recognition of his efforts to increase access outdoor recreation for all children.

North Riverfront Park sits along the northern end of Springfield’s portion of the Connecticut River Walk and Bikeway, a proposed 20-mile corridor that would run through Agawam, Springfield, West Springfield, Chicopee, and Holyoke. EEA invested $1.2 million in North Riverfront Park to transform a property surrounded by barbed wire into a welcoming, vibrant site that will better connect Springfield’s North End to the riverfront. The city’s design features a reduction of pavement, installation of picnic tables, and an increase of pervious lawn areas, plant beds, rain gardens, and additional trees to provide shade. The city is contributing an additional $300,000 toward the project, and construction will be beginning shortly.

Mary Troy Park, a new park in the densely populated Liberty Heights neighborhood, will provide green space and access to outdoor recreation for residents. The park, set to be completed next spring, was made possible by a $400,000 Parkland Acquisition and Renovations for Communities (PARC) grant from the Patrick administration. The city will use this funding to design and build a new park, including a universally accessible series of free-standing play structures, including a water-spray feature and exercise equipment along a central pathway, as well as park amenities like drinking fountains and trash receptacles. The city of Springfield is contributing $380,000 in federal Community Development Block Grant funding toward the project.

Balliet Park received a $400,000 PARC grant to renovate the baseball diamond and tennis courts, install a playground and swingset equipment, establish a picnic area, and improve access to park entrances and walkways. Springfield is using its Our Common Backyards Grant to construct a splash pad at the park, which will be completed by the year’s end.

Springfield is one of seven cities to receive funding through the governor’s Signature Urban Parks program. Through these projects, the Patrick administration seeks to revitalize urban communities by opening up or upgrading green spaces for outdoor recreation and improving access to natural resources such as waterways and historic neighborhood landmarks.

Daily News

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) forecasts a steady and ongoing economic recovery for the U.S. commercial and industrial construction industries in 2015. The reasonably brisk industry recovery in 2014 should continue in 2015, with momentum especially growing in segments closely related to the current American energy and industrial production resurgence.

“ABC forecasts non-residential construction spending will expand by roughly 7.5% next year,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “The segments that will experience the largest growth in construction spending in 2015 include power (e.g. natural-gas-related construction), lodging (leisure and business spending), office space (professional-services employment creation), and manufacturing (rebounding industrial production). The public sector will see far more sluggish growth in construction spending; however, this fits a multi-year pattern with private non-residential spending exceeding public non-residential spending by 28% in 2014, up from 15.6% in 2013.”

Daily News

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Construction spending increased in October amid growing public-sector demand for construction and continued modest growth in residential work, according to an analysis by Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials said the new spending figures underscore the need for measures to increase the supply of qualified construction workers as firms worry about growing labor shortages.

“Today’s data shows that construction growth remains volatile,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “While overall construction spending jumped by more than 1% in October, the gain followed two months of stagnation. Public construction was the fastest-growing segment for the month but the slowest-growing over the past year and for the first 10 months of 2014 combined. Conversely, private, non-residential construction inched down from September to October but has risen at double-digit rates — 11% — for the combined January-through-October period. And private residential construction continues to grow very modestly, with multi-family construction taking the lead on an annual basis.”

Construction spending in October totaled $971 billion at a seasonally adjusted annual rate, up 1.1% from the September total and 3.3% higher than in October 2013, Simonson noted. Private residential spending edged up 1.3% from September and 1.9% from a year earlier, while private non-residential spending dropped 1.0% for the month but rose 6.4% year-over-year. The third component of the total — public construction spending — increased 1.5% from September and 2.3% from a year ago.

Single-family home construction gained 1.8% for the month and 13.2% over 12 months, and multi-family work increased 1.0% from the September level and jumped 27.2% from a year earlier. The largest private non-residential type, power construction — which includes oil and gas fields and pipelines as well as electric power — slumped 1.9% in October but rose 0.3% from the prior year.

Commercial construction — comprising retail, warehouse, and farm projects — decreased 2.6% for the month but increased 9.3% for the year. Manufacturing construction increased 3.4% for the month and 23% year-over-year. Among the largest public segments, highway and street construction inched up 1.1% for the month and declined 0.1% from October 2013. Public-education construction inched up 2.2% and 6.1%, respectively.

“For 2014 as a whole and 2015, private non-residential spending and multi-family spending should be the strongest segments, followed by single-family construction, with very limited prospects for public construction,” Simonson said.

Association officials said the spending increases come as many firms report growing labor shortages. They urged elected and appointed officials to act on a series of measures the association has identified that will help expand the supply of qualified construction workers. “We need to make sure there are enough workers available to meet growing demand for construction,” said Stephen Sandherr, the association’s CEO.

Community Spotlight Features
In Palmer, Life Goes On After Failed Casino Bid

Linda Leduc and Charles Blanchard

Linda Leduc and Charles Blanchard say it’s important to implement strategies to raise Palmer’s profile and reputation as a business-friendly town.

Charles Blanchard says many residents and people who drive through Palmer think, because the majority of its mills have closed, that industrial jobs no longer exist in town.

“We hear it all the time,” the town manager said, adding that this is an erroneous conclusion, and a new video, titled Industry Alive in Palmer: An Inside Look at Local Businesses, has been created to dispel that notion.

It was shown for the first time on Oct. 14 during a Town Council meeting and showcases eight of the town’s successful manufacturing companies. They range in size from large to very small, but many have been operating for generations inside former mills and locations such as the Maple Tree Industrial Center, a 48-acre site on Route 20 with access to rail that abuts the Massachusetts Turnpike.

“There are people doing things behind walls here better than anywhere else in the world; it’s just interesting that it’s happening in Palmer,” said Mark Borsari, president of Sanderson MacLeod Inc., a company featured in the video that makes twisted wire brushes.

Darcy Fortune agrees. “I’m a fifth-generation Palmer resident, and before I did the interviews for this video, I did not realize how many factories, foundries, commercial distribution facilities, and industrial parks we have here in town,” said the co-creator of the production. “Although Palmer is known as the Town of Seven Railroads, it should actually be called the Hub for Industrial Activity.

“People work hard here every day behind the scenes to produce products that are distributed all over the world,” she went on. “These establishments are participating in the American dream, and they deserve recognition, along with the smaller mom-and-pop businesses that prosper here. Palmer is an ideal place to live, work, and operate a business.”

Getting that message across was the unofficial motivation behind the video, which shows that there is definitely life in this community after a high-stakes attempt to bring a casino to a site off Turnpike exit 8 — an endeavor that went on for several years — came to an abrupt end 13 months ago when town voters voted against the plan.

And while the casino dominated talk in the town, officials there didn’t wait for the matter to be decided before moving forward with a number of economic-development-related initiatives. These include everything from a tax-increment-financing (TIF) zone to establishment of so-called priority-development sites, a status that requires officials to issue permits for new businesses in those sites within 180 days, to the creation of the new position of economic development director. Linda Leduc, who had been serving as the town’s planner, now has that new title as well, and she’s moving ahead with a number of strategic initiatives ro raise Palmer’s profile and bring more businesses to the community.

“We have a variety of strategies and resources that can help businesses that want to move here,” she noted. “They include our priority-development- zoned properties, which have an expedited permitting process, as well as our single tax rate. We just want people to know that Palmer is a business-friendly town.”

Making Strides

Leduc said she plans to use the video as a marketing tool at economic-development conferences and other appropriate settings. She told BusinessWest that she and Blanchard came up with the idea for the production after she became economic-development director last year, and they began to tour local businesses with Lenny Weake, president of the Quaboag Hills Chamber of Commerce.

“We wanted to see what types of businesses were in town, make sure the town was meeting their needs, and find out what they needed to help them grow and prosper,” Leduc said, adding that the visits generated a wealth of information and insight.

Blanchard said they visited 16 companies. “Along the way, we met a lot of owners, learned about their businesses, and became excited about what was going on in Palmer. Many had developed a strong niche in the marketplace, and their prosperity has been a well-kept secret,” he told BusinessWest, citing examples that included a foundry, a precision metal company, a construction firm, and a major tree service.

After the trio completed their visits, Blanchard approached M-Pact TV General Manager Bruce Henriques with the idea of creating a video that would focus on companies involved with manufacturing and distribution. M-Pact is the town’s public-access station and airs in Palmer and Monson on channels 7 and 12.

Henriques said he would be happy to do the work at no charge. “I had been self-employed most of my life when I took this job 15 years ago, and I wanted to give the station a more commercial feel and do more for the business community, so it was an ideal fit,” he explained. “I know some of the business owners who are profiled in the video, and they have gone through some tough times over the years. I felt they deserved a break; they supply jobs and are doing some great things people aren’t even aware of.”

Leduc concurred. “We wanted people to understand the types of businesses we have here and why they are successful, and the video speaks loudly about why a business would want to be located in Palmer.”

Since its completion, the video has been shown frequently on the public-access channels and has also been posted on the town’s website, YouTube, and Facebook. Companies featured in the production include Palmer Foundry, Mustang Motorcycle Seats, Rathbone Precision Metals Inc., Sanderson MacLeod, Maple Leaf Distribution Services Inc., Palmer Paving Corp., Northern Tree Service, Northern Construction Service LLC, Architectural Millwork Specialists, and BL Tees Inc.

Beyond simply telling Palmer’s story, though, town officials are also taking steps to incentivize businesses to move there.

Within the TIF zone, for example, a new business that opens there can negotiate an agreement with the town to pay taxes on a graduated rate for a period of no less than five and no more than 20 years. The state also offers incentives connected with the agreement, and Leduc said Palmer Corp. and, more recently, Detector Technology Inc. have taken advantage of the program.

“Palmer Corp. moved into warehouse space and made $1 million in improvements,” she noted, “while Detector Technology acquired a second building and changed warehouse space into manufacturing space.”

Right Place, Right Time

Blanchard believes there is plenty of opportunity to build a business in Palmer’s four villages, including space in a mill in Thorndike that is only partially occupied. He also believes the town is an ideal location for businesses due to its location.

“Palmer has access to a number of major highways,” he said, adding that, in addition to the turnpike, Routes 20, 32, 181, and 67 run through town. “Plus, there are a number of freight lines that go into Palmer Industrial Park, and there is an off-loading rail-line facility at Maple Street Industrial Park on Route 20.”

Blanchard cited Sherwood Industries, which is not showcased in the video, as a prime example of how Palmer’s access to rail is beneficial to businesses.

“They bring lumber products here by rail from the Northwest, then distribute them all over the Northeast and into the Carolinas,” he said. “And last year, they received an industrial rail access grant to extend rail service onto their property to allow more products to be brought in and distributed.

“There was also another grant issued to expand rail service in our industrial park,” he went on, adding that many local businesses not featured in the video are doing well, such as American Dry Ice, which distributes carbon dioxide and dry ice to various firms, including hospitals and restaurants.

Leduc agrees there is plenty of room for new businesses. “Palmer Technology Center and Maple Tree Industrial Park have unfilled space, and there are some empty storefronts available in Depot Village,” she said.

The town also has five priority-development sites, and in 2009, the community received a $15,000 grant to conduct a study to determine what was needed in terms of water and traffic control to put the sites to “their highest and best use,” said Leduc. These sites include:

• Olson Farm, 30 acres of open land zoned for mixed business along Route 20;
• The Holbrook site, a downtown parcel of less than a half-acre on the corner of Route 20 and Bridge Street;
• Chamber Road Industrial Park, a site containing two parcels of shovel-ready land totaling 10.7 acres;
• Thorndike Energy, an old mill complex located off Church Street on five acres with the potential for 90,000 square feet of renovated building space; and
• The area formerly slated for the casino, 152 acres across from the turnpike exit controlled by Northeast Realty.

Moving Pictures

Leduc, Blanchard, Fortune, Henriques, and other people who helped create the video hope it will inspire new businesses to consider moving to these sites or other available properties in Palmer. However, Blanchard said the production has already had an impact within the town.

“It opened new lines of communication between town officials and existing businesses, which we hope will continue whenever an issue comes up and they need support,” he told BusinessWest.

Meanwhile, the screening before the Town Council probably inspired a vote to make the town more business-friendly, or at least not less so.

“They were scheduled to vote on the tax-classification rate that night,” said Blanchard. “Although we have historically maintained a single tax rate, the council was considering changing it because of rising costs. But the video made them recognize the value of maintaining the single tax rate, and they voted to continue it to help the businesses in Palmer.”

