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Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Dean Gomes recently joined Bulkley Richardson as senior manager of Information Technology. His career has been dedicated to IT management, and he spent the last 13 years as director of Enterprise Technology at the law firm of Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider, LLP with offices in New York City, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, and Hartford, Conn.

“As a member of the firm’s senior management team, we expect Dean to add considerable value,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “His recent experience at Axinn, one of the world’s top anti-trust firms, allowed him the opportunity to oversee the IT operations at an extremely sophisticated level. Dean’s breadth of information-technology experience in the law-firm environment is unmatched.”

Gomes earned a bachelor’s degree in management information systems from Pace University in New York City.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson, with offices in Springfield and Hadley, recently welcomed four attorneys to the firm.

Matthew Dziok earned a juris doctor degree from Western New England University School of Law, where he graduated second in his class. He also earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from UMass Boston.

Briana Dawkins is a graduate of Western New England University School of Law and earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Curry College, summa cum laude. She was an intern at the U.S. Department of Labor and the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.

Shriti Shah graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Law. She received a master’s degree in Management Studies in 2007 and a bachelor’s degree in commerce in 2004 from the University of Mumbai.

Jacob Kosakowski is a graduate of Suffolk University School of Law and earned a bachelor’s degree from UMass Amherst, summa cum laude. He served as an intern for Chief Justice Paul Dawley and the Child Abuse Unit of the Northwestern District Attorney’s Office.

“The hiring of these four talented lawyers is consistent with the firm’s ongoing strategy for continued growth,” said Kevin Maynard, chair of the firm’s hiring committee. “Briana, Shriti, and Jacob are all graduates of Bulkley Richardson’s enhanced Summer Associate Program, so we had the pleasure of working with them last summer. And Matt’s experience as a private investigator and clerking for an area law office will help him integrate well into our litigation practice. We are confident they will each make significant contributions to the firm.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson partners Mark Cress and John Pucci were named 2023 Lawyer of the Year in their respective practice areas by Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News Media Group.

Cress was named the 2023 Lawyer of the Year for bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law and was also recognized in 2022 as Lawyer of the Year for his work in the area of corporate law. He leads the firm’s banking, finance, and bankruptcy practice group and has significant experience representing banks and other financial institutions, for-profit and not-for-profit entities, and individual clients in connection with all forms of financing and business transactions. He also represents parties in creditor-debtor relationships and appears on behalf of creditor parties in proceedings before the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Pucci was named the 2023 Lawyer of the Year for white-collar criminal defense and has held that title for 10 of the past 13 years for his success as a litigator. He co-chairs the firm’s independent investigations practice and represents individuals and companies in complex civil and criminal litigation of all kinds in both state and federal court, as well as in responding to government investigations and in conducting corporate internal investigations. He has particular experience in the areas of white-collar criminal defense and state and federal regulatory agency matters.

Lawyer of the Year rankings are awarded to one lawyer per practice area and region. Honorees receive this award based on their high overall peer feedback within specific practice areas and metropolitan regions.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that 16 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in 2023 edition of Best Lawyers in America. These lawyers were recognized in 24 unique areas of practice. They include:

• Peter Barry (in the practice areas of construction, education, healthcare);

• Kathleen Bernardo (real estate);

• Michael Burke (medical malpractice law: defendants, personal injury litigation: defendants);

• Mark Cress (banking and finance, bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, corporate);

• Francis Dibble Jr. (bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, criminal defense: white-collar, litigation: labor and employment, litigation: securities);

• Daniel Finnegan (administrative/regulatory law, construction, litigation: construction);

• Scott Foster (business organizations, including LLCs and partnerships);

• Mary Jo Kennedy (employment);

• Kevin Maynard (commercial litigation, litigation: banking and finance, litigation: construction);

• David Parke (corporate, mergers and acquisitions);

• Jeffrey Poindexter (commercial litigation, litigation: construction);

• John Pucci (bet-the-company litigation, criminal defense: general practice, criminal defense: white-collar);

• Jeffrey Roberts (corporate, trusts and estates);

• Michael Roundy (commercial litigation);

• Elizabeth Sillin (nonprofit/charities law, trusts and estates); and

• Ronald Weiss (corporate, mergers and acquisitions, tax).

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Adam Hogan has joined Bulkley Richardson as the firm’s controller.

In this management role, Hogan will execute all financial and tax-related activities for the firm, including development of the annual operating budget; partnership reporting; successful collaboration with his team for billing, payables, and receivables; and working closely with firm leadership to contribute to the growth and overall success of the firm.

Previously, Hogan held the positions of CFO, controller, and staff accountant at several area businesses. He holds both a master’s degree in accounting and financial planning and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Elms College.

Daily News

SPRINGFIED — Bulkley Richardson has welcomed five law students to its 2022 Summer Associate Program. 

The robust program will introduce law students to the inner workings of a law firm, where they will receive mentorship from lawyers ranging from firm leaders and retired judges all the way through the ranks to junior associates, and gain exposure to real-life legal matters. 

This year’s Summer Associates are: 

  • Allison Laughner, who is currently attending Western New England University School of Law, where she is on the Law Review staff. She is also working toward an MBA at Western New England University College of Business and earned a B.A. from Smith College;
  • Jacob Cronin is currently attending Northeastern University School of Law. He earned a B.A. from Connecticut College with additional coursework at Carnegie Mellon University and Georgetown University; 
  • Sara Sam-Njogu is currently attending Western New England University School of Law. She earned a B.A., magnacum laude, from St. Lawrence University and participated in the Denmark International Study Abroad Program in Copenhagen, Denmark with a focus on international business;
  • Christa “Christabelle” Calabretta is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law and earned a B.A. from St. John’s University and an A.A. from Suffolk County Community College; and 
  • Mumina Egal is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law, where in addition to a juris doctorate, she is seeking certificates in both Intellectual Property and Transactional Practice. Egal received a bachelor of Social Sciences from the University of Ottawa. 

“The firm’s Summer Associate Program continues to thrive, and we are honored to have such a talented group of law students who chose to spend the next few months with us receiving in-depth legal training and exposure to a wide range of legal matters,” said Mike Roundy, head of Bulkley Richardson’s Summer Associate Program.”    

Bulkley Richardson continues to accept resumes from future summer associates, as well as recent law school graduates and attorneys considering a lateral move. Visit https://bulkley.com/summer-associates/ for more information. 

