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Firm Resolve

Sean Buxton was talking about why he chose to join the Springfield-based law firm Bulkley Richardson, and what he’s found since he came on board not quite a year ago.

“It’s been an amazing experience,” said Buxton, who handles general commercial litigation and is currently doing a lot of work in the firm’s new office in Greenfield, referring specifically to being around — and being mentored by — seasoned attorneys with decades of experience.

“Just in the Litigation department alone, we have Sandy Dibble — I can’t even tell you how long he’s been practicing — and Mike Burke, too; they’re such valuable asssets,” he said. “In the legal field, you get this feeling sometimes that the problem you’re coming on is something you’re seeing for the first time and that no one’s ever dealt with this before. To have someone to go to and have them say, ‘that same exact circumstance hasn’t happened to me, but here’s what my instincts say’ and ‘here’s what I’ve experienced,’ that is so valuable.

“You can bounce ideas off so many people here and make sure that your decisions are informed not only by you and what you’ve learned, but by the instincts and experience of everyone around you,” Buxton went on. “And they’re just fascinating people; we have Judge [John] Greaney here, who sat on the Appeals Court and the Supreme Judicial Court, and Sandy as well; the stories they tell and the experiences they can relate … they’re great mentors.”

While the names of the older lawyers and mentors may have changed, and the exact words used to describe their impact may have changed as well, generations of lawyers who have worked at the firm have been saying pretty much the same things as Buxton.

“You can bounce ideas off so many people here and make sure that your decisions are informed not only by you and what you’ve learned, but by the instincts and experience of everyone around you.”

And that’s just one of many things the firm is celebrating as it marks its centennial this year in what could be described as quiet, poignant fashion (we’ll get back to that in a bit).

It’s taking place at a time of change in the business landscape, such as the rise of the cannabis industry, and at a time when many firms are smaller or have been merged into larger entities. Meanwhile, the firm’s ongoing commitment to the community has become a focal point of the centennial, said Managing Partner Dan Finnegan, who came on board in 1992.

“We wanted to celebrate all of the amazing work that has gone into supporting, celebrating, and engaging in the communities in which we live, work, and play through initiatives such as helping to feed the hungry and addressing food insecurity, supporting arts and culture, contributing funds to lifesaving healthcare and research organizations, and providing pro bono legal services to those in need, among many, many others,” he explained. “Members of the firm have contributed time, resources, and finances to help so many worthy causes over the past century, and we plan to continue that legacy.”

Dan Finnegan

Dan Finnegan says the firm’s commitment to the community has become a focal point of its centennial celebration.

Elaborating, he said the firm has launched a new campaign called ‘Be the Change.’ It will connect lawyers and staff with opportunities to engage with organizations in Western Mass. and beyond so they can act together to bring positive change.

The campaign was launched last fall, with a team of 50 from the firm taking part in the annual Rays of Hope breast-cancer walk. Other specific initiatives include a YMCA clean-up day on May 3, when attorneys and staff rolled up their sleeves and helped prepare Stony Brook Acres, a YMCA camp in Wilbraham, for a June opening; partnering with Greater Springfield YMCA to assist area boys and girls attend summer camp (the firm will send 16 youth campers to a YMCA-run camp this summer for one week); and a $10,000 donation to Baystate Health to purchase infusion chairs.

“Giving back to the community is one of the core values that differentiates us,” said Peter Barry, who joined the firm in 1982 and preceded Finnegan as managing partner, adding that this is one of many qualities and traditions that essentially go back to 1924.

For this issue and its focus on law, BusinessWest takes a look at 100 years of tradition, expansion, innovation, entrepreneurship, and giving back — and at how these traits will continue to define the firm moving forward.

 

Making Their Case

When asked how Bulkley Richardson intends to celebrate its centennial — beyond ‘Be the Change’ — Finnegan suggested that the annual holiday party “might be a little more robust this year.”

In most respects, though, it will be business as usual.

And it has been this way since 1924, when R. DeWitt Mallary became associated with the law firm of Frederick Wooden and Harold Small, located in an office at 387 Main St. in Springfield, several blocks south of where the firm is headquartered now, in Tower Square. Eventually, the firm would become Wooden, Small & Mallary.

Peter Barry

Peter Barry says the firm has had a noticeable impact on Springfield and surrounding communities over the years.

Mallary would later partner with Morgan Gilbert to form Mallary & Gilbert, and in 1934, J. Bushnell Richardson, a graduate of Springfield’s Central High School, Amherst College, and Harvard Law School, would join them, and in 1947, the firm became Mallary, Gilbert & Richardson.

In 1950, the firm was reorganized, with the law practice conducted in collaboration by two separate partnerships — Mallary & Gilbert, and Richardson Dibble & Atkinson, adding Norris Dibble and Robert Atkinson as partners. The firms practiced together in shared office space.

Fast-forwarding through the middle of the 20th century, Richardson Dibble & Atkinson merged with the firm of Gordon, Bulkley, Godfrey and Burbank in 1956, and the firm was renamed Bulkley, Richardson, Godfrey and Burbank. A year later, Robert Gelinas joined the firm, and in 1964, Godfrey left to form a partnership with Edwin Lyman. Matthew Ryan Jr., elected as district attorney, a part-time office in those days, joined Bulkley, Richardson, Godfrey & Burbank soon thereafter. And with Burbank’s departure in 1972, the firm was renamed Bulkley, Richardson, Ryan, and Gelinas.

In 1978, the district attorney’s role became full-time, and Ryan left the firm, whch was renamed Bulkley, Richardson, and Gelinas. By 1983, the firm consisted of 27 attorneys and was occupying a suite of offices at Baystate West, which later became Tower Square.

It is still there and recently renewed its lease, said Finnegan, so it will be there for a long while to come. Meanwhile, the firm recently opened a Greenfield location (it also has one in Hadley), and now consists of 40 attorneys and more than 30 staff.

“We work hard, and we provide quality service, but we’re pretty good at work-life balance and understanding that folks have to have lives outside of the office.”

That brings us to today, when the firm is marking what have remained constants through all those changes to the letterhead over the past 100 years — especially quality service to a wide array of clients across dozens of different specialities, and an environment where generations of lawyers have, as Buxton noted, worked together and mentored those new to the profession.

It is also marking change, including the contunuing expansion of its practice areas — there are now 32 of them, Finnegan noted.

“We’ve always been a full-service law firm, one of the biggest, if not the biggest, in the area,” he said. “And we’ve always been able to provide a wide array of services to clients.”

Within those 32 practice areas there have long been specific strengths, such as health law, said Barry, noting that the firm has long represented many of the region’s larger providers, as well as education, representing several colleges and universities.

Bulkley Richardson’s leaders say the firm was built on excellence and has maintained it through the decades.

But there have been important additions to the portfolio over the years as well, he went on, citing the broad realm of cyber law and service to the growing, changing cannabis industry as just two examples.