It is the hope of those involved that the video, not to mention the many other initiatives undertaken by town officials, will yield more success stories to relate in the years and decades to come.

Palmer at a glance

Year Incorporated: 1775
Population: 12,140 (2010)
Area: 32 square miles
County: Hampden
Residential Tax Rate: Palmer, $19.36; Three Rivers, $20.06; Bondsville, $19.97; Thorndike, $20.25
Commercial Tax Rate: Palmer, $19.36; Three Rivers, $20.06; Bondsville, $19.97; Thorndike, $20.25
Median Household Income: $50,050
Family Household Income: $58,110
Type of government: Town Council
Largest Employers: Baystate Wing Hospital; Sanderson MacLeod Inc.; Camp Ramah; Big Y

* Latest information available

Features
When It Comes to the Family Business, Explore All Your Options

By MICHAEL KLEIN, PsyD

While we often think of family-run enterprises as corner mom-and-pop shops, more than one-third of the S&P 500 are family-owned. Companies as significant as media giant Comcast are family-owned. Mars, the food manufacturer, is also family-owned. Ford Motor Co. still retains family leadership, and, of course, there’s always Walmart, owned and operated by the Walton family.

As many family-business consultants will affirm, family-owned companies can be incredibly complex. Due to the overlap of roles between owners, employees, board members, and family, there is frequently a lack of clarity surrounding fundamental business facets and processes, including job responsibilities, performance expectations, individual development and advancement, as well as compensation policies, among many others.

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Michael Klein

Michael Klein

Add in a variety of topics that are often undiscussable — including substance abuse, estate planning, share transfers, leadership succession, and many others — and one can often find a tornado of conflict and emotion just waiting to touch down.

The more mature (i.e., older) a family business is, the more likely that lessons have been learned from generation to generation. However, no matter how old a family business may be, complexity is always present. Unfortunately, the individual family member often loses out due to the greater issues of family and business. Many, if not most, family-business consultants focus their attention on maintaining engagement and involvement, maximizing the business while understanding the family dynamics. Few are focused on what is in the best interest of an individual.

Family-business processes, systems, strategies, and planning are all critical issues if the business is to survive and thrive. A focus on individual interests, growth, satisfaction, and development comes only after larger issues are addressed. Sadly, the individual family member can become an afterthought.

Consider the prevalence of this theme of family-business expectations for employment versus individual talents, desires, and dreams. Many recent children’s movies are centered fundamentally around the individual’s conflict with family legacy, tradition, and power. As just one example, Brave’s Merida is pressured to follow in her mother’s footsteps (and the family business) as a properly behaved queen despite her desire for very ‘unqueenly’ activities and passions.

Back in the real world, however, decisions about family-business employment are far more complicated and have more than one side to the story.

Three Perspectives

In my research, as well as experience with family-business clients, the following three perspectives are exceedingly common but rarely discussed openly, thoroughly, or objectively:

• As an active member of the family business: “Is this the best path for me going forward?”
• As a current family-business owner or parent: “What is the role of the family business in the future of my children?”
• As a next-generation member: “Should I join the family business?”

With each of these perspectives comes the underlying question, is this the best fit between person and career/job? The answer doesn’t fall out of the sky, but requires patience, tolerance for ambiguity, and a willingness to change direction when needed.

Quick decisions should be avoided at all costs. The following is a sample of some of the questions each constituency should start asking, followed by some important things to remember.

Questions for active family-business members include:

• How satisfying is my current role?
• Do I have options to change my role?
• Which family relationships are most important to me?

Keep in mind, nobody can decide your path for you. There are always pros and cons to any decision or change. You owe it to yourself and your family to either fully engage or disengage from the business sooner or later.

Questions for owners/parents include:

• What would make me most satisfied for my children?
• What skills, talents, or interests do they have that might fit well in the family business?
• Am I considering other options for my children?

Keep in mind, your own feelings about the business may be very different from your son or daughter. If your child decides not to join initially, they might be interested when they are older. In the meantime, be as objective as you can about your child’s personality, skills, interests, and motivations.

Questions for next-generation family members include:

• What excites me about the family business?
• What traits or skills do I have that will contribute to the business?
• Is there something I would be giving up if I joined?

Try as best you can to separate the idea of being a member of your family from working in the family business. Focus on understanding and developing your skills, not making a lifelong commitment to one path or another. You probably won’t have all the answers about what you may want from work until you have worked for a while.

Go with the Flow

Regardless of what the genetic lottery hands us at birth, our personal and professional experiences should result in new insights into who we are and what we are capable of. As our work lives progress, we should be able to develop new skills and abilities, as well as perhaps discover interests and passions we didn’t know we possessed. Ultimately, our jobs and other professional experiences should guide us toward finding out where our true strengths and talents lie.

For some, the family business provides an unmatched arena for this type of professional development. Unfortunately, for far too many, the family business stands directly in the way of this — and, as a result, it stands in the way of healthy adult development.

Family businesses are wonderful career and professional opportunities for many family members. While it is not a secret that the primary beneficiaries of arranged marriages are the families, we do not as easily admit this is often the case in family-business employment.

Family businesses can be wonderful opportunities for professional and personal growth, satisfaction, and success. But they should never be the only option. n


Michael Klein, PsyD, is a business consultant and author of Trapped in the Family Business: A Practical Guide for Uncovering and Managing This Hidden Dilemma. He holds a doctoral degree in professional and applied psychology, and supports family businesses and their advisors by providing assistance in the hiring, management, and development of leaders, managers, and employees. He has more than 20 years of experience working in multiple industries, including manufacturing, insurance, healthcare, construction, financial services, education, pharmaceuticals, real estate, and entertainment; mkinsights.com;trappedinthefamilybusiness.com

Accounting and Tax Planning Sections
This Checks-and-balances Process Is a Must for Property Owners

By

Nicholas Yanouzas

Nicholas Yanouzas

Your property manager is awarding significant contracts to related parties.

He or she has changed the name of the payee on a check after the payee has been reported to owners.

Questionable leasing relationships have been developed by your property manager.

These are just some of the insights property owners might see if they were a fly on the wall of property managers who look out for their own best interests, instead of the owner’s.

Real-estate owners commonly hire property managers to run the day-to-day operations of an investment property with an implied trust that their manager will act ethically. A trusted property manager duly performs his or her tasks, and the owner earns the expected return on the investment. Conversely, a less scrupulous property manager takes advantage of a trustworthy owner who does not closely scrutinize transactions of their investments.

MGM Springfield’s plans to launch construction on an $800 million casino project in the spring of 2015 may just provide the confidence needed to inspire new investments in the Springfield area by out-of-town owners gaining interest in a market that is not overpriced compared to Boston and New York. Reviewing the financial operations of a property — the operational review — is often a missed opportunity by owners making real-estate investments. This checks-and-balance process gives owners the power to conduct a periodic review of the activities and transactions conducted by its property manager, details that might get overlooked in the rush of monthly and quarterly closings.

On a recent financial-operations review for a property owner in the Baltimore area, our team exposed various unexpected findings to a rather surprised owner. The owner learned that, upon review of some legal invoices, the property was being sued by the former cleaning company, which cited that the contract with the property was inappropriately terminated. On the same property, the spouse of the property manager owned a construction company that was providing in excess of $500,000 in services to the property without going out to bid and having their invoices paid within 24 hours of submission.

An operational review not only provides exposure to selected transactions, it affords the discretion of a third party to represent the owner when meeting with senior management of the property-management company. This separation allows for a candid and sometimes uncomfortable discussion about the current financial processes and procedures in place. Standardized processes and procedures would be introduced at this meeting, as needed, to provide positive business results for owners, while designing a best-practice model for property managers to implement.

While meeting with a national property-management firm regarding an apartment complex in Boston, it was determined that their process for reviewing tenant applications included a liberal policy on the credit worthiness of prospective tenants. Although this policy was beneficial to improving occupancy, the manager found that they were spending a lot of time and money on collections and evictions. The final recommendation of the operational review allowed the manager to develop a customized policy that protected the interests of the owner, while securing long-term tenants. Now the manager has additional time and resources to devote to the quality of the property, instead of chasing tenants down for rent.

Whether the real-estate investment is new or established, most owners prefer not to pay additional fees for property-management services, beyond the basic contractual terms. Operational reviews can assist owners in drilling down to see how their investment is being managed and what fees to property management are necessary or not. Knowing how assets are being managed, and what all the costs are, allows an owner to make better decisions and ask appropriate questions when selecting a property-management firm.

The ideal outcome for both owner and property manager is to have trust and transparency when issues arise and need to be communicated and resolved. And if that doesn’t happen naturally, then there’s always the operational review to intervene.

Nicholas Yanouzas is an audit partner and head of real estate at accounting and consulting firm Whittlesey & Hadley, P.C., with offices in Holyoke and Hartford, Conn.

Construction Sections
Houle Builds on Its Expertise in Healthcare Contracting

By KEVIN FLANDERS

Houle Construction President Tim Pelletier, left, and Vice President Bob Langevin

Houle Construction President Tim Pelletier, left, and Vice President Bob Langevin, with a ‘baffle box’ used to keep air free of dangerous particulates.

As a contractor specializing in projects at medical facilities, Raymond R. Houle Construction has seen the industry evolve dramatically since opening in 1977. Practices have changed. Regulations have tightened. Competition has increased.

But Ludlow-based Houle hasn’t been daunted by change, instead employing innovation and reinvention to succeed in a challenging business where plenty of other enterprises have failed.

Leading the way have been President Timothy Pelletier and Vice President Robert Langevin Jr., with more than 40 years combined at the company.

“We are healthcare-contractor-certified and have a tremendous amount of experience working in hospitals,” Pelletier said. “Our staff is up to date on all of the latest infection-control procedures.”

That’s critical in an age when construction at medical facilities has been far more closely scrutinized and regulated than in past decades. With the emergence, over the past 15 years, of new policies and protocols governing every project — from emergency departments to patient rooms — contractors must be certified before they can even consider working inside a hospital. Houle, boasting a staff of around 30 employees, is one of a few commercial builders in the area with experience in all aspects of healthcare construction.

Simply put, Pelletier said, his staff knows how to get the job done in situations where planning and execution are crucial. Hospitals are among the most challenging construction venues, partly because they can’t be shut down for weeks or months at a time to facilitate site work. As such, every member of the construction team must be adept at working seamlessly in an active medical environment, with minimal disruption to patients and staff.

For instance, “when you’re renovating an emergency department, you have to create a construction environment within the existing environment. The ER isn’t going to close so you can work,” he explained. And with hospital patients often resting in close proximity to where the work is being completed, he added, every procedure must be completed with an emphasis on safety and efficiency.

History in Healthcare

Operating in the beginning out of founder Raymond Houle’s garage in South Hadley, Houle Construction has evolved and grown to become one of the region’s noted contractors, particularly in the realm of medical facilities. The company’s clients have included Cooley Dickinson Hospital, Baystate Medical Center, Baystate Wing Hospital, Holyoke Medical Center, Mercy Medical Center, the Sisters of Providence Health System, and Genesis Health Ventures, among others.

Tim Pelletier

Tim Pelletier says working on medical facilities means completing projects efficiently while keeping patients safe.

But becoming a leading area name in healthcare construction has been far from easy. For example, each time a new infection-control procedure is introduced, the company must adapt accordingly, and each time a new healthcare mandate is instituted, the staff must align its practices to the fresh industry standard. In some instances, uncertainty over new regulations required the Houle team to rely on innovation.

“We were told to figure it out and come up with a solution,” Pelletier said, recounting a situation about eight years ago when hospital infection-control departments began to implement new asbestos-abatement regulations in windowless areas of facilities.

In response to the changes, the staff invented what is now known in the industry as a ‘baffle box’ — a device used to diffuse torrents of air generated by negative air machines during asbestos-removal projects. Now made of plexiglass, the first such devices made by Houle were constructed of plywood and helped to safely exhaust dust and particles.

Not long after the creation of baffle boxes, Pelletier and Langevin recalled, hospitals were requiring the use of similar devices, and the competition was mimicking Houle’s design. Today the staff continues to search for new strategies to maximize safety and efficiency on the job site, well aware that they can’t afford to be complacent in a rapidly changing, increasingly policed industry.

The reasons for tighter controls are numerous. First, patient privacy laws have been tightened under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). As for the renewed emphasis on infection control, there’s good reason for that. In 1999, the Institute of Medicine dropped a bombshell of a report called “To Err Is Human — to Delay Is Deadly,” claiming that up to 98,000 people were dying needlessly each year because of preventable medical harm, including hospital-acquired infections.