Daily News

 

Today at noon, Bulkley Richardson will present the final session in its Business Transitions webinar series. 

Attorneys Michael Sweet, Jenelle Dodds, and Ryan Barry will take a look at preparing for a transition. Guest speaker Chris Nadeau of Whittlesey will give his perspective on best practices. The session will be presented via Zoom. 

The session will focus on:  

  • Corporate records;
  • Disputes and contingent liabilities;
  • Financial statements;
  • Management team;
  • Assignable contracts;
  • Employee engagement and retention; and
  • ‘Preparing Yourself to Let Go’

 

Visit www.bulkley.com/exit-strategies for more details and to register. 

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed Jeffrey Roberts to the firm as counsel in the Trusts & Estates and Business practices.

Roberts has handled many sophisticated estate-planning matters and complex business transactions throughout his career. His practice will continue to focus on estate planning, trusts and estates, taxation, and estate administration, as well as corporate work and business transactions primarily for closely held companies. He also has extensive experience with advice to family-owned companies with respect to business-succession planning and representation of the owner with respect to the sale of a closely held business.

Roberts has practiced law at Robinson Donovan P.C. since graduating from Georgetown Law in 1974 and served as the firm’s managing partner for many of those years.

“Jeffrey is well-known in the community for his wealth of knowledge and his ability to build dynamic, long-term relationships,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner at Bulkley Richardson. “He has spent a career helping his clients plan for their future, and we are honored that he chose Bulkley Richardson for his own future.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — On Tuesday, April 5 at noon, Bulkley Richardson will present session 3 of the firm’s Business Transitions webinar series. Ron Weiss, partner in the firm’s Business and Finance department, will look at family-business succession planning along with guest speaker Ira Bryck, former executive director of the Pioneer Valley Family Business Center and experienced family-owned business advisor.

Topics to be covered include management-succession issues in a family business, estate-planning issues when not all children will be involved in the business, insurance as an equalizer, ownership of non-operating business assets (such as real estate), use of buy/sell agreements, funding, valuation issues, and tales of successful family-business succession planning.

Session 4 (about preparing for a transition) will take place on Tuesday, May 3 at noon. All seessions take place via Zoom, and registration is required for each session. Visit www.bulkley.com/exit-strategies to register.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Throughout the course of a year, the Davis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Baystate Children’s Hospital cares for more than 800 newborns. These babies are fighters, but they require essential care. Many have come into the world too early; others emerge with medical challenges that need to be addressed in the moments after birth. All of them deserve the best chance for a healthy life.

Bulkley Richardson, a Springfield-based law firm, recently made a $10,000 gift to support that essential care through the purchase of a transcutaneous CO2 monitor. This device provides a non-invasive and efficient way to monitor newborns’ exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide (CO2) when they require a ventilator to assist their breathing. It also allows the team to review and respond to important health details in real time instead of through multiple painful blood draws.

“We are so appreciative of Bulkley Richardson for their generous support of this technology,” said Stephanie Adam, manager of the NICU and Continuing Care Nursery. “For newborns in our care, being able to monitor and respond to changes in a way that does not put them in any discomfort is one more way that we can provide the highest level of compassionate care. This technology is a game changer for our sickest infants.”

With one in 10 families needing the NICU in their lifetime, this type of equipment will be used by many and provide a more comfortable experience for Baystate’s youngest patients.

“We wanted to contribute to the care of our most vulnerable citizens,” said Peter Barry, partner at Bulkley Richardson. “These CO2 monitors provide essential data in a non-invasive manner, eliminating additional pain and discomfort to newborns who may already be struggling. I understand the helplessness of seeing your child or grandchild in distress and hope that our gift will bring some peace of mind to those with children in need of monitoring.”

Anyone who would like to support care for infants in the NICU, can contact the Baystate Health Foundation at (413) 794-5444 or [email protected].

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed James Moher and Michael McAndrew to the firm.

Moher joined the firm as counsel in the Business and Finance department, where his practice will focus on general corporate and business matters, including mergers and acquisitions and other transactional work. He will also be active in the areas of cannabis and other emerging businesses.

Moher previously practiced at a Hartford, Conn. law firm and most recently was founder and CEO of a successful startup business, giving him an insider’s perspective on the challenges and opportunities faced by a small business. He received a bachelor’s degree from Boston College in 2008 and a juris doctor from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 2011.

McAndrew joined Bulkley Richardson’s Litigation department as an associate.

Previously, McAndrew was a law clerk at several area law firms and served as a clerk intern to the Hon. Alfred Covello in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut. He received a bachelor’s degree from Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, magna cum laude, in 2018 and a juris doctor from Western New England University School of Law, magna cum laude, in 2021.

“The firm is honored to have two outstanding lawyers join the firm’s largest practice areas,” said Dan Finnegan, Bulkley Richardson’s managing partner. “Finding qualified candidates has been tough for all law firms, but we have kept our standards high. James and Mike fall nicely into our model for growth and will contribute to the firm’s overall success.”

Class of 2022

His Decisions, and His Actions, Have Helped Move Society Forward

Leah Martin Photography

Leah Martin Photography

 

 

It wasn’t the most compelling moment in John Greaney’s long and distinguished career behind the bench. And it certainly wasn’t the most controversial.

But it was poignant, and it spoke volumes about who he is and how he does things.

As the opposing sides in a bitter power struggle for control of the Boston Red Sox gathered in Room 1006 of the Massachusetts Court of Appeals on Feb. 14, 1984, Greaney, the recently appointed chief justice of the Appellate Division, and his fellow justices could feel the tension rising.

“We had practically every major lawyer in Boston there either observing or arguing,” Greaney, currently senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, recalled. “[Justice] Ami Cutter, who was sitting next to me, said, as the whole thing ended, ‘this was very tense; can you say something?’”

He did. Speaking specifically to the lawyer in front of him, but also all those present, he said, “it may take into the baseball season before a decision is rendered, so I Ieave you with this thought. I urge all of the disputing parties in the meantime to at least get together to do something about the pitching.”

The next day’s story on the court session in the sports section of the Boston Globe carried this headline:

 

May They Please the Court

Judge Offers Red Sox Litigants Advice on Pitching as Appeals Are Heard

 

The episode also found its way into Sports Illustrated, said Greaney, who said that, while his tongue may have been in cheek, he was speaking for all Sox fans thirsty for a pennant, and with a sense of humor that became a trademark.