 

Continuing a Legacy

Barry, who has been with the firm for 42 of its 100 years, joined it just before it relocated from State Street to Tower Square, a big move and a rather large risk for the partners at the time, he said, adding that downtown Springfield was a much different place at the time.

And the firm has been involved in many of the changes that have taken place since, representing entities ranging from the Basketball Hall of Fame, which built its new home just over 20 years ago, to the Springfield Redevelopment Authority, which presided over the renovations that brought Union Station back to productive life after nearly 40 years of dormancy, to the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, which operates the MassMutual Center.

“It’s nice to be able to drive around and say, ‘we were involved with that,’” Barry said, adding that the firm has also represented the Westover Metropolitan Development Corp. in its many endeavors in Chicopee and Ludlow and countless other clients as well.

Like Finnegan, Barry said many changes have come to the field of law and the firm over the past few decades, let alone the past century — everything from the demise of law libraries, with all that material now online, to the advent of depositons and other legal functions via Zoom.

What’s probably more important is what hasn’t changed — and won’t change, they said, especially the firm’s commitment to excellence as well as the environment that Buxton described earlier, one where lawyers and staff with wide ranges of experience and knowhow work together to generate positive results for clients while learning from each other.

In fact, both Barry and Finnegan used similar words and phrases to describe those who mentored them when they arrived four and three decades ago, respectively.

“I’ve had a lot of great mentors here,” said Barry, noting that he and others now serve as mentors to the younger atttorneys.

Finnegan said the firm has created a strong culture, one that has promoted many lawyers (he’s one of them), and staff members as well, who then spend their entire careers at Bulkley Richardson.

“That’s a testament to the culture of the firm,” he said. “We work hard, and we provide quality service, but we’re pretty good at work-life balance and understanding that folks have to have lives outside of the office.”

Looking ahead, Barry and Finnegan said the business plan is rather simple. It calls for continued growth and building upon the solid foundation laid in 1924.

“We’ve made a commitment to growth. Within the past few years, we’ve hired quite a few young lateral attorneys, as well as several attorneys right out of law school,” said Finnegan, adding that the firm has what he calls a rather robust summer associate program (he was one himself) that has served to help keep talent flowing through the pipeline. “We have a lot of young lawyers that we’ve hired over the past few years.”

“Overall, the firm has long managed to maintain an important mix of older attorneys, those in the middle of their careers, and those just joining the profession,” said Barry, adding that such a mix is critical to the ongoing success of any law firm.

Finnegan agreed, noting that this quality is one of many that have defined the firm since Warren Harding was in the White House, and will continue to do so moving forward.

“When I got here, the word I always heard was ‘excellence’ — this firm was built on excellence,” he said. “The firm has always been a collection of exceptional lawyers providing top-quality legal services to our clients. I don’t think that’s ever changed over the 100 years the firm has been in existence, nor is it going to change moving forward.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — In continuing Jeff Poindexter’s legacy, Bulkley Richardson has partnered with the Greater Springfield YMCA to help area boys and girls attend summer camp. The firm will send 16 youth campers to a YMCA-run camp this summer for one week.

Poindexter was a partner at Bulkley Richardson and the former chairman of the Greater Springfield YMCA board of directors.

“Jeff knew summer camp was a privilege not all kids had access to, and he was a huge advocate of advancing equity in our Springfield neighborhoods,” said Dan Finnegan, Bulkley Richardson’s managing partner. “We felt that honoring Jeff’s longtime commitment to the YMCA and its efforts to provide opportunities to youth in the community was something he would be proud of.”

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SPRINGFIELD — Francis “Sandy” Dibble, John Pucci, and Jeffrey Roberts, attorneys at Bulkley Richardson, have been recognized by Super Lawyers for 20 consecutive years, coinciding with the 20th anniversary of Massachusetts Super Lawyers.

According to Super Lawyers, there are 42,635 attorneys registered with the Massachusetts state bar, but only 264 attorneys selected to Super Lawyers all 20 years, making this an elite group of 0.6% of attorneys in the state.

Dibble, partner, has been recognized in the area of business litigation. He has tried and won, or favorably settled, significant cases for a wide range of clients throughout the U.S.

Pucci, partner, has been recognized in the area of criminal defense: white collar crimes. He is one of Massachusetts’ top trial lawyers, representing individuals and companies in complex civil and criminal litigation of all kinds in both state and federal courts.

Roberts, counsel, has been recognized in the area of estate & probate. He has handled many sophisticated estate-planning matters throughout his career, as well as corporate work and business transactions, primarily for closely held companies.

“Twenty years of being recognized as a Super Lawyer is a testament to the solid reputations that these lawyers have earned within their respective fields of practice,” said Dan Finnegan, Bulkley Richardson’s managing partner. “Their contributions to clients across Massachusetts and beyond are noteworthy.”

Super Lawyers is a rating service of lawyers who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. A patented attorney-selection process is peer-influenced and research-driven, selecting the top 5% of attorneys to the Super Lawyers list each year.

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Stephen Holstrom and Lauren Ostberg were promoted to partner, effective Jan. 1.

Holstrom is a general practice litigator with a focus on medical-malpractice defense. In addition to medical-malpractice cases, he has litigated complex tort actions, commercial disputes, insurance cases, complex class actions, and education cases.

Ostberg, a key member of Bulkley Richardson’s intellectual property and technology and cybersecurity practice groups, also maintains a diverse commercial-litigation practice.

“Steve is an asset to the medical-malpractice and general-litigation teams. With a strong work ethic and persuasive skills, he continues to earn the respect of his peers,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “Lauren has established herself as a leader in many technical areas of the law, and her dedication to achieving results for clients is unwavering. As co-chair of the firm’s cybersecurity group, she has been instrumental in launching the robust practice and positioned herself as a go-to cyber resource.”

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SPRINGFIELD — Luke Goodridge has joined the law firm of Bulkley Richardson as a partner. His practice will continue to focus on estate planning, trust administration, and general business-law matters.

Goodridge was previously a named partner at the law firm of Curtiss, Carey, Gates & Goodridge, LLP, based in Greenfield. He will continue to maintain an office in Greenfield.

“Luke Goodridge has established a reputation as a go-to lawyer in Franklin County, and we are thrilled to welcome him at Bulkley Richardson,” Managing Partner Dan Finnegan said. “His clients will continue to receive the stellar legal work they have come to expect from Luke and now will have the support of complementary practice areas to help his clients achieve their personal and business goals.”

Goodridge earned a bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, from UMass Amherst; a juris doctorate from the University of Connecticut School of Law, and is currently a candidate for an LLM (master of laws) degree in taxation at Boston University School of Law.

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SPRINGFIELD — Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News and World Report, ranks Bulkley Richardson as 2024 Best Law Firm in the Springfield region in the following 14 practice areas: banking and finance law, bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, business organizations (including LLCs and partnerships), commercial litigation, corporate law, criminal defense – general practice, criminal defense – white collar, employment law, litigation – labor and employment, medical-malpractice law – defendants, personal-injury litigation – defendants, real-estate law, tax law, and trusts and estates law.