Since that time, hospitals have aggressively ramped up their infection-control protocols, and contractors that want a piece of the lucrative medical-facility construction niche have done the same. In fact, the New England Regional Council of Carpenters has created a training program for members who perform work in a clinical environment. The curriculum covers everything from controlling airborne contaminants to mold remediation to routing materials and personnel around patients and staff.

Bob Langevin

Bob Langevin says Ray Houle, the company’s founder, was a believer in figuring things out for himself, a trait he passed on to the current leadership.

“Hospital construction is a whole different animal,” Pelletier said. “It really isn’t like any other kind of construction. We are always looking for new ways to improve infection-control equipment. As we continue to do more projects, we learn better and faster ways to achieve results. You have to continually research the latest products so you can stay ahead of the curve and provide the best possible service to customers.”

Demonstrating the breadth of the firm’s work, he cited renovations to the fourth and fifth floors at Mercy Medical Center as one of the company’s largest recent projects, as well as a $10 million project for Specialized Technology Resources in Enfield, Conn., that converted a mushroom plant to a solar manufacturing facility. Houle also led a recent laboratory renovation at the John W. Lederle Graduate Research Center on the campus of UMass Amherst.

Drawing on Experience

Pelletier and Langevin ascribe their company’s sustained success to not only the staff’s commitment and hard work, but also the experience of each member. From the management team to those leading work in the field, Langevin said, everyone is on the same page and works collaboratively during each project.

“The core of the staff has been here for a minimum of 10 years. We all work really well together,” he noted.

Neither Pelletier nor Langevin went to college, instead receiving education in construction from hundreds of projects over the years. Starting off as carpenters, they slowly progressed through the ranks — every jobsite their classroom, every supervisor a de facto professor in a different subject.

“There is no replacement for being out in the trenches and doing it yourself,” Pelletier said. “We have a tight group here — it’s like a family environment.”

Both men learned much of what they know from Raymond Houle himself, who has now been retired for 15 years after handing the reigns to Pelletier.

“He worked his way up through the trade just like us and eventually started his own business,” said Langevin, who works closely with owners, project managers, and architects on a daily basis — all skills he learned from Houle and others. “He really wanted you to get out there and figure things out for yourself, but he was always there if you had a problem.”

He and Pelletier agree that taking time to appreciate all aspects of the job is integral, especially the lighter moments. In a business that often abounds with stress — particularly when deadlines near — the staff does its best to keep the atmosphere loose and upbeat. “I think it’s important to keep a good sense of humor,” Langevin said.

It’s far more important, of course, to ensure that each project stays on time and within its budget, which is often made even more difficult by tight parameters. For hospital leaders, the goal is to get work done as quickly as possible to reduce disruptions to staff and patients, although speed and attention to detail can be a tricky blend unless a company has many years of experience balancing those needs.

Sometimes, Pelletier told BusinessWest, meeting a condensed deadline can feel like achieving the impossible, even for veterans who have been in the industry for decades. But those who dedicate their careers to the industry learn to embrace the innate challenges of deadlines.

“It’s rewarding,” Pelletier said of finishing ahead of a difficult deadline, especially for jobs in medical settings. “Everyone has to work together, from the hospital staff to all of the contractors involved. It’s always a team effort, and we try to keep everything coordinated so it gels like it’s supposed to.”

Pelletier said business has taken a slight dip this year for Houle, with an array of smaller projects dominating the 2014 schedule. The staff has high hopes for a solid 2015, though. Overall, the local industry has been trending in a positive direction, and with such recent announcements as Holyoke Medical Center renovating its Emergency Department to include a behavioral-health component, contractors working in the medical niche hope construction opportunities will be available at area hospitals in 2015.

Then it’s up to Pelletier and his staff to decide which projects they will pursue.

“Things have been really busy over the last five years,” he noted. “It’s tailed off a little, but the drop hasn’t been significant, just a little downturn this year. I am optimistic that things will pick up. It all depends on what our customers are doing.”

Construction Sections
Construction Unemployment Hits Eight-year Low, but Challenges Remain

The construction industry, both nationally and in Massachusetts, seems to be emerging from several years of sluggish growth, as unemployment in the field has fallen to an eight-year low across the U.S.

Specifically, construction companies added 12,000 jobs nationally in October, pushing the sector’s unemployment rate to 6.4%, the lowest mark since 2006, according to Associated General Contractors of America.

“For the past several months, the construction industry has added jobs at double the all-industry rate of 1.9%,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Construction wages, which were already higher than the private-sector average, rose 2.6% in the last year — the fastest rate since early 2010 — as contractors ramped up their search for qualified workers. There were fewer unemployed, experienced construction workers [in October] than at any time in the past eight years.”

The trend is occurring fairly uniformly across America, with 28 states adding construction jobs between September and October, and 37 adding jobs over the past 12 months, in both cases including Massachusetts.

Indeed, over the past 12 months, the Commonwealth has added 2,400 construction jobs, a 2.0% increase that ranks 29th among all U.S. states. However, the Bay State added 1,300 jobs between September and October alone, a 1.1% increase that ranked 13th in the U.S. That performance coincides with a quarterly report from the Mass. Assoc. of Commercial & Institutional Builders that casts a cautiously positive eye on the landscape, while lamenting the rising costs of materials and labor.

“In the near term, higher costs of production don’t help contractors repair their recession-weakened bottom lines,” the report states. “However, these components are also signs of a growing economy as manufacturers see higher utilization rates and unemployment drops closer to full employment levels, thus pushing wages up.”

Back to Work

Nationally, construction employees worked an average of 39.2 hours per week, tying the highest mark in almost nine years. “Together,” Simonson said, “these indicators — high weekly hours, low unemployment, and accelerating wage gains — point to an industry that may be on the verge of acute difficulty filling key positions.”

Association officials said the construction-employment gains, along with rising wages and weekly hours, are consistent with survey results showing more firms having a hard time finding enough qualified workers to fill available positions. Construction employment totaled 6,095,000 in October, the highest total since May 2009, with a 12-month gain of 231,000 jobs, or 3.9%, Simonson said.

Over the past year, Florida added the most construction jobs of any state (38,900 jobs, or 10.2%), trailed closely by Texas (38,500 jobs, 6.2%), California (34,300 jobs, 5.3%), Illinois (14,800 jobs, 7.8%), and Utah (11,000 jobs, 14.9%). Meanwhile, Texas, Florida, Utah, Colorado, and Idaho posted the highest one-month jumps between September and October.

Stephen Sandherr, CEO of Associated General Contractors of America, noted that job growth remains inconsistent in some states because many firms are struggling to cope with growing worker shortages, new regulatory burdens, and flat, or declining, public-sector investments in infrastructure and construction. “Many firms are having a hard time expanding their payrolls as wages rise, costs grow, and market demand varies greatly from one segment to the next.”

Added Simonson, “these year-over-year and one-month changes show that construction is doing well in most of the country. Yet, the list of states that have added construction jobs varies from month to month, showing that the industry’s recovery remains vulnerable to worker shortages and unfavorable governmental actions.”

The latter is also a worry for the Mass. Assoc. of Commercial & Institutional Builders, which notes that the federal government continues to stall on a comprehensive highway bill, while private investors follow the government’s lead and sit on their hands.

“The good news is that, in general, we are now at a point in the recovery where we can focus more on thriving than surviving,” the group notes, “but thriving in the new economic climate will require not just being the strongest or biggest, but also the most adept at dealing with economic climate change.” n

Departments Real Estate

The following real estate transactions (latest available) were compiled by Banker & Tradesman and are published as they were received. Only transactions exceeding $115,000 are listed. Buyer and seller fields contain only the first name listed on the deed.

FRANKLIN COUNTY

BERNARDSTON

512 Bald Mountain Road
Bernardston, MA 01337
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Allison E. Page
Seller: Thomas P. Owen
Date: 10/24/14

BUCKLAND

25 North St.
Buckland, MA 01339
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Jody P. James
Seller: Carolyn V. Boyer
Date: 10/28/14

CHARLEMONT

207 Main St.
Charlemont, MA 01339
Amount: $166,000
Buyer: Jennifer L. Lagoy
Seller: JJ Smith Properties LLC
Date: 10/24/14

93 Warfield Road
Charlemont, MA 01339
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Samuel B. Smith
Seller: Nancy Kittelsen
Date: 10/24/14

CONWAY

86 Main St.
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Jim D. Moore
Seller: Paula L. Olson
Date: 10/31/14

64 Mathews Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: David R. Mazur
Seller: A. P. Kari
Date: 10/30/14

420 Mathews Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $239,000
Buyer: Andrew P. Soles
Seller: Raymond E. Perkins
Date: 10/23/14

800 Roaring Brook Road
Conway, MA 01341
Amount: $305,000
Buyer: Dick L. McLeester
Seller: Nancy T. Winter RET
Date: 10/31/14

DEERFIELD

17 Braeburn Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Catherine A. Carulli
Seller: Kathleen D. Johnston
Date: 10/31/14

139 Lower Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $220,000
Buyer: John G. Savage Realty Corp
Seller: Hassay, Agnes B., (Estate)
Date: 10/31/14

27 North Hillside Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Francis G. Sobieski
Seller: David A. Rohrs
Date: 10/29/14

341 Pine Nook Road
Deerfield, MA 01342
Amount: $221,888
Buyer: David Ilsley
Seller: William B. McIlvaine
Date: 10/31/14

249 River Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $360,000
Buyer: Norma S. Friedman
Seller: Daniel F. Graves
Date: 10/24/14

48 South Mill River Road
Deerfield, MA 01373
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Florence E. Howes
Seller: Boron LT
Date: 10/27/14

ERVING

16 Flagg Hill
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $179,900
Buyer: Curtis R. Brunelle
Seller: Craig D. Moore
Date: 10/24/14

58 High St.
Erving, MA 01344
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: James M. Hackett
Seller: Elizabeth A. Hackett
Date: 10/29/14

GILL

33 Atherton Road
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $154,000
Buyer: Elizabeth L. Girard
Seller: Raymond E. Purington
Date: 10/31/14

25 Green Hill Road
Gill, MA 01354
Amount: $600,000
Buyer: Laura M. Wiancko
Seller: Mackin, Helen, (Estate)
Date: 08/01/14

GREENFIELD

62 Barton Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: Daniel P. Goepp
Seller: Beatrice S. Clair
Date: 10/24/14

525 Bernardston Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $640,000
Buyer: 525 Bernardston Road LLC
Seller: Mass. Non Elective Credit TR
Date: 10/31/14

366 Davis St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Andrew Babits
Seller: Allison E. Page
Date: 10/24/14

10 Euclid Ave.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Fawn M. Howe
Seller: David W. Britt
Date: 10/24/14

32 Fargo St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $286,000
Buyer: Alexander J. Duda
Seller: Eunice N. Kugell RET
Date: 10/30/14

63 Haywood St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: John Bottomley
Seller: David E. Moscaritolo
Date: 10/28/14

576 Leyden Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $234,000
Buyer: Bryan G. Hobbs
Seller: Albrecht H. Kummerle
Date: 10/30/14

164 Log Plain Road
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: John P. Markoski
Seller: Jerry A. Gaimari
Date: 10/29/14

22 Quincy St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $155,000
Buyer: Thomas L. Wilkinson
Seller: Aaron J. Sawyer
Date: 10/30/14

90 Vernon St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Mary I. Fiske
Seller: Scott D. Collins
Date: 10/31/14

3 Woodbine St.
Greenfield, MA 01301
Amount: $159,000
Buyer: Angela Recchia
Seller: Dick J. McLeester
Date: 10/31/14

HAWLEY

26 Forget Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $268,000
Buyer: Holly B. Steward
Seller: Jade L. Mortimer
Date: 10/22/14

59 Middle Road
Hawley, MA 01339
Amount: $208,000
Buyer: William C. Cosby
Seller: Singing Brook Farm TR
Date: 10/24/14

MONTAGUE

127 Chestnut Hill Loop
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $237,500
Buyer: Sandy J. Beauregard
Seller: Thomas F. Schiff
Date: 10/30/14

118 Federal St.
Montague, MA 01349
Amount: $218,000
Buyer: Michelle D. Demers
Seller: Chris Roberts
Date: 10/29/14

517 Federal St.
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Deerfield Valley Management Trust
Seller: Teri M. Martineault
Date: 10/21/14

224 Greenfield Road
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $171,000
Buyer: Daniel M. Bartos
Seller: Stanley E. Noga
Date: 10/29/14