Indeed, whether it was while he sat on the state Supreme Judicial Court — his next stop after the Appeals Court — or at the table for a meeting of the Noble Hospital board of directors, Greaney usually had a one-liner (or three or four) and a way of relieving tension in whatever courtroom he was serving in. And that’s just one of his many talents.

Only a small percentage of lawyers enter the profession with the hard goal of one day sitting on the bench, but Greaney did. He said he was influenced in a profound way by his experience serving working for Westfield District Court Judge Arthur Garvey the summer after his first year at New York University School of Law.

“I was basically just hanging around, observing the court,” he recalled. “So every morning, I sat and observed the court, and I was bewitched because he seemed to handle the cases that would come in — driving while intoxicated, small burglaries, those kinds of things — with relative ease. And he had a good demeanor about giving defendants a break; usually, if they had a job and had a family, he didn’t want to incarcerate them, so he’d give them warnings, tell them to behave, and maybe give them probation.

“I said ‘jeez, he’s certainly doing something worthwhile here,” he went on, adding that he went back to law school in the fall committed to finding a career path that would enable him to do the same.

And to say that he did would be an understatement. After serving in the military and then working for a decade at the law firm Ely and King in Springfield, Greaney was appointed the presiding judge of the Hampden County Housing Court, the second such court in Massachusetts. In 1976, the was appointed a justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court; in 1978, he was appointed a justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court; and in 1984, as noted, as that court’s chief justice.

“He had a good demeanor about giving defendants a break; usually, if they had a job and had a family, he didn’t want to incarcerate them … I said, ‘jeez, he’s certainly doing something worthwhile here.’”

In 1989, he was appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court, and during his two decades on the court, during which he famously rode a Peter Pan Bus to work most days so he could work during his commute, he participated in many significant decisions, including the landmark Goodridge v. Department of Health, in which he wrote the concurrence to the opinion establishing Massachusetts as the first state to legalize same-sex marriage (more on that later).

He also wrote many other significant decisions, including the 1993 decision that recognized the rights of gay couples in Massachusetts to adopt children, a 1997 decision affirming the unconstitutionality of a statute prohibiting panhandling, and a 2007 decision upholding a $2 million libel verdict against the Boston Herald.

Slicing through all those cases and work on each of those courts, Greaney said he remembered what he learned back in Westfield District Court in the early ’60s and tried to make the same overall kind of impact on people’s lives.

Daniel Finnegan, managing partner for Bulkley Richardson, who nominated Greaney for the Difference Maker award, summed up Greaney’s career, and his broad impact, this way:

“Throughout each phase of his career, Justice Greaney has earned tremendous respect for his intellect, professional integrity, and commitment to the community. He has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice, influenced our societal values and ways of thinking, and continues to be a valuable mentor, sharing wisdom and insight deemed from his impressive career. Greaney has proven that he is a trailblazer, an agent of social change, and a true difference maker.”

 

Court of Opinion

Long before imploring those fighting for control of the Red Sox to get some pitching help, Greaney was making his mark in a different kind of setting.

That would be this region’s housing court, an assignment that would in many ways set the tone for all that would come later.

Indeed, Greaney would essentially create the Housing Court from scratch, making it into what he called a true ‘Peoples Court,’ with the help of an advisory committee that included another member of this year’s Difference Makers class, Herbie Flores (see story on page 30).

“People who came in were not going to be intimidated, if we could help it,” he recalled. “We were going to design simple, plain-English forms to be used in evictions and other actions, and we were going to print them in two languages, Spanish and English, and we were going to allow people to be pro se as much as we could. And I decided in Small Claims that I would write a decision in every case.

“I then took the court on the road, which was unheard of at the time,” he went on, adding that he had sessions in public buildings, such as city halls, schools, and other facilities, to make the court more accessible. Its home base, though, was the courthouse in Springfield, which had no room at the time, he recalled, noting that a small courtroom was eventually secured, and for a clerk’s office, “a janitor was kicked out, and we took that space — but it was a heck of a fight.”

As noted, that Housing Court assignment would enable Greaney to make his mark and forge a reputation as an imaginative, hard-working, people-oriented jurist. And these were some of the qualities that caught the attention of Mike Dukakis, who would play a huge role in his career trajectory.

The two first met when Dukakis was running for lieutenant governor and Greaney, long active with the state’s Democratic party, was a state delegate. Greaney backed Dukakis in that election, and he won the nomination, but the Democratic ticket lost the election. Two years later, Dukakis ran for governor and won, and not long after appointed Greaney to the state’s Superior Court. Later, he would appoint him to the Appeals Court, where he later became chief justice.

“Then he lost the next election to Ed King, and I thought, ‘that’s the end of that,’ Greaney recalled. “But he was back four years later, and he later appointed me to the Supreme Judicial Court, so I owe a lot to Mike.”

Looking back on his career and his legacy, Greaney said he carried on in the spirit of Judge Garrity, and with the same philosophy that defined his work when building the Housing Court.

“Simple principles of decency dictate that we extend to the plaintiffs, and to their new status, full acceptance, tolerance, and respect. We should do so because it is the right thing to do.”

“I was motivated by helping the little guy and helping society move forward, and the SJC gave me a great opportunity to do that,” he said, referring to several of those groundbreaking cases he heard and helped decide.

One was the 1993 decision that recognized the rights of same-sex couples to adopt children, and another was the historic Goodwin v. Department of Public Health case that led to Massachusetts becoming the first U.S. state to allow same-sex couples to marry, a ruling that has influenced many other states that have followed suit and the U.S. Supreme Court as well.

The wording used in his concurring opinion has not only brought tears to the eyes of many gay-rights activists, but they have reportedly found their way into the wedding vows used by many same-sex couples:

“I am hopeful that our decision will be accepted by those thoughtful citizens who believe that same-sex unions should not be approved by the state,” he wrote. “I am not referring here to acceptance in the sense of grudging acknowledgment of the court’s authority to adjudicate the matter. My hope is more liberating … we share a common humanity and participate together in the social contract that is the foundation of our Commonwealth. Simple principles of decency dictate that we extend to the plaintiffs, and to their new status, full acceptance, tolerance, and respect. We should do so because it is the right thing to do.”

Throughout his career, Greaney has demonstrated the right thing to do, whether it was on the bench or in service to the community — on the board of Noble Hospital and the Westfield Academy or while serving on commissions such as the Massachusetts Housing Partnership, the Alternative Dispute Resolution Task Force, and the Massachusetts Gender Bias Study Committee.