To be eligible for a ranking, a law firm must have at least one lawyer included in the list of Best Lawyers. Bulkley Richardson has 15 lawyers included on the 2024 Best Lawyers list, and two of the firm’s partners, Michael Burke and John Pucci, were named 2024 Springfield-area Lawyers of the Year. Rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations and peer reviews from leading attorneys in their field.

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SPRINGFIELD — Any U.S. business that sends products, services, or technology or technical data to foreign countries is subject to export control regulations. Having a compliance program that ensures compliance in all areas of the business will help avoid export violations.

Bulkley Richardson invites business leaders to join Dan Sacco for a webinar on Wednesday, Sept. 27 at noon via Zoom. Topics will include U.S. export control regulations (how they regulate the release of critical technologies, information, and services to foreign countries and, in some cases, to foreign nationals in the U.S.), developing and implementing an export compliance program (avoiding major challenges arising from export control violations), and avoiding export control violations (penalties can be severe and may include significant fines, the denial of export privileges, and criminal prosecution).

Register at bulkley.com/export-compliance to receive a confirmation email with a link to join the webinar.

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed Sean Buxton, Christa Calabretta, Allison Laughner, and Yevgeniy “Gene” Pilman to the firm.

Buxton will practice in the Litigation department. He earned a juris doctorate (JD), summa cum laude, from Western New England University School of Law in 2022. He also earned a bachelor’s degree, cum laude, from Princeton University. He spent the last year as a judicial law clerk for Judge Ariane Vuono of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and previously was an intern at the Hampden County District Attorney’s Office and the Superior Court of New Jersey.

Calabretta will focus her practice on Business and Healthcare matters. She is a 2023 graduate of the University of Connecticut School of Law and also earned a bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and an associate degree from Suffolk County Community College.

Laughner will split her time between the Trusts & Estates and Family Law departments. She graduated from Western New England University School of Law in 2023, where she was on the Law Review staff. She also earned an MBA at Western New England University and a bachelor’s degree from Smith College.

Pilman will practice in both the Business and Real Estate departments. He earned a JD from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in 2015, where he was a Cordozo Scholar, and a bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, from Hunter College City University of New York.

“Bulkley Richardson continues to expand, and attracting talented lawyers has proven to be a key to our success,” Managing Partner Dan Finnegan said. “Adding Gene as a lateral attorney, along with three first-year lawyers who were all graduates of our summer associate training program, strengthens the firm’s infrastructure and allows us to maintain the quality of work that we are able to provide from top to bottom.”

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that both Stephen Holstrom and Lauren Ostberg have been included in the 2024 edition of Best Lawyers: Ones to Watch in America.

Holstrom, counsel at Bulkley Richardson, was recognized for his work in both professional malpractice law and education law. Ostberg, an associate in the Litigation department and co-chair of the Cybersecurity practice, was recognized in the area of commercial litigation.

Best Lawyers: Ones to Watch in America recognizes lawyers relatively early in their careers for their outstanding professional excellence in private practice in the U.S.

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed Jennifer Santucci to the firm as an associate in the Real Estate department.

She will work with clients on drafting and negotiating purchase and sale agreements; reviewing and analyzing sales contracts, LLC/corporate documents, trust documentation, and title commitments; and preparing for and conducting closings. Her experience also includes real-estate financing, including representing various lenders in commercial real-estate transactions, and preparation of loan agreements and other loan documents on behalf of lenders.

Santucci earned a juris doctorate from Suffolk University Law School in 2014 and a bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, in criminal studies from Johnson & Wales University in 2009.

“Our real-estate practice supports the legal objectives of so many of our business and individual clients,” said Kathy Bernardo, chair of the firm’s Real Estate department. “Jennifer’s addition to the real-estate group came at an ideal time as her skills and experience as a lawyer will complement our ongoing work and help to support our clients’ complex real-estate needs.”

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that 15 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in the 2024 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. These lawyers were recognized in 24 unique areas of practice. They are:

Peter Barry: construction law, healthcare law, and education law;
• Kathy Bernardo: real-estate law;
Michael Burke: medical malpractice law (defendants) and personal-injury litigation (defendants);
Mark Cress: banking and finance law, bankruptcy and creditor-debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, and corporate law;
Francis Dibble Jr.: bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, white-collar criminal defense, labor and employment litigation, and securities litigation;
Daniel Finnegan: administrative/regulatory law, construction litigation, and construction law;
Scott Foster: business organizations, including LLCs and partnerships;
Mary Jo Kennedy: employment law (individuals) and employment law (management);
Kevin Maynard: commercial litigation, banking and finance litigation, and construction litigation;
David Parke: corporate law and mergers and acquisitions;
Jeffrey Poindexter: commercial litigation and construction litigation;
John Pucci: bet-the-company litigation, general-practice criminal defense, and white-collar criminal defense;
Jeffrey Roberts: corporate law and trusts & estates;
Michael Roundy: commercial litigation; and
Ronald Weiss: corporate law, mergers and acquisitions law, and tax law.

Lawyers who are nominated for consideration are voted on by currently recognized Best Lawyers working in the same practice area and located in the same geographic region. Lawyers on The Best Lawyers in America list are reviewed by their peers based on professional expertise, and recognitions are based purely on the feedback received.

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SPRINGFIELD — Julie Dick, counsel at Bulkley Richardson, has been named one of this year’s Emerging Women Leaders in the Law by the Women’s Bar Assoc. of Massachusetts (WBA).

The WBA’s Emerging Women Leaders in the Law award honors women attorneys who have demonstrated professional excellence or had a significant professional achievement in approximately their first 12 years in the legal profession, and either promote the status of women in the legal profession or contribute meaningfully to the equal participation of women in a just society.

The other honorees are Avana Epperson-Temple of Peabody & Arnold LLP, state Rep. Tram Nguyen, and Whitney Williams of the Middlesex County District Attorney’s Office.

“This year’s group of Emerging Women Leaders is an exceptional group of women attorneys whose talent and accomplishments thus far in their careers are commendable. I look forward to their continued good work and celebrating their contributions to the legal profession into the future,” said Jessica Babine, WBA president.

The 2023 awardees will be celebrated at the WBA’s annual gala on Oct. 16 at Marriott Copley Place in Boston.

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SPRINGFIELD — Elizabeth Dougal has joined Bulkley Richardson as counsel in the Trusts & Estates department, where her practice incudes preparation and administration of wills, revocable and irrevocable trusts, personal-effects memorandum, durable powers of attorney, healthcare proxies, real-estate deeds, homestead exemptions, and small-business succession plans.

For the past 19 years, Dougal ran a boutique legal practice providing clients with estate planning and related transactional work. She was also a consultant to estate, trust, and elder-care clients in several states through the Attorney Resource Center. She earned both a bachelor’s degree, magna cum laude, and a juris doctorate from Boston College.