53 Randall Wood Dr.
Montague, MA 01351
Amount: $223,500
Buyer: Steven A. Hawkins
Seller: William A. Shattuck
Date: 10/30/14

NORTHFIELD

13 Ferncliff Ave.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $137,000
Buyer: Arthur W. Davis
Seller: Suzanne M. Travisano
Date: 10/24/14

112 Main St.
Northfield, MA 01360
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: George M. Larue
Seller: Michelle C. Minter
Date: 10/22/14

ORANGE

3 Converse Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $285,000
Buyer: Maureen F. Polana
Seller: Schwab, Mary L., (Estate)
Date: 10/27/14

153 Dana Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Robert J. Zajac
Seller: Paul G. Duffell
Date: 10/31/14

800 Pine Hill Road
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Zachary McBride
Seller: Darcy R. Flynn
Date: 10/24/14

91 Sandrah Dr.
Orange, MA 01364
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Samantha North
Seller: Keith S. Holden
Date: 10/31/14

ROWE

112 Ford Hill Road
Rowe, MA 01367
Amount: $220,200
Buyer: Alexandra R. Reisman
Seller: James M. Wootton
Date: 10/30/14

29 Potter Road
Amount: $328,000
Buyer: Cynthia L. Stetson
Seller: Audrey I. Faivre
Date: 10/22/14

SHELBURNE

121 Bridge St.
Shelburne, MA 01370
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Richardson
Seller: Joseph F. Palmeri
Date: 10/27/14

SHUTESBURY

399 Leverett Road
Shutesbury, MA 01072
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Russell P. Mizula
Seller: Deerfield Valley Management Trust
Date: 10/30/14

SUNDERLAND

120 North Main St.
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Town of Sunderland
Seller: Sophie M. Buczynski
Date: 10/29/14

70 North Silver Lane
Sunderland, MA 01375
Amount: $230,500
Buyer: Daniel F. Cicia
Seller: Alfred R. Lamountain
Date: 10/24/14

WHATELY

Masterson Road (ES)
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: FS RT
Seller: Steven R. Hannum TR
Date: 10/24/14

Masterson Road #6
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Stacy R. Ashton
Seller: Trust Indenture
Date: 10/29/14

215 River Road
Whately, MA 01093
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: James M. Pasiecnik
Seller: Lorri L. Jorgensen

HAMPDEN COUNTY

AGAWAM

68 Birch Hill Road
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $359,900
Buyer: Mark B. Vye
Seller: Derek H. Egerton
Date: 10/20/14

14 Farmington Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $377,000
Buyer: Mary Millimet RET
Seller: Hillside Development Corp.
Date: 10/31/14

127 Katherine Dr.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Mi Wheat
Seller: Gary M. Matroni
Date: 10/29/14

4 Memory Lane
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $332,000
Buyer: Gregory M. Caputo
Seller: David B. O’Neill
Date: 10/28/14

49 Morningside Circle
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $286,000
Buyer: Dmitriy Shlemanov
Seller: Frank E. Disco
Date: 10/24/14

68 Parkview Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $246,000
Buyer: Matthew A. Pacinella
Seller: Gregory M. Caputo
Date: 10/28/14

76 Pineview Circle
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $276,400
Buyer: David L. Aldrich
Seller: James J. Sikora
Date: 10/24/14

51 Robin Ridge Dr.
Agawam, MA 01030
Amount: $214,900
Buyer: Harriet R. Lawton
Seller: FHLM
Date: 10/24/14

394 Springfield St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: VIP Homes & Associates LLC
Seller: Schulze, Germaine A., (Estate)
Date: 10/28/14

156 Suffield St.
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $2,775,000
Buyer: Legacy RT
Seller: GP Apartments LLC
Date: 10/30/14

Washington Ave. #A-D
Agawam, MA 01001
Amount: $2,775,000
Buyer: Legacy RT
Seller: GP Apartments LLC
Date: 10/30/14

BLANDFORD

41 North Blandford Road
Blandford, MA 01008
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: Eric B. Mcvey
Seller: Darlene F. Horne
Date: 10/23/14

BRIMFIELD

55 Dix Hill Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
Amount: $214,900
Buyer: Keith Vieweg
Seller: Sarah A. Parker
Date: 10/31/14

56 Haynes Hill Road
Amount: $278,000
Buyer: Thomas M. Williams
Seller: Fountain & Sons Fuel Co. Inc.
Date: 10/31/14

CHESTER

74 Kinnebrook Road
Chester, MA 01011
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Douglas L. Rockwell
Seller: Steven A. Stroud
Date: 10/29/14

CHICOPEE

149 Casey Dr.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $191,000
Buyer: Neonita M. Yeaple
Seller: Michael G. Harris
Date: 10/28/14

63 Chapel St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $168,900
Buyer: Willie D. McCollaum
Seller: Bennett Properties LLC
Date: 10/23/14

12 Columba St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Frank A. Demarinis
Seller: Christopher Pawlikowski
Date: 10/24/14

134 Gilbert Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Hector R. Gonzalez
Seller: Daniel R. Godbout
Date: 10/31/14

1193 Granby Road
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $7,769,000
Buyer: ARCP WA Chicopee MA LLC
Seller: Ogden MA LLC
Date: 10/31/14

541 Grattan St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: William J. Beynor
Seller: Lucille A. Dubois
Date: 10/31/14

71 Kaveney St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $254,000
Buyer: Shawn C. Roberts
Seller: Christine M. Filiau
Date: 10/27/14

12 Loretta Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Kirill I. Zenchenko
Seller: Edmund Stlaurent
Date: 10/30/14

127 Lukasik St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Kele
Seller: Wyllie, Nancy E., (Estate)

91 Mountainview St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Timothy J. Dupuis
Seller: Frances S. Cahalan
Date: 10/31/14

56 Ogden St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $144,900
Buyer: Scott E. Early
Seller: Inna Boyko
Date: 10/24/14

134 Polaski Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $131,200
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Dorothy Weber
Date: 10/23/14

169 Poplar St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Krzysztof Dziegielewski
Seller: Ferdynand Dziegielewski
Date: 10/30/14

16 Sanford St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Liena Mor
Seller: Tod R. Noftall
Date: 10/31/14

147 Skeele St.
Chicopee, MA 01013
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: John R. Damato
Seller: Edward P. Gay
Date: 10/28/14

96 Walnut St.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $117,000
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Ran D. Booth
Date: 10/27/14

128 Wheatland Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $180,400
Buyer: MKAA LLC
Seller: Edward S. Bury
Date: 10/28/14

48 Woodcrest Circle
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $126,000
Buyer: Brendan D. Crandall
Seller: Patricia Scanlon
Date: 10/23/14

73 Wymanlea Ave.
Chicopee, MA 01020
Amount: $162,500
Buyer: Triple JCD LLC
Seller: Charlene Stoyak
Date: 10/30/14

EAST LONGMEADOW

37 Frankwyn St.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $187,000
Buyer: Deutsche Bank
Seller: Lisa C. Finn
Date: 10/27/14

74 Indian Spring Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $269,900
Buyer: Paul S. Brewster
Seller: David R. Mazur
Date: 10/30/14

4 Hedgerow Lane
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $239,900
Buyer: Dorothy M. Joseph
Seller: Timber Development LLC
Date: 10/23/14

35 High Pine Circle
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $342,000
Buyer: David M. Ference
Seller: Jeffrey D. Leclair
Date: 10/24/14

Pease Road
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Dennis A. Chaffee
Seller: Ronald I. Goldstein
Date: 10/23/14

121 Westwood Ave.
East Longmeadow, MA 01028
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Christopher R. Driscoll
Seller: Mary E. Kostorizos
Date: 10/30/14

GRANVILLE

81 Granby Road
Granville, MA 01034
Amount: $172,200
Buyer: Wells Fargo Bank
Seller: Thomas F. Alamed
Date: 10/28/14

HAMPDEN

8 East Brook Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $372,500
Buyer: Frank Morello
Seller: Peter C. James
Date: 10/31/14

32 Oak Knoll Dr.
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $206,400
Buyer: Craig A. Forni
Seller: Gordon E. Clark
Date: 10/31/14

19 Tall Pines Road #19
Hampden, MA 01036
Amount: $326,500
Seller: BB Holdings 2 LLC
Date: 10/24/14

HOLYOKE

8 Bayberry Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Jennifer L. Dowland
Date: 10/28/14

11 Brenan St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $174,000
Buyer: Marcia Russell
Seller: Edward H. Riel
Date: 10/30/14

6 Brenan St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $178,000
Buyer: Susan Yelle
Seller: Kathleen M. Costello
Date: 10/31/14

190 Chestnut St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $9,432,354
Buyer: PNC Bank
Seller: Melvin N. Caballero
Date: 10/20/14

11 Claren Dr.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $150,368
Buyer: Midfirst Bank
Seller: Raymond A. Cote
Date: 10/23/14

21 Glen St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Caelin M. Aklais
Seller: Michael S. Lesniak
Date: 10/31/14

Nonotuck St. (rear)
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Joseph H. Ely
Seller: 329 Beech Street LLC
Date: 10/31/14

25 Orchard St.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $173,000
Buyer: Sofia Lemons
Seller: Jill Gagne
Date: 10/27/14

15 Park Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Deborah L. Willis
Seller: Nancy Kennedy
Date: 10/29/14

109 Ridgewood Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Danielle R. Dallaquila
Seller: John A. Magri
Date: 10/29/14

21 Saint James Ave.
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Francisco Marrero
Seller: Russell A. Sprague
Date: 10/31/14

9 Vassar Circle
Holyoke, MA 01040
Amount: $274,000
Buyer: William J. Cubi
Seller: Barowsky, Norma J., (Estate)
Date: 10/30/14

LONGMEADOW

46 Cheshire Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $398,750
Buyer: Joseph W. Furnari
Seller: Diana M. Abbasy
Date: 10/29/14

223 Kenmore Dr.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Keith S. Maynard
Seller: Apex Inc.
Date: 10/21/14

113 Longmeadow St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $278,000
Buyer: Bruce L. Morin
Seller: Stephen J. Murphy
Date: 10/29/14

104 Osceola Lane
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $778,166
Buyer: Hershal Patel
Seller: Sodi Inc.
Date: 10/24/14

43 Severn St.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Ellen Humphreys
Seller: Philip C. Steiger
Date: 10/31/14

59 South Ave.
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: David A. Lenn
Seller: Nancy J. Burns
Date: 10/30/14

68 Willow Brook Road
Longmeadow, MA 01106
Amount: $309,000
Buyer: Willow Realty LLC
Seller: Edward F. Szela
Date: 10/27/14

LUDLOW

21 Batista Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $267,000
Buyer: Erik McKeone
Seller: Wayne N. Lafleur
Date: 10/30/14

148 Cislak Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $655,000
Buyer: Jeremy J. Procon
Seller: Ann L. Morello
Date: 10/31/14

80 Davis St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $220,545
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Andrew Robert
Date: 10/29/14

5 Green St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $230,000
Buyer: Michael P. McGrath
Seller: Etta H. Sergneri
Date: 10/24/14

59 Meadow St.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $160,500
Buyer: Kevin P. Geissler
Seller: Krystal A. Cortinhas
Date: 10/24/14

42 Jestina Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $365,000
Buyer: Wayne N. Lafleur
Seller: Christopher J. Dias
Date: 10/30/14

155 Lakeview Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $190,000
Buyer: Steven W. Balicki
Seller: Goncalves, Maria F., (Estate)
Date: 10/31/14

7 Parker Lane
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: James C. Wyllie
Seller: USA HUD
Date: 10/31/14

66 Ridgeview Circle
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $141,000
Buyer: Anthony J. Elias
Seller: Robert H. Hickey
Date: 10/28/14

180 Southwood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $500,000
Buyer: Jessica Salema
Seller: Peter D. Martins
Date: 10/20/14

67 Valley View Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $355,000
Buyer: Carmine M. Keane
Seller: Debra K. Stacy
Date: 10/31/14

142 Wedgewood Dr.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Timothy D. Rego
Seller: John R. Davis
Date: 10/24/14

105 West Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $143,000
Buyer: Walter A. Lorenz
Seller: Gretchen E. Moos
Date: 10/27/14

149 Wilno Ave.
Ludlow, MA 01056
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Alicinio Martins
Seller: Corine A. Thompson
Date: 10/31/14

MONSON

72 Bradway Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $277,500
Buyer: Timothy B. Gregoire
Seller: Donald J. Grimaldi
Date: 10/31/14