Today, he is back where he started with his career — sort of. As senior counsel at Bulkley Richardson, he’s been involved with a number of cases, including some involving some area colleges; and some mediation, although there is less call for it now with most courts still being closed; and even some work on the firm’s COVID-19 Response Committee to advise clients on the latest status of the law and matters ranging from vaccines to aid from the federal government.

He works two days a week on average, more if he has active projects he’s working on, and even works remotely on occasion, although he much prefers to be in the office. At 83, he’s still committed to staying busy — and making a difference in any way he can.

 

Bottom Line

While Greaney’s request probably wasn’t the reason, Red Sox ownership did eventually do something about the pitching, and the team delivered an American League pennant in 1986.

That plea for help doesn’t have much to do with Greaney being a Difference Maker, but, then again, it does. Looking back, he was able to seize that moment, as he was with so many other moments over the past 60 years, whether they were in Hampden County’s first Housing Court, on the Supreme Judicial Court, or as a professor of law at Suffolk University after his forced retirement from the bench at age 70. Suffice it to say, he wasn’t ready to leave.

As Finnegan noted, Greaney has demonstrated compassion and understanding as an advocate to so many in need of a voice. And that has made him worthy of inclusion in the Difference Makers class of 2022.

 

George O’Brien can be reached at [email protected]

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Elizabeth “Liz” Zuckerman has been promoted to partner in the firm’s Litigation department.

Zuckerman joined the firm in 2014 as an associate in the Litigation department, where her practice focuses on general commercial litigation, First Amendment issues, and defamation. She has a proven history of successfully litigating complex cases in both state and federal courts.

“Liz is an incredible asset to the firm,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner at Bulkley Richardson. “Her keen insight and unshakeable confidence has helped shape her into a formidable lawyer. Not only is she a skilled litigator, but she is compassionate, making her an effective advocate for her clients.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News & World Report, ranks Bulkley Richardson as 2022 Best Law Firm in the Springfield region in the following 11 practice areas: bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, banking and finance law, commercial litigation, corporate law, criminal defense: general practice, criminal defense: white-collar, litigation – labor and employment, medical malpractice law – defendants, personal injury litigation – defendants, tax law, and trusts and estates law.

To be eligible for a ranking, a law firm must have at least one lawyer included in its list of Best Lawyers. Bulkley Richardson has 13 lawyers included on the 2022 Best Lawyers list, and two of the firm’s partners, Mark Cress and Mike Burke, were named 2022 Springfield-area Lawyers of the Year. Rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations and peer reviews from leading attorneys in their field.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — In today’s environment, nonprofit organizations may be challenged by reduced donor and governmental support, turnover in management, staff shortages, and competing demands for resources. There are many circumstances where a merger with, or an acquisition of or by, another nonprofit organization may be the best strategy. Such a transaction could help to grow the organization, allow it to expand into different territories or new activities, take advantage of efficiencies of scale, or reduce overhead. And in some cases, such a transaction might be the only option for the nonprofit to survive.

Bulkley Richardson merger and acquisition (M&A) attorneys David Parke and Ron Weiss will present a virtual discussion on Thursday, Oct. 28 at noon over Zoom, focusing on these areas of concern: types of transactions, lack of recourse by the acquiring organization, effect on an organization’s tax-exempt status, effect of a transaction on endowments, approval by the Massachusetts attorney general, and options for obtaining necessary member approval in large membership organizations.

To register, click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with a link to join the webinar.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Mike Sweet has joined the firm as a partner in the Business and Finance department.

Sweet started his career at a Wall Street-based law firm and has been practicing in Springfield for the past 25 years. His practice focuses on representing businesses and the people that own and manage those businesses through all stages of their business cycle, as well as in their personal lives.

“This is an exciting development for the firm and furthers our goals for continued growth and talent acquisition,” said Dan Finnegan, managing partner. “Mike has established longtime relationships with his clients and continues to achieve successful results for them. He has earned the reputation of a great lawyer, and we feel honored to have him on our team.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson partners Michael Burke and Mark Cress were named 2022 Lawyer of the Year in their respective practice areas by Best Lawyers in partnership with U.S. News Media Group.

Burke was recognized for his work in personal-injury litigation, and Cress was recognized for his work in corporate law. Burke and Cress have been named by Best Lawyers since 2001 and 2003, respectively.

Lawyer of the Year rankings are awarded to one lawyer per practice area in each region, making it a distinguished accolade. Honorees receive this award based on their extremely high overall peer feedback within specific practice areas and metropolitan regions.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that 13 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2022. These lawyers were recognized in 20 unique areas of practice. They are:

• Peter Barry, recognized in the fields of construction law and healthcare law;

• Michael Burke, medical malpractice law – defendants and personal-injury litigation – defendants;

• Mark Cress, banking and finance law, bankruptcy and creditor-debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, and corporate law;

• Francis Dibble Jr., bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, criminal defense – white-collar, litigation – labor and employment, and litigation – securities;

• Daniel Finnegan, administrative/regulatory law and litigation – construction;

• Scott Foster, business organizations (including LLCs and partnerships);

• Kevin Maynard, commercial litigation, litigation – banking and finance, and litigation – construction;

• David Parke, corporate law and mergers and acquisitions;

• Melinda Phelps, medical-malpractice law – defendants and personal-injury litigation – defendants;

• Jeffrey Poindexter, commercial litigation;

• John Pucci, bet-the-company litigation, criminal defense – general practice, and criminal defense – white-collar;

• Elizabeth Sillin, nonprofit/charities law and trusts and estates; and

• Ronald Weiss, corporate law, mergers-and-acquisitions law, and tax law.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently welcomed Dr. Lisa Harty as an associate in the firm’s litigation and professional malpractice groups.

Harty earned a bachelor’s degree from Mount Holyoke College in 2001, an M.D. degree from St. Matthew’s University School of Medicine in 2009, and a juris doctor degree from Western New England University School of Law in 2020.

“As an attorney who has earned degrees in both medicine and law, Lisa brings a unique perspective to our healthcare and medical professional clients,” said Mike Burke, chair of Bulkley Richardson’s professional malpractice group. “She will add tremendous value to our team.”

Daily News

Most cyberattacks — from a small, local breach to the major ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline — start with phishing scam. It can take just one email to hook a recipient into providing access to valuable information.