“Our Trusts & Estates practice continues to thrive, and Elizabeth’s arrival at the firm is evidence of our commitment to engaging stellar lawyers to handle all of our clients’ most sensitive personal and business matters,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner at Bulkley Richardson.

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed attorneys Julie Dick and Daniel Sacco to the firm.

Dick is counsel in Bulkley Richardson’s family-law practice. She counsels individuals, couples, and families on all matters relating to domestic relationships. Prior to joining the firm, she was an attorney at Community Legal Aid, where she represented clients in probate and family courts and district courts as a part of the Family Law Unit. She earned a bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, from Ohio State University in 2013, and a juris doctorate from Ohio State University Moritz College of Law in 2016.

Sacco is counsel in Bulkley Richardson’s litigation department, where he works with clients on preparing for administrative proceedings and trials. He has many years of experience helping public and private companies and educational institutions address regulatory compliance-related issues, including both responding to alleged compliance violations and developing compliance policies and programs.

Prior to joining Bulkley Richardson, Sacco was a partner at Lindquist & Vennum in Minneapolis. Most recently, he was senior associate director of Research Compliance at UMass Amherst. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College in 1996 and a juris doctorate from the University of Maine School of Law in 2003.

“Julie and Dan represent what the firm is all about,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “They bring fresh perspectives, a breadth of experience, and diverse careers paths that have prepared them to be successful at Bulkley Richardson. Adding two lateral attorneys strengthens our existing core practices and positions the firm for continued success.”

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson welcomed three law students to its 2023 Summer Associate Program. The robust program will introduce law students to the inner workings of a law firm, where they will receive mentorship from lawyers ranging from firm leaders and retired judges all the way through the ranks to junior associates, and gain exposure to real-life legal matters.

This year’s summer associates are:

• Alexandria Abacherli, who is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Lafayette College, where she double majored in government & law and international affairs;

• Andrew Loin, who is currently attending Western New England University School of Law, where he is on the WNE Law Review. She earned bachelor’s degrees in political science and business: entrepreneurship from the University of Rochester; and

• Nicole Palmieri, who is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law, where she is on the Connecticut Law Review and is a University of Connecticut Scholar. She received a bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, in American studies from Christopher Newport University.

Each summer associate anticipates a spring 2024 law-school graduation.

“We are honored to have another group of talented law students who have chosen to spend the next few months with us,” said Mike Roundy, who oversees Bulkley Richardson’s Summer Associate Program. “We continue to expand and adapt our program to provide in-depth legal training and exposure to a wide range of legal matters.”

Bulkley Richardson continues to accept résumés for its 2024 Summer Associate Program, as well as recent law-school graduates and attorneys considering a lateral move. Visit bulkley.com/current-openings for more information.

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WESTFIELD — The Greater Westfield Emergency Food Pantry received recently a $2,000 donation from the Springfield-based law firm Bulkley Richardson.

“Since the expiration of special government assistance during the pandemic, we have witnessed the need for additional aid in feeding the hungry,” said Rebecca Hart, director of the Greater Westfield Emergency Food Pantry. “Along with a dramatic rise in prices for food and housing, food insecurity remains a growing concern.”

Mike Roundy, partner at Bulkley Richardson and longtime Westfield resident, added that “seeing the real struggles that members of our community face every day to meet basic needs is painful. I am pleased that our firm can be a small part of the solution to help combat hunger, but there is so much more work to be done. I encourage others to help in ways that they are able.”

The mission of the Greater Westfield Emergency Food Pantry is to provide food to those in need in the Westfield area; to foster self-sufficiency in individuals through encouragement, support, guidance, and education; and to identify and address the root causes of hunger in the community and to strive to provide long-term solutions.

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Sarah Willey has been promoted to partner in the firm’s Business/Finance Department, and Stephen Holstrom has been promoted to counsel in the firm’s Litigation Department.

Willey’s practice includes a range of business services, including advising clients in business formation, mergers and acquisitions, business-succession planning, and corporate structuring of businesses in regulated industries, including cannabis. She also represents employers in a variety of matters before the MCAD, EEOC, and state and federal courts, and counsels clients in protecting and maximizing their intellectual property via trademarks, copyrights, and licensing agreements.

Holstrom joined the firm in 2018 as an associate. He is a general practice litigator with a focus on medical-malpractice defense. In addition to medical-malpractice actions, he has litigated other complex tort actions, commercial cases, insurance cases, complex class actions, and education cases.

“Sarah has been an asset to the firm’s corporate clients, overseeing their complex business needs. And she has been particularly valuable to the firm’s growing cannabis practice, understanding the nuances of this regulated industry,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “Steve continues to be a valuable resource to the litigation team. His growth over the past five years has earned him the respect of colleagues. With his intellectual abilities and strong work ethic, I anticipate Steve to have a long and successful career as a litigator.”

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SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield-based law firm Bulkley, Richardson and Gelinas, LLP announced the passing of longtime partner and valued friend Bob Gelinas.

Gelinas joined the firm as an associate on June 1, 1957 and became a named partner of the firm in 1972.

“Bob Gelinas was one of this firm’s most beloved partners and continued to be a mentor to many of us who still practice at the firm today,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “I can honestly say that I have never met anyone who enjoyed the practice of law more than Bob. He was still coming into the office on a regular basis well into his 80s, and I am sure he would have continued to practice another decade if he had been able to do so. Bob was a great lawyer and an even better person.”

Gelinas was a member of the firm’s Litigation department and also worked with the Government Strategies, Health Law, and Employment Law practice groups. His practice focused on resolving disputes through advice, litigation, or alternative dispute resolution in such areas as healthcare, employment, land use, taxation, and construction. Gelinas had long represented the major medical providers in Western Mass. before various agencies and courts, and he represented nearly all of the major educational institutions in the region on various issues, including labor relations, construction, real estate, and professional and personal conduct.

For more than 25 years, Gelinas was selected by his peers for inclusion in Best Lawyers in America in the area of personal-injury litigation (defendants).

Prior to commencing his practice of law in 1957, he graduated from Naval Officer Candidate School and served as a U.S. Naval air intelligence officer.

An active member of his professional and local communities, he was an active member of the Hampden County Bar Assoc. for more than 60 years and served as a trustee and chairman of the board of trustees of Holyoke Community College, president of the Chicopee Community Center, chairman of the United Way professional campaign unit, and board member of Heritage Savings Bank. He was honored for his service by many civic organizations.

Gelinas was a 1951 graduate of St. Michael’s College with a bachelor’s degree, and earned his juris doctorate from Boston University School of Law in 1953.

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SPRINGFIELD — Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News and World Report, ranked Bulkley Richardson as 2023’s Best Law Firm in the Springfield region in the following 12 practice areas: banking and finance law, bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, business organizations (including LLCs and partnerships), commercial litigation, corporate law, criminal defense – general practice, criminal defense – white collar, litigation – labor and employment, medical-malpractice law – defendants, personal-injury litigation – defendants, tax law, and trusts and estates law.