21 Bunyan Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Richard A. Lombardo
Seller: USA
Date: 10/27/14

356 Main St.
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Tina M. McBee
Seller: John J. Bish
Date: 10/28/14

53 Nieske Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $229,000
Buyer: John J. Maloney
Seller: Steven D. Fontaine
Date: 10/31/14

126 Upper Hampden Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $287,500
Buyer: Martin R. Bolduc
Seller: Thomas A. Wood
Date: 10/31/14

98 Wilbraham Road
Monson, MA 01057
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: Michael S. Kazalis
Seller: Gregory J. Hall
Date: 10/28/14

PALMER

55-69 Belanger St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $340,000
Buyer: Remlap Rentals LLC
Seller: C. K. Scott LLC
Date: 10/23/14

88 Longview St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $179,000
Buyer: Joshua J. Gagnon
Seller: Roy M. St.George
Date: 10/31/14

2090-2092 Main St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $130,000
Buyer: Remlap Rentals LLC
Seller: Clifford J. Scott
Date: 10/23/14

2094-A Main St.
Palmer, MA 01080
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Remlap Rentals LLC
Seller: Clifford J. Scott
Date: 10/23/14

81 Mount Dumplin Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $186,000
Buyer: Ryan A. Dias
Seller: Sergio A. Dias
Date: 10/31/14

120 Peterson Road
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Christyna A. Rioux
Seller: Kenneth L. Mongeau
Date: 10/21/14

3064 Pine St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Amount: $133,000
Buyer: Richard T. Wells
Seller: Divina Urena
Date: 10/29/14

SPRINGFIELD

199 Acrebrook Road
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $166,000
Buyer: Oleg Atayan
Seller: Fannie Sophinos
Date: 10/27/14

100 Aldrew Terrace
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $127,000
Buyer: John L. Viens
Seller: Richard B. Francis
Date: 10/31/14

28 Austin St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $400,000
Buyer: Teodoro R. Cruz
Seller: West Meadow Homes Inc.
Date: 10/21/14

814 Belmont Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: Chhabi Pathak
Seller: DB Properties LLC
Date: 10/31/14

95 Briggs St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Ileana Garcia
Seller: Grahams Construction Inc.
Date: 10/22/14

60 Clement St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $134,000
Buyer: Paul V. Allard
Seller: Anthony A. Bocchino
Date: 10/31/14

24-26 Commonwealth Ave.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Dawa W. Tamang
Seller: Thomas W. Cuzzone
Date: 10/22/14

24 Cunningham St.
Springfield, MA 01107
Amount: $133,320
Buyer: Maureen Rehbein
Seller: Alexis A. Majka
Date: 10/22/14

246 Dutchess St.
Springfield, MA 01129
Buyer: Lisa P. Kallaugher
Seller: Surtan Realty LLP
Date: 10/24/14

8-10 Enfield St.
Springfield, MA 01151
Amount: $140,000
Seller: Anthony J. Nowak
Date: 10/27/14

119 Fenway Dr.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $162,000
Buyer: Luis E. Diaz
Seller: Robert P. Doty
Date: 10/24/14

127-129 Fountain St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $169,000
Buyer: Cristhian B. Vasquez
Seller: Phuong Nguyen
Date: 10/31/14

287 Fountain St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: Cherrie L. Mahmoud
Seller: Shirley A. Ford
Date: 10/31/14

143 Groveland St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $138,081
Buyer: Bayview Loan Servicing
Seller: Carrie Schaub
Date: 10/30/14

152 Harkness Ave.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $127,500
Buyer: Tsering Lhamo
Seller: Value Properties LLC
Date: 10/27/14

27 Health Ave.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $142,500
Buyer: Luis A. Cruz
Seller: Shawn Carleton
Date: 10/24/14

39 Hermitage Dr.
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Emilio Sanchez
Seller: Delois F. Swan
Date: 10/31/14

44 Howes St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Nathan Ladlee
Seller: Gabrielle Agron
Date: 10/31/14

63 Kipling St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $189,000
Buyer: Mark J. Hawkins
Seller: Christine Gula
Date: 10/31/14

231 Louis Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $149,900
Buyer: Virgilio Garcia
Seller: Cindy Valerio
Date: 10/21/14

20 Mandalay Road
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $168,750
Buyer: Alan B. Magill
Seller: Laurence P. Brandoli
Date: 10/31/14

77 Methuen St.
Springfield, MA 01119
Amount: $116,505
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Eugenia Caraballo
Date: 10/23/14

74 Mildred Ave.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Javires M. Colon
Seller: Timothy J. Rahilly
Date: 10/24/14

225 Oakland St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: MJT Properties LLC
Seller: Oak Ridge Custom Home
Date: 10/24/14

47 Palmyra St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $132,000
Buyer: Shirley L. Spencer
Seller: Michael D. Thomas
Date: 10/22/14

119 Park Road
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: Meraliss Velazquez
Seller: Robert F. Filipiak
Date: 10/31/14

104 Parkside St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $127,000
Buyer: Pedro Arenas
Seller: Elsa Dones
Date: 10/28/14

146 Paulk Terrace
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $182,000
Buyer: Ian M. Mancini
Seller: Jason D. Sylvester
Date: 10/29/14

120 Pinecrest Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Laura M. Acerra
Seller: Lucien J. Demers
Date: 10/27/14

55 Ramblewood Dr.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $149,900
Buyer: Siha Sok
Seller: Stanley Tolpa
Date: 10/23/14

83 Ridgewood Terrace
Springfield, MA 01105
Amount: $212,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Anne B. Bell
Date: 10/30/14

25 Riverview Terrace
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $253,000
Buyer: Kerri Saucier
Seller: Paul Depelteau
Date: 10/28/14

30 Rosedale Ave.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $125,000
Buyer: Jack A. Ohlemacher
Seller: Beatrice U. Rancore
Date: 10/30/14

53 Rosella St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $224,000
Buyer: Robert F. Schmidt
Seller: Elizabeth A. Staggs
Date: 10/31/14

151 Saffron Circle
Springfield, MA 01129
Amount: $168,900
Buyer: Bob L. Daniels
Seller: Taryn Markham
Date: 10/30/14

152-154 Santa Barbara St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $152,500
Buyer: Luis R. Torres-Ortiz
Seller: Abigail Alers
Date: 10/24/14

43 Sargon St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $119,000
Buyer: Robert D. Gaspari
Seller: John J. Maloney
Date: 10/31/14

691 State St.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $135,000
Buyer: MS Homes LLC
Seller: CF SBC REO LLC
Date: 10/24/14

70 Sunset Dr.
Springfield, MA 01109
Amount: $181,382
Buyer: DLJ Mortgage Capital Inc.
Seller: Rafael R. Santana
Date: 10/23/14

78 Thorndyke St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $167,500
Buyer: Victor Colon
Seller: Lisa D. Richardson-Gomes
Date: 10/31/14

25 Tioga St.
Springfield, MA 01128
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Mark S. Flood
Seller: Marshall Harris
Date: 10/31/14

35 Trillium St.
Springfield, MA 01108
Amount: $134,526
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Nicole Moody
Date: 10/28/14

69 Upland St.
Springfield, MA 01104
Amount: $142,600
Buyer: Sue A. Ho-Sang
Seller: Gilbert F. Gordon
Date: 10/31/14

46 Wachusett St.
Springfield, MA 01118
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Darwin Rivera
Seller: DAG Real Estate Development Inc.
Date: 10/31/14

SOUTHWICK

21 Feeding Hills Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Megan Cammisa
Seller: Raymond A. Ouellette
Date: 10/30/14

6 Jeffrey Circle
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $197,000
Buyer: Carmen L. Marquez
Seller: Edward C. Hildreth
Date: 10/31/14

69 Lakeview St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $170,000
Buyer: US Bank
Seller: Mark W. Blackmer
Date: 10/31/14

358 North Loomis St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Lauren Kendzierski
Seller: Roger E. Hughes
Date: 10/28/14

11 Pine Knoll
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $389,000
Buyer: Craig A. Johnsen
Seller: Michael J. Rauza
Date: 10/31/14

210 Sheep Pasture Road
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $187,827
Buyer: FNMA
Seller: Veronica L. Dearden
Date: 10/28/14

108 South Loomis St.
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Matthew J. Pomeroy
Seller: Seth W. Pomeroy
Date: 10/22/14

26 Shirley Terrace
Southwick, MA 01077
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Jessica L. Gilbert
Seller: Adam R. Hart
Date: 10/23/14

TOLLAND

307 Jeff Miller Road
Tolland, MA 01034
Amount: $223,800
Buyer: Ryan A. Michonski
Seller: Robert Franchino
Date: 10/31/14

WEST SPRINGFIELD

64 Ashley St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $158,000
Buyer: Pavel Banaru
Seller: Louis H. Beauvais
Date: 10/30/14

39 Baldwin St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $138,000
Buyer: Elida Gashi
Seller: Richard Williams
Date: 10/31/14

36 Blossom Road
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $200,000
Buyer: Kathleen M. McDonagh
Seller: Lizanne Campanini
Date: 10/30/14

34-38 Elmdale St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Constantin Enciu
Seller: Cesare R. Ferrari
Date: 10/31/14

44 Hillside Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $140,000
Buyer: Cassandra Ardizoni
Seller: Patrick J. Lynch
Date: 10/31/14

222 Kings Hwy.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $150,000
Buyer: Jose M. Perez
Seller: Elizabeth A. Staltare
Date: 10/30/14

21 Lynne Dr.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $242,500
Buyer: Jason Boutet
Seller: Robert A. Swanson
Date: 10/29/14

47 Mosher St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $147,000
Buyer: Jason R. Vandeusen
Seller: Lindsey G. Brynjolfsson
Date: 10/30/14

95 Ohio Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Edward P. Czeremcha
Seller: Jeffrey W. Puffer
Date: 10/22/14

112 Orchardview St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Kristen N. Montville
Seller: Mark A. Lamy
Date: 10/24/14

36 Orchardview St.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $167,000
Buyer: Benjamin J. Crum
Seller: David L. Aldrich
Date: 10/24/14

44 Talcott Ave.
West Springfield, MA 01089
Amount: $196,600
Buyer: Melissa Deslauriers
Seller: Conlin, Barbara A., (Estate)
Date: 10/27/14

WESTFIELD

10 Belden Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $339,900
Buyer: Matthew T. Vanheynigen
Seller: Long, Theresa A., (Estate)
Date: 10/24/14

288 Elm St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $425,000
Buyer: Siddhi Vinayak Corp.
Seller: Leemilts Petroleum Inc.
Date: 10/31/14

18 Fowler Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Sergey Markevich
Seller: Susan M. Oleksak
Date: 10/24/14

351 Hillside Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Peter M. Ulias
Seller: Maurice S. Erwin
Date: 10/31/14

56 Jefferson St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $180,000
Buyer: Double D. Investments LLC
Seller: Lynn A. Chrzanowski
Date: 10/30/14

44 Llewellyn Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $324,000
Buyer: Edward F. Wienckowski
Seller: Bruce E. Armstrong
Date: 10/24/14

24 Loring Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Dana A. Gronbeck
Seller: Roy E. Tatro
Date: 10/31/14

9 Paper St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Jefford A. Barnes
Seller: Lawrence S. Trinceri
Date: 10/24/14

193 Peach St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $214,188
Buyer: Kimberly A. Landry
Seller: James N. McElroy

107 Pineridge Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $306,600
Buyer: Eric L. Breault
Seller: Dana A. Gronbeck
Date: 10/31/14

39 Pochassic St.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $147,500
Buyer: Edward M. Tosado
Seller: Martin E. Newman
Date: 10/24/14

140 Pontoosic Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $210,000
Buyer: Kenneth A. Pelletier
Seller: Matthew A. Pacinella
Date: 10/28/14

53 Putnam Dr.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $172,500
Buyer: Jeffrey A. Thomson
Seller: Peter J. Miller
Date: 10/24/14

25 Ridgeway Ave.
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $161,000
Buyer: Stephan K. Dickinson
Seller: Andrew J. Pavlica
Date: 10/24/14

44 Sabrina Brooke Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Jason A. Lavallee
Seller: John M. Tierney
Date: 10/31/14

12 Winding Ridge Lane
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $414,900
Buyer: Gerard J. Sokop
Seller: Norman E. Wroblewski
Date: 10/20/14

7 Woodland Road
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $350,000
Buyer: Nancy J. Bals
Seller: Jon M. Schultz
Date: 10/30/14