To address growing concerns of cyberattacks, Are You Vulnerable to a Phishing Scam? will be presented by Lauren C. Ostberg, an attorney in Bulkley Richardson’s cybersecurity group, and Chris Wisneski, IT Security and Assurance Services manager at the accounting firm Whittlesey on July 15 at noon.

To attend the virtual presentation, registration is required at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gihuwqIDTbSkyCFgVq_yXA.

This webinar is a continuation of Bulkley Richardson’s CyberSafe series aimed at providing critical information to businesses and organizations on topics of cybersecurity.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson has enhanced the firm’s summer associate program, welcoming four law students this summer.

Briana Dawkins is currently attending Western New England University School of Law and earned a bachelor’s degree from Curry College, summa cum laude, in 2018. She was an intern at the U.S. Department of Labor and the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.

Sean Buxton is currently attending Western New England University School of Law. He is a 2019 graduate of Princeton University, cum laude, where he earned a bachelor’s degree. He was an intern at the Hampden County District Attorney’s Office and for Judge Alberto Rivas in the Superior Court of New Jersey.

Shriti Shah is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law. She received a master of management studies degree in 2017 from K. J. Somaiya Institute of Management Studies and Research, and a bachelor of commerce degree in 2004 from SIES College of Arts, Science and Commerce, both affiliated with the University of Mumbai.

Jacob Kosakowski is currently attending Suffolk University School of Law. He is a 2018 graduate of UMass Amherst, summa cum laude, and served as an intern for Chief Justice Paul Dawley and the Child Abuse Unit of the Northwestern District Attorney’s Office.

Summer associates are introduced to the inner workings of a law firm, receive mentorship from lawyers ranging from firm leaders and retired judges to junior associates, and are exposed to real-life legal matters. All of this year’s summer associates anticipate a spring 2022 graduation from law school.

“Having a robust summer program is a vital component of the firm’s growth,” said Kevin Maynard, chair of the firm’s hiring committee. “Our attorneys take pride in mentoring new lawyers, and the summer associate program is where it all begins. By inviting bright, new talent to the firm, we have the opportunity to play a significant role in the start of their careers.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity is on the rise, fueled by attractive market conditions and economic necessities. Buyers looking to increase their market share may see the pandemic as an opportunity to acquire a competitor and have access to record-low interest rates for bank-financed transactions. For businesses that have been hard hit by the pandemic, selling is a more attractive option than insolvency, bankruptcy, or dissolution, and a properly structured deal can allow the sellers to benefit from any post-pandemic growth.

On Wednesday, May 12, attorneys David Parke and Ryan Barry from Bulkley Richardson’s M&A team will present a virtual seminar, “Buying or Selling a Business During COVID-19: Unique Opportunities and Challenges,” in which they will discuss the unique challenges for M&A transactions during the pandemic, including:

• Achieving an accurate valuation of a business impacted by the pandemic;

• Structuring compensation and earn-outs in a way that fairly allocates the risks of current conditions and the benefits of a post-pandemic recovery;

• Issues posed by unforgiven PPP loans;

• Loss carryback refunds and deferred payroll taxes under the CARES Act;

• Impacts on material customers and supply chains;

• Addressing the risks of pandemic-related changes on the target business prior to closing; and

• Impacts on traditional representations and warranties.

The webinar will be held from noon to 1 p.m., and pre-registration is required at www.bulkley.com/ma-invitation.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson recently launched a Blockchain and Cryptocurrency practice group to provide solutions for businesses adopting blockchain technology in a complex and changing regulatory landscape.

The group’s attorneys have broad-based experience in key areas affecting blockchain technologies, including financial services and banking, intellectual property, securities regulation, emerging businesses, corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, taxation, and digital privacy and cybersecurity.

Blockchain technologies like cryptocurrencies and non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are changing the way businesses operate. The rise of the blockchain has spurred a wave of innovation that is disrupting the market and spawning new areas of the digital economy. As blockchain innovation continues to grow and evolve, so do the legal, regulatory, and business challenges.

The Blockchain and Cryptocurrency practice group includes attorneys Mark Cress, Dan Finnegan, Scott Foster, Bart Galvin, Lauren Ostberg, Ron Weiss, and Sarah Willey. With a cross-disciplinary approach, Bulkley Richardson aims to assist clients in capitalizing on new business opportunities and meeting the challenges in this rapidly evolving industry.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Margaret Mack has joined Bulkley Richardson as a member of the law firm’s real-estate practice group.

Mack earned her juris doctor degree from Suffolk University Law School in 2019 and a bachelor’s degree, cum laude, from the Catholic University of America in 2016.

Prior to joining Bulkley Richardson, she was an attorney at the Global 200 law firm of Fragomen, Del Ray, Bernsen, and Lowey in New York City and a law clerk at Seyfarth Shaw in Boston, ranked 75th and 74th, respectively, among all law firms globally. She was also a research assistant for Suffolk University Law School and a legal associate at Integreon, a global provider of alternative legal solutions to leading law firms, corporations, and professional service firms.

“Our real-estate practice continues to thrive, and Maggie’s interpersonal and analytical skills will make her an excellent addition to our team,” said Kathy Bernardo, chair of Bulkley Richardson’s real-estate practice group. “She brings with her the legal experience from exceptional firms, plus a rounded education that includes travel abroad, giving her the perspective and discipline to excel at our firm.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bart Galvin joined the law firm of Bulkley Richardson as a member of two practice groups: business, mergers, and acquisitions; and finance, banking, and bankruptcy.

Galvin earned his juris doctor cum laude from Harvard Law School in 2013 and a bachelor’s degree from Brown University in 2009. Most recently, he was an attorney at the AmLaw100 law firms White & Case in Milan, Italy and Ropes & Gray in Boston, ranked ninth and 13th, respectively, by revenue among all law firms globally. He was also a law clerk for the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Iowa and the Massachusetts State Ethics Commission.

“Bart embodies the traits of a great hire — stellar education, impressive résumé of past firms, and an entrepreneurial spirit,” said Scott Foster, chair of Bulkley Richardson’s business department. “We think he will do exceptionally well here and be a great addition to our team.”