To be eligible for a ranking, a law firm must have at least one lawyer included in the year’s list of Best Lawyers. Bulkley Richardson had 16 lawyers included on the 2023 Best Lawyers list, and two of the firm’s partners, Mark Cress and John Pucci, were named 2023 Springfield-area Lawyers of the Year. Rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations and peer reviews from leading attorneys in their field.

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SPRINGFIELD — Dean Gomes recently joined Bulkley Richardson as senior manager of Information Technology. His career has been dedicated to IT management, and he spent the last 13 years as director of Enterprise Technology at the law firm of Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider, LLP with offices in New York City, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, and Hartford, Conn.

“As a member of the firm’s senior management team, we expect Dean to add considerable value,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “His recent experience at Axinn, one of the world’s top anti-trust firms, allowed him the opportunity to oversee the IT operations at an extremely sophisticated level. Dean’s breadth of information-technology experience in the law-firm environment is unmatched.”

Gomes earned a bachelor’s degree in management information systems from Pace University in New York City.

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SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson, with offices in Springfield and Hadley, recently welcomed four attorneys to the firm.

Matthew Dziok earned a juris doctor degree from Western New England University School of Law, where he graduated second in his class. He also earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from UMass Boston.

Briana Dawkins is a graduate of Western New England University School of Law and earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Curry College, summa cum laude. She was an intern at the U.S. Department of Labor and the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.

Shriti Shah graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Law. She received a master’s degree in Management Studies in 2007 and a bachelor’s degree in commerce in 2004 from the University of Mumbai.

Jacob Kosakowski is a graduate of Suffolk University School of Law and earned a bachelor’s degree from UMass Amherst, summa cum laude. He served as an intern for Chief Justice Paul Dawley and the Child Abuse Unit of the Northwestern District Attorney’s Office.

“The hiring of these four talented lawyers is consistent with the firm’s ongoing strategy for continued growth,” said Kevin Maynard, chair of the firm’s hiring committee. “Briana, Shriti, and Jacob are all graduates of Bulkley Richardson’s enhanced Summer Associate Program, so we had the pleasure of working with them last summer. And Matt’s experience as a private investigator and clerking for an area law office will help him integrate well into our litigation practice. We are confident they will each make significant contributions to the firm.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson partners Mark Cress and John Pucci were named 2023 Lawyer of the Year in their respective practice areas by Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News Media Group.

Cress was named the 2023 Lawyer of the Year for bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law and was also recognized in 2022 as Lawyer of the Year for his work in the area of corporate law. He leads the firm’s banking, finance, and bankruptcy practice group and has significant experience representing banks and other financial institutions, for-profit and not-for-profit entities, and individual clients in connection with all forms of financing and business transactions. He also represents parties in creditor-debtor relationships and appears on behalf of creditor parties in proceedings before the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Pucci was named the 2023 Lawyer of the Year for white-collar criminal defense and has held that title for 10 of the past 13 years for his success as a litigator. He co-chairs the firm’s independent investigations practice and represents individuals and companies in complex civil and criminal litigation of all kinds in both state and federal court, as well as in responding to government investigations and in conducting corporate internal investigations. He has particular experience in the areas of white-collar criminal defense and state and federal regulatory agency matters.

Lawyer of the Year rankings are awarded to one lawyer per practice area and region. Honorees receive this award based on their high overall peer feedback within specific practice areas and metropolitan regions.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that 16 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in 2023 edition of Best Lawyers in America. These lawyers were recognized in 24 unique areas of practice. They include:

• Peter Barry (in the practice areas of construction, education, healthcare);

• Kathleen Bernardo (real estate);

• Michael Burke (medical malpractice law: defendants, personal injury litigation: defendants);

• Mark Cress (banking and finance, bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, corporate);

• Francis Dibble Jr. (bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, criminal defense: white-collar, litigation: labor and employment, litigation: securities);

• Daniel Finnegan (administrative/regulatory law, construction, litigation: construction);

• Scott Foster (business organizations, including LLCs and partnerships);

• Mary Jo Kennedy (employment);

• Kevin Maynard (commercial litigation, litigation: banking and finance, litigation: construction);

• David Parke (corporate, mergers and acquisitions);

• Jeffrey Poindexter (commercial litigation, litigation: construction);

• John Pucci (bet-the-company litigation, criminal defense: general practice, criminal defense: white-collar);

• Jeffrey Roberts (corporate, trusts and estates);

• Michael Roundy (commercial litigation);

• Elizabeth Sillin (nonprofit/charities law, trusts and estates); and

• Ronald Weiss (corporate, mergers and acquisitions, tax).

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Adam Hogan has joined Bulkley Richardson as the firm’s controller.

In this management role, Hogan will execute all financial and tax-related activities for the firm, including development of the annual operating budget; partnership reporting; successful collaboration with his team for billing, payables, and receivables; and working closely with firm leadership to contribute to the growth and overall success of the firm.

Previously, Hogan held the positions of CFO, controller, and staff accountant at several area businesses. He holds both a master’s degree in accounting and financial planning and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Elms College.

Daily News

SPRINGFIED — Bulkley Richardson has welcomed five law students to its 2022 Summer Associate Program. 

The robust program will introduce law students to the inner workings of a law firm, where they will receive mentorship from lawyers ranging from firm leaders and retired judges all the way through the ranks to junior associates, and gain exposure to real-life legal matters. 

This year’s Summer Associates are: 

  • Allison Laughner, who is currently attending Western New England University School of Law, where she is on the Law Review staff. She is also working toward an MBA at Western New England University College of Business and earned a B.A. from Smith College;
  • Jacob Cronin is currently attending Northeastern University School of Law. He earned a B.A. from Connecticut College with additional coursework at Carnegie Mellon University and Georgetown University; 
  • Sara Sam-Njogu is currently attending Western New England University School of Law. She earned a B.A., magnacum laude, from St. Lawrence University and participated in the Denmark International Study Abroad Program in Copenhagen, Denmark with a focus on international business;
  • Christa “Christabelle” Calabretta is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law and earned a B.A. from St. John’s University and an A.A. from Suffolk County Community College; and 
  • Mumina Egal is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law, where in addition to a juris doctorate, she is seeking certificates in both Intellectual Property and Transactional Practice. Egal received a bachelor of Social Sciences from the University of Ottawa. 

“The firm’s Summer Associate Program continues to thrive, and we are honored to have such a talented group of law students who chose to spend the next few months with us receiving in-depth legal training and exposure to a wide range of legal matters,” said Mike Roundy, head of Bulkley Richardson’s Summer Associate Program.”    

Bulkley Richardson continues to accept resumes from future summer associates, as well as recent law school graduates and attorneys considering a lateral move. Visit https://bulkley.com/summer-associates/ for more information. 

Daily News

 

Today at noon, Bulkley Richardson will present the final session in its Business Transitions webinar series. 

Attorneys Michael Sweet, Jenelle Dodds, and Ryan Barry will take a look at preparing for a transition. Guest speaker Chris Nadeau of Whittlesey will give his perspective on best practices. The session will be presented via Zoom. 