31 Woodside Terrace
Westfield, MA 01085
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Edward J. Fournier
Seller: Patricia A. Cray
Date: 10/31/14

WILBRAHAM

1126 Glendale Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $185,000
Buyer: Jason P. Keegan
Seller: Linda S. Hall
Date: 10/24/14

28 Grassy Meadow Road
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $222,500
Buyer: Kimberly Ross
Seller: Claudette Desanctis
Date: 10/28/14

7 Ladd Lane
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $311,000
Buyer: Bart Soar
Seller: Stanley Kogut
Date: 10/31/14

509 Main St.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Brett F. Johnson
Seller: Claire E. Fredette
Date: 10/31/14

12 Mcintosh Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $315,000
Buyer: Tina M. Carnevale
Seller: David D. Patterson
Date: 10/29/14

17 Millbrook Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Taryn Siciliano
Seller: FHLM
Date: 10/30/14

6 Stirling Dr.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
Amount: $235,000
Buyer: Kenneth C. Byers
Seller: Patrick F. McComb
Date: 10/30/14

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY

AMHERST

181 Aubinwood Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Mazen Naous
Seller: Catherine E. Manicke
Date: 10/29/14

44 Dennis Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $216,000
Buyer: Corey B. Kurtz
Seller: Kathleen I. Dyer
Date: 10/23/14

9 Hedgerow Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $369,000
Buyer: Brian E. Messier
Seller: David R. Salvage
Date: 10/30/14

7 Laurel Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $175,000
Buyer: Hampshire Property Management
Seller: Kornorfer, Raymond H., (Estate)
Date: 10/23/14

86 Northampton Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $436,000
Buyer: Amherst College
Seller: Daniel P. Barbezat
Date: 10/30/14

340 Potwine Lane
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $272,000
Buyer: Peter M. Levy
Seller: Robert A. Cooke
Date: 10/30/14

616 Station Road
Amherst, MA 01002
Amount: $445,000
Buyer: David R. Salvage
Seller: Elliott N. Fortescue
Date: 10/30/14

BELCHERTOWN

12 Clark St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $260,000
Buyer: Steven D. Fontaine
Date: 10/31/14

26 Clark St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Alicia B. Agoglia
Seller: Bethany K. Bowman
Date: 10/27/14

178 Federal St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: Darkar LLC
Seller: Manx LLC
Date: 10/28/14

61 Federal St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Jackson Brothers Property Management
Seller: Peter S. Galuszka
Date: 10/27/14

130 Gold St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $177,250
Buyer: Edward B. Tick
Seller: Joshua D. Burkett
Date: 10/31/14

9 Howe St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $237,000
Buyer: Molly W. Fenton
Seller: Kenneth R. Chaisson
Date: 10/24/14

14 Ledgewood Circle
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $160,000
Buyer: Walter J. Rose
Seller: Larry D. Unwin
Date: 10/22/14

7 Rural Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $170,600
Buyer: Thomas J. Tonelli
Seller: Property Edge LLC
Date: 10/30/14

22 South Main St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $279,000
Buyer: Joseph R. Bowman
Seller: Christopher Agoglia
Date: 10/27/14

121 Stebbins St.
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $145,000
Buyer: David M. Arbour
Seller: James A. Ribeiro
Date: 10/24/14

127 Turkey Hill Road
Belchertown, MA 01007
Amount: $290,000
Buyer: John H. Bickford
Seller: David Wilson
Date: 10/29/14

CUMMINGTON

247 Stage Road
Cummington, MA 01026
Amount: $165,000
Buyer: Elizabeth E. Kapitulik
Seller: David E. Gowdy
Date: 10/30/14

EASTHAMPTON

1 Autumn Dr.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $359,900
Buyer: Jason Curtis
Seller: Melissa L. Coyle
Date: 10/20/14

9 Camelot Lane
Amount: $320,000
Buyer: Alan C. Borowski
Seller: Bartlett, Russell P., (Estate)
Date: 10/30/14

4 Gaugh St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $197,500
Buyer: Budlia LLC
Seller: Jaime M. Caplis
Date: 10/24/14

2 Grove St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $245,000
Buyer: Thomas W. Brown
Seller: Robert J. Labonte
Date: 10/31/14

157 Hendrick St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $330,000
Buyer: Nancy A. Ogulewicz
Seller: David M. Lepine
Date: 10/24/14

20 Mayher St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $199,900
Buyer: Nicholas J. Schwab
Date: 10/21/14

24 Mill St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $552,500
Buyer: James C. Seltzer
Seller: Chester R. Torrey
Date: 10/22/14

222 Park St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: Molly Montgomery
Seller: Charles G. Cernak
Date: 10/31/14

52 Phelps St.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $203,000
Buyer: April Yvon
Seller: Timothy J. Dowgiert
Date: 10/31/14

9 Taft Ave.
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $269,000
Buyer: Alysa Austin
Seller: Laura A. Tilsley
Date: 10/24/14

29 Treehouse Circle
Easthampton, MA 01027
Amount: $251,000
Buyer: Jonathan D. Cartledge
Seller: EH Homeownership LLC
Date: 10/30/14

HADLEY

15 Stockwell Road
Hadley, MA 01035
Amount: $148,500
Buyer: Manuel T. Morocho
Seller: Schick, Karl D., (Estate)
Date: 10/29/14

HATFIELD

11 Pleasant View Dr.
Hatfield, MA 01038
Amount: $389,900
Buyer: Dennon A. Rodrigue
Seller: Gerard J. Sokop
Date: 10/20/14

HUNTINGTON

80 County Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $282,500
Buyer: Carole J. Bihler
Seller: Allison T. Flynn
Date: 10/24/14

46 Harlow Clark Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $205,000
Buyer: Luke Leszczynski
Seller: FNMA
Date: 10/24/14

61 Searle Road
Huntington, MA 01050
Amount: $216,500
Buyer: Chrisoula Marangoudakis
Seller: Kyle Colby
Date: 10/31/14

NORTHAMPTON

10 Bright Ave.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $195,000
Buyer: Michelle L. Squires
Seller: Vivian M. Eastman
Date: 10/31/14

Easthampton Road
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $387,500
Buyer: City Of Northampton
Seller: Carol Hewes
Date: 10/24/14

33 Emerson Way
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $120,000
Buyer: Susan H. Angier
Seller: Emerson Way LLC
Date: 10/23/14

141 Fair St., Ext
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $250,000
Buyer: Laurel Carangelo
Seller: Marcia Russell
Date: 10/30/14

65 Ford Xing
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $563,810
Buyer: Ivana M. Liebert
Seller: Kent Pecoy & Sons Construction
Date: 10/24/14

18 Laurel Park
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $115,000
Buyer: 35 State St. LLC
Seller: David R. Baker
Date: 10/31/14

46 Laurel Park
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $159,500
Buyer: Todd Wilsey
Seller: Laurie Scanlon
Date: 10/22/14

38 Matthew Dr.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $215,000
Buyer: Chanbona Er
Seller: Matthew R. Marchand
Date: 10/31/14

123 Moser St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $433,931
Buyer: Lora M. Hodges
Seller: Kent Pecoy & Sons Construction
Date: 10/29/14

14 Murphy Terrace
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $123,000
Buyer: Sherry L. Taylor
Seller: Elizabeth M. Mongeau
Date: 10/29/14

273 North Main St.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $303,000
Buyer: Jennifer L. Busone
Seller: Bonnie A. Galenski
Date: 10/31/14

128 Rocky Hill Road
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $387,500
Buyer: City Of Northampton
Seller: Carol Hewes
Date: 10/24/14

237 Spring Grove Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $242,500
Buyer: Elizabeth L. Mercer
Seller: Marjorie L. Harrington
Date: 10/22/14

276 State St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Linda Putnam
Seller: Elizabeth A. Falkenthal
Date: 10/30/14

26 Sumner Ave.
Northampton, MA 01062
Amount: $335,000
Buyer: Nooni Hammarlund
Seller: Bryan N. Lombardi
Date: 10/30/14

51 Vernon St.
Northampton, MA 01060
Amount: $457,000
Buyer: Stephen Petegorsky
Seller: David J. Lalima
Date: 10/27/14

SOUTH HADLEY

246 Brainerd St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $331,000
Buyer: Andreas Zinner
Seller: Michael A. Chmura
Date: 10/31/14

113 East St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $327,500
Buyer: Paul S. Kandel
Seller: Katie L. Stefanik
Date: 10/20/14

141 Granby Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $152,500
Buyer: Ruby Z. Khan
Seller: Eleanor M. Contini
Date: 10/31/14

340 Granby Road
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $202,500
Buyer: Lauren Emery
Seller: Glen E. Kotfila
Date: 10/22/14

16 Michael Dr.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $295,000
Buyer: Jeffrey W. Dupaul
Seller: David J. Boutin
Date: 10/30/14

44 Pittroff Ave.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $231,000
Buyer: Dana R. Sicard
Seller: George W. Dewolfe
Date: 10/30/14

22 Spring Meadows
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $440,000
Buyer: Michael R. Matty
Seller: Stephen Doyle
Date: 10/22/14

4 Stewart St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $192,000
Buyer: Raymond V. Hebert
Seller: Mark R. Marion
Date: 10/31/14

18 Summit St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $222,000
Buyer: Shannon K. Dasilva
Seller: Peter A. Gallivan
Date: 10/20/14

23 Tampa St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $164,900
Buyer: Kyle E. Rodrigues
Seller: Anne Pappas
Date: 10/31/14

6 Yale St.
South Hadley, MA 01075
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: Christopher F. Geraghty
Seller: Francis W. Geraghty
Date: 10/22/14

SOUTHAMPTON

22 Bluemer Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $167,500
Buyer: Darcelle A. Ward
Seller: Barbara J. Calisch
Date: 10/30/14

83 College Hwy.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $275,000
Buyer: TBH Realty LLC
Seller: Daniel T. Hatzipetro
Date: 10/27/14

96 Gunn Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $452,500
Buyer: Richard S. Lyman
Seller: James F. Boyle
Date: 10/31/14

87 Maple St.
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $303,000
Seller: Doreen A. Boisjoli
Date: 10/23/14

199 Pomeroy Meadow Road
Southampton, MA 01073
Amount: $348,000
Buyer: Gary Sheldon
Seller: Richard C. Ziomek
Date: 10/21/14

WARE

88 Coffey Hill Road
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $240,000
Buyer: James A. Beaudry
Seller: Martin R. Bolduc
Date: 10/31/14

133 North St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $196,500
Buyer: Taylor B. Williams
Seller: Kenneth Fitzgibbon
Date: 10/20/14

51 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
Amount: $300,000
Buyer: Heat Pro Inc.
Seller: Jean E. Broom
Date: 10/27/14

WILLIAMSBURG

161 Main St.
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $183,000
Buyer: John J. Svoboda
Seller: Emma F. Karowski
Date: 10/21/14

4 Nash Hill Road
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $310,000
Buyer: Adrienne Deluca
Seller: Andrew P. Soles
Date: 10/23/14

80 South St.
Williamsburg, MA 01096
Amount: $375,000
Buyer: Laura T. Garcia
Seller: Robert J. Bihler
Date: 10/24/14

DBA Certificates Departments

The following Business Certificates and Trade Names were issued or renewed during the month of November 2014.

AGAWAM

4tion Skateboards
206 Garden St.
Dylan Copella

AFIS, LLC
365 Main St.
Steven Zicolella

Enigma HVAC
33 Norman Terrace
Irina Kuzmenko

Happy Home Maid Service
101 Sylvan Lane
Laura Vieu

CHICOPEE

Chuck’s Auto Sales, LLC
78 West St.
Charles Swider

Eric’s Sales
103 Lukasik St.
Eric Ladabouche

Salon Bocage
766 Memorial Dr.
Lisa A. Allen

St. Amand Services
32 Highland Ave.
Jessica St. Amand

HOLYOKE

Action Figure Planet
50 Holyoke St.
Nancy Cote

Amy’s Hallmark
50 Holyoke St.
Buzook Vitt

Dunkin Donuts
330 Main St.
Lori Martins

Dunkin Donuts
1600 Northampton St.
Lori Martins

Paper City Cuts 2
522 South St.
Jose M. Lopez

NORTHAMPTON

Karmel Kreations
25 Franklin St.
Selena Dittberner

Pixel Edge
109 High St.
Sunergix Inc.