Added Galvin, “I was seeking an opportunity to continue working with high-level clients on sophisticated matters. But I was also looking for that rare opportunity that allows some work-life balance. Bulkley Richardson was able to offer up both, so it was the perfect fit for me at this stage of my career.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — John Pucci, a partner at Bulkley Richardson, and Jennifer Levi, professor of Law at Western New England University School of Law, were named members of a bipartisan advisory committee to review and provide recommendations on U.S. attorney candidates for the District of Massachusetts. The announcement was made on Dec. 18 by U.S. Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey.

The advisory committee will solicit, interview, and comment on applications for the position of U.S. attorney for the District of Massachusetts, the state’s top federal law-enforcement officer. The committee is comprised of members of the Massachusetts legal community, including prominent academics and litigators, and is chaired by former U.S. District Court Judge Nancy Gertner.

Levi noted that “the strength of our justice system depends on the inclusion and participation of people from every community and walk of life. It’s an honor to serve on this committee and get the chance to work to build a strong, diverse pool of candidates for such an important position.”

Other members of the committee include Elissa Flynn-Poppey, former deputy legal counsel to Gov. Mitt Romney and executive director of the judicial nominating commission for the Office of the Governor of Massachusetts; Angela Onwuachi-Willig, dean of Boston University School of Law; Walter Prince, partner at Prince Lobel and former president of the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Assoc; and Georgia Katsoulomitis, executive director of the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute.

“The advisory committee plays an important role ensuring that a highly qualified, fair-minded, and justice-seeking candidate is appointed as U.S. attorney for the District of Massachusetts,” Warren and Markey said in a joint statement. “We look forward to receiving the committee’s recommendations.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELDBest Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News and World Report, ranks Bulkley Richardson as 2021 Best Law Firm in the following 11 practice areas: banking and finance law, bankruptcy and creditor-debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, commercial litigation, corporate law, criminal defense: white collar, criminal defense: general practice, litigation: labor and employment, medical-malpractice law: defendants, personal-injury litigation: defendants, tax law, and trusts and estates law.

To be eligible for a ranking, a law firm must have at least one lawyer who is included on the Best Lawyers list. Bulkley Richardson has 14 lawyers included on the 2021 list, and two of the firm’s partners, Liz Sillin and John Pucci, were named 2021 Springfield Lawyers of the Year. Rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations and peer reviews from leading attorneys in their field.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Chris St. Martin, an associate at Bulkley Richardson, was named a 2021 up-and-coming lawyer by Best Lawyers in its new “Ones to Watch” category. This honor is given to attorneys who are earlier in their careers, recognizing them for outstanding professional excellence in private practice.

St. Martin joined Bulkley Richardson in 2019 and is an associate in the firm’s litigation department.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson partners Liz Sillin and John Pucci were named 2021 Lawyer of the Year recipients in their respective practice areas by Best Lawyers, in partnership with U.S. News Media Group. Sillin was recognized for trusts and estates, and Pucci was recognized for criminal defense (general practice), an honor he has held for the past 11 years.

Lawyer of the Year rankings are awarded to one lawyer per practice area and region, making it a distinguished accolade. Honorees receive this award based on their high overall peer feedback within specific practice areas and metropolitan regions.

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced it has joined the Law Firm Antiracism Alliance (LFAA), a national collaboration of more than 260 law firms united in identifying and dismantling structural or systemic racism in the law.

The alliance’s charter states its purpose is to “leverage the resources of the private bar in partnership with legal-services organizations to amplify the voices of communities and individuals oppressed by racism, to better use the law as a vehicle for change that benefits communities of color, and to promote racial equity in the law.”

“We are joining some of the country’s most prominent law firms to shine a spotlight on systemic racism,” said Jeff Poindexter, co-chair of Bulkley Richardson’s litigation department. “Recognizing that racism is a public crisis, the firm has made a pledge to reject racism, hate, bigotry, and all forms of discrimination. By joining the LFAA, we can be a part of the solution and support an initiative to advance racial equity.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD Bulkley Richardson announced that 14 lawyers from the firm were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© 2021. Bulkley Richardson had more honorees than any other law firm in Springfield. These 14 lawyers were recognized in 20 unique areas of practice.

  • Peter Barry — Construction Law
  • Michael Burke – Medical Malpractice Law (defendants), Personal Injury Litigation (defendants)
  • Mark Cress — Banking and Finance Law, Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law, Corporate Law
  • Francis Dibble, Jr. — Bet-the-Company Litigation, Commercial Litigation, Criminal Defense (White-Collar), Litigation (Antitrust), Litigation (Labor and Employment), Litigation (Securities)
  • Daniel Finnegan – Administrative / Regulatory Law, Litigation (Construction)
  • Robert Gelinas — Personal Injury Litigation (defendants)
  • Kevin Maynard — Commercial Litigation, Litigation (Banking and Finance), Litigation (Construction)
  • David Parke — Corporate Law
  • Melinda Phelps — Medical Malpractice Law (defendants), Personal Injury Litigation (defendants)
  • Jeff Poindexter – Commercial Litigation
  • John Pucci – Bet-the-Company Litigation, Criminal Defense (General Practice), Criminal Defense (White-Collar)
  • Elizabeth Sillin – Nonprofit / Charities Law, Trusts and Estates
  • Ronald Weiss – Corporate Law, Mergers and Acquisitions Law, Tax Law
Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — During COVID-19, the world has turned upside down. For parents with babies at the Davis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Baystate Children’s Hospital, the pandemic brings especially tough choices.

Due to the coronavirus, Baystate Health’s NICU allows just one parent to visit at a time. To ease the stress of separation, the NICU team keeps families connected through personal webcams attached to many of the bassinettes. Using a unique password, parents can log onto a secure website anytime, day or night, to visit their baby virtually.

Recently, Bulkley Richardson generously donated $10,000 to support the purchase of additional cameras.

Peter Barry, former managing partner at Bulkley Richardson, knows firsthand the difference these resources make for families. His grandchild was in the care of Baystate Children’s Hospital Neonatal Continuing Care Unit when he was born.

“The skill and caring of the team were truly impressive,” Barry said. “These cameras will make a very difficult situation a bit easier for parents and grandparents. Bulkley Richardson is proud to provide philanthropic support for this level of life-saving expertise in our region.”

The Davis Family Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is the only one of its kind in Western Mass., providing the highest level of care available for sick or premature newborns. NICU patients often have prolonged hospital stays of weeks or months.

“At Baystate, parents are key members of the care team,” said Stephanie Adam, manager of the Davis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Continuing Care Nursery. “In normal times, these cameras have enabled family members to stay connected when work, military service, or other children have limited their visits. During the pandemic, the connection these cameras offer is crucial. We are thankful to all the donors over the years who have supported this project.”