The session will focus on:  

  • Corporate records;
  • Disputes and contingent liabilities;
  • Financial statements;
  • Management team;
  • Assignable contracts;
  • Employee engagement and retention; and
  • ‘Preparing Yourself to Let Go’

 

Visit www.bulkley.com/exit-strategies for more details and to register. 

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed Jeffrey Roberts to the firm as counsel in the Trusts & Estates and Business practices.

Roberts has handled many sophisticated estate-planning matters and complex business transactions throughout his career. His practice will continue to focus on estate planning, trusts and estates, taxation, and estate administration, as well as corporate work and business transactions primarily for closely held companies. He also has extensive experience with advice to family-owned companies with respect to business-succession planning and representation of the owner with respect to the sale of a closely held business.

Roberts has practiced law at Robinson Donovan P.C. since graduating from Georgetown Law in 1974 and served as the firm’s managing partner for many of those years.

“Jeffrey is well-known in the community for his wealth of knowledge and his ability to build dynamic, long-term relationships,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner at Bulkley Richardson. “He has spent a career helping his clients plan for their future, and we are honored that he chose Bulkley Richardson for his own future.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — On Tuesday, April 5 at noon, Bulkley Richardson will present session 3 of the firm’s Business Transitions webinar series. Ron Weiss, partner in the firm’s Business and Finance department, will look at family-business succession planning along with guest speaker Ira Bryck, former executive director of the Pioneer Valley Family Business Center and experienced family-owned business advisor.

Topics to be covered include management-succession issues in a family business, estate-planning issues when not all children will be involved in the business, insurance as an equalizer, ownership of non-operating business assets (such as real estate), use of buy/sell agreements, funding, valuation issues, and tales of successful family-business succession planning.

Session 4 (about preparing for a transition) will take place on Tuesday, May 3 at noon. All seessions take place via Zoom, and registration is required for each session. Visit www.bulkley.com/exit-strategies to register.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Throughout the course of a year, the Davis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Baystate Children’s Hospital cares for more than 800 newborns. These babies are fighters, but they require essential care. Many have come into the world too early; others emerge with medical challenges that need to be addressed in the moments after birth. All of them deserve the best chance for a healthy life.

Bulkley Richardson, a Springfield-based law firm, recently made a $10,000 gift to support that essential care through the purchase of a transcutaneous CO2 monitor. This device provides a non-invasive and efficient way to monitor newborns’ exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide (CO2) when they require a ventilator to assist their breathing. It also allows the team to review and respond to important health details in real time instead of through multiple painful blood draws.

“We are so appreciative of Bulkley Richardson for their generous support of this technology,” said Stephanie Adam, manager of the NICU and Continuing Care Nursery. “For newborns in our care, being able to monitor and respond to changes in a way that does not put them in any discomfort is one more way that we can provide the highest level of compassionate care. This technology is a game changer for our sickest infants.”

With one in 10 families needing the NICU in their lifetime, this type of equipment will be used by many and provide a more comfortable experience for Baystate’s youngest patients.

“We wanted to contribute to the care of our most vulnerable citizens,” said Peter Barry, partner at Bulkley Richardson. “These CO2 monitors provide essential data in a non-invasive manner, eliminating additional pain and discomfort to newborns who may already be struggling. I understand the helplessness of seeing your child or grandchild in distress and hope that our gift will bring some peace of mind to those with children in need of monitoring.”

Anyone who would like to support care for infants in the NICU, can contact the Baystate Health Foundation at (413) 794-5444 or [email protected].

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed James Moher and Michael McAndrew to the firm.

Moher joined the firm as counsel in the Business and Finance department, where his practice will focus on general corporate and business matters, including mergers and acquisitions and other transactional work. He will also be active in the areas of cannabis and other emerging businesses.

Moher previously practiced at a Hartford, Conn. law firm and most recently was founder and CEO of a successful startup business, giving him an insider’s perspective on the challenges and opportunities faced by a small business. He received a bachelor’s degree from Boston College in 2008 and a juris doctor from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 2011.

McAndrew joined Bulkley Richardson’s Litigation department as an associate.

Previously, McAndrew was a law clerk at several area law firms and served as a clerk intern to the Hon. Alfred Covello in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut. He received a bachelor’s degree from Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, magna cum laude, in 2018 and a juris doctor from Western New England University School of Law, magna cum laude, in 2021.

“The firm is honored to have two outstanding lawyers join the firm’s largest practice areas,” said Dan Finnegan, Bulkley Richardson’s managing partner. “Finding qualified candidates has been tough for all law firms, but we have kept our standards high. James and Mike fall nicely into our model for growth and will contribute to the firm’s overall success.”

Class of 2022

His Decisions, and His Actions, Have Helped Move Society Forward

Leah Martin Photography

Leah Martin Photography

 

 

It wasn’t the most compelling moment in John Greaney’s long and distinguished career behind the bench. And it certainly wasn’t the most controversial.

But it was poignant, and it spoke volumes about who he is and how he does things.

As the opposing sides in a bitter power struggle for control of the Boston Red Sox gathered in Room 1006 of the Massachusetts Court of Appeals on Feb. 14, 1984, Greaney, the recently appointed chief justice of the Appellate Division, and his fellow justices could feel the tension rising.

“We had practically every major lawyer in Boston there either observing or arguing,” Greaney, currently senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, recalled. “[Justice] Ami Cutter, who was sitting next to me, said, as the whole thing ended, ‘this was very tense; can you say something?’”

He did. Speaking specifically to the lawyer in front of him, but also all those present, he said, “it may take into the baseball season before a decision is rendered, so I Ieave you with this thought. I urge all of the disputing parties in the meantime to at least get together to do something about the pitching.”

The next day’s story on the court session in the sports section of the Boston Globe carried this headline:

 

May They Please the Court

Judge Offers Red Sox Litigants Advice on Pitching as Appeals Are Heard

 

The episode also found its way into Sports Illustrated, said Greaney, who said that, while his tongue may have been in cheek, he was speaking for all Sox fans thirsty for a pennant, and with a sense of humor that became a trademark.

Indeed, whether it was while he sat on the state Supreme Judicial Court — his next stop after the Appeals Court — or at the table for a meeting of the Noble Hospital board of directors, Greaney usually had a one-liner (or three or four) and a way of relieving tension in whatever courtroom he was serving in. And that’s just one of his many talents.

Only a small percentage of lawyers enter the profession with the hard goal of one day sitting on the bench, but Greaney did. He said he was influenced in a profound way by his experience serving working for Westfield District Court Judge Arthur Garvey the summer after his first year at New York University School of Law.

“I was basically just hanging around, observing the court,” he recalled. “So every morning, I sat and observed the court, and I was bewitched because he seemed to handle the cases that would come in — driving while intoxicated, small burglaries, those kinds of things — with relative ease. And he had a good demeanor about giving defendants a break; usually, if they had a job and had a family, he didn’t want to incarcerate them, so he’d give them warnings, tell them to behave, and maybe give them probation.