Red Barn Honey Company
43 Fort Hill Terrace
Richard Conner

Skyline Design
209 Locust St.
Douglas Ferrante

Sushi City
228 King St.
Soe Naing

Toad’s Kin Car Company
5 Middle St.
Radley Nutting

PALMER

A-Z Heating & Cooling
17 Lafayette St.
Kevin Zawaliki

Al’s Heating & Plumbing
37 Stimson St.
Eric Nareau

Blockberries
65 Jim Ash St.
David Whitney

Family Produce Market
54 Commercial St.
Gidget Jolly

Hollywood Nails
1411 Main St.
Linh Lee

PG Building & Remodeling
54 Charles St.
Peter Gorski

Target Engineering
111 Woodland Heights
Norman Leclair

SPRINGFIELD

Kate Transportation
44 Montgomery St.
Catherine Kamau

La Primera Iglesia Elahim
113 Orchard St.
Carmen Rodriguez

Mamajuana Roasted Chicken
30 Fort Pleasant Ave.
Christian Flores

Manna Chinese Food
44 Springfield St.
Hua Y. Ou

Martinelli, Martini & Gall
82 Maple St.
Paul R. Gallagher

Metro Apartment, LLC
908 Belmont Ave.
Peter J. Houser

Midway Barber & Company
1106 State St.
Thomas Allen

Painter Plus Floors
91 Portulaca Dr.
Gilfrey Gregory

Powell Construction Company
11 Preston St.
Lillian Moultrie

South End Smoke and Grocer
469 Main St.
Manirakiza Jamari

The Rich Look Fine Auto
36 Amity Court
Richard D. Manning

The Touch of NYC Hair Studio
680 Sumner Ave.
Sophia C. Evans

Word Barista
79 James St.
Cheryl D. Noel

WESTFIELD

Alessio’s Pizza Inc.
280 Southampton Road
Alessio’s Pizza, Inc.

Have Comedy Will Travel
36 Moseley Ave.
Steven L. Henderson

Menard Construction & Design
46 Stuart Place
Dennis Menard

Mlisyany Direct
1 Brentwood Dr.
Mlisyany Direct

Roadrunner Express
772 West Road
Thomas Sorel

Briefcase Departments

EDC Names Sullivan New President, CEO
SPRINGFIELD — Richard Sullivan, former mayor of Westfield and currently chief of staff for Gov. Deval Patrick, has been chosen to become president and CEO of the Economic Development Council of Western Mass., succeeding Alan Blair, who will retire Dec. 31. Sullivan prevailed in a lengthy search for Blair’s successor that began when Blair announced his intention to retire almost a year ago. Sullivan, an attorney, brings to the job a résumé that includes a lengthy stint as Westfield’s mayor as well as work with the Patrick administration, first as commissioner of the Department of Conservation and Recreation, then as secretary of the Mass. Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and then as chief of staff, a position he assumed in June.

Massachusetts Adds 1,200 Jobs in October
BOSTON — The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) reported that preliminary estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) show Massachusetts added 1,200 jobs in October for a total preliminary estimate of 3,424,600. The October total unemployment rate remained unchanged at 6.0%. Since October 2013, Massachusetts has added a net of 52,600 jobs, with 50,400 jobs added in the private sector. The total unemployment rate for the year is down 1.2% from the October 2013 rate of 7.2%. BLS also revised its September job estimates to a 7,800-job gain from the 9,400-gain previously reported for the month. Here’s an October 2014 employment overview:
• Information added 1,900 jobs (+2.0%) over the month. Over the year, the sector added 7,900 jobs (+9.1%);
• Construction gained 1,300 jobs (+1.1%) over the month. Over the year, the sector has added 2,400 jobs (+2.0%);
• Education and Health Services added 800 jobs (+0.1%) over the month. Over the year, the sector gained 16,000 jobs (+2.2%); 
• Professional, Scientific and Business Services gained 200 jobs (0.1%) over the month. Over the year, the sector added 14,500 jobs (+2.9%);
• Other Services had no change in its jobs level over the month. Over the year, Other Services are up 1,100 jobs (+0.9%);
• Trade, Transportation, and Utilities lost 1,800 jobs (-0.3%) over the month.  Over the year, the sector gained 7,200 jobs (+1.3%);
• Leisure and Hospitality lost 1,500 jobs (-0.4%) over the month. Over the year, the sector added 100 jobs (0.1%);
• Financial Activities lost 500 jobs (-0.2%) over the month. Over the year, the sector added 1,900 jobs (+0.9%);
• Manufacturing lost 400 jobs (-0.2%) jobs over the month. Over the year, Manufacturing lost 700 jobs (-0.3%); and
• Government added 1,200 jobs (+0.3%) over the month. Over the year, the sector gained 2,200 jobs (+0.5%).
The October 2014 estimates show 3,334,800 Massachusetts residents were employed and 211,000 were unemployed, for a total labor force of 3,545,800. The October labor force increased by 14,100 from 3,531,700 in September, as 16,400 more residents were employed and 2,300 fewer residents were unemployed over the month. The labor force was an estimated 61,800 above the 3,484,000 October 2013 estimate, with 100,600 more residents employed and 38,800 fewer residents unemployed. The unemployment rate is based on a monthly sample of households. The job estimates are derived from a monthly sample survey of employers.  As a result, the two statistics may exhibit different monthly trends.

Baystate Health Opens TechSpring Center
SPRINGFIELD — Representatives from companies that are developing new products to improve healthcare joined leaders from Baystate Health, the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, and a host of elected officials on Nov. 14 to celebrate the opening of TechSpring, Baystate Health’s technology innovation center based in Springfield’s emerging innovation district. The facility will match private enterprises with partners and expertise from Baystate to take on some of healthcare’s most difficult challenges.
TechSpring owes its existence in large part to a $5.5 million grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, an investment agency charged with implementing Gov. Deval Patrick’s 10-year, $1 billion Life Sciences Initiative that supports life-sciences innovation, research, development, and commercialization. “Being part of the innovation ecosystem that’s developing in downtown Springfield was a major incentive for us in locating here,” said Joel Vengco, Baystate Health’s vice president of Information & Technology and chief information officer. “There is very real potential and a strong foundation in our community for real progress in creating employment and economic opportunities in the areas of healthcare technology and informatics. The fact that these innovators and companies have come here to invest time and resources is a testament to the potential here, and we’re thrilled to be part of it.” TechSpring, which is housed at 1350 Main St. in downtown Springfield, is already hosting work between Baystate and private-industry partners to create new technology solutions and products that could be used to improve health outcomes. TechSpring’s founding sponsors and innovation partners are IBM, Premier Inc., Cerner Corp., Dell, Medecision, and Mainline Information Systems. All are engaging in collaborative work and product development in the new space. “In this space, my colleagues and their industry partners are putting information technology to work in service of better health outcomes for people here in our community and across the nation,” said Dr. Mark Keroack, president and CEO of Baystate Health. “They’re also working toward bringing opportunity — a real potential for better economic health — for our city and our community. We’re very proud to be here downtown, and we’re proud of the partnerships on display, with industry, with academia. and with government.”

Patrick Announces $1.5 Million for Water-technology Innovation
AMHERST – Gov. Deval Patrick announced $1.5 million in funding to build on his administration’s efforts to make Massachusetts a hub for the emerging water-innovation sector. Patrick was joined by UMass Amherst and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials as they announced $4.1 million in federal funding for a national center for drinking-water innovation at the university. “All over the world and right here at home in the Commonwealth, water challenges are threatening the environment and the economy,” said Patrick. “Investing in the development of water-innovation technologies not only protects precious natural resources and public health, but creates high-quality local jobs.” The Water Infrastructure Bill, signed by Patrick in August, calls for $1.5 million in investments from the Mass. Department of Environmental Protection for water innovation. The federally funded center will be one of two national research centers focused on testing and demonstrating cutting-edge technologies for small drinking-water systems. The Patrick administration, through MassCEC, matched the federal investment with a $100,000 grant. “Under Gov. Patrick’s leadership, Massachusetts has pursued cost-effective innovations to address environmental concerns,” said Curt Spalding, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s regional administrator for New England. “We are very pleased to join the governor as both the EPA and the Commonwealth announce investments in further research and technology development at UMass Amherst that will help continue to provide clean and safe drinking water to people.” Providing safe, clean drinking water is critical for maintaining the health and security of the Commonwealth, said UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy. “Researchers here at UMass Amherst are on the front lines of efforts to make sure that clean water is a reality for all our communities and citizens. This new funding will help the Commonwealth’s flagship campus make an important contribution to this key public need.” During the Massachusetts-Israel Innovation Partnership (MIIP) mission in May, Patrick announced the winners of the first MIIP water-innovation challenge. The governor made this announcement with Israeli Chief Scientist Avi Hasson during the U.S.-Israel Connected Summit “Going Global with Water Tech” forum. The MIIP was launched in 2011 as a direct result of Patrick’s first innovation-partnership mission to Israel. During that 10-day trade mission in March 2011, a coalition of the state’s leading business executives and senior government officials explored growth opportunities of common interest to Massachusetts’ and Israel’s innovation industries. During that mission, Patrick and Shalom Simhon, Israeli minister of Economy, signed a memorandum of understanding in Jerusalem resulting in this partnership. “Safe, reliable drinking water has always been a critical need. In the 21st century, we will need to develop new technologies to meet growing demand,” said U.S. Rep. Jim McGovern. “I’m pleased that the federal government is joining with the Commonwealth and UMass Amherst in this promising effort.”

Women’s Fund to Issue $240,000 in Grant Funding
EASTHAMPTON — The Women’s Fund of Western Massachusetts (WFWM) announced the availability of $240,000 in grant funding for organizations that serve women and girls in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, and Hampshire counties. Grant recipients will each receive $60,000 over three years to deploy innovative programs that help shift the landscape for women and girls within the agency’s focus areas of educational access and success, economic justice, and safety and freedom from violence. Grant applications will be available on the WFWM website on Jan. 10 and will be due on March 23. “Due to renewed and expanded investments from community members in the Women’s Fund mission, we are thrilled to be able to offer another round of multi-year grants in 2015,” said Elizabeth Barajas-Román, chief executive officer of the WFWM. “Multi-year grants allow us to partner with organizations in a sustained way that helps make a significant impact in communities. This funding will increase our ability to scale up and positively affect the lives of women and girls.” Successful applications will demonstrate meaningful partnerships among two or more organizations, agencies, or projects. “We know that effective solutions require creative collaboration,” said Barajas-Román. In addition to the financial award, the Women’s Fund will invest an additional $20,000 into each grantee by giving each project the opportunity to select two staff, constituents, or board members as participants of the Women’s Fund’s Leadership Institute for Political and Public Impact (LIPPI). LIPPI, a Women’s Fund program, has equipped 200 women from across Western Mass. to become civic leaders in their communities; to impact policy on the local, state, and national levels; and to seek and retain elected positions. Since 1997, the WFWM has awarded more than $2 million to more than 150 nonprofit organizations, impacting more than 80,000 women and girls.

Company Notebook Departments

Florence Bank Opens New Hadley Branch
HADLEY — Florence Bank, a mutually owned savings bank serving the Pioneer Valley through nine branch locations, celebrated the opening of its new Hadley location at 377 Russell St. last month, with local and state officials, as well as more than 100 well-wishers. Florence Bank CEO John Heaps Jr. and bank officials were joined by State Senate Majority Leader Stan Rosenberg, state Rep. John Scibak, Hadley Town Administrator David Nixon, and Amherst Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Don Courtemanche, along with customers, friends, and supporters who turned out to welcome the bank to its new home. In addition to the ribbon cutting, bank officials officially dedicated a new tractor weathervane, which sits atop the new building, to the Devine family of Hadley. John Devine, who was a lifelong farmer and a member of Hadley’s Planning Board, was instrumental in recommending that the bank consider a cupola and weathervane as part of the new building’s design. Bank officials wanted to do something to honor the memory of Devine, who passed away unexpectedly a year ago. Florence Bank Senior Vice President Sharon Rogalski presented a replica of the weathervane to John Devine Jr., who accepted the gift on behalf of his family. Toby Daniels, vice president and  branch manager of the Hadley Branch, will continue in that role in the new location. “Hadley has been our home for nearly 20 years,” said Heaps. “We are especially pleased to renew our commitment to this community with our new location. We thank our many customers and friends for their ongoing support and look forward to serving everyone for years to come.”