Scott Berg, vice president of Philanthropy at Baystate Health and executive director of the Baystate Health Foundation, added that “we are so thankful for the generosity of Bulkley Richardson in helping our youngest patients and their families. These cameras provide comfort to parents during a very challenging time for their families.”

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Christopher Gelino will be spending the next several weeks at the firm as a summer associate. During this assignment, he will have the opportunity to assist with legal work from all practice areas within the firm.

Gelino is currently attending the University of Connecticut School of Law with an expected graduation date of May 2021. He is a 2014 graduate of the University of Connecticut, where he received degrees in both political science and human rights, and was recognized as a university honors scholar. He also earned a master’s degree in international politics in 2017 from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London.

“Christopher’s education in political science and human rights demonstrates his commitment to justice,” said Kevin Maynard, chair of the firm’s hiring committee. “I believe this foundation, combined with his studies in political science and law, will help make him a better, more compassionate lawyer. Our goal this summer is to introduce him to the inner workings of a law firm, provide mentorship from lawyers ranging from firm leaders and retired judges all the way through the ranks to junior associates, and expose him to real-life legal matters.”

Bulkley Richardson continues to accept résumés from future summer associates and recent law-school graduates and attorneys considering a lateral move. Visit bulkley.com/careers for more information.

COVID-19 Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — With record-breaking speed, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has begun providing guidance on how the recently created Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) will work in practice, attorneys at Bulkley Richardson note.

The PPP is one of the new programs created by the CARES Act, the more than $2 trillion emergency relief package fast-tracked through Congress in less than a week. The PPP is designed to encourage employers to keep employees on the payroll throughout the coronavirus crisis.

The SBA is starting to publish its guidance and sample forms. Click here for more information.

Perhaps the most important guidance is that “lenders may begin processing loan applications as soon as April 3, 2020,” which is this Friday — a week after the CARES Act was signed into law by President Trump.

Some of the guidance is at odds with the CARES Act. The guidance states that PPP loans have a maturity of two years and an interest rate of 0.5% while the CARES Act states that the PPP loans would bear interest at 4% and have a maximum maturity of 10 years. The guidance confirms that “any federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union, and Farm Credit System institution” can make a PPP loan, in addition to the existing SBA 7(a) approved lenders. This greatly expands the universe of potential lenders, which is important since all PPP loans need to be originated and closed by June 30, 2020.

The first sample form (available by clicking here) is the proposed application for the PPP loans, which reveals several details that are either not addressed in the CARES Act or are directly contrary to the language in the CARES Act. For example, the CARES Act provides that the maximum PPP loan amount is based on “payroll costs incurred during the one-year period before the date on which the loan is made.” The proposed application’s instructions instead direct applicants to “use the average monthly payroll for 2019.” In each case, the maximum loan amount is 2.5 times this average monthly payroll.

Another discrepancy affects the amount of the loan that can be forgiven. The CARES Act simply provides that the forgiveness amount cannot exceed the sum of the following costs incurred by the business in the eight-week period immediately following the closing of the loan: payroll costs; any payment of interest on any covered mortgage obligation (which shall not include any prepayment or payment of principal on a covered mortgage obligation); any payment on any covered rent obligation; or any covered utility payment.

While the application does state that “loan forgiveness will be provided for the sum of documented payroll costs, covered mortgage interest payments, covered rent payments, and covered utilities,” the application also requires the business to certify that, “due to likely high subscription, it is anticipated that not more than 25% of the forgiven amount may be for non-payroll costs.”

The sample form also confirms that applicants and any individual owning 20% or more of an applicant must be able to certify that each of them are U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents (so any businesses where 20% of more is owned by an undocumented immigrant or a foreign citizen may not apply for or receive a PPP loan); and that none of them are “presently subject to an indictment, criminal information, arraignment, or other means by which formal criminal charges are brought in any jurisdiction, or presently incarcerated, or probation, or parole.” The breadth of that last provision is striking, in that anyone merely accused of a crime may not apply for or receive a PPP loan.

Visit bulkley.com for more resources from Bulkley Richardson’s COVID-19 Response Team.

Coronavirus

Bold Response to a Crisis

By Scott Foster

The CoronaCrisis has been a roller coaster for business owners. Starting almost a month ago, the rumblings of disruption began and have now erupted into complete and utter chaos. Business owners have been forced to make stark decisions — restaurant owners laying off their entire workforce; ‘non-essential’ businesses shutting down on 36 hours notice; whether and how to support employees facing three, then six weeks of cancelled school; supply-chain disruptions; canceled orders; canceled events; and more. Business owners have openly wondered, ‘how will my business survive?’

Fortunately, once the legislation pending in the U.S. Senate becomes law, which is widely expected, business owners — including sole proprietors and gig-economy workers — will be receiving a lifeline from the federal government that is unprecedented in scope, speed, and breadth.

Coined the Keeping American Workers Paid and Employed Act, the proposed provisions would appear to apply to every for-profit business with fewer than 500 employees (again, including sole proprietors). The act would allow these businesses (whether a corporation, LLC, partnership, or some other form of entity) to obtain a loan to cover payroll costs, including healthcare premiums and paid time off, rent, utilities, mortgage payments (interest, not principal), and interest on other pre-existing loans for an eight-week period falling between Feb. 15 and June 30, with a maximum loan amount of $10 million. The loan would be non-recourse, require no security or personal guarantees, and bear interest of only 4% with a repayment period of 10 years.

But this is not like any other loan ever offered. This loan would be forgiven in an amount equal to the sum of payroll costs, payments of interest on any covered mortgage, payments on any covered rent obligations, and covered utility payments. The amount to be forgiven would be reduced if the business reduced its workforce, and the forgiveness would not apply to payroll costs of any employees who were paid more than $100,000 in 2019. And the best part, unlike other debt that is forgiven by the lender, any amount forgiven under this program will be excluded from gross income.

To summarize, if you are a business and are willing to keep your employees on the payroll, pay your rent or mortgage, and stay in business, the federal government is prepared to pay your rent, your utilities, and your payroll (for employees making under $100,000 annually) for eight weeks, and the payment is tax-free. It sounds too good to be true, but the public policy is sound — the easiest and best way to get financial support to the most Americans is through their employers (especially in this time of historically low unemployment). 