“I said ‘jeez, he’s certainly doing something worthwhile here,” he went on, adding that he went back to law school in the fall committed to finding a career path that would enable him to do the same.

And to say that he did would be an understatement. After serving in the military and then working for a decade at the law firm Ely and King in Springfield, Greaney was appointed the presiding judge of the Hampden County Housing Court, the second such court in Massachusetts. In 1976, the was appointed a justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court; in 1978, he was appointed a justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court; and in 1984, as noted, as that court’s chief justice.

“He had a good demeanor about giving defendants a break; usually, if they had a job and had a family, he didn’t want to incarcerate them … I said, ‘jeez, he’s certainly doing something worthwhile here.’”

In 1989, he was appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court, and during his two decades on the court, during which he famously rode a Peter Pan Bus to work most days so he could work during his commute, he participated in many significant decisions, including the landmark Goodridge v. Department of Health, in which he wrote the concurrence to the opinion establishing Massachusetts as the first state to legalize same-sex marriage (more on that later).

He also wrote many other significant decisions, including the 1993 decision that recognized the rights of gay couples in Massachusetts to adopt children, a 1997 decision affirming the unconstitutionality of a statute prohibiting panhandling, and a 2007 decision upholding a $2 million libel verdict against the Boston Herald.

Slicing through all those cases and work on each of those courts, Greaney said he remembered what he learned back in Westfield District Court in the early ’60s and tried to make the same overall kind of impact on people’s lives.

Daniel Finnegan, managing partner for Bulkley Richardson, who nominated Greaney for the Difference Maker award, summed up Greaney’s career, and his broad impact, this way:

“Throughout each phase of his career, Justice Greaney has earned tremendous respect for his intellect, professional integrity, and commitment to the community. He has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice, influenced our societal values and ways of thinking, and continues to be a valuable mentor, sharing wisdom and insight deemed from his impressive career. Greaney has proven that he is a trailblazer, an agent of social change, and a true difference maker.”

 

Court of Opinion

Long before imploring those fighting for control of the Red Sox to get some pitching help, Greaney was making his mark in a different kind of setting.

That would be this region’s housing court, an assignment that would in many ways set the tone for all that would come later.

Indeed, Greaney would essentially create the Housing Court from scratch, making it into what he called a true ‘Peoples Court,’ with the help of an advisory committee that included another member of this year’s Difference Makers class, Herbie Flores (see story on page 30).

“People who came in were not going to be intimidated, if we could help it,” he recalled. “We were going to design simple, plain-English forms to be used in evictions and other actions, and we were going to print them in two languages, Spanish and English, and we were going to allow people to be pro se as much as we could. And I decided in Small Claims that I would write a decision in every case.

“I then took the court on the road, which was unheard of at the time,” he went on, adding that he had sessions in public buildings, such as city halls, schools, and other facilities, to make the court more accessible. Its home base, though, was the courthouse in Springfield, which had no room at the time, he recalled, noting that a small courtroom was eventually secured, and for a clerk’s office, “a janitor was kicked out, and we took that space — but it was a heck of a fight.”

As noted, that Housing Court assignment would enable Greaney to make his mark and forge a reputation as an imaginative, hard-working, people-oriented jurist. And these were some of the qualities that caught the attention of Mike Dukakis, who would play a huge role in his career trajectory.

The two first met when Dukakis was running for lieutenant governor and Greaney, long active with the state’s Democratic party, was a state delegate. Greaney backed Dukakis in that election, and he won the nomination, but the Democratic ticket lost the election. Two years later, Dukakis ran for governor and won, and not long after appointed Greaney to the state’s Superior Court. Later, he would appoint him to the Appeals Court, where he later became chief justice.

“Then he lost the next election to Ed King, and I thought, ‘that’s the end of that,’ Greaney recalled. “But he was back four years later, and he later appointed me to the Supreme Judicial Court, so I owe a lot to Mike.”

Looking back on his career and his legacy, Greaney said he carried on in the spirit of Judge Garrity, and with the same philosophy that defined his work when building the Housing Court.

“Simple principles of decency dictate that we extend to the plaintiffs, and to their new status, full acceptance, tolerance, and respect. We should do so because it is the right thing to do.”

“I was motivated by helping the little guy and helping society move forward, and the SJC gave me a great opportunity to do that,” he said, referring to several of those groundbreaking cases he heard and helped decide.

One was the 1993 decision that recognized the rights of same-sex couples to adopt children, and another was the historic Goodwin v. Department of Public Health case that led to Massachusetts becoming the first U.S. state to allow same-sex couples to marry, a ruling that has influenced many other states that have followed suit and the U.S. Supreme Court as well.

The wording used in his concurring opinion has not only brought tears to the eyes of many gay-rights activists, but they have reportedly found their way into the wedding vows used by many same-sex couples:

“I am hopeful that our decision will be accepted by those thoughtful citizens who believe that same-sex unions should not be approved by the state,” he wrote. “I am not referring here to acceptance in the sense of grudging acknowledgment of the court’s authority to adjudicate the matter. My hope is more liberating … we share a common humanity and participate together in the social contract that is the foundation of our Commonwealth. Simple principles of decency dictate that we extend to the plaintiffs, and to their new status, full acceptance, tolerance, and respect. We should do so because it is the right thing to do.”

Throughout his career, Greaney has demonstrated the right thing to do, whether it was on the bench or in service to the community — on the board of Noble Hospital and the Westfield Academy or while serving on commissions such as the Massachusetts Housing Partnership, the Alternative Dispute Resolution Task Force, and the Massachusetts Gender Bias Study Committee.

Today, he is back where he started with his career — sort of. As senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, he’s been involved with a number of cases, including some involving some area colleges; and some mediation, although there is less call for it now with most courts still being closed; and even some work on the firm’s COVID-19 Response Committee to advise clients on the latest status of the law and matters ranging from vaccines to aid from the federal government.

He works two days a week on average, more if he has active projects he’s working on, and even works remotely on occasion, although he much prefers to be in the office. At 83, he’s still committed to staying busy — and making a difference in any way he can.

 

Bottom Line

While Greaney’s request probably wasn’t the reason, Red Sox ownership did eventually do something about the pitching, and the team delivered an American League pennant in 1986.

That plea for help doesn’t have much to do with Greaney being a Difference Maker, but, then again, it does. Looking back, he was able to seize that moment, as he was with so many other moments over the past 60 years, whether they were in Hampden County’s first Housing Court, on the Supreme Judicial Court, or as a professor of law at Suffolk University after his forced retirement from the bench at age 70. Suffice it to say, he wasn’t ready to leave.

As Finnegan noted, Greaney has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice. And that has made him worthy of inclusion in the Difference Makers class of 2022.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Elizabeth “Liz” Zuckerman has been promoted to partner in the firm’s Litigation department.