PeoplesBank Named a ‘Top Place To Work’
HOLYOKE — Recently, the Boston Globe recognized PeoplesBank as a “Top Place to Work” for the third year in a row. Massachusetts-based companies that are eligible for Top Place to Work consideration undergo a rigorous evaluation by survey firm WorkplaceDynamics. More than 76,000 individuals’ responses were submitted by the companies regarding key factors related to employee happiness, company direction, execution, employee connection, work load and responsibility, management, and pay and benefits. 
“While there is definite value in these indicators, many signs of recovery cannot be boiled down to pure economics,” said Boston Globe Business Editor Mark Pothier. “The companies on our Top Places to Work list foster productivity and innovation by investing in the happiness of their employees, which cannot solely be measured in dollars and cents.” Said Douglas Bowen, president and CEO of PeoplesBank, “our intent was to establish the values and culture necessary to support a great organization. Over time, we learned that those values and that culture would improve our bottom line and make PeoplesBank a top place to work.” Employee engagement is critical to a high-performance culture, according to Janice Mazzallo, executive vice president and chief human resource officer at PeoplesBank. “Associates become engaged when they know we care about them,” she said. “We want to know their ideas, so we have associate think tanks. We want them to grow, so we have innovative development programs, mentoring, and learning centers. And we want to encourage life-work balance because our values are abou more than just work. We need to have fun, too.” As part of the Top Place to Work award to PeoplesBank, the Boston Globe highlighted two efforts by bank associates. The first, called the Smoothie Patrol, started at an associates’ organized wellness fair and was so well-received that associates decided to take it on the road and make surprise visits to each of the bank’s 17 offices. Xiaolei Hua, an assistant vice president and credit officer at PeoplesBank and Habitat for Humanity volunteer, was interviewed by the Boston Globe regarding the bank’s support of volunteerism. “I know that the bank cares about more than just getting the work done,” Hua told the paper. “They care about me, my family, and the community.”

Polish National Credit Union Donates $15,000 to Westfield Senior Center
WESTFIELD — At a check-presentation ceremony last month, Polish National Credit Union made a $15,000 donation to the capital campaign of Friends of the Westfield Senior Center Inc. The donation was made at the Westfield River Branch of the PNCU by Branch Manager Cynthia Houle to Friends of the Westfield Senior Center’s board of directors. PNCU President and CEO James Kelly commented on the credit union’s commitment to the Westfield community. “Our branch in Westfield is one of our largest and most vibrant locations, and we enjoy being involved in supporting the community in any way we can. The new senior center is going to be a wonderful asset to the community, and PNCU is thrilled to be a part of it.” The donation will be used for furnishings at the new senior center, currently under construction on Noble Street in Westfield. “The Polish National donation will enable us to provide comfortable furniture and accessories for the new senior center that Westfield’s seniors will benefit from for years to come,” said board member Tom Keenan. “Polish National is genuinely concerned about the community and making Westfield a better place to live.” Founded in 1921, Polish National Credit Union is one of the largest credit unions in the Pioneer Valley. Headquartered on Main Street in Chicopee, the credit union operates full-service branches in Chicopee, Granby, Westfield, Southampton, Hampden, and Wilbraham.

Grainger Foundation Supports STCC Foundation
SPRINGFIELD — The Grainger Foundation, an independent, private foundation located in Lake Forest, Ill., has donated $5,000 to the Springfield Technical Community College (STCC) Foundation in support of its Foundation Innovation Grant program. “This grant will be used to help us continue to support faculty and staff innovation here at STCC,” said President Ira Rubenzahl. “The Foundation Innovation Grant program helps us to improve excellence in the delivery of academic or student retention services at STCC. We are grateful to the Grainger Foundation for its generosity and in helping us to continue our mission.” In addition to the contribution from the Grainger Foundation, the STCC Foundation will match Grainger’s $5,000 contribution this year. Foundation Innovation Grants are awarded in the spring. “We want to thank the Grainger Foundation for its generous support,” said STCC Foundation President Kevin Sweeney. “With their assistance, the STCC Foundation will continue its commitment to support innovative projects at the college that promote community impact, economic growth, workforce development, and quality of life in our region.” The donation to the STCC Foundation was recommended by John Duffy, market manager of W.W. Grainger Inc.’s Springfield location. Grainger has been a part of the Western Mass. business community for nearly 40 years as the leading broad-line supplier of maintenance, repair, and operating products. “We are proud to recommend the programs offered by STCC,” said Duffy. “We understand the need for active engagement and partnership between our technical education providers, businesses, and the community.” The Grainger Foundation was established in 1949 by William Grainger, founder of W.W. Grainger Inc.

Mercy Hosts Topping-off Event for Cancer Center
SPRINGFIELD — The construction project to expand the Sr. Caritas Cancer Center at Mercy Medical Center is on schedule, and a topping-off ceremony was held Nov. 20 to mark the completion of the project’s main structure with the placement of the top steel beam. A topping-off ceremony is a tradition within the construction industry and is held when the highest structural point in the building construction is attained. To celebrate this event, the last steel girder is signed, lifted into place, and welded to the structure. A small evergreen tree and the American flag are also secured to the girder as it is hoisted to the top of the structure. The tree is meant to represent the strength of the new building and the desire for the construction project to remain injury-free. The $15 million expansion of the Sr. Caritas Cancer Center, which will add an additional 26,000 square feet of space on two levels, is designed to provide more comprehensive care delivery and added convenience for patients. In addition to radiation-oncology services, medical-oncology offices, physician offices, and exam rooms will be located on the first floor. Medical-oncology treatment and infusion space, an oncology pharmacy, and laboratory space will be located on the second floor.

Court Dockets Departments

The following is a compilation of recent lawsuits involving area businesses and organizations. These are strictly allegations that have yet to be proven in a court of law. Readers are advised to contact the parties listed, or the court, for more information concerning the individual claims.

HAMPDEN SUPERIOR COURT
Calise & Sons Bakery Inc. v. East Baking Co. Inc.
Allegation: False advertising and breach of contract: $26,000
Filed: 11/7/14

Datto Inc. v. Haselkorn Inc.
Allegation: Breach of equipment lease: $143,704
Filed: 10/30/14

Mark Lizak v. Apria Health Care, LLC
Allegation: Product liability: $13,593
Filed: 10/20/14

Perkins Paper, LLC v. Daily Harvest Café Inc.
Allegation: Non-payment of goods sold and delivered: $91,147.42
Filed: 10/27/14

HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT
Hap Inc. v. Certain Underwriters of Lloyd’s London and Bresnahan Insurance Agency Inc.
Allegation: Breach of insurance policy: $99,000+
Filed: 10/3/14

Kenneth Williams v. Thibault Fuel Inc.
Allegation: Negligent operation of motor vehicle causing injury: $25,444.86
Filed: 10/20/14

Teresa O’Shea v. Florence Pizza and Family Restaurant
Allegation: Negligent maintenance of property causing injury: $289,365.20
Filed: 10/6/14

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COURT
David W. Kretchmar v. Burris Logistics, Inc. d/b/a Burris Springfield, LLC and Jason James
Allegation: Violation of the Wage Act: $4,149.76
Filed: 11/5/14

PALMER DISTRICT COURT
Lynn Baker v. East Longmeadow Methodist Church
Allegation: Negligent maintenance of property causing slip and fall: $2,888.80
Filed: 11/5/14

St. Clair Landscaping Inc. v. Northern Tree Service
Allegation: Non-payment for labor and materials: $6,394
Filed: 9/4/14

SPRINGFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Amelia Goldrup p/p/a Trista Nadolski v. Peanuts Daycare Inc.
Allegation: Breach of duty of care and failure to adequately supervise: $912.50
Filed: 10/1/14

Comcast Spotlight Inc. v. Adrian Construction Co.
Allegation: Non-payment of advertising services provided: $2,580.16
Filed: 10/6/14

Marlene Johnson v. Kenton Johnson d/b/a A.T.C. Home Improvement, LLC
Allegation: Breach of contract: $7,824.72
Filed: 11/10/14

WESTFIELD DISTRICT COURT
Advance Me Inc. v. Lawrence Bannish d/b/a Feed Warehouse
Allegation: Breach of contract: $27,284.26
Filed: 8/28/2014

Capital One Bank v. Jason Liacos and Liacos Landscaping
Allegation: Non-payment on credit account: $12,934.94
Filed: 10/28/14

Patricia Scuderi v. Scuderi’s Inc. d/b/a Crabby Joe’s
Allegation: No compensation for hours worked: $11,942.87
Filed: 9/22/14

Daily News

LENOX, PITTSFIELD — Gov. Deval Patrick recently joined state environmental officials and local officials to announce $1.2 million in capital funding to support environmental projects at Baker’s Pond in Lenox and Berkshire Community College in Pittsfield, enhancing existing natural habitats and improving recreational opportunities for residents.

“Growth requires investment, and creating and upgrading recreational parks and open spaces while also providing important community resources will help create growth and opportunity across the commonwealth,” Patrick said. “This investment will improve the lives of Massachusetts children and families now and for generations to come.”

The administration’s $125,000 investment in Baker’s Pond will assist in the final phase of restoration of the pond. The removal of invasive species and water-quality improvements will preserve the habitat for wildlife species and make it a more appealing destination for visitors to Kennedy Park. Berkshire Community College’s Life Sciences Department will work with the town to ensure proper removal of any invasive species and the complete restoration of the pond.

“Safe, reliable drinking water has always been a critical need. In the 21st century, we will need to develop new technologies to meet growing demand,” said U.S. Rep. Jim McGovern. “I’m pleased that the federal government is joining with the Commonwealth and UMass Amherst in this promising effort.”

Baker’s Pond has a history of recreational use, but, after a small dam breach, the pond fell into disrepair, resulting in the growth of invasive plant and animal species. With ongoing improvements, the pond is once again becoming an attraction for tourists and hikers, as well as a habitat for endangered amphibian species.

The city of Pittsfield was also awarded $1.1 million to ensure proper drainage and wetland protection as Berkshire Community College works to construct an athletic field on campus, the first of its kind in Berkshire County. The athletic-field location is north of a vernal pool, certified by the Natural Heritage Endangered Species Program, making it important for the project to be environmentally sensitive in order to preserve habitat for plants and animals.

“Gov. Patrick has demonstrated a strong commitment to Pittsfield an Berkshire County,” said Mayor Daniel Bianchi. “The city of Pittsfield is pleased to join the governor in a financial commitment for the environmental restoration and construction of the new Berkshire Community College turf field. The new field will provide an athletic hub from Berkshire County and beyond. I look forward to the new events that the BCC turf field will bring to Pittsfield.”

Daily News

NORTHAMPTON — Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Undersecretary Aaron Gornstein recently joined representatives of the Grantham Group, Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz, MassDevelopment President and CEO Marty Jones, and state and local officials to break ground on the Christopher Heights assisted-living community in Northampton.

“Christopher Heights is an important step toward the goal of expanding our supply of affordable housing for all of our citizens in the Commonwealth,” said Gornstein. “DHCD is pleased to assist with this development that will not only provide new housing opportunities for the elderly, but will stimulate local economic activity. We congratulate Grantham Group and appreciate the leadership of Mayor Narkewicz and other local, state, and federal officials who have helped make this project a reality.”

Christopher Heights will be the newest development in Village Hill, a 126-acre mixed-use community located on the site of the former Northampton State Hospital. Christopher Heights is expected to open in the fall of 2015 and will have 83 assisted-living units, of which 43 are designated for low-income seniors. Seventeen of the 43 affordable units will be reserved for households earning less than 30% of the area median income. Christopher Heights also has locations in Worcester, Webster, Attleboro, and Marlborough.

“We are excited to bring our expertise in assisted-living development and management to the Northampton State Hospital redevelopment known as Village Hill,” said Grantham Group Managing Director Walter Ohanian. “We look forward to serving the senior population who will benefit from the housing and services of an affordable assisted-living community.”

The Grantham Group estimates that the project will create 65 construction jobs for the area. Once built, there will be another 40 permanent jobs at the facility.

“This exciting new addition to the Village Hill community will provide affordable assisted-living housing for our local seniors,” said state Rep. Peter Kocot. “I want to congratulate the Grantham Group, Undersecretary Gornstein, and Gov. Patrick for their leadership and commitment to developing affordable housing for people of all ages.”

Since 2007, the Patrick administration has invested more than $1 billion in state and federal resources to create 24,000 units of housing, of which approximately 22,000 are affordable. In Northampton, DHCD has invested more than $7.6 million to preserve or create 98 units of housing, 95 of which are affordable, for veterans, those who are institutionalized or at-risk of institutionalization, and low-income households.