We would expect loans under this program to start being processed by late April or early May, with funding happening as soon as the loans can be closed. The program is relying on banks and commercial lenders to aggressively participate as the primary lenders under the program, so you should be able to continue working with your current bank. 

Given the tight timeframe and the unprecedented scope of this program, Bulkley Richardson is preparing for an unusually high level of lending in the local market and will be prepared to help our clients navigate this new program, get the necessary loans, and submit the backup needed to qualify for the forgiveness.

Scott Foster is a partner at Bulkley Richardson.

Coronavirus Features

Taking Action

If your business, or one or more of your major customers’ or suppliers’ businesses, have been or could be adversely impacted by the effects of the coronavirus outbreak, Bulkley Richardson recommends considering the following proactive actions:

1. Review Insurance Coverage. Most standard business insurance packages include ‘business-interruption’ coverage. Business-interruption insurance is designed to replace income lost in the event that a business is halted for some reason, such as a fire or a natural disaster. It can also cover government lockdowns or mandatory curfews or closings such as those becoming more widespread as a result of the coronavirus. In addition to lost income, such coverage may also include items such as operating expenses, a move to a temporary location if necessary, payroll, taxes, and rent or loan payments. Since the language that addresses the terms of business-interruption coverage and exclusions can be lengthy and complex, it can be helpful to have your policy reviewed by a qualified expert.

2. Review Critical Contracts. It is quite common for certain types of contracts, such as supply contracts that require future performance on the part of one or both parties, to include a contract provision that allows a party to suspend or terminate the performance of its obligations when certain circumstances beyond their control arise, making performance inadvisable, commercially impracticable, illegal, or impossible. Such provisions are most often referred to and appear under a ‘force majeure’ clause of a contract. If disaster strikes or the unanticipated occurs beyond the control of a party, such in the case of coronavirus, a force majeure clause may excuse one or both parties from performance of their contractual obligations without liability to the other party.

Determining which types of circumstances will be covered by the force majeure clause is obviously essential. Standard provisions often cover natural disasters like hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and weather disturbances sometimes referred to as ‘acts of God.’ Other covered events can include war, terrorism or threats of terrorism, civil disorder, labor strikes or disruptions, fire, disease, or medical epidemics, pandemics, or other outbreaks. Such provisions can also place certain obligations on a party seeking to take advantage of excused performance such as undertaking reasonable actions to minimize potential damages to the other party. As with insurance coverage, it can be very helpful to have the assistance of a qualified expert in reviewing contracts critical to the survival of your business.

3. Communications. Once you have reviewed the terms of your business-insurance coverage and critical contracts, you will be in a much better position to effectively communicate with your insurers, suppliers, customers, vendors, creditors, and other parties with whom your business has relationships concerning the uncertainties facing your business and the businesses of those with whom you have significant ongoing relationships.

Actions like placing an insurance carrier on notice of or making a business-interruption insurance claim, advising another party of your intention to exercise your rights under a force majeure clause of a contract or being prepared for another party with whom you have an important relationship to do so, or effectively communicating with a lender, landlord, or other creditor to productively address disruptions to such relationships are all critical to minimizing losses and ensuring the survival of your business. As with the interpretation of insurance policies and other contracts, input from experts can be very helpful in developing effective communications and providing advice concerning the parties to whom such communications should be directed.

Bulkley Richardson launched a COVID-19 Response Team to address issues critical to businesses and their employees. Call (413) 272-6200 to reach the team.

 

COVID-19 Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — As developments surrounding COVID-19 continue to escalate daily, concerns beyond personal health and safety have quickly emerged. The virus has already made a significant impact on the global economy, altering the way businesses operate, as well as potentially seismic shifts in consumer activity.

To address issues critical to businesses and their employees, Bulkley Richardson has launched a COVID-19 response team comprised of seasoned attorneys in the areas of business, finance, employment, schools, healthcare, and cybersecurity. In this time of great uncertainty, businesses are seeking legal counsel to help navigate this fluid landscape and prepare as we enter a period of uncertainty and rapid change.

Bulkley Richardson understands that each business will be affected differently and that taking proactive measures may help to minimize the risk of business interruptions. This COVID-19 response team has prepared an initial catalog of issues to be considered by each business owner or manager and has posted this information at bulkley.com. In the upcoming days, we will be expanding on this list and providing further detailed guidance. If you have specific questions, contact a member of the COVID-19 response team below or call (413) 272-6200.

The team consists Scott Foster (business, cybersecurity), Mark Cress (business, banking and finance), Mary Jo Kennedy (employment), Ryan Barry (business, banking and finance, healthcare, schools, colleges, and universities), Judge John Greaney (strategy), and Christopher St. Martin (employment, teleservices).

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson continues its CyberSafe series on Wednesday, March 11 with a discussion on legal, technical, and law-enforcement responses to common cybersecurity incidents. “There Has Been a Security Breach. Now What?” will take place from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at Bulkley Richardson’s office in downtown Springfield.

This will be an interactive, scenario-based discussion, providing a unique opportunity to understand causes and consequences of these thefts and key lessons learned: from the CEO of a company that has twice been the victim of cybersecurity crimes; from the head of an IT company that was responsible for uncovering and responding to those and hundreds of other events (and who will include a demonstration of the depth of the dark web); from a national law-enforcement official responsible for investigating these crimes locally, but in a national and international context, and who is keenly aware of the issues of timing and cooperation; and from a cybersecurity attorney who will discuss what should — and should not — be done to fulfill associated legal responsibilities.

Speakers include attorneys Jim Duda and Lauren Ostberg of Bulkley Richardson’s Cybersecurity Group, Delcie Bean of Paragus Strategic IT, Julie Cowley of the FBI, and Eric Hagopian of Pilot Precision Products.

A networking reception will follow the program. Registration is required by e-mailing [email protected].

Daily News

SPRINGFIELD — Bulkley Richardson announced that Betsey Quick, executive director, was named the “Excellence in the Law” honoree for Firm Administration and Operations by Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly.

Quick joined the firm in September 2017 and, during her short tenure in this role, has made a significant impact, including increasing the firm’s productivity, implementing policies, and advancing the overall mission of the firm.

Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly honors individuals in the categories of Firm Administration and Operations, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Marketing, Paralegal Work, Pro Bono, and Up & Coming Lawyers. Quick will be recognized at a reception on Thursday, April 30 at the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel in Boston.

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