Zuckerman joined the firm in 2014 as an associate in the Litigation department, where her practice focuses on general commercial litigation, First Amendment issues, and defamation. She has a proven history of successfully litigating complex cases in both state and federal courts.

“Liz is an incredible asset to the firm,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner at Bulkley Richardson. “Her keen insight and unshakeable confidence has helped shape her into a formidable lawyer. Not only is she a skilled litigator, but she is compassionate, making her an effective advocate for her clients.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News & World Report, ranks Bulkley Richardson as 2022 Best Law Firm in the Springfield region in the following 11 practice areas: bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, banking and finance law, commercial litigation, corporate law, criminal defense: general practice, criminal defense: white-collar, litigation – labor and employment, medical malpractice law – defendants, personal injury litigation – defendants, tax law, and trusts and estates law.

To be eligible for a ranking, a law firm must have at least one lawyer included in its list of Best Lawyers. Bulkley Richardson has 13 lawyers included on the 2022 Best Lawyers list, and two of the firm’s partners, Mark Cress and Mike Burke, were named 2022 Springfield-area Lawyers of the Year. Rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations and peer reviews from leading attorneys in their field.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — In today’s environment, nonprofit organizations may be challenged by reduced donor and governmental support, turnover in management, staff shortages, and competing demands for resources. There are many circumstances where a merger with, or an acquisition of or by, another nonprofit organization may be the best strategy. Such a transaction could help to grow the organization, allow it to expand into different territories or new activities, take advantage of efficiencies of scale, or reduce overhead. And in some cases, such a transaction might be the only option for the nonprofit to survive.

Bulkley Richardson merger and acquisition (M&A) attorneys David Parke and Ron Weiss will present a virtual discussion on Thursday, Oct. 28 at noon over Zoom, focusing on these areas of concern: types of transactions, lack of recourse by the acquiring organization, effect on an organization’s tax-exempt status, effect of a transaction on endowments, approval by the Massachusetts attorney general, and options for obtaining necessary member approval in large membership organizations.

To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with a link to join the webinar.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Mike Sweet has joined the firm as a partner in the Business and Finance department.

Sweet started his career at a Wall Street-based law firm and has been practicing in Springfield for the past 25 years. His practice focuses on representing businesses and the people that own and manage those businesses through all stages of their business cycle, as well as in their personal lives.

“This is an exciting development for the firm and furthers our goals for continued growth and talent acquisition,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “Mike has established longtime relationships with his clients and continues to achieve successful results for them. He has earned the reputation of a great lawyer, and we feel honored to have him on our team.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson partners Michael Burke and Mark Cress were named 2022 Lawyer of the Year in their respective practice areas by Best Lawyers in partnership with U.S. News Media Group.

Burke was recognized for his work in personal-injury litigation, and Cress was recognized for his work in corporate law. Burke and Cress have been named by Best Lawyers since 2001 and 2003, respectively.

Lawyer of the Year rankings are awarded to one lawyer per practice area in each region, making it a distinguished accolade. Honorees receive this award based on their extremely high overall peer feedback within specific practice areas and metropolitan regions.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that 13 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2022. These lawyers were recognized in 20 unique areas of practice. They are:

• Peter Barry, recognized in the fields of construction law and healthcare law;

• Michael Burke, medical malpractice law – defendants and personal-injury litigation – defendants;

• Mark Cress, banking and finance law, bankruptcy and creditor-debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, and corporate law;

• Francis Dibble Jr., bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, criminal defense – white-collar, litigation – labor and employment, and litigation – securities;

• Daniel Finnegan, administrative/regulatory law and litigation – construction;

• Scott Foster, business organizations (including LLCs and partnerships);

• Kevin Maynard, commercial litigation, litigation – banking and finance, and litigation – construction;

• David Parke, corporate law and mergers and acquisitions;

• Melinda Phelps, medical-malpractice law – defendants and personal-injury litigation – defendants;

• Jeffrey Poindexter, commercial litigation;

• John Pucci, bet-the-company litigation, criminal defense – general practice, and criminal defense – white-collar;

• Elizabeth Sillin, nonprofit/charities law and trusts and estates; and

• Ronald Weiss, corporate law, mergers-and-acquisitions law, and tax law.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed Dr. Lisa Harty as an associate in the firm’s litigation and professional malpractice groups.

Harty earned a bachelor’s degree from Mount Holyoke College in 2001, an M.D. degree from St. Matthew’s University School of Medicine in 2009, and a juris doctor degree from Western New England University School of Law in 2020.

“As an attorney who has earned degrees in both medicine and law, Lisa brings a unique perspective to our healthcare and medical professional clients,” said Mike Burke, chair of Bulkley Richardson’s professional malpractice group. “She will add tremendous value to our team.”

Daily News

Most cyberattacks — from a small, local breach to the major ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline — start with phishing scam. It can take just one email to hook a recipient into providing access to valuable information.

To address growing concerns of cyberattacks, Are You Vulnerable to a Phishing Scam? will be presented by Lauren C. Ostberg, an attorney in Bulkley Richardson’s cybersecurity group, and Chris Wisneski, IT Security and Assurance Services manager at the accounting firm Whittlesey on July 15 at noon.

To attend the virtual presentation, registration is required at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gihuwqIDTbSkyCFgVq_yXA.

This webinar is a continuation of Bulkley Richardson’s CyberSafe series aimed at providing critical information to businesses and organizations on topics of cybersecurity.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson has enhanced the firm’s summer associate program, welcoming four law students this summer.

Briana Dawkins is currently attending Western New England University School of Law and earned a bachelor’s degree from Curry College, summa cum laude, in 2018. She was an intern at the U.S. Department of Labor and the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.

Sean Buxton is currently attending Western New England University School of Law. He is a 2019 graduate of Princeton University, cum laude, where he earned a bachelor’s degree. He was an intern at the Hampden County District Attorney’s Office and for Judge Alberto Rivas in the Superior Court of New Jersey.

Shriti Shah is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law. She received a master of management studies degree in 2017 from K. J. Somaiya Institute of Management Studies and Research, and a bachelor of commerce degree in 2004 from SIES College of Arts, Science and Commerce, both affiliated with the University of Mumbai.

Jacob Kosakowski is currently attending Suffolk University School of Law. He is a 2018 graduate of UMass Amherst, summa cum laude, and served as an intern for Chief Justice Paul Dawley and the Child Abuse Unit of the Northwestern District Attorney’s Office.

Summer associates are introduced to the inner workings of a law firm, receive mentorship from lawyers ranging from firm leaders and retired judges to junior associates, and are exposed to real-life legal matters. All of this year’s summer associates anticipate a spring 2022 graduation from law school.

“Having a robust summer program is a vital component of the firm’s growth,” said Kevin Maynard, chair of the firm’s hiring committee. “Our attorneys take pride in mentoring new lawyers, and the summer associate program is where it all begins. By inviting bright, new talent to the firm, we have the opportunity to play a significant role in the start of their careers